Page 1

2018


Welcome Friends to the Park Rapids Area

See Us Under The East Side Water Tower

Large Selection of Fine Wines, Beers & Liquors Ice & Mixes Large Coolers to Assure Cold Beverages

Hwy. 34 E., Park Rapids • 732-0998 Please Use Our Products In Moderation

Open: Monday-Saturday 9 am-10 pm

001725235r1

Large Parking Lot For Boats & RVs


Loony Tunes

A

century ago, stories are told of families arriving at the Park Rapids train station for a summer vacation, a driver with horse and buggy greeting the haggard guests. They had ridden hours, arriving from Minneapolis-St. Paul and out of state ­– Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska… After a stop at the area mercantile establishment for some flour, sugar and other basic necessities, it was off to the cabin on the lake. Fishing. Swimming. Lounging on the beach. Card games. Catching fireflies. Watching squirrels skirmish. Picnics. Reading a good book. Times may have changed. But the overall lure of vacation on the lake remains. Reconnecting with nature and family. Giggles and goggles. Bonfires and burgers. Loons and fish. May we offer some insights on the panorama of fun the north woods has to offer…

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

1

Nothing symbolizes the beauty of northern Minnesota more than the haunting call of the loon, our state bird. Few birds use sound to communicate in as many ways as loons do. Scientists have categorized common loon calls into four main types, each conveying a unique message. Hoot: A loon gives a hoot – a soft, short call – to let other loons know where it is or to ask another loon where it is. A parent might hoot to its chick, or one of a pair to another. Tremolo: The wavering tremolo call – sometimes likened to maniacal laughter – means a loon is excited or alarmed. Loons also use the tremolo when they fly over a lake to announce their presence to any loons there. Yodel: Only male loons make this loud sound, which starts with three notes and ends with a couple of swinging phrases. They use it to defend their territory. Each male has a “signature” yodel. Some people have learned to recognize a specific loon by his yodel. Wail: The high, haunting wail helps loons to figure out where they are relative to each other. They call back and forth, using the location of the sound to move closer together. Do your part to protect loons. Minnesota’s loon population is threatened by loss of breeding habitat, water contamination and direct human disturbance to shoreline nests. Watch loons from at least 200 feet away. It’s particularly important to stay away from nesting loons. Be a responsible boater – never chase loons and use only non-lead fishing sinkers and jigs. CABIN READER 2018


Picking wild fruits of the forest

Gathering wild berries was a necessity in the past. Now it’s a pleasurable recreational activity. Berry production varies from year to year, but different types of edible berries can be found all summer long. Wild raspberry, wild strawberry and low bush blueberry are the three shrubs that provide the most commonly harvested berries in Minnesota. Wild blueberry This is a low bush, growing from six inches to two feet high. It is found in sandy soil, open woods and clearings. It’s often found surrounded by coniferous trees, such as jack and red pine. Bell-shaped white or pinkish flowers bloom in late May or early June. Berries begin as white, pale blue or green and mature to round, dark blue berries in July and August. Wild strawberry If you look close to the ground alongside a sunny path in the woods, you might spy the bright, red berries of wild strawberry. Each plant is two to six inches tall and spreads above the ground on “runners.” A plant has three leaflets that look like toothy ovals. The berries are tinier than garden or market strawberries, but taste better. It blooms in late May and into June with a white, five-petaled flower with a yellow center. Berries will ripen in mid-June through most of July. Strawberries are members of the rose family. PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

2

Wild raspberry Wild raspberry plants can typically be found in sunny areas. Land that has been burned or logged in previous years is a good place to begin looking or along the edges of trails and roads. It is a low, arching, prickly shrub from one to five feet high. Wild raspberries flower during June of their second year and begin producing berries in their third year. Fruit begins ripening in mid-July and continues through August. Currant This is a low shrub, two to five feet high. It’s found in moist places, cool woods and thickets. The fruit is very sour, round, smooth and ranges in color from pink to dark red. It ripens in late June and July. It can be used for jelly and jam. Juneberry Commonly known as Serviceberry or Saskatoon, it’s a shrub or small tree growing six to 20 feet high with white, fivepetaled blossoms. The fruit, which ripens in late June or July, is round and almost black when mature. It can be eaten fresh or used for jams. It also makes a fine beverage. Elderberry The common or American elderberry is a shrub growing from four to 12 feet tall. it’s found in most soils along roadsides, ditches, streams and in fields. It has creamy clusters of tiny, star-shaped flowers that become round, purplish-black berries in late summer and early fall. The fruit is used for jelly, pies and wine.

CABIN READER 2018


Very Berry Crumble 2 cups each blueberries, blackberries and raspberries 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 flour 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon Crisp topping: 1 cup oats 1/2 flour 1/2 cup brown sugar 1/2 cup sugar A pinch of salt 1/2 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and butter a 9-inch pie plate (oven-proof glass is recommended). Gently combine berries with sugar, flour and cinnamon and place in the prepared pie plate. Prepare the topping by combining the oats, flour, sugars and salt in a bowl. Use a pastry blender or two knives to work topping until it resembles coarse meal. Sprinkle evenly over the berries. Place pie plate on a baking sheet. Bake in the center of the oven until the fruit is bubbling and the topping is golden brown, about one hour. Remove the pan of crisp to a rack to cool slightly. Serve in dessert bowls topped with whipped cream or ice cream.

Fishing...Fun...Camping...Fun...Family...Fun

The Adventure Starts At THE LARGEST SPORTING GOODS STORE IN THE AREA! THE LARGEST DEALER IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA

Load up on fishing tackle and supplies.

New & expanded product lines including Shimano & Daiwa. Great Selection of Live Bait!

RODS • REELS • TACKLE GUNS • AMMO • ARCHERY EQUIPMENT • LIVE BAIT CLOTHING • BOOTS 3D ARCHERY RANGE

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8AM - 6PM (SALES & SERVICE FOR FISH HOUSES 6 DAYS A WEEK MONDAY-SATURDAY)

YOUR HUNTING & FISHING HEADQUARTERS FOR THE PARK RAPIDS AREA!

001725236r1

FISH HOUSE & RV SERVICE & PARTS CENTER

Area’s largest sporting goods store!

www.smokeyhills.com • 218-237-5099 • North on Hwy. 71, Park Rapids PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

3

CABIN READER 2018


Other notable plants to watch for during your walk in the woods:

Wild sarsaparilla Wild sarsaparilla spreads out from a tall, thick stalk one to two feet high. It likes to grow in shady spots. People brew root beer from the rhizomes.

This plant’s big, soft leaves have a reputation as a pretty good emergency substitute for toilet paper. It’s also known as “lumberjack’s toilet paper.”

Wintergreen Wintergreen adds a touch of spice to the forest floor. The thick, shiny leaves of this ground-hugging plant give off a strong, fresh smell if you crush them. They are the source of oil of wintergreen, which is used as a flavoring. They also contain methyl salicylate, the active ingredient in aspirin. Large-leaved aster If you see a plant that stand up to a foot tall with big heart-shaped leaves covering the forest floor, you are probably looking at large-leaved asters. This common plant prefers the dry part of the woods. Aster is Latin for star. In late summer, the petals of blue, lavender or white surround a dish of small yellow flowers. Together, they look like a star. To help cure headaches, some American Indians brewed tea from the roots of large-leaved asters. PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

4

Wintergreen

large-leaved aster CABIN READER 2018


Common fish of Minnesota Bluegill Sunfish

Smallmouth bass

Muskie

Pumpkinseed Sunfish

Northern pike

Black Crappie

Walleye

Yellow perch 001727022r1

Private Charters

“Small enough to know you, Large enough to SERVE you!” On Board Snack Bar

You have the exclusive private use of the entire boat and crew for your event. Full capacity of the boat is 141 passengers including crew and other staff required. 1 hour and 1 3/4 hour charters available. ALL OCCASIONS & CELEBRATIONS

Business Groups • Reunions • Weddings • Birthdays

Naturalist History & Wildlife Tour

We look forward to helping you with all your real estate needs!

Our Most Popular Daytime Tour

www.WolffSimonRealEstate.com

218-237-7770

tttttttttttt

tttttttttttt

Discover Minnesota At The LoggingCamp

Top Off Your Adventure With A 64 Year Tradition...

ALL YOU CAN EAT All meals served family style to assure the ol’ logging tradition.

• Stroll through nature trails brimming with wildlife • See the State Flower, the Lady Slipper in its natural surroundings, located along the scenic Fish Hook River. • See the steam-powered sawmill • See our many antiques on display • Visit our souvenir shop • Roam freely about and enjoy this unique experience

Narrated History/ Wildlife Cruise to the Mississippi’s Source. See and learn about the real Itasca. History about the Schoolcraft expedition, Native Americans, logging, civilian conservation corp and Jacob Browers founding of the Park in 1891.

