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Speaking Chiropractic Successful Strategies for Communicating Effectively PLUS: THE FUTURE OF INTEGRATIVE HEALTHCARE

10


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT In all my years as a student, administrator, and collegiate president, I cannot recall a more exciting time to be part of the vibrant community here at Parker College. As you may have noticed, the enthusiasm on campus is overwhelming as we gear up for our formal transition to university status. Momentous achievements such as this give me cause to reflect on my time working alongside Dr. Jim. I know our founding father, Dr. Jim W. Parker, would have been immensely proud of our college’s evolution to university status. Our progress and commitment to standards have helped us serve a multitude of people along the way. Before charting our path for success for 2011, I must first give ample credit to all of you, the students, faculty, and staff who continue to solidify Parker’s status as a world-class institution, on the leading edge of chiropractic and wellness education. In this issue of ParkerLife, you’ll notice two things. First, we’ve changed our format to focus on industry trends in chiropractic, as well as health and wellness, and how they relate to Parker. Secondly, the theme of ‘integration’ carries throughout. From our feature story on integrative care, to our secondary stories detailing how to market your practice and communicate effectively, you’ll notice an emphasis on unity and integration. This theme is a reflection of the trend here at Parker. Currently, Parker is in the initial stages of partnering with the Baylor Health Care System to achieve like-minded goals in the field of holistic healthcare and overall wellness. Our partnership is a strong step in the right direction toward integrative care, and toward a future where chiropractors, massage therapists, and medical doctors will work in tandem. Chiropractic’s natural approach is one whose time has come! Additionally on our horizon, Parker will undergo our scheduled accreditation review by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools this year, which we meet with great enthusiasm and fervor. I look forward to meeting these opportunities alongside you, the members of our Parker family. I know my passion for the philosophy, science, and art of chiropractic—as well as my commitment to academic excellence, is shared by all. As such, I am proud to stand beside all of you in representing the finest chiropractic and wellness institution in the world! My best wishes to you as we move through what is sure to be an exciting year here at Paker. Love,

Fabrizio Mancini, DC, FICC, FACC, FICA President, Parker College of Chiropractic

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


CHAIRMAN’S COMMENTS Dear Parker Family, For nearly thirty years, Parker College of Chiropractic has built an exceptional reputation of chiropractic excellence through service, professionalism, and innovation. Our principles and values have guided us along this journey, and have prepared us to make great strides toward health and wellness education into the future. As chairman of the Parker College Board of Trustees, I have the unique privilege of witnessing this commitment to excellence first-hand. For 2011, our board eagerly awaits Parker’s transition to university status, as well as several other projects and initiatives which will positively affect many of us in the extended Parker family. Expansion—We are reviewing a variety of assessments toward either expanding our current campus, retrofitting an existing location, or breaking ground on a completely new campus to meet the needs of our growing student body, faculty, and staff. Excellence—The board is committed to ensuring the new Tri-10 curriculum is effectively implemented and provides an outcome that improves the quality of our students’ education and experience. Evaluation—We will examine the new clinic model and assess whether it is a sustainable form of growth based on its initial success. Concurrently, we will evaluate improvements to Parker Seminars, and how its effectiveness for doctors and their staffs can be maximized. Parker aspires to be the best chiropractic and wellness education institution in the world. Our board is dedicated to serving those who dedicate themselves to serving the health and wellness needs of others. On behalf of the board of trustees, I’d like to thank you for affording us the opportunity to serve you as we eagerly prepare for the coming year. Respectfully,

Bill Nardiello Chair, Board of Trustees

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


FEATURES 5 WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR PRACTICE ON THE CHEAP 12 Creative and effective ways to flood your practice with new patients—and new ideas— without breaking the bank.

SPEAKING CHIROPRACTIC 21 Tips on how to communicate the benefits of chiropractic to the uninformed, without using industry jargon.

THE SOCIAL (MARKETING) NETWORK 31 How to market yourself and your practice on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media websites. Status updates not included.

DISPELLING THE MYTHS OF MASSAGE 39 How qualified massage therapists are overcoming outdated misconceptions and distancing themselves from suggestive ads in newspaper classifieds.

THE FUTURE OF INTEGRATIVE HEALTHCARE 45 The relationship between chiropractic and traditional medicine is changing. Find out if you will be carpooling to work with a medical doctor someday. 10 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


CONTENTS Chiropractic on the Political Front 5 It’s been a big year for chiropractic on Capitol Hill. Take a look at recent developments.

2011

Parker International 9

Ideas

Here and abroad, find out how Parker is spreading its influence around the world.

Success in Specialization 16 Find out how expanding your expertise can increase your chances for success.

Big Happy Family 19 Parker’s chiropractic and massage students rub elbows every day. They might want to consider going into practic together.

Smart Lunch Options for Healthy Kids 25

Jasmin Adams Assistant Art Director

Words Jon Ball Copywriter

Keep your little ones in tip-top shape with these lunchbox options.

Plotting Your Wellness Journey 29 Step one: read our list. Step two: follow our easy tips for greater health and wellness.

Whats in Your Bag? 49

Art Jacob Patrick Graphic Designer

Take a peek at what Parker students have stuffed in their satchels­— and can’t live without.

The Parker Files 51 A look back at 2010, and how each Parker department helped achieve overall success.

Activity Page 77 You like games, we like games—here are some wellness-themed puzzles to get your juices flowing.

2540 Walnut Hill Lane | Dallas, TX 75229 www.parkercc.edu

Matt Eiserloh

Chief Marketing Officer meiserloh@parkercc.edu Questions? Comments? We’d love to hear from you!