ADULTS: $17.5O KIDS Ages 4-12: $9.00 • (3 & under FREE) 1 3/4 HOUR - 10 MILE

Est. 1985

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Breakfast: 7:30 -12 noon ◉ Dinner: 1:00-9:00 p.m.

Located in Itasca State Park

www.lakeitascatours.com

MEMORIAL WEEKEND THRU LABOR DAY Open 7 Days A Week at 7:30 AM

218-732-3444

Hwy. 71 N. Turn on Co. Rd. 18. Follow Signs.

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

218-266-3660 Office • 218-573-2216 *Off Season

Public & Private Cruises

001725233r1

5

ON LAKE ITASCA - SOURCE OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER

CABIN READER 2018


Top ten common dragonflies of Minnesota

Common Green Darner

Canada Darner

Chalk-Fronted Corporal

Calico Pennant

Dot-Tailed Whiteface

Twelve-Spotted Skimmer

Blue Dasher

American Emerald

White-Faced Meadowhawk

Autum Meadowhawk

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

Jurassic yard: Dragonflies and damselflies in Minnesota

According to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, dragonflies and their close relatives called damselflies are ancient insects and prehistoric reminders of the age of the dinosaurs. Enormous dragonflies with a wingspread up to 30 inches across were part of the Paleozoic landscape about 300 million years ago. Even with major changes in the landscape over millions of years, dragonflies have continued to adapt and are found worldwide. There are an estimated 5,500 to 6,500 dragonfly and damselfly species in the world. In Minnesota, there are about 140 total species. There are about as many dragonflies and damselflies in Minnesota as there are butterflies, but butterflies are more well known. Damselflies are generally smaller than dragonflies and have a more slender body. Their eyes are widely separated, and they hold their wings together above their body when at rest. Dragonflies are an aeronautical marvel. They can hover, glide, and pursue prey species like mosquitoes at speeds up to 29 inches per second. They are an aggressive and voracious predator that eats midges, mosquitoes, butterflies, moths, and even smaller dragonflies and fish. Although dragonflies are efficient predators, they also serve as prey for birds like purple martins, frogs and larger dragonflies. The nymphs are eaten by frogs, toads, newts and fish. The largest species of dragonflies are the Lake Darner and Arrowhead Spiketail which average 3.1 inches long. The smallest dragonfly in the state is the Elfin Skimmer which is only .8 inches long. Dragonflies and damselflies depend on abundant and diverse types of wetlands, rivers and lakes. Every species has special requirements related to water quality, aquatic vegetation, and natural shoreline vegetation where they may lay eggs, hunt, or rest. They serve as an important part of the food chain and comprise an important part of our natural biological diversity.

6

CABIN READER 2018


Trails galore Lakes country offers many opportunities to bike, run, walk or inline skate with beautiful scenery. • Heartland Trail: An excellent place for running, biking, inline skating and walking. There are mile markers posted along the trail, which runs from Heartland Park in Park Rapids to Dorset (6.3 miles), Nevis (5.3 miles), Akeley (6.3 miles), Walker (9.4 miles), Wilkinson (12.5 miles) and ends two miles before Cass Lake (7.2 miles). The hilly snowmobile trail alongside the Heartland Trail, with beautiful scenery and wildlife, is a great opportunity for horseback riding, mountain biking, running and walking. • Itasca State Park: A six-mile, paved biking trail connects Douglas Lodge with the Mississippi River headwaters. Wilderness Drive offers a 10-mile, one-way bike route. Rentals are available.

Self-guided hiking trails take visitors through the most scenic parts of the park. In the winter, trails are groomed for cross-country skiing, snowmobiling and snowshoeing. The park is located 20 miles north of Park Rapids on Highway 71. • Soaring Eagle: Spring and fall are good times for running on these cross-country ski trails. The trails are located about 8 miles north of Park Rapids on Highway 71. • Paul Bunyan State Trail: The Paul Bunyan Trail is 115 miles long, extending from Crow Wing State Park to Lake Bemidji State Park. It’s the longest of Minnesota’s state trails and the longest continuously paved rail-trail in the country. The trail is open year-round to non-motorized use and snowmobile in the winter. In Walker, the route intersects with the Heartland Trail.

Take a hike

The North Country National Scenic Trail runs from New York to North Dakota, Minnesota’s footpaths holding unimpeded travel for hikers, berry pickers, hunters, geocachers, cross country skiers and snowshoers. The trail now runs from the southeast Juggler Lake Road in Becker County to the southeast edge of the Chippewa National Forest, 136 miles of forest and prairie,

with rivers, lakes, wetlands and wildlife to view. There are scores of hiking opportunities, long and short. Trail routes are shown on the Hubbard County highway map, available at area businesses, forestry offices and Chambers of Commerce. See northcountrytrail.org for information about the entire trail.

001726563r1

a t s a P LaItalian Eatery

Thru Memorial Day: Open Thurs. - Sun. at 8:30 am Breakfast & Lunch, 5 pm Dinner After Memorial Day: Open Tues. - Sun 8:30 am Breakfast & Lunch and 7 DAYS A WEEK 5pm for Dinner

“Your Family Pharmacy”

Customer satisfaction is our priority. Ourpharmacists and technicians are prompt and eager to assist you with all your healthcare needs.

DORSET

IN TWO LOCATIONS Located in Hugo’s Family Marketplace, Hwy. 71 So. Park Rapids • 218-237-5848 Mon. - Fri. 9 A.M. - 6 P.M. • Sat. 3:30 P.M. - 5:30 P.M. • Closed Sunday

GENERAL STORE

Menahga Seip Drug - Located on Hwy. 71 South, Menahga • 218-564-4655 Mon. - Fri. 9 am - 5:30 pm Sat. 10 am - 3 pm (Pharmacy) 1 pm - 3 pm

7 Days A Week 7:30 am-9 pm)

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

Located in LaPasta Building

Dorset, MN Open All Holidays!

218-732-0275

7

Italian Eatery

Fine Italian Food Served In A Family Atmosphere Serving Delicious Breakfasts, Lunches & Full Italian Dinner Menu

732-0275 Dorset, MN

CABIN READER 2018


Poison ivy, sumac and oak myths

Poison Ivy

Poison Sumac

Contact with poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac can cause red, swollen skin, blisters and severe itching, sometimes within hours. Learning to identify and avoiding these plants is the best treatment. Western poison ivy has a short, woody stem and three, solid green leaflets. It can grow as a vine or low shrub. Like its ivy counterpart, poison oak leaves also cluster in sets of three. The edges of the solid green leaves, while reminiscent of an oak tree, are less dramatic. Poison oak is most often seen in shrub form, but it can also grow as a vine. Poison sumac has oval leaflets with smooth edges arranged in groups of 7 to 13. The leaf stems are always red. The bark is gray and smooth. It’s usually found in swampy or boggy areas where it grows as small tree or tall shrub. All parts of these plants contain a toxic, oily substance called urushiol (pronounced “you-ROO-shee-ol”). The poison is absorbed by the skin almost immediately, although symptoms may appear 12 to 24 hours later. Gently washing your skin with ordinary soap within five to 10 minutes after exposure may help avert a reaction. Wash clothing and any other contaminated objects promptly with detergent or warm, soapy water. Mild cases resolve on their own within a few weeks. Control itching with calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream.

Poison Oak

Oatmeal baths and cool compresses also might be helpful. Severe or widespread rashes should be seen by a doctor, especially if there’s a fever, blisters are oozing pus and the rash affects your face or genitals. Barrier creams containing 5 percent bentoquatam are the only FDA-approved, skin-applied products proven to protect against or reduce the severity of the rash when applied at least 15 minutes prior to exposure. MYTH: The rash is contagious. FACT: Rubbing the rashes won’t spread poison ivy to other parts of your body or to another person. The blisters contain only body fluids. You spread the rash only if urushiol oil has been left on your hands. Urushiol oil is potent – only 1 nanogram (one billionth of a gram) is needed to cause rash. MYTH: You can develop a rash simply by being near the plants. FACT: Direct contact is needed to release urushiol oil. Contact may be between the plant and bare skin or the poison may travel on the fur of a dog, gardening gloves, camping equipment, clothing or other intermediary. MYTH: Don’t worry about dead or dormant plants. FACT: The plants are poisonous year round. Urushiol oil stays active on ANY surface, including dead plants, for up to 5 years.

A group of fourth graders in Mahtomedi, MN suggested the monarch as the state butterfly in 2000. The monarch is one of six popular families of butterflies in Minnesota. August is the best month to see them before they migrate south to Mexico. PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

8

CABIN READER 2018


The Anishinaabe

The largest Indian group in Minnesota calls itself Anishinaabe, which means “the original people.” Europeans named them Ojibwe. No one is exactly sure how this name developed. Perhaps it came from the Anishinaabe word “ojib,” which describes the puckered moccasins worn by

the people. Some Europeans had trouble saying Ojibwe, pronouncing it instead as Chippewa. But both these names refer to the same people. In Canada, the Anishinaabe call themselves Ojibwe. In the U.S., many tribal members prefer the name Chippewa.