Chiropractic on the

Political Front

10 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


Parker and the Politics of Chiropr actic Parker’s President Travels to Washington D.C. for Legislative Summit Parker College of Chiropractic President Dr. Fabrizio Mancini traveled to Washington D.C. to attend the 2010 National Chiropractic Legislative Conference (NCLC) and Chiropractic Legislative Summit. Prior to passing healthcare reform, chiropractic leaders came together to meet with congressional leaders to emphasize the importance of chiropractic’s role in national healthcare and Medicare reform. Close to 600 doctors of chiropractic, students, and supporters met at the nation’s capital to attend the NCLC. The group heard speeches from government leaders, received advocacy training, and urged elected officials to support prochiropractic measures that seek to provide patients, veterans, and active-duty military personnel with direct access to the essential services provided by doctors of chiropractic.

The Student American Chiropractic Association (SACA) also attended to represent the future chiropractors of the nation. Dr. Mancini, who is involved in numerous ways throughout the profession, spoke to the students about the future of chiropractic. He expressed his appreciation to the students who put a great deal of work into helping move the profession forward and motivated them to continue communicating the chiropractic message. “SACA members challenge other students to take the initiative and do something for the betterment of chiropractic,” said Dr. Mancini. “All of you are an example of what the future of chiropractic holds and I am tremendously excited and proud of that.”

The Chiropractic Summit VII was held in conjunction with NCLC. The summit represented leadership from more than 40 organizations within the profession—including ACA, ICA, COCSA, and ACC. The summit meets regularly to collaborate, seek solutions, and support collective action to address challenges facing the profession. “We all have the same goal, which is to advance chiropractic,” said Dr. Mancini.

President Obama Signs Healthcare Reform Bill Historic Pro-Chiropractic Provisions Become Law On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed national healthcare reform legislation into law. His signature came after a nearly 13 month battle, culminating in a contentious struggle to garner votes from undecided members of the Democratic majority in Congress. Important details include a non-discrimination provision long championed by the American Chiropractic Association (ACA).

Incorporation of this provider non-discrimination provision, also known as the “Harkin Amendment,” was achieved primarily due to the efforts of Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa), with help from other key players such as Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Connecticut). Although he did not support the final bill overall, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) also lent his support for the advancement of the non-discrimination provision. 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

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“Regardless of how you feel about this legislation and its overall impact on the nation, it has to be recognized as historic for the chiropractic profession. We now have a federal law applicable to ERISA (Employee Retirement Income Security Act) plans that makes it against the law for insurance companies to discriminate against doctors of chiropractic and other providers relative to their participation and coverage in health plans. Such discrimination based on a provider’s license is inappropriate and now must stop,” said ACA President, Rick McMichael, DC. “While this does not fully level the playing field for doctors of chiropractic in our healthcare system, this is a highly significant step that has the potential for a positive, long-range impact on the profession and the patients we serve. Congress has finally addressed the issue of provider discrimination based on one’s license, and they have said that such discrimination must stop.”

Additionally, two other important provisions were passed that impact the chiropractic profession. Doctors of chiropractic are specifically included as potential members of interdisciplinary community health teams. These teams support the development of medical homes by increasing access to comprehensive, community-based, coordinated care. Community health teams are integrated teams of providers that include primary care providers, specialists, other clinicians, licensed integrative health professionals, and community resources to enhance patient care, wellness, and lifestyle improvements. The language in the bill ensures that doctors of chiropractic can be included in these patient-centered, holistic teams. Dr. McMichael noted, “This language was a critical inclusion to give doctors of chiropractic increased opportunities to be fully engaged as part of the healthcare team.”

The provider non-discrimination provision (Section 2706) reads in part: “A group health plan and a health insurance issuer offering group or individual health insurance coverage shall not discriminate with respect to participation under the plan or coverage against any healthcare provider who is acting within the scope of that provider’s license or certification under applicable state law.”

Furthermore, the legislation establishes a National Health Care Workforce Commission to examine current and projected needs in the healthcare workforce. The commission specifically includes doctors of chiropractic by defining them as part of the healthcare workforce, and includes them in the definition of health professionals. In addition, chiropractic colleges are included among the health professional training schools to be studied. The National Health Care Workforce Commission is tasked with providing comprehensive, unbiased information to Congress and the Obama Administration about how to align federal healthcare workforce resources with national needs. Congress will use this information when providing appropriations to discretionary programs or in restructuring other federal funding. The law guarantees that the need for doctors of chiropractic will be addressed when considering federal healthcare workforce programs, another very important inclusion.

National healthcare reform is designed to cover 30 million currently uninsured Americans. The non-discrimination language will, over time, apply to those individuals as well. However, that number of covered individuals pales in comparison to the 55 percent of workers who are currently covered by self-insured plans that will be affected by the Harkin non-discrimination language. The potential impact in this regard cannot be overstated.

Source: American Chiropractic Association - acatoday.org

7 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


Fabrizio Name:

Dr. Fabrizio Mancini

Employed at Parker Since: Department:

June 1999

President’s Office

My Department’s Proudest Ach

ievement of 2010: Assembling a team of ad ministrators that truly care about the growth in chiropractic, educational standards, an d service to all.

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2010:

For 2011, I’m Look ing For ward

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strategic congruency.

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We facilitate all to reach their maximum potential.

Hands down the people. From the exe cutive team, to our faculty, administrators, students, , and patients. What Ma kes Parker Specia l:

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

8


PA R KE R INTERNATIONAL How Parker’s Presence is Spreading Around the World


N

ot content to rest on the laurels of being a revered name for chiropractic and wellness education in the United States, Parker College of Chiropractic has made a name for itself worldwide. From supporting chiropractic around the world, to establishing clinics in Mexico and hosting international wellness professionals on campus, Parker has easily managed to expand its reach around the globe. In addition, Parker Seminars have been held in Italy, Japan, and Australia. Here are a few points of light Parker has managed to ignite which reinforce its international presence. Universidad Estatal del Valle de Ecatepac (UNEVE) Parker offers a ‘Clinic Abroad Program’ for senior interns, which serves to expand the typical learning environment by offering interns a multicultural experience. Parker students study at the Universidad Estatal del Valle de Ecatepac, or UNEVE, a public university located near Mexico City. UNEVE was the first institution in the world to offer a Spanish-taught chiropractic program and has graduated more than 140 chiropractors since its inception in 2001. The 11-week learning experience promotes the development of Spanish-speaking chiropractors to meet the increasing Hispanic population healthcare demands in the United States. President of Parker College, Dr. Fabrizio Mancini, and Dr. Juan Sanchez, Director of External Programs, have