Riding the rail

When the railroad was built in Park Rapids in 1891, the depot became the hub of the town and allowed people, including the first tourists, to travel with much greater ease than by stagecoach. The line later became known as Great Northern Railroad.

Main street mystery

The parking on Main Avenue has mystified many visitors. A street wide enough to accommodate center and side parking may be more than a curiosity, though. It is said since Park Rapids originally was a logging community, the street was laid out wide enough to allow teamsters to turn their horses around. It also has been said the street was made wide so piles of lumber could be stacked in the center to dry. Both stories may be right.

680 of the Mississippi River’s 2,522 total miles flows through Minnesota – and it all begins in Hubbard County at Itasca State Park. The name “Minnesota” comes from Dakota Indian words meaning “sky-tinted waters” or “sky-blue waters.” Minnesota has 90,000 miles of shorelines due to its abundance of lakes – that’s more than California, Florida and Hawaii combined. PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

9

CABIN READER 2018


Itasca State Park Headwaters of the Mississippi Minnesota’s oldest state park celebrates its 127th anniversary this year. Itasca State Park was established on April 20, 1891 to preserve the old growth pine trees that were in danger of being logged. More than half a million people visit Itasca State Park every year to see the giant pines and wade across the headwaters of the Mississippi River State Water Trail. Park Rapids is the undisputed Gateway to Itasca State Park and the south entrance is a 22-mile drive from Park Rapids north on Highway 71. Exploring the park Itasca State Park encompasses Lake Itasca, the official source of the Mississippi River, and a scenic area of northern Minnesota that has remained relatively unchanged from its natural state. Today, the park totals more than 32,000 acres and includes more than 100 lakes. Stand under towering pines at Preacher’s Grove. Visit the Itasca Indian Cemetery or Wegmann’s Cabin, landmarks of centuries gone by. Camp under the stars or stay the night at the historic Douglas Lodge or cabins. Explore Wilderness Drive past the 2,000-acre PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

10

Wilderness Sanctuary, one of Minnesota’s seven National Natural Landmarks. The headwaters of the mighty Mississippi It’s hard to imagine America’s greatest river as a burble, but if you venture to the Mississippi headwaters in Itasca State Park, you will be able to wade across Huck Finn’s favorite river as it starts its winding journey 2,552 miles to the Gulf of Mexico. The Mary Gibbs Mississippi Headwaters Center offers outdoor displays, a restaurant and gift shop. The walkway to the headwaters also has been enhanced to accommodate the 500,000 park visitors who arrive every year. For more information, call Itasca State Park at at 218-699-7251, email itasca. statepark@state.mn.us or go to www.dnr. state.mn.us/state_parks/itasca/index. html. There are plenty of other activities to do at the park. Other outdoor activities include taking an excursion boat on Lake Itasca, exploring along Wilderness Drive, biking or hiking along more than 30 miles of designated trails, fishing in one of the many lakes, observing the wild flowers in season as well as birding. CABIN READER 2018


7 scrumptious s’more recipes Nothing says “Northwoods dessert” like a s’more eaten around the campfire. No dishes are required, although paper plates to set up the graham crackers topped with chocolate are a nice addition. A wide variety of s’mores can be created by varying the type of cracker, chocolate and filling. Here are seven scrumptious combinations to get started, but many more can be created. Some stores now carry flavored marshmallows as well. Graham crackers can also be replaced with Oreos, rice krispie bars or even crisped waffles to create even more variations. Marshmallows are best roasted over the fire’s embers on a long roasting fork. Turn the roasting fork throughout the roasting process until the marshmallow is puffy and golden brown. Break graham crackers into squares. Put the marshmallow on top of chocolate between two squares and enjoy! It is also helpful to keep a container of wet wipes nearby for sticky fingers.

CASUAL DINING

Classic S’more Fill a plain graham cracker with squares of milk or dark chocolate to cover surface. Salted Caramel and Bacon Fill a plain graham cracker with a square chocolate caramel and slice of cooked bacon. Cinnamon Snickers Slice a mini Snicker bar lengthwise and place on half of a cinnamon graham cracker. Peanut Butter Cup Fill a plain graham cracker with a medium peanut butter cup. Fluffernutter Spread peanut butter on one square of a chocolate graham cracker. Strawberry Nutella Spread Nutella on one square and top with thinly sliced strawberries. Grasshopper Use a chocolate graham cracker and top with a flat square chocolate mint.

STOP IN TODAY TO SEE ALL THE POSSIBILITIES!

Kitchen is always ope until 10 pmn

Also full service dining on the deck overlooking beautiful Island Lake

MON - THURS 4 PM TO CLOSE FRI - SUN 11 AM TO CLOSE

001727012r1

FULL MENU & KIDS MENU NIGHTLY DINNER SPECIALS Prime Rib, BBQ Ribs, Pastas, Burgers, Salads, Wraps Broasted Chicken - eat in or buckets to go

Located 8 mi. N. of Park Rapids on Hwy. 71, then right on Co. Rd. 89 for 1 mi.

(218) 732-5270

Certified Service

Hwy. 34 East, Park Rapids

218-732-3347 www.thielenmotors.com VACATIONAIRERESORT. COM

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

001727018r1

11

CABIN READER 2018


001720007r1

Explore Downtown Park Rapids With Unique Shopping & Dining 001727235r1

Join your friends at The Royal Bar “Park Rapids” Original Sports Bar & Grill

Chocolates & Fudge Made Fresh Daily While You Watch 110 S. Main Street, Park Rapids • 218-732-7019 407 Minnesota Ave., Walker • 218-547-3699

Orders Shipped Nationwide 1-888-536-7019 www.auntbelles.com

001727029r1

Mon.-Sat. Open at 11 AM Sunday Open at Noon

CANDIES 001725921r1

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Beer & Liquor 7 Days A Week

Charitable Gambling • Video Games Big Screen Plus 4 Other TVs for Sports Action

Specializing in “up north” gifts and home decor.

Come See What’s New!

DOWNTOWN PARK RAPIDS 732-9443

You’ll Find Us In The Back Of Park Rapids Aunt Belle’s Confectionary

001725919r1

every day

Open 7 Days A Week

- fresh dairy - fresh tastes - fresh bakery - fresh flavors - fresh deli - fresh produce - fresh seafood 209 West 1st Street Park Rapids, MN (218) 732-0182 2030Cob7.25x4.75SmmrGdAd_042015

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

12 1

CABIN READER 2018


001720007r1

Explore Downtown Park Rapids With Unique Shopping & Dining 001727236r1

Furniture, Art & Collectables Inside... and Outside!

Mon.-Sat. 9:30-5:30 Sun. 11-4

001727030r1

Visit Moose Creek Village Behind The Store, For A Fun And Delightful Selection Of Decor For Your Home, Deck And Yard 001727025r1

Quality Furniture and Furnishings for Your Home & Cabin 110 4th St. West, Park Rapids • 218-237-1600

Pas ta • Seafood • Steak

Certificate of Excellence!

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN CUISINE

ITALIANO 311 Main Avenue •218.237.4625 www.necces.net

Open Daily at 4 pm Call for winter/spring hours

Seasonal Italian fare made fresh daily by our certified Italian chef! Vegan, lactose/ gluten-free options

DINE IN OR CARRY OUT FULL SERVICE CATERING Hand-Crafted Cocktails

•Premium Spirits •Imported Wines •Craft Tap Beers

Happy Hour Specials

Monday -Friday 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

OVER 30 WINES BY THE GLASS001726565r1 PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

1 13

112 Main Ave S, Park Rapids, MN (218) 237-9090 | gliks.com 001726564r1

CABIN READER 2018


DINING GUIDE A variety of delicious dining options around the lakes area

THE GOOD LIFE CAFE

Fresh, creative food and craft beer in a comfortable atmosphere! Lunch and dinner menus offer a combination of traditional and adventurous dishes, including comfort foods, vegetarian and gluten-free. We prepare unique specials for each meal aligned with the seasons. We also have 10 MN craft beers on tap, cocktails, wine, wi-fi, outdoor seating and a kid’s menu. It’s time you got back to The Good Life! Memorial - Labor Day Weekends: Open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner, Seasonal hours and menus online. 220 Main Ave. S., Park Rapids. 218-237-4212 www.thegoodlifecafepr.com. Breakfast & Lunch $ Dinner $$ (W) F

LAPASTA

Full menu items for all to enjoy. Breakfast starts at 8:30 am with our famous Dorset Pockets & Potato pancakes plus lots of omelets and other goodies. Lunch offers a wide selection of fresh Angus burgers as well as Italian entrees including pizza. Dinner is amazing starting at 5:00 pm with a full Italian menu with our traditional Italian plus more exotic fusion dishes. Thru Memorial Day Open Thurs. Sun. at 8:30 am Breakfast & Lunch, 5:00 pm Dinner, After Memorial Day Open Tues. - Sun 8:30 am Breakfast & Lunch and 7 DAYS A WEEK 5 pm for Dinner. Downtown Dorset. 218-732-0275. Breakfast & lunch $. Dinner $$ [W] F

VACATIONAIRE & CLANCY’S ON ISLAND LAKE

Casual dining in our dining room or on the deck overlooking beautiful Island Lake. Full menu, kids menu, broasted chicken eat-in or take-out. Reservations recommended. Kitchen open until 10 pm. 218732-5270.

The 64-year tradition. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT served family style. Open 7 days a week, Memorial weekend through Labor Day. Breakfast 7:30am to 12 noon. Dinner 1-8 pm. top off your logger’s meal with a stroll along the Fish Hook River. Hwy. 71 N. Turn on Co. Rd. 18, follow signs. 218-732-3444. $ [w]

THE ROYAL

The local favorite where you will enjoy possibly the BEST burger in northern Minnesota. Plus many appetizers and your favorite beverage. Open 7 days a week. Mon.-Sat. at 11 am, Sun. at noon. 120 S. Main, downtown Park Rapids. 218-732-9443. $ [w]

STOMPIN’ GROUNDS

Full menu served daily. Sink your teeth into the ‘Stompin Burger,” our most popular burger! Chicken, fish, homemade soup & more. Don’t miss Wing Wednesdays! Full bar ~ 4 pm Happy Hour. Breakfast Sat. & Sun. 8 am - 11 am. Kitchen open Sat. - Thurs. 10 am - 8 pm, Fri. & Sat. 10 am - 9 pm. Bar open Mon. - Sat. 10 am - 1 am, Sun. 10 am - Midnight.•Hwy. 64, N. of Akeley. 218-652-2964

Y STEAK HOUSE

Celebrating 72 years of fine dining in the Park Rapids area on Hwy. 71. Prime rib nightly, walleye, jumbo shrimp, BBQ ribs, seafood, choice steaks, chicken, combination meals, children’s menu, nightly specials and your favorite beverage from the new Fish Hook Bar. Open 7 days a week. Sun.-Thurs 4 pm - 9 pm, Fri. & Sat. 4 pm -10 pm. Reservations appreciated.•1 mi. North on Hwy. 71, Park Rapids. 218-732-4565. $$ [w] F

ZONA ROSA

LAKE GEORGE CAFE

We do breakfast all day! Lunch menu, American food, lunch & dinner specials. Open Tues.-Fri. 7 am - 7 pm, Sat. & Sun. 7 am - 3 pm, closed Mon.•Hwy. 71, Lake George (37550 Night Hawk Rd.) 218699-3080

NECCE’S ITALIANO RISTORANTE

Authentic Italian cuisine! Enjoy house-made Italian specialties like sausage manicotti, lasagna classico, spaghetti & meatballs, veal marsala, filet gorgonzola, Caesar salad & delicious desserts. Now offering walleye sandwiches, 1/2 lb. burgers and flatbread pizzas! Great Happy Hour specials! Open daily 4:00 pm (Call for spring/winter hours). Reservations accepted. We are proud to be No.1 on TripAdvisor! Check us out! 311 S. Main Street, Park Rapids. 218-237-4625. $$ [w] F PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

RAPID RIVER LOGGING CAMP

14

Visit old Mexico in the heart of beautiful downtown Walker. Large selection of authentic Mexican and American favorites. Full bar, specializing in margaritas. Warm “south of the border” atmosphere and outdoor patio dining. Kids menu. Lunch, dinner, daily specials. Open 7 days a week.•101 5th St. N., Downtown Walker.

DINING GUIDE KEY: [w] Wheelchair Accessible F Facebook

Dollar signs indicate the cost of a typical dinner: $ less than $15 • $$ $15-$25 • $$$ more than $25 CABIN READER 2018


Frogs of Minnesota Green Frog

Size: 3½-8 inches The green frog is the second largest frog in Minnesota, second only to the bullfrog. Voice: A throaty gunk or boink, like the pluck of a loose banjo string. Often calls during day and night. The male has paired vocal pouches. Identification: This fist-sized frog has two ridges down its back. The young may have black spots. The males have large tympanums (the round structures directly behind the eye). Summer habitat: This highly aquatic species is often associated with streams and ditches, although it also inhabits shallow water of lakes and ponds.

Spring Peeper Size: 3/4-11/4 inches.

Voice: Short, loud, highpitched peep. Many individuals singing together sound like sleigh bells. Identification: Tan with a dark X on its back. Summer habitat: Inhabits forested areas, especially areas with brushy undergrowth. May be heard calling in the fall.

Wood Frog

Bullfrog

Size: 2- 23/4 inches. Voice: Often the first species heard calling in the spring. Their short chuckle is a harsh racket, racket, racket. A chorus sounds like the feeding call of the mallard. Males have paired vocal sacs.Identification: This brown, palm-sized frog has a dark patch over its eyes and two big ridges run down its back. Summer habitat: This highly aquatic frog prefers large bodies of water occupies woodland and forest habitat, sometimes traveling a considerable distance from water.

Size: 3½-8 inches This is the largest North American frog. Voice: A resonant series of deep bass notes sounding like rrr-uum or jug-o-rum. Identification: Green skin coloration with yellow throat in males and white in females. No dorsolateral fold is present. Summer habitat: This highly aquatic frog prefers large bodies of water such as lakes, ponds, sluggish streams, and backwaters of rivers.

001725234r1

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

15

CABIN READER 2018


PUZZLE #1 ACCOMPANIMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS ACHIEVE AMATEUR ARTIST ATLAS ATOMS BEARDS CHOIR CIVIL CLAMS COSTS DIVED DRILL DROWN EXITS FRONTIER HASN’T LIGHT LIONS MANUFACTURERS MENDS MOUNTAINOUS NINTH OUGHT OWNER PILLS PLAYS PLOWS POLAR PUZZLE #3 ABLE ALRIGHT ARTS CARGO CHAPEL COLT DEEP DIGS DISH DRAW DRUGS ECHO ENDS ESSAY EXACT FERN FIRE FORGET GOOD-BYE GRAIN GROWN GUNS HARDER HEAR HELD LANE HIDES LATER HORSES MADE ISN’T MEND JAIL MERE LAMP MIGRATION

POLLEN RAINING RUNNERS SEIZE SHOULDN’T SIXTH

MOLD MOTHER MOTHS OARS OATH OMIT

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

STUNS STURDY SURELY SWEDEN TENTS THEORY

ONLY ORAL OVERHEAD RADAR RAINS RARE

16

RING ROSE SALAD SHOT SHOW SILK

THORN TIRES UMBRELLA VALUE WASN’T

SIRUP SLEEK SMASH SORT SPOIL STAR

SUIT TIED TILT TRACK TRIM TRIPS

VARY VETS VISIT VOYAGES WIPE WISE

CABIN READER 2018


PUZZLE #2 ABOVE ADMIT ASKED ATLAS BECOME BEGGED BEGUN BEHIND BITTEN BRAVE BROKEN BUSINESSMEN CITIES DECADE DEGREES DENSE DESPERATE DIAGRAM DREAM EDGED ENTIRE ESTATE FAULT FIRED GAZED NASTY GRINNING NINTH HABIT PAGES HILLS PATCH IDEAS PEARS LANES PUZZLE #4 ALONE ASIA ASKS AXLE BONUS BUSES COIN COMMUNICATION COOK DEEP DIED EARN EASE ELDER ESCAPE FIFTH GIFT HEAD HITS IDEA INKS INNER ISN’T ISSUE KNIT LAUNCH MENTAL OMIT LAVA MESSING OURS LEAPS MOAN OWLS LIMP MOTH PEARL LIPS NOSE PRESSING LOCK NUTS PUSH PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

PIANOS RACES RENTED ROARS ROUTE

REST ROBIN ROOMS RUNG SEES SEWS

SCENT SNACK SOLID STEEP TEDDY

17

SICK SITE SLOT SNEEZED SPUN STEM

TENDED THREW TIDAL TONGUE TOTAL

STIRS SWAM TALK TARTS TEAR THAT

TRADER TUNNEL UPSET WORSE

THEN THUS TOOL TORN TREE TURKEY

TURN UPSIDE VETS VIEWS WANT YARN

CABIN READER 2018


SUDOKU

Fun by the Numbers

Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test!