been instrumental in establishing the program. Since its inception, hundreds of highly-trained and skilled chiropractors have dedicated themselves to bringing chiropractic services to the people of Mexico. Parker College Provides Chiropractic Care During South American Games Seven Parker College student interns from the student abroad program at the Olympic Committee facilities in Colombia and their faculty chiropractor joined the Olympic healthcare staff in the 2010 South American Games by providing chiropractic care for the country of Colombia where they made history by becoming the champion of the games for the first time. The games were held in Medellin, Colombia in March 2010, and included 15 competing countries for two weeks in 42 sports. Student interns Terry Lea, Robert Cox, April Holly, Edward Newsome, Joseph Passanante, Eric Phipps, and Victoria Wirtz treated the athletes that competed in 42 different sports, under the supervision of Dr. Sarah SantoDomingo ‘07. The South American Games are a multisport event that develops between the South American countries belonging to the Sports South American Organization (ODESUR). The games included participation from 15 nations including Netherlands Antilles, Bolivia, Panama, Suriname, Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay, Uruguay, Aruba, Chile, Guyana, Peru, and Venezuela. The group of interns participated in the opening ceremony parade walking among the Colombian athletes with 41,000 spectators in attendance. International Chiropractor’s Association Visits Parker College of Chiropractic The International Chiropractor’s Association (ICA) visited Parker College of Chiropractic for their 84th annual meeting. Their trip to Parker was a tribute to the tremendous work being done at the college and how the profession recognizes Parker as a leader in chiropractic. During their time at Parker, ICA officers were shown first-hand examples of the work that Parker forges on behalf of the profession. ICA officers were welcomed for lunch by Dr. Eric Russell, associate professor in the Department of Chiropractic Sciences at Parker, and member of the ICA Council of Chiropractic Philosophy. “The ICA and Parker have had a great relationship over the years,” said Dr. Russell. “The visit strengthened our bonds and gave the officers of the ICA from all 50 states and from as far away as Israel a chance to experience Parker College.”

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 10


Matt Name:

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September 2009

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a new client/account ng ti en em pl Im of 2010: oudest Achievement Pr t’s relationships en ng tm ki ar or ep w D y ed M ov pr im ly al is structure dramatic Th e. ur ct ru st ve ti ta en es repr through the shop. s ow fl k or w ay w e th and d and modified ge ug pl un ch ee sp ly mb se ney’s as 2010: L ai or y from Funniest Parker Mem g For 2011, I’m Look in

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5

Ways to Market Your Practice on the Cheap

M

aking the decision to become a doctor of chiropractic has always been two-fold. First, you are committing yourself to years of rigorous study in order to obtain the skills necessary to become a qualified, professional healthcare provider. Second, you are effectively saying, “yes, I want to undergo all of the intense training required to become a doctor and then I’d like to dive right in to the world of small business ownership so I can support myself and turn my education into a financially viable livelihood.” That’s a lot. But, wait, there’s more. To compound the already serious undertaking of doctor and small business owner, you’ve got to make sure people know you exist before they can beat down your door begging for consultations and adjustments. In essence, making sure the community you’ll be serving realizes you’re there to offer skilled treatment is the first step in making sure you’re viable. 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 12


allocate a small part of their gross sales from the previous year to marketing initiatives. For existing practice owners, they advise that number to hover around two percent of annual gross. However, for new business owners, and new DCs just opening their own practice, this can be a challenge as there is no data from the previous year to formulate their budget. The SBA suggests a figure around 10 percent of expected gross for businesses just starting out. That can seem like a large number to the uninitiated, but your first year will focus heavily on your ability to reach clients who otherwise don’t know you—or your practice—exist in the first place. “Establishing a budget before spending the first dollar will ensure marketing budgets are spent efficiently,” says Matt Eiserloh, Chief Marketing Officer at Parker College. After you’ve decided on a number you feel comfortable with, it’s time to blueprint your strategic marketing plan. How will you not only reach clients, but create a snowball effect that continues to gain momentum and gain revenue over time? Let’s explore some options… 2. Stamp It, Send It That’s right, good old fashion snail mail. There’s a reason this country has had a postal service in operation since 1692—because it works. And, let’s face it, it’s cheap too. Even in the advanced communication age we live in, direct mailing, when done right, is still a profitable and cost-effective form of marketing to grow and advertise your business. But how can this be achieved, especially in today’s economic climate? In order to get the word out that you’re here to help takes a marketing budget. It’s no secret that our economy isn’t in stellar shape—nor is it off the ropes yet. It can be difficult for anyone to open, maintain, and grow a small business. Banks may be slow to lend money. Many people are neglecting their healthcare in lieu of rising personal expenses, or even unemployment. Many small business owners have to cut cost in order to stay viable. So, is there a way to not only sustain but also grow and market your chiropractic practice on a limited budget? Well, the short answer is “yes.” But not without taking some calculated steps to assure you stay viable and competitive in today’s market. Luckily, they’re cost effective. And why wouldn’t they be in an article about “growing your practice on a limited budget?” You get the picture. 1. Establish a Budget Formulating a long-term marketing and spending plan is the first and most crucial step in deciding how you’ll effectively reach the public and grow your practice. The U.S. Small Business Association advises business owners to 13 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

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Experts recommend 10% of expected gross should go toward advertising.

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Chiropractors most often use postcards, and sometimes letters, to solicit patients. For a tight budget, postcards make a strong business case for maximizing effectiveness while giving a potential patient something tangible. The drawback can be the immediate response—or lack thereof— frequently associated with direct mail campaigns. The key to making sure your dollars are well spent is finding a good recipient list. There are many online companies that can provide (i.e., “sell”) you a list, depending on demographics, location, and other specifics you may be interested in. Be sure to find the best list broker you can to maximize results. And always ask how often the information is verified and updated. Next, focus on the message and consistency. There’s more to effective direct mailing than slapping your name and address on a postcard and sending them off to be delivered…to someone’s


trash can. Avoid letting your prospective client base get bored with your message or your mailings. Be sure to get on a regular mailing schedule, perhaps once a month. And when it’s time for your postcards, letters, or direct mail advertisements to be sent out, make sure each one is unique. “The key to success with any direct mail campaign is consistent, targeted messaging,” says Eiserloh. “Keep your message short and consistently deliver that same message in a series of seven to ten impressions for the best results.” Concentrate on making a personal connection with your potential patients. Keep the message on point and concise, but make sure that clients feel like you’re speaking directly to them. Recipients have a higher likelihood of converting to patients if they feel engaged by what they’re reading. You may want to consider including a picture of yourself on the mailing, to help make that connection. As you know, there’s a serious difference in the way chiropractors approach healing versus medical doctors; capitalize on that in your message to stand out. 3. Pick Up the Phone Telemarketing is an often overlooked and relatively low-cost means for garnering new business. Why? Most likely because there is a stigma associated with cold calling, and it’s too close to the realm of “direct selling” for some comfort zones. However, it’s relatively simple to locate a reputable telemarketing service that will do the legwork on your behalf. Moreover, telemarketing is a highly competitive industry, with many agencies offering specialized services for chiropractors. Money-back guarantees based on delivering you a set number of prospective clients to your waiting room is a commonly advertised incentive by today’s agencies. Depending on your needs, telemarketing agencies can even assist in roles typically reserved for receptionists or assistants. From reminding patients of appointments, to scheduling follow-up sessions, even following up with former patients, these services can streamline your business needs, giving you one less thing to manage in your practice. Not to mention, these services can be a big help for those just starting their practice, or others who can’t afford a full-time staff. If this feels like the right option for you, be sure to establish guidelines with the agency of your choosing. The ball is in your court with this—choosing what message you want to convey in the initial contact phase is up to you. Consider how your unique talents would be best presented to someone on the other end of the line, then draft up a script or at least bullet points you’d like the telemarketer to highlight. Finally, make sure you’re not just throwing money out the window. Examine the conversion rates and metrics associated with your telemarketing campaign. Whatever your goals may be, calculate the return on investment you’re getting from, say, follow-up calls. If the results aren’t what you expect, amend your approach.

4. Online Marketing For more on this, see how to effectively market yourself through the use of social media networks on page 31. 5. Buddy Up For a new chiropractor opening his or her first practice, getting to know the locals can be more lucrative than just getting a free cup of sugar out of the deal. Word of mouth is a powerful tool, as is partnering with local businesses that can endorse your practice, and offer incentives to their own customers based on a referral system. It’s a simple process; local businesses have loyal, established relationships with their clientele. By aligning yourself with existing businesses that thrive in your community, you immediately set yourself apart from the masses—mainly other chiropractors competing for the same patients. But why would other local businesses endorse your practice— and what’s the actual process of cementing that relationship? Try and work out a barter agreement with the selected businesses of your choice. Perhaps discounted rates for the business owner and their family can add incentive to them referring clients to you. And if the partnering business owner has first-hand experience of the quality of your treatment, imagine how much more likely they’ll be to find other prospective clients on your behalf. In essence, this may be the least expensive form of marketing we’ve touched on, but perhaps the most important. Not just for your practice, but also the education of chiropractic within the community. And remember… Don’t be afraid to improvise. On a small budget, it’s key to utilize a “best practices” approach to achieve greater profitability. Whatever your plan of attack consists of, losing money shouldn’t be part of it. Carefully examine and define your budget, and what inexpensive yet effective means of marketing your business is best for you. As always, its best to review local, state, and federal regulations before starting any marketing initiatives. You’ve already made the commitment to chiropractic, and you knew that running a business was all part of the song and dance when you signed up. Don’t let a lukewarm economy detour you from pursuing your dream or your passion. Be smart, budget wisely, market effectively (and cost-effectively), and you’ll be sharing your own personal success secrets with the next generation down the road.

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 14


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Massage School - exceeding our enrollment projections; CE - meeting our cap on the Animal Chiropractic program. It has truly become an internationally renowned program! ievement of 2010:

The talent show. Not only is it amazing to see how talented our students are but also how wonderfully funny they are. Funniest Parker Memory from

2010:

Homecoming 2011! We are revamping the event and bringing it back on campus. It will be an Oktoberfest celebration so look for som e good old German food and festivities. Oh ...great CE too! For 2011, I’m Look ing For ward

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cia l: The Staff! The Massage School and the CE departments have caring and dedicated employees that I truly am glad to call my friends and teammates! What Ma kes my Department Spe

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The people!


Success in Specialization How Continuing Education Programs Can Benefit Your Bottom Line

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lbert Einstein was once quoted as having said, “Learning is not merely a product of schooling but the lifelong attempt to acquire it.” Einstein, if you haven’t heard, was a smart cookie. And his quote resonates—especially for those who have completed formal schooling, yet still have a desire to push themselves to acquire an expanded knowledge of their trade, specialty, and the world around them. Due to the evolving nature of chiropractic, and the highly competitive nature of the industry, a personal quest for increased knowledge and skills is very common. Luckily, there has never been a better time to pursue specialization within chiropractic,

nor has there ever been more availability to those pursuing continuing education. Sharpening Your Skills At Parker, the Office of Continuing Education is the one-stopshop for chiropractors, massage therapists, alumni, and wellness professionals from across the country who seek to expand their skills in various areas of specialization. Continuing education programs are relevant to a doctor’s daily practice and grounded in the latest evidence-based research. Courses stimulate learning through interactive technology and hands-on training.