PUZZLE #5

PUZZLE #6

PUZZLE #7

PUZZLE #8

PUZZLE #9

PUZZLE #10

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

18

CABIN READER 2018


Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

PUZZLE #11

PUZZLE #12

PUZZLE #13

PUZZLE #14

PUZZLE #15

PUZZLE #16

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

19

CABIN READER 2018


PUZZLE #17

CLUES ACROSS

1. River herrings 6. Body art (slang) 9. Taxis 13. Covered with asphalt 14. Mineral found in granite 15. Assist 16. Handled 17. Not drunk 18. Home to a famous tower 19. Songs 21. A way to designate 22. More infrequent 23. Medical man 24. Tellurium 25. Cycles/second 28. Neither 29. Home to a famous tower 31. Former Ravens tight end Todd 33. One who helps 36. Tries to persuade 38. Israeli city __ Aviv 39. Political distance (abbr.) 41. Emergency first aid worker 44. Canadian law enforcers 45. Fathers 46. Drain of resources 48. An awkward stupid person 49. Home of the Wolverines 51. Chinese PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

52. Gives a hoot 54. Emaciation 56. “Sam Malone” 60. Horses do this 61. Hillsides 62. River in Florence 63. Republic of Ireland 64. Lapse 65. Blemished 66. Backside 67. Woman (French) 68. An edict of the Russian tsar CLUES DOWN 1. The Bird of Paradise 2. Emit coherent radiation 3. Above 4. Passover feast and ceremony 5. Commercial 6. Rome is on its banks 7. Kershaw and King Felix are two 8. Seaman 9. Stores an electronic charge 10. Teething babies need _ __ 11. Threaten persistently 12. Not fresh 14. Presides over 17. Astronomical period

20

20. Harding’s self-proclaimed mistress Britton 21. Nocturnal primate 23. Patriotic American women 25. Vietnamese river 26. Suspect 27. Heroic tales 29. Fences of wooden stakes 30. Venzetti’s partner 32. Outermost parts of an area 34. Type of student 35. Noncoding RNA gene 37. Frocks 40. Sunscreen rating 42. Opposite of women 43. Needed to play games 47. A partner to carrots 49. Absolute 50. Disgraced French aristocrat Antoinette 52. End 53. Food eaten between meals 55. Cold wind 56. Streetcar 57. Soluble ribonucleic acid 58. Singles 59. Intersecting point 61. Beats per minute 65. Gold CABIN READER 2018


PUZZLE #18

CLUES ACROSS

1. Corpuscle count (abbr.) 4. Longtime sports columnist Cook 9. Tributary of the Rio Grande 14. Geological time 15. About ilium 16. Religion 17. Beverage holder 18. Its largest city is Fargo 20. Attaches muscle to a bone 22. Hindu queens 23. Sir __ Newton 24. Developments 28. British thermal unit 29. The Ocean State 30. Smell 31. Line 33. Seizure 37. Where vets are tended to 38. Goddess of the dawn 39. Pear-shaped fruit 41. Taxi 42. Where injured ballplayers end up 43. Preceding period 44. Uncovers 46. Smudge 49. Dad 50. Peyton’s little bro PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

51. Flawless 55. Judges 58. Expressed one’s displeasure 59. Immature 60. PBS interviewer 64. Hat 65. Cover with wood 66. Acts dejectedly 67. Perform 68. Where people store their tools 69. Sulfuric and citric are two 70. Long-term memory CLUES DOWN 1. Muscles that control eyeball movement 2. Hillsides 3. The dried leaves of the hemp plant 4. Used to see far away things 5. Inventor Musk 6. We all need it 7. __ King Cole 8. Earthy pigment 9. Stringed instrument 10. A language of the Inuit 11. Shuttered 12. Cereal plant

21

13. Senior officer 19. Sportscaster Patrick 21. What day it is 24. Petrels with saw-toothed bills 25. Bumps in the road 26. Stars 27. Riding horses 31. Swamp plant 32. Type of bear 34. Style of cuisine 35. Home of the Flyers 36. Serious-mindedness 40. Velvet Underground album 41. Highly important 45. Winged 47. Cultured 48. Fastened 52. ___ Royce 53. Wreath 54. Excessive fluid accumulation in tissues 56. Synchronizes solar and lunar time 57. Ninth month 59. Deployed 60. Cycles per second 61. Expresses surprise 62. Mythological bird 63. Open payment initiative CABIN READER 2018


PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

PUZZLE #4

PUZZLE #6

PUZZLE #5

PUZZLE #3

PUZZLE #1

PUZZLE #2

Puzzle Answers Pgs. 16-22

22

CABIN READER 2018


PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

23

CABIN READER 2018

PUZZLE #14

PUZZLE #13

PUZZLE #12

PUZZLE #11

PUZZLE #10

PUZZLE #9

PUZZLE #8

PUZZLE #7


PUZZLE #15

PUZZLE #16

PUZZLE #17

PUZZLE #18

LOOKING FOR MORE PUZZLE FUN? Be sure and check out the weekly puzzles in the Park Rapids Enterprise every Wednesday and Saturday

203 Henrietta Ave. No., Park Rapids, MN 56470 (218) 732-3364 • Fax (218) 732-8757 • www.parkrapidsenterprise.com

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

24

CABIN READER 2018


10 fun firefly facts 1. They are beetles. Fireflies are not flies, but nocturnal members of Lampyridae (which in Greek means “to shine”), a family of winged beetles. There are more than 2,000 species of fireflies, and only some have the ability to light up. 2. Fireflies are just one type of bioluminescent species. Fireflies are probably one of the more popular of these species, but they’re definitely not alone in their ability to light up. Most of their bioluminescent peers live in the ocean so people don’t have as much contact with them. Their light is created by a chemical reaction during which oxygen combines with calcium, adenosine triphosphate and luciferin with the help of the enzyme luciferase. When they are larvae, fireflies use their bioluminescence to scare off predators. 3. Not all fireflies have the “fire.” Those who don’t produce light are usually most active during the day, while fireflies that produce light are active at night. 4. Fireflies are energy efficient. Firefly lights are the most efficient lights in the world. One-hundred percent of the energy created is emitted through the light. In comparison, an incandescent bulb emits 10 percent of its energy as light and a fluorescent bulb emits 90 percent of its energy through light. Fireflies’ efficiency is partly due to luciferin’s heat resistant properties. 5. Light shows are part of mating. Most of the fireflies flying around are males looking for a mate. Each species has a specific light pattern that they use to communicate with each other. Once a female spots a male she likes, she will respond with the same light pattern. Usually females are perched on plants, waiting for a mate. 6. Not all firefly light looks the same. Each species has their own specific color of light they produce. Some glow blue or green, while others glow orange or yellow. 7. They taste disgusting. Fireflies are poisonous to some animals. When fireflies are attacked, they shed drops of blood. The blood contains chemicals that create the bitter taste and poison. Most animals have learned this and avoid munching on fireflies.

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

25

8. Fireflies sometimes practice cannibalism. When fireflies are still in the larval stage, they snack on snails. Usually as they mature, they move away from meat. Scientists believe adult fireflies live off of nectar and pollen. But others, especially the Photuris fireflies, enjoy their own kind. Photuris females often eat males of other genera. They attract unsuspecting males by mimicking their light pattern. 9. They need your help. There are several reasons why firefly populations are declining, including climate change, light pollution and habitat destruction. When firefly habitats are destroyed for roads or other construction, they don’t migrate to a new spot, they simply disappear. Keeping a firefly journal can help scientists learn more about fireflies. Go to the Museum of Science Firefly Watch website (legacy.mos.org/fireflywatch), which includes a virtual habitat and a link to share observations of fireflies with scientists. 10. Have a firefly party! The best areas for firefly viewing are near lakes and damp wooded areas. June, July and early August are prime viewing times. Bring a flashlight and go out after dark to a selected location. Wait for 10 or 15 minutes and if no fireflies are seen, select a new location. Sometimes flashing a flashlight will help in getting fireflies to respond with flashes of their own. This firefly information is courtesy of Ecowatch (www.ecowatch.com). Check it out for more firefly facts.

CABIN READER 2018


Turtles of

Minnesota Painted Turtle

False Map Turtle

Snapping Turtle

Spiny Softshell Turtle

Wood Turtle

Ouachita Turtle

Northern Map Turtle

Blanding’s Turtle

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

26

CABIN READER 2018


www.NevisChamber.com Nevis, Minnesota

Muskie Days Northwoods July 27-28, 2018 Triathlon Citywide August 11, 2018 Garage Sale August 4, 2018 Water Ski Shows at Halvorson Beach on Lake Belle Taine June 24th, July 15th, and Aug 5th

001727106r1

Sites ‘n Bites June 10, 2018 Pig Races July 8, 2018

Experience the small town charm! OFF-SALE

• Great Selection of Beer, Wine & Spirits • Beer Specials On & Save 10% on Military Mondays, Off Sale Wine Wednesdays, Senior Discount Thursdays Main Street, Nevis • (218)652-9910 Open: Mon.-Sat. 9 am-10 pm

Full Bar Open Mon.-Sat. 9 am-1 am

• Happy Hour: Monday 3-8 pm Tues.-Fri. 3-6 pm • Pizza & Snacks • Pull Tabs • Tuesday Trivia • Wednesday Bingo • Friday Meat Raffle

• Karaoke Every Other Saturday PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

27

001727069r1

CABIN READER 2018


Local Church Directory Come and worship in the church of your choice! - PARK RAPIDS -

- OUTLYING CHURCHES -

FAITHBRIDE CHURCH: 1505 Park Ave. S. 218-732-1404. Website: faithbridgepr.org Summer Worship Schedule (June 3-Sept 2): Traditional 8:15 a.m., contemporary 10 a.m. (Faith Kidz: June & July). Fall Worship Schedule (begins Sept 9): Traditional 8:15 a.m., Sunday School 9:30 a.m., contemporary 10:45 a.m. Check the website for special activities, dates and times.