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 16


Michelle Yungblut, Senior Director of Professional Studies and Continuing Education at Parker College, has seen a noticeable increase in enrollment numbers within continuing education courses. “Our department is seeing an increase of registrations and inquiries regarding programs that will allow doctors to expand their patient base,” says Mrs. Yungblut.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration estimates 9-12 million patients visit acupuncturists every year, with that number consistently increasing.

To understand the attractiveness of specialization, a better understanding of the programs offered at Parker can be beneficial. Let’s look at some of the most popular previously mentioned… Acupuncture The foundation of acupuncture is the two-way communication between the skin, organs, glands, and tissues of the body. By stimulating certain skin points, the progress of the negative condition can be arrested and even reversed, bringing the patient back to health. Restoration of function is brought about by balancing the body’s own energy force, thus healing the body. Recognized by the World Health Organization, the National Institute of Health, and practiced by a wide-variety of healthcare providers, this 5000 year old healing method is highly soughtafter. In fact, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration estimates 9-12 million patients visit acupuncturists every year, with that number consistently increasing. Animal Chiropractic Don’t giggle at the thought of Fido getting adjusted—this is serious business! The diagnosis and management of injured animals is an area of increased interest for both chiropractors and veterinary practitioners. Parker College of Chiropractic is the only continuing education animal chiropractic program taught at a U.S. accredited chiropractic college. “More and more state boards are changing their regulations to allow chiropractors to play a more active role in this growing field,” says Ms. Yungblut. For chiropractors with patients who have injured or aging pets, the ability to relieve pain in their four-legged friends and restore vitality is a great benefit over the medications and surgery often prescribed in veterinary practices. Sports Specialist This increasingly popular specialty combines elements of physical therapy and athletic training with chiropractic adjustments 17 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

to help create a truly unique patient experience. For weekend warriors or collegiate athletes looking for an edge, these services can be invaluable. Athletic evaluation, taping, soft tissue work, and rehabilitation for common repetitive stress injuries are all hallmarks of the program. Being versed as a sports specialist can positively affect a chiropractor’s bottom line, as this treatment appeals to a wider segment of the populous. In the past, children and young teens have forgone chiropractic treatment, due to the absence of back pain commonly found in older segments of the population. However, the ability to treat sports injuries in little leaguers and high school athletes opens inroads previously ignored. Increased Skills to Increase Profits The key to growing your practice, or making yourself more marketable, might just mean developing new skills and enhancing and reinforcing your current strengths. Regardless of the specialty that interests you most (and believe us, there are several we neglected to mention) your opportunities have never been better to attain that knowledge. Specializations like those found in Parker’s Continuing Education Program can help you access those skills, while also giving you the needed edge to grow your practice and provide better quality service to your patients—whether they have two legs or four.

[

The ability to treat sports injuries in little leaguers and high school athletes opens inroads previously ignored.

[

Did you know? • The National Cancer Institute says the effect of acupuncture on the immune system of cancer patients showed that it improved the immune system response. • Owners and teams involved in horse racing are frequent patrons of animal chiropractic services. • According to the American Medical Association, the nation’s increasing participation in sports and fitness activities will require the expertise of healthcare professionals with an understanding of sports medicine.


CONTINUING EDUCATION Our updated course catalog features a wide-variety of classes for chiropractors and massage therapists—giving you, your practice, and your patients an edge! For chiropractors, we offer classes in acupuncture, animal chiropractic, nutrition, neurology, pediatrics, integrative primary care, relicensure, a sports practitioner certification program, and much more! Massage therapists will love our classes in medical massage, gross anatomy, sports massage, taping, massage oncology, and much more! Visit our website for a full list of programs and details!

Find out more about our course offerings online at www.parkercc.edu/ce or call 800.266.4723.

Continuing Education 10


BIG HAPPY FAMILY BRINGING CHIROPRACTIC AND MASSAGE TOGETHER UNDER ONE ROOF

19 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


A

s is the case with many popular professions, the rate of growth for chiropractic is sharply rising. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that the number of practicing chiropractors in the U.S. will increase twenty percent by 2018. Attracted by lucrative salaries and a high degree of job satisfaction, chiropractors will face increased competition in an already competitive industry. For massage therapists, the rates of growth are equally as optimistic. According the same bureau study, employment of massage therapists is expected to grow faster than the national average for other occupations—at a rate of nineteen percent. The bureau points out that those with advanced qualifications and formal training will have a higher likelihood of obtaining top-tier opportunities. With both fields growing at an unprecedented rate, the trend toward combining both disciplines under one roof, at the same practice, is projected to become more prevalent. For future chiropractors and massage therapists enrolled at Parker, the relationship of complimentary co-existence is second nature. Deciding to carry the relationship from classmate to business partner could be highly beneficial for both parties. Collaboration, Not Competition When chiropractors and massage therapists decide to go into practice together, an economically viable situation occurs where costs are shared and profits are maximized. By providing patients with the opportunity to stay in-house, mixed specialty practices offer services and convenience over single-operator practices. In addition to job growth projections, an increase in demand for alternative healthcare services is also expected in the coming years. The need for skilled chiropractors and massage therapists will continue to rise as the public puts a greater emphasis on overall wellness and preventative care.

Proof Positive Some have already seen the value of this trend and are distinguishing themselves as mixed healthcare providers. According to Dr. Drew Riffe, Director of the Parker School of Massage Therapy, as well as a doctor of chiropractic, the trend toward complementary care has never been stronger. “When you live in a large city, such as Dallas, there can be a chiropractor nearly every square mile. You need every opportunity to stand out. Offering a combined service, such as chiropractic and massage, is a great way to accomplish this,” says Dr. Riffe. Chiropractors and massage therapists live and die by their ability to garner new patients. The hands-on approach applied by both practices, as well as their association in treating pain and injuries, are highly complementary. When a practice can offer both specialties to the public, their chances of success increase exponentially.

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While the ideologies and sciences behind each area of specialization may differ, all of these professions regard healing the body as paramount.

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Gotta Keep ‘Em Seperated? However, for some who are trying to make ends meet, or are too consumed by the needs of their own practice, locating a complimentary healthcare provider to “join-forces” with can be quickly neglected. To counter that point, Dr. Riffe says you may be limiting yourself, and your potential for success, by not offering mixed services within the same four walls. “Nearly half of all chiropractors offer massage services in their practice as either a supplemental service for therapy, added income, or just a simple business partnership,” says Riffe. In a market where both areas of specialty are growing, choosing to forgo supplemental services could be shortsighted. For example, if a chiropractor who performs adjustments on a patient notices that their client would benefit from soft tissue therapy, it would be much easier—and much more lucrative—to send them down the hall, rather than send them out the door and across town. An Attitude of Emergence Luckily, for those interested in either specialty, or expanding the skills of concentration, Parker’s chiropractic and massage programs place an emphasis on duality. “It’s important to remember that a true holistic approach includes chiropractic, massage, and a wide range of other modalities. At Parker, we pay special attention to that symbiotic relationship, and build our curriculum to complement that approach,” says Dr. Riffe. The clinical training received at Parker is an ideal environment for students of different concentrations to come together and grasp a stronger understanding and appreciation for the skills and knowledge of their peers. The hands-on experience in Parker clinics, both chiropractic and massage, is an ideal method of beginning the collaborative process early. Clearly, the future is bright for alternative healthcare. And for students, and even established wellness professionals who want to take advantage of a mixed approach, the timing has never been better.

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 20


Speaking Chiropractic

21 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


How to Communicate Effectively– Without Turning Patients Off


Chiropractors often face two challenges when dealing with the public who, by in large, assume they’re merely bone doctors without other areas of expertise or specialization. Humans are creatures of habit, and once there’s a widespread assumption, it can be hard to break.

Alternative Healthcare?

The first challenge is enlightening the masses that chiropractors are not merely bone doctors. Admittedly, it can be difficult to connect the dots from chiropractic adjustments on the spine to benefits beyond relieving back pain, such as fibromyalgia, carpel tunnel, even Alzheimer’s.

Miriam-Webster defines alternative healthcare as “any of various systems of healing or treating disease not included in the traditional medical curriculum.”

The second challenge is communicating the benefits and background of chiropractic effectively. Nobody likes jargon; even the word is disconcerting. However, for those comfortable in the health and wellness bubble, it can be difficult to communicate with the public openly, without requiring them to also possess a degree signed by Dr. Mancini. Additionally, the decision to enter into chiropractic study is often a labor of love. The very nature of chiropractic is more emotive in its concern for happiness, well-being, and overall health of patients, much more-so than many areas of medical specialization. Because of this very reason, it can sometimes be a challenge to communicate a concise message to the misinformed, or even the prospective patient, without an overly passionate tone dominating the approach.

Lost in Translation Within our field of study, there are terms the general public is largely unfamiliar with. Ask a random sample of people on the street to define ‘subluxation’ and you’ll most likely find yourself receiving a bevy of varied answers. Quiz someone on the 33 philosophical principles or laws which chiropractic is based on, and you may get a few blank stares. Even from other chiropractors. There are, however, effective and direct ways chiropractors can learn to ‘speak’ chiropractic—which has nothing to do with dumbing down the validity of the care or research behind the treatments and procedures. It’s more of a streamlined approach in dealing with today’s uninformed passerby—which might just be tomorrow’s happily informed client. Let’s take a look at how best to approach these issues and concepts with the public. Are health and wellness professionals doing the best possible job of conveying a coherent message now, or is there room for improvement? What are common questions heard, and how can DCs avoid old stereotypes while also clarifying a bit of misinformation along the way? Most of all, how can DCs ‘speak chiropractic’ to the masses, while offering simple answers to many common inquires about their livelihood and passion? Let’s find out. 23 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

It may be common knowledge for many of us that the study and methodology of chiropractic is classified as alternative healthcare. But what exactly does that mean?

Great, spot on, right? Well, that also includes faith-based healing and hypnosis. That may be fine for some, but may also raise more eyebrows than not for others, so a wider explanation may be needed. Let’s look at a sample approach:

Speak no Evil Try this: “Chiropractic teaches us that the the body wants to be healthy and heal itself. As chiropractors, our goal is to unlock the body’s healing potential.” Avoid this: Anything that has to do with slamming conventional medicine.

Why? In the world we live in, integrated healthcare is a sign of the times; and a welcome one by many accounts. These days, it is more and more common to see a doctor of chiropractic employed on a staff with conventional doctors, massage therapists, and physiotherapists than in the past. In 2004, a survey of nearly 1,400 U.S. hospitals found that more than one in four offered alternative and complementary therapies such as acupuncture, homeopathy, and massage therapy. That means that as research evolves and our industry grows, it is more likely now than ever to be alongside members of the medical community. Not to mention, you won’t have too difficult a task in finding a captive audience. In a survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, 75 percent of those polled had used some form of complementary and alternative medicine, with 62 percent having done so within the preceding twelve months.

Explaining “Innate Intelligence” Here’s a tricky one. How do we define ‘‘innate intelligence” to the uninformed? One of the very hallmarks of chiropractic is the belief that an internal intelligence resides inside living organisms, which


dictates the very health and potential of that individual. Since the body has a desire to operate under maximum health, and outside factors can inhibit those results, chiropractors are trained in the study of the nervous system, reducing interferences to return the body to a state of optimal operation.

Bite your tongue Try this: “As chiropractors, we adjust the spine in order to remove the interference of nerves and involuntary impulses so that the body can function as intended.” Avoid this: Anything that alienates your clientele on account of socio-religious beliefs.

Why? Because chiropractors come from around the world and make up a large and varied segment of the population. Within the halls at Parker, you’ll find students and faculty from across the globe; many with opposing viewpoints on issues such as religion and cultural norms. The idea of innate intelligence is larger than any one religion, and doesn’t require that one believe in any religious doctrine over another. The notion that the human body is hardwired to perform at optimal health and well-being is a common thread, meant to unite those in the field (and those outside of it), not divide. Focus on the body, and the brilliant functionality ingrained therein. Leave talk of religion and spirituality for where it belongs; at the Thanksgiving table with your in-laws. Just kidding.