ST. CATHERINES CATHOLIC CHURCH – LAKE ITASCA: At the North Entrance to Itasca State Park. 218-2663312. Visiting vacationing priests. Sunday Mass: 9 a.m. (May 27 to Sept. 2, 2018)

EASTSIDE CHRISTIAN CHURCH: 5 miles south of Park Rapids, at 16623, State 87, Park Rapids, MN 56470. For current service times visit: Eastside.com/parkrapids Sunday school “Kidside” offers a unique experience from birth through grade 5 at all of our services. RIVERSIDE UNITED MEHTODIST CHURCH: 1005 Park Avenue North. (Hwy 71 N.) 218-732-5205. Pastor Chip Nielsen and Pastor Lori Nielsen. Traditional worship service 8:30 a.m., contemporary worship service 10:30 a.m. Fellowship following each service. Itasca Park Ministry (Itasca State Park) Sundays 10:30 a.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day. Sunday school 9:30 a.m. September through April.

ST. THEODORE’S CATHOLIC CHURCH – At the intersection of Becker County Roads 124 & 129 in Ponsford. Father Joseph Hitpas. 218-983-3261. Mass time: Daylight Saving Time: Saturday 5 p.m., CST (Winter Hours): Saturday 4 p.m. Contact People: Paul Joyce, 237-4203 and Tim Willenbring, 573-3870. Potluck Supper: First Saturday of every month following the Potluck Supper. Praying the Rosary: Second Saturday of every month, 25 minutes before Mass.

ST. PETER THE APOSTLE CATHOLIC CHURCH: 305 West 5th St., Park Rapids, MN 56470. 218-732-5142. Father Thomas Friedl. Sunday Mass: Memorial Day through Labor Day Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 8:30 a.m., during the school year, Saturday 5 p.m., Sunday 9:00 a.m. - NEVIS PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH: 24025 State 34 Nevis, MN 56467, three miles west of Nevis, seven miles east of Park Rapids. 218-652-6508, peacelutherannevis@ gmail.com. Pastor Tim Balfanz. Times of worship: 9:30 a.m. Sundays, fellowship following service. Traditional 1st and 3rd Sundays, Contemporary 2nd and 4th Sundays. Sunday school 10:30 a.m. - TWO INLETS ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH: 55744 County Hwy. 44 (3 miles west of Hwy. 71 N. on Co Rd. 44) Two Inlets Rd. Father Thomas Friedl. 218-732-4046. Sunday Mass 10 a.m. (in the “Grotto,” Memorial Day, weather permitting). Worship service (during school year): Sunday 11 a.m. - HUBBARD HUBBARD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: 12150 Broadway Road, Park Rapids, MN 56470. 218-732-0224. hubbardumc@unitelc.com. Pastor Laurie Kantonen. Sunday: Hymn Sing 8:45 a.m., worship 9 a.m., Wednesday: Kids club & Youth Group 4:30 p.m., Community Service 6 p.m., Choir practice 7 p.m. PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

28

CABIN READER 2018


Getting onto your skin: mosquitos, ticks

Mosquitos • There are over 50 species of mosquito in Minnesota, and over 3,000 mosquito species worldwide. • Mosquito eggs can survive for more than five years. • One female mosquito can lay over 200 eggs at one time. • Only female mosquitoes bite and take blood. Male mosquitoes feed only on plant nectar. • Not all mosquito species bite people. Some prefer birds, horses or even frogs and turtles. • Mosquitoes can fly about 1 to 1.5 miles per hour. • Mosquitoes find hosts by sight, by infrared radiation and by chemicals. • Mosquitoes are the primary food for many birds and bats. One bat can eat 200 mosquitoes in one night and birds eat hundreds of mosquitoes every day. Without these mosquito predators, we would really have a mosquito problem! Dog ticks and deer ticks • American dog and deer ticks are just two of 13 known tick species in Minnesota. Deer ticks are potential carriers of Lyme disease, human anaplasmosis and babesiosis.

• Male American dog ticks feed briefly but do not become distended with blood. Once replete, female dog ticks detach from their host and drop into a leaf litter, where they can lay over 4,000 eggs before dying. • Deer ticks, also known as black-legged ticks, live about two years. Adult females are the size of a sesame seed. • Use tweezers to grasp an attached tick close to its mouth. Gently and slowly pull the tick straight outward. Wash the area and apply an antiseptic to the bite. • Ticks must remain attached for one to two days to transmit Lyme disease bacteria. • When hiking in wooded areas, wear light-colored clothing so ticks will be more visible. Use a repellent containing DEET or permethrin. After being outdoors, get out of your clothes immediately and do a complete body check. • Lyme disease is named for Lyme, Conn., where scientists first discovered the tickborne infection in 1975. Female Deer Tick

American Dog Tick

Come See Us In

Akeley Home Of Paul Bunyan Don’t miss the

70th annual

Akeley Muni

The

Where Paul Wets His Whistle!

• Happy Hour • 2-for-1 Saturdays 11-Noon, 9pm-10pm • Food • Pool • Darts • Pull Tabs • Fun! Open Mon.-Sat. 9am-1am

Paul Bunyan days

652-4084

June 22-24, 2018

1 BLOCK E. OF PAUL BUNYAN

STOMPIN’ GROUNDS LODGE & CAMPING

Antiques & Gifts

RV & Tent Sites • ATV Trails

Thousands of Items

Antiques, Collectables, Primitives, Superb Selection of Glassware, Men’s Items, Artisan-made Gifts & More

Restaurant Open Daily • Full Bar • OFF SALE

Akeley, 3 miles North on Hwy. 64 MN 218-652-2964 800-725-1579

Open May thru Mid November Tuesday - Saturday 9:30 am Sunday p.m. and Monday every other week Seasonal hours begin Oct. 1

www.abigailsatticantiques.com

001727065r1

Plan Your Stay In The Heart Of The Paul Bunyan Forest

Attractive Shop With Quality Treasures

www.stompingroundslodge.com

612-720-8833 • Hwy. 34, Akeley PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

001727053r1

001727273r1

Male Deer Tick

29

CABIN READER 2018


Paddle through scenic waters There are great opportunities to paddle for kayak or canoe enthusiasts on our rivers and lakes. Mississippi River Meander through the most scenic and remote of the Mississippi River’s 2,552 miles. Depending on water levels, a trip can start at the headwaters of the Mississippi in Itasca State Park or at Gulsvig Landing on State Hwy. 200. The first 40 miles of the river wander entirely within the Mississippi Headwaters State Forest. This infant Mississippi is not an easy river to traverse; planning is recommended for a safe trip. In this remote part of the river, there are some lengthy stretches of rocky riffles that can challenge any paddler in high water and create obstacles when in low water – and three large wetlands where even the most experienced wilderness traveler could get lost. The river alternates between straight, fast segments of river within boreal forests of pine and fir and vast open marshlands of bog, fen, cane grass, cattails and wild rice where the channel can completely disappear. Approaching Bemidji, the river’s banks become more defined and farms and homes become visible. Kayaks and boats are available for rent at Itasca State Park. www.dnr.state. mn.us/watertrails/mississippiriver/one_ more.html. PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

30

Crow Wing River Crystal waters, gentle flow, wilderness setting and numerous campsites along forested riverbanks make the Crow Wing River a draw for both residents and visitors. The Crow Wing River starts at 11th Crow Wing Lake and meanders 90 miles to the Mississippi River. Because of its many campsites and undeveloped shores, the river is one of the state’s best “wilderness” routes for family canoeists. Clear waters are rarely interrupted by rapids, and although the river is seldom more than three feet deep, it is nearly always deep enough for canoeing. Dense forests flank much of the river. For its first 20 miles the river cuts through low marshy lands. The river broadens and the banks increase in height as it flows southward through the Huntersville State Forest. There are 12 public campsites located at convenient intervals along this section of the river. All are scenic and wooded with plenty of room for hiking, bird watching and exploring. Each has fresh water, toilet facilities, picnic tables and fireplaces. Tubing is a popular activity on this part of the river. More information is at www. dnr.state.mn.us/watertrails/crowwingriver/more.html.

CABIN READER 2018


The first city on the Mississippi. Located on the shores of Lake Bemidji, the city offers an abundance of shopping, dining, art, theater, education, entertainment & lodging opportunities.