What is Chiropractic Care? Walk into a cardiologist’s office and you might find yourself diagnosed with high blood pressure, arrhythmia, or hypertension. Walk into a chiropractor’s office and you might be diagnosed with...wait; what will you be diagnosed with?

chiropractic lifetime wellness care, is key to maintaining the highest quality life for patients, outside of acute pain caused by such misalignments. So, in order to effectively communicate the unique approach adhered to by DCs, examine the following sample explanation.

Keep your foot out of your mouth Try this: “As chiropractors, we specialize in not only returning the body to an optimal state of function, but also maintain regularly scheduled care to assure the body stays in an a state of maximized health.” Not this: Anything that limits you to only treating back pain.

Ah, yes, you are a doctor of chiropractic and practice an act, science, and philosophy which is validated through years of research, as well as your own commitment and journey as a wellness professional. You have the skills and training to affect—and keep the body healthy long after acute care has been administered. In this approach, it’s more about highlighting your strengths, less about the semantics of medical protocol.

Accentuate the Positive As chiropractors, don’t get lost in the small details. Your ability to convey the positive impact you can have on a patient’s health over the course of their lifetime shouldn’t get bogged down due to the industry’s ever evolving language. Be straightforward with your skills, knowledge, and abilities as a doctor of chiropractic and leave the jargon to the poindexters in the PR department.

The nature of chiropractic differs from traditional medicine, because chiropractic is about restoring and keeping the body at optimal health. Medicine places a greater emphasis on finding and fixing a given issue­—without addressing overall health. Thus is the nature, and challenge, of communicating chiropractic care effectively. Chiropractors have commonly used two terms to define their approach. The first, chiropractic corrective care, is the term for the application of healing methods when a patient’s body is in pain, due to spinal misalignments or subluxations. The second, 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 24


h c n u L t r a Sm

r o f s n o i t Op

s d i K y h t l a e H

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R

aising happy children is an art form. Raising them to be healthy—and to make smart choices concerning their eating habits when you’re not looking over their shoulder—is quite an undertaking in and of itself. Luckily, it isn’t quite as difficult as getting them to school on time or even getting them to sit still for five minutes. Did I say five minutes? Make that two. The first way to establish healthy eating habits for your little ones is to lead by example. Take our word for it, our editorial office can be a hotbed of fast food. If you’re anything like us, long hours and leafy greens don’t always mix. We won’t hold it against you for the occasional relapse to greasy hedonism. However, you’ll have a much easier time guiding your children to healthier options if lighter fare is stocked on your pantry shelves. And not to break out the scare tactics, but helping your kids make healthy eating choices prevents one of the most dangerous epidemics affecting American children today: childhood obesity. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) point to a survey which indicated an estimated 17 percent of children and adolescents between the ages of 2-19 are obese. Childhood obesity is a leading factor for serious health risks, such

as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and Type 2 diabetes. Plus, obese children have an 80 percent likelihood of becoming obese adults, according to the same study. With that comes a lifetime of pulmonary and cardiovascular disease risks. To think something as simple as substituting juice for soda in a child’s lunch box could be the first step to avoiding these risks seems almost too simple. Do you see where we’re going with this? That’s right, it’s all about lunch box options. Now, we don’t claim that this is a cure all. Sitting down for dinner as a family, portion control, choosing to forgo sweets as rewards; all of these are pieces of the puzzle when it comes to feeding and keeping your family healthy. But, sending your kiddos off to school with a healthy lunch—one that takes no additional time to prepare over a less-than-healthy offering—is a great place to start. To prove the point, we’ve prepared some options you can start with, and we’ve broken down calorie count. This way, you can feel good about the brussel sprouts you’ll be making them eat. We’re kidding. We hate brussel sprouts. We wouldn’t force that on anyone.

Vitamins in fruits and veggies play a crucial role in helping children grow strong!

the o t p i l F ge a p t x e n e h t t e g and n scoop o ht. g i l g n i pack

26


H C N LULosers

Bologna & Cheese Sandwich– White Bread with Regular Mayo Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Cholesterol Protein

500 14 g 6g 45 mg 10 g

Cheesy Puffs

(Serving size 2.25 oz) Calories Total Fat Sodium Vitamin A

360 22.5 g 290 mg 0%

2 Yellow Snack Cakes Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Carbohydrates Sugars Protein

300 10 g 3g 50 g 28 g 1g

20 oz Cola Calories Sodium Sugar Vitamin C

27

250 87.5 mg 67.5 g 0%


Turkey Sandwich Wheat Bread with Lite Mayo Calories 170 Total Fat 4g Saturated Fat 0g Cholesterol 0 mg Protein 13 g

LUNC H Leader s

Baby Carrot Snack Pack (Serving size 2.25 oz)

Calories Total Fat Sodium Vitamin A

30 0g 30 mg 220%

Cottage Cheese with Peaches Calories 140 Total Fat 2.5 g Saturated Fat 1.5 g Carbohydrates 17 g Sugars 14g Protein 11 g

100% Fruit Punch Juice Box Calories Sodium Sugar Vitamin C

100 10 mg 10 g 100%

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Plotting Your

WELLNESS J O U RN E Y

Easy Steps to a Healthier You

Supermarket tabloids adorned with movie stars and their rock-hard abs can make the rest of us feel like schlubs. Well guess what, they have trainers and Botox and airbrushing and, well, you get the picture. Luckily, being a healthy, happy member of society doesn’t require any airbrushing. The good news for those of us who want to get healthy, but aren’t sure how to get on track; the path to greater wellness isn’t rocket science. We’ve outlined a few important and easy steps you can follow to maximize your overall health and wellness. Let’s get started…

Catch More ZZZZ’s Easier said than done? Not so, busybody. Get in bed earlier a few minutes each night. Over the course of a few days, weeks, and months, your body—and your schedule—will acclimate to more sleep.