001585338r1

Chippewa Trading Post

See LOBO the wolf

Unique Gifts & Souvenirs

• Paul Bunyan Souvenirs • Local American Indian Handcrafts • Beadwork • Birch Bark Baskets • Pottery Open • Jewelry • Beads 7 Days & Beading Supplies A Week 301 Bemidji Ave., Downtown Bemidji 1-218-751-4321 001727239r1

Ring of Fire June 8-9 & 14-16: 7:30pm June 10, 13: 2:00pm The Complete History of America Abridged June 22-23 & 28-30: 7:30pm June 24, 27: 2:00pm

Clue the Musical July 6-7 & 12-14: 7:30pm July 8, 11: 2:00pm Steel Magnolias July 20-21 & 26-28: 7:30pm July 22, 25: 2:00pm Hairspray August 1-4 & 9-11: 7:30pm August 5, 8: 2:00pm

502 3rd St. NW Bemidji, MN 56601 (Behind Ink Spot Press)

218-759-8931

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 10 am-5 pm GrandmasAtticBemidji

001727145r1

001727237r1

An investment in American heritage.

001727181r1

301 Irvine Ave NW Bemidji, MN 56601 www.bemidjiwoolenmills.com

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

Bemidji’s largest antique shop housing over 30 dealers.

31

make your reservation • (218) 751-1100 300 Beltrami Avenue Northwest, Bemidji, MN 56601 CABIN READER 2018


How to build a safe campfire Campfires are a summer tradition in the northwoods. Gathering around a crackling campfire and listening to the loons calling from the lake is a peaceful way to end the day. Whether cooking hotdogs, roasting marshmallows or taking the chill off the night air, these tips will help you build a campfire that burns well and extinguish it safely when you are done. Building a safe campfire There are a few important things to consider before building a fire. If wilderness camping, pick a spot at least 10 feet from tents and away from brush and grass. This will keep smoke away from the sleeping area. Also pick a location that is sheltered from the force of the wind so the fire will not be blown out. Be sure young children are actively supervised so they do not get too close to the fire. They should also practice the move “stop, drop and roll” used to extinguish clothing that catches fire. The DNR suggests these steps to build a safe campfire:  Clear the campfire site down to bare soil and remove any combustible materials (leaves, sticks, etc.) within five feet of the fire.  Build a small fire and contain it within a fire ring three feet or less in diameter.  If no fire ring is available, scoop out a depression in the center of the cleared area and arrange a ring of rocks around it.  Have a bucket of water and a shovel near the campfire in case the fire spreads.

The Log Cabin This type of fire may also be referred to as the criss-cross or self-feeding fire. A log cabin format consists of logs stacked in alternating layers like the frame of a log cabin. Larger logs are stacked in a crisscross fashion at the bottom level, then medium sized-wood, then small wood. Put some twigs and brush on the top for kindling and start the fire from the top down. As the fire burns on top, it will spread down to the next layer, making this a self-feeding fire. The Log Cabin fire is exceptional for cooking since it produces a steady heat and burns for a long time.

The Swedish Torch This type of fire is ideal for cooking or boiling water with a limited supply of wood. Take a large log and slice it in an “x” shape to create just enough air flow to allow a fire to burn in the center. Shortly after starting the fire, set a pot or kettle on top of the log Campfire styles These are a few of the most popular base. Remove the pot or kettle before the log burns and collapses. styles.

The Teepee This is the most common type of campfire. It is made by a creating a base of kindling (newspaper, bark, or dry brush) and then leaning logs onto each other over it. The fire is started at the bottom, and as the kindling burns it ignites the logs. Eventually the teepee will collapse as the logs burn and fall into the middle of the fire. More logs may be added as needed. The teepee fire produces a lot of heat and light, but is fast-burning, so be sure to have a good supply of wood on hand a safe distance from the fire to add as the fire burns down.

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

32

Extinguishing the campfire When leaving the campsite, make sure the fire is completely out. TakeMeCamping. org states that the best way to extinguish the fire is to first use a bucket to spread water over the fire to extinguish the flames. Next, use a stick to stir the fire bed and then pour more water over the area. Repeat as needed until there is no more “hissing” sound coming from the fire when water is poured over it. Cover the area with dirt. This assures embers are all extinguished and cannot re-ignite. Stay in the area for at least 30 minutes to make sure the fire does not start up again. CABIN READER 2018


All Veterans Memorial

The All Veterans Memorial pays tribute to veterans of all wars and branches of the service. Granite monoliths, a walkway of commemorative stones and benches make the park setting a wonderful place for reflection. Volunteers staff a building at the memorial and assist with tours. Located by the wayside rest and Park Rapids Lakes Area Chamber office on Highway 71 south, the lighted memorial is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The memorial committee has started work on an Interpretive and Educational Center and Museum. It will hold information on all the U.S. wars.

Walker MINNESOTA

001727292r1

Located on the shores of Leech Lake Explore all that Walker has to offer.

“A taste of Mexico in the heart of Walker.”

Serving Traditional Mexican Food

Hours may vary with seasons, call 218-547-3558 5th St., Downtown Walker • Summer 7 Days A Week

001727119r1

Made-Fresh Salsa & Sauces Kids Menu • Large Outdoor Patio Daily Happy Hour

001727141r1

& American Favorites Too!

Full menu at www.cafezonarosa.com PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

33

CABIN READER 2018


Land of 10,000 things to do

May 27– Wildflower Walk, Itasca State Park

June 5 – CHI St. Joseph’s Health Hospice Care Golf Benefit, Blueberry Pines Golf Club 7 – Noon Hour Concert, Emma and Jacob Taggart, Hubbard Methodist Church 10 – Nevis Sites & Bites 13 –  Passion for Fashion Style Show, CHI St. Joseph’s Health Hospice Auxiliary, St. Johns Lutheran Church 13-15– PEO Treasure Market, Hubbard County fairgrounds 14- 2nd Street Stage, Downtown Park Rapids 16 – Author Fest, Park Rapids 16 – K  inship’s Amazing Chase, Heartland Park 16 – Park Rapids Fire Department open house 20 – 23rd annual Butterfly Hike, Itasca State Park 21 – 2nd Street Stage, downtown Park Rapids 21-23 – Moondance Jammin’ Country Fest, Walker 22 – Hubbard County Historical Museum roast beef dinner, Park Rapids American Legion 22-24 – 70th annual Paul Bunyan Days, Akeley 23- Dorset Boardwalk Art Festival 24 – Water Ski Show, Halvorson Beach, Nevis 28 – Noon Hour Concert, Hubbard Methodist Church 28 – 2nd Street Stage, Downtown Park Rapids July 4-7  – 40th Annual PRCA Pro Rodeo/PBR Professional Bull Ride 4 – F irecracker Footrace, Heartland Park, Park Rapids 4 – Fourth of July parade 4 – John Michael Lerma Pie Contest, Park Rapids 4–P  ark Rapids Area Community Band pre-fireworks concert 4 – Park Rapids Rotary Fourth of July fireworks 5 – 2nd Street Stage, Downtown Park Rapids 6-7 – Bigfoot Days, Remer 6-8 – Menahga Midsummer Celebration 8 – Nevis Pig Races 10 – Dorset Crazy Days 11-15 – Shell Prairie Agricultural Association Hubbard County Fair, Park Rapids PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

12 – 2nd Street Stage, Downtown Park Rapids 15 – Water Ski Show, Halvorson Beach, 5 p.m. 19 – Noon Hour Concert, Sarah Carlson, St. Johns Lutheran Church 19 – 2nd Street Stage, Downtown Park Rapids 19 – Smokey Bear Day, Itasca State Park 21 – Summer Salad Luncheon, First Lutheran Church, Akeley 26 –  Noon Hour Concert, Brian Perez, Calvary Lutheran Church 26 - 2nd Street Stage, Park Rapids 26 – Crazy Days, Downtown Park Rapids 27-Aug. 4 – Northern Light Opera Company, “My Fair Lady,” Armory Square 27 –CHI St. Joseph’s Health Hospice chicken dinner, American Legion 27-28 – Nevis Muskie Days Music Festival 27-2 9 – Lake George Blueberry Festival 28 –Park Rapids Class of 1978 40th reunion, Vacationaire 28 – Park Rapids Fire Department’s 5 Alarm 5K Run/Walk August 2 – 2nd Street Stage, Downtown Park Rapids 5 – Park Rapids Water Ski Show, Nevis City Beach, 5 p.m. 4 – Nevis City Wide Garage Sale 4-5 – Field Days, Park Rapids Antique Tractor & Engine Club’s East 40 Grounds 5 – Taste of Dorset 5 – Water Ski Show, Halvorson Beach, Nevis, 5 p.m. 9 – 2nd Street Stage, Downtown Park Rapids 9-11 – Legends and Logging Days, Park Rapids Antique Tractor & Engine Club’s East 40 Grounds 10-11 – Northern Nights Run to the Rapids car show 10-11 – Remer Harvest Festival 11 – Run to the Rapids classic car show, Park Rapids 11 – Northwoods Triathlon, Nevis 11 – Park Rapids Fire Department’s 5 Alarm Fishing Frenzy, Potato Lake 16 – Noon Hour Concert, Upper Mississippians, Calvary Lutheran Church 16 – 2nd Street Stage, Downtown Park Rapids 17 – Festival of Tables, CHI St. Joseph’s Health Auxiliary, River-

34

side Methodist Church 18 – Tour de Pines Bike Ride, Itasca State Park 18 – Friends of Heritage Living golf tournament, Eagle View Golf Course 18-19 – Art Fair at the Winery, Forestedge Winery 22 –Kinship of Park Rapids mini golf tournament, Evergreen Gifts & Fun Park 25 – Veterans Tribute Program at Howard Maninga’s home 31 - Sept. 1 – Nimrod Jubilee Days/ Labor Day Bull Bash September 1-2 – Art by the Lake, Walker 9 – Dorset Garage Sale 13 – H  ubbard County Historical Museum soup and salad luncheon at the museum 15-16– Bigfoot Music Festival, Remer 21 – Kinship of Park Rapids spaghetti dinner, Park Rapids American Legion 22 – Great American Story, Park Rapids 22 – Headwaters 100 Bike Ride, Park Rapids 22 – Annual Autumn Harvest Festival, Lantern Lit Hike, Itasca State Park 22-23 – Art Leap October 6 - Harvest Moon Festival 12 – Heartland Homes 40th anniversary fish fry, Park Rapids 31 – Trick or Treat Downtown Park Rapids November 16 – Minnesota Firearms Deer Season Opener 16 – CHI St. Joseph’s Health Foundation Benefit Gala, Chase on the Lake 22 – Heartland Homes Turkey Trot and 5K Walk/Run, Park Rapids 22 – Community Thank Meal, Riverside United Methodist Church 23 – Community Tree Lighting Ceremony and Yuletide Sampler 24 - Small Business Saturday December 8–C  hristmas Sweets, Treats, & Treasures, CHI St. Joseph’s Health Auxiliary, Calvary Lutheran Church 25 – American Legion Communit Christmas Dinner

CABIN READER 2018


Frolic, picnic in our city parks

Muskie Park: Located just north of Highway 34 in Nevis, home of the giant Tiger Muskie statue erected in the early 1950s. There’s a pavilion, picnic table shelter and playground. To get to Nevis city swimming beach and park on the eastern tip of Lake Belle Taine, take Highway 34 east to Nevis then go north on CSAH 2 and west on Beach Road. Osage City Park: Located due west of Park Rapids boasts a great swimming beach at Straight Lake . Akeley: The city’s swimming beach is located on 11th Crow Wing Lake. Adjacent to the beach is the city campground. Follow signs to the public access on 11th Crow Wing Lake. 001727049r1

Heartland Park: Located along Fishhook River in Park Rapids. It offers a swimming beach, playground equipment, hiking trail, a hacky sack court, tennis courts, softball field, frisbee golf, picnic tables and shelters, restrooms, public access to the river and access to the Heartland Trail. Deane Park: Located north of Park Rapids, between Fish Hook River and Fish Hook Lake has playground equipment, picnic tables, picnic shelter, restrooms and fishing. There are plans to repair Works Progress Administration era structures in the park including an echo ring. Rice Park: Located near the dam on Fish Hook River offers fire pits, picnic tables, restrooms, fishing and a boat landing. Lindquist Park: Located east of Heritage Living Center between 5th and 6th Streets West, has picnic tables, barbecue grills, a drinking fountain, athletic field and playground equipment. Depot Park: Located on 3rd Street across from the former middle school, has a picnic shelter and playground equipment in addition to tennis courts, a skateboard park and public restrooms.

Visit our shop & find a delightful selection of antiques, PLUS -the works of 100 area artists & Heritage Custom Framing

ALL UNDER ONE ROOF!

walkerartistsmall.com 406 Minnesota Ave. W., Walker, MN • 218-547-4781

Swenhog’s

Thousands of Items

Store and Flea Market No Trash Just Treasures You Name it, We’ve Got it! The Old Red Barn 3 miles West of Nevis on State Hwy. 34

Open May thru Mid November Tuesday - Saturday 9:30 am Sunday p.m. and Monday every other week Seasonal hours begin Oct. 1

Store Open: 9-5 Wednesday - Sunday Market: Friday/Saturday/Sunday Always Accepting New Vendors Reasonable Rates

Antiques & Gifts

May to October

Antiques, Collectables, Primitives,Superb Selection of Glassware, Men’s Items, Artisan-made Gifts & More Attractive Shop With Quality Treasures

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

001727036r1

www.abigailsatticantiques.com

612-720-8833 • Hwy. 34, Akeley

35

218-820-8550 - Kerry 218-766-6968 - Mary

001723289r1

CABIN READER 2018


PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

36

CABIN READER 2018

Common Yarrow

Columbine

Nodding Trillium

Downy Yellow Violet

Black-eyed Susan

Common Wildflowers of Minnesota


PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

37

CABIN READER 2018

Blue Flag Iris

Spiderwort

Fireweed

White Water Lily

Purple Coneflower


PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

38

CABIN READER 2018

Purple Finch

White-breasted Nuthatch

American Goldfinch

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Common Song Birds of Minnesota


PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

39

CABIN READER 2018

Song Sparrow

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Downy Woodpecker

Black-capped Chickadee

Red-winged Blackbird


Ducks of

Minnesota Wood Duck

Mallard

Size: About 20 inches, 1-1/2 pounds Identification: Broad wings and a long square tail. Drakes have a bluegreen crested head with white stripes, reddish-brown breast, buff sides and red eyes. Hens are brown with white speckled breast, crested head, and white eye ring. Sounds: The hen’s “wee-e-e-e-k, wee-e-e-e-k” whistle is commonly heard. Fun facts: Wood ducks, also called woodies, have a strong grip and can perch on branches.

Size: About 24 inches, 2-1/2 to 3 pounds Identification: A large paddle duck with a blue patch on the wing. Drakes have a distinctive glossy green head and white neck collar. Hens are mostly brown. Both sexes look like females in the summer. Sounds: Hens use a loud, long series of quacks. Drakes have a low-pitched “wheat” call. Fun facts: Mallards swim with their tail held above the water, so they can spring directly into the air when threatened.

Blue-Winged Teal

Ring-Necked Duck

Size: About 15 inches, one pound Identification: A very small duck with a small black bill. Drakes have a white facial crescent, chestnut spots on the breast, and pale blue wing patches. Hens are gray-brown with pale blue wing patches. Sounds: A faint “tsee-tsee” call and a high-pitched quack. Fun facts: Cinnamon teal look nearly identical to their blue-winged cousins until spring, when both species grow their distinctive breeding plumage.

Canvasback

Size: About 21 inches, 2-1/2 pounds Identification: This large duck has a sloping bill. Drakes have red eyes, cinnamon-colored heads and brilliant white backs. Females have tan heads, dark brown breasts and cream sides and bellies. Sounds: Hens have a deep staccato purring, and drakes have a “whoo” call. Fun facts: Canvasbacks build floating nests out of cattails or bulrushes.

PARK RAPIDS ENTERPRISE

40

Size: About 16 inches, 1-3/4 pounds Identification: A small diving duck with bright yellow eyes, dark body and wings, a brown neck ring and a white ring on the front of its bill. Drakes are mostly black. Hens are dark brown. Sounds: Hens have a high-pitched purr. Fun facts: The ring-necked duck is also known as a ringbill.

Bufflehead

Size: About 14 inches and 13 ounces Identification: This species has a distinctive head shape caused by a puff of feathers. Drakes have white chest and flanks, iridescent green and purple face and a large white patch on the head. Hens are brownish with a white patch on the cheek. Sounds: Drakes have a grating or chattering mating call and may squeal or growl. Hens have a guttural “cuk-cuk-cuk” and summon their ducklings with a low, throaty note. Fun facts: Also known as a spirit duck, the bufflehead is very monogamous and migrates punctually. Gathering in small groups, one duck acts as a sentry while others dive for food.

CABIN READER 2018


001726999r1

Visit the Winery in the Woods

Celebrating 19 Years! Our award-winning wines are handcrafted from the fruits & berries of the north. Stop in for a sip, take home a bottle.

17TH ANNUAL ART FAIR AT THE WINERY Sat. & Sun., Aug. 18 & 19, 2018

Also available at area liquor stores and on our website ~ forestedgewinery.com

Featuring 30+ Artists Art•Live Music•Food ®

Open May-Dec.

14 miles North of Akeley on Hwy. 64 • 25 miles South of Bemidji

218-224-3535 4

Cabin Reader 2018  
Cabin Reader 2018