Easier Exercise Studies have shown that adding intermittent bursts of activity to your day—such as taking the stairs or delivering a message in lieu of an e-mail—can help you burn hundreds of calories a week over your stagnant counterparts.


Say Goodbye to Salt We’ll promise to work on this if you do. Once a week, ditch processed meats and potato chips for something healthier, like yogurt and fruit or cottage cheese.

Embrace the Eggplant Step away from the drive-thru! Integrate at least one fruit or vegetable into your dinner each night. From leafy greens to succulent fruits, choose a healthy side item and invite it to your plate. Next month, rotate the greenery so your taste buds don’t burn out.

Wakey Wakey, Eggs and Bakey Breakfast regulates blood glucose levels and helps you steer clear of midmorning cravings. If you’re crunched for time, grab a banana, high-fiber cereal, or whole-grain toast. If you don’t have time to make toast, you’re clearly the President or the Pope, and therefore have a staff of trained professionals who can do it for you.

Accentuate the Positive! Mental health is part of overall health so take time to reflect on the things you’re grateful for in your life. Chances are you’re not reading this in a Turkish prison, so you can probably find something positive to focus on. Keep the list fresh and update regularly.

You may have heard this before, but health and wellness isn’t a destination—it’s a journey.

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 10


THE SOCIAL

(M ARKETING)

N E T WO RK

31 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


How to Ef fectively M arket Your Practice Through S o cial M e dia


Come in and receive a free brochure on the benefits of chiropractic.

At the office, finishing up some last minute work.

T

echnology is a funny thing, isn’t it? Only a few years ago, the ability to connect to long lost friends, loved ones, business contacts, and even close knit family members online was something of a novelty. Now, many interpersonal relationships are only truly legitimized if documented in a relationship status update on a platform that starts with ‘face’ and ends with ‘book’. For chiropractors, massage therapists, and health and wellness professionals looking to use platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to garner new business prospects—specifically patients—a deliberate approach to establishing a presence through social media is a must. For new docs just leaving school and starting their own practice, the idea of manipulating a social media entity for maximized profitability is a given. But for established chiropractors and practices that have ignored social media as a fad until this point, you can guarantee that continuing on that path will almost certainly mean doing so at your own peril. Something that should solidify your initiative to build a strong marketing effort through social media is the sheer amount of time people spend on these platforms already. Think about it: you don’t have to convince them to use Facebook, you’ve just got to make sure they can see you, which is a considerably easier task. According to Nielsen Online, users spend an average of nearly six hours a month on Facebook, making it the most time consuming entity on the Web. To put it in perspective, that’s three times the amount of time spent on Google. Trust me; I’ve checked my profile six times since starting this article. Make that seven.

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According to Nielsen Online, users spend an average of nearly six hours a month on Facebook.

33 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

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Remember, the aim here isn’t just to connect with the community, or find a few friends you’ve lost touch with. For doctors or chiropractic, massage therapists, and other wellness professionals, this approach is about attracting clients to benefit your business or practice. Sign Up Now So, how do you build a social networking presence that will keep existing patients engaged while also reaching out to new ones? Step one: sign up. If you haven’t already, start an account on every viable social media outlet you feel you can devote the time or energy to maintain. Then, identify which sites will benefit your unique goals and needs, which we’ll explore later. If it is networking based on experience and qualifications, try LinkedIn. If it’s keeping existing and prospective patients abreast of the day to day goings on of your practice, or having your offers and promotions seen by the masses, try Twitter. Looking to create lasting contacts, with the greatest visibility on the Web? Use Facebook. If you’d like to try the multimedia approach, tie in Flickr® and YouTube to your social media strategy. For all the options named here, there are ten not mentioned, and depending on your level of tech expertise, some may be more viable than others. “Keep in mind that each platform caters to different segments, often based on age, preferences, or even the reason for being a part of that particular community,” says Matt Eiserloh, Chief Marketing Officer at Parker College. “It is important to consider and understand this before choosing a platform for your message,” says Eiserloh. The bottom line is all of these platforms are relatively easy to use and can definitely be strong tools when used correctly. Plus, they’re all free, which doesn’t hurt either. Attracting Patients To use Facebook, Twitter, or other platforms effectively, you must examine how to best utilize the medium. This means creating an online presence that is original and unique. Remember, content is king. Clearly define and communicate which segment of the population you cater to and your skills best serve. “Chiropractors can distinguish themselves through social media branding by focusing on specific types of patients,” says Patrick Bodnar, DC, associate professor at Parker College.


“A Parker alumni comes to mind as a great case example. She focused on tri-athletes and created a Facebook community of over 700 followers and uses it as a news and info outlet to support her patients as they compete and unify the local triathlete community by announcing event dates and locations,” says Bodnar. Investing the time to build up your followers pays dividends in the long run. In connecting with followers on a personal level, it’s much easier to transition the online relationship to one of a patient and healthcare provider, as the seeds of trust have already been planted. In effect, it’s relationship marketing. “In the process she managed to introduce herself as the point person for providing training, care for injury, and strategies to promote performance by introducing services not provided other chiropractors such as key equipment, on site tri-athlete supervised training, and hosting running club meetings,” says Dr. Bodnar. By capitalizing on perhaps the greatest strength of social media—the ability to replicate the satisfaction of real, human interpersonal bonds—you can position yourself ahead of the competition when those same connections are in need of treatment. Give Your Social Media Presence a Voice...And a Face One of the true beauties of the social media revolution is the ease with which different mediums and platforms can be intertwined. Budget video cameras have turned an entire generation into YouTube all-stars. Andy Warhol’s wildest dream couldn’t have predicted the fame and notoriety some individuals receive by uploading two-minute video clips.

Here’s the article I mentioned at your last appointment!

Discount on X-rays! Today only!

By shooting a short video, introducing yourself, and explaining the specialties focused on within your practice, you give your business a human touch. Then, by linking that same video to Facebook, you give prospective clients the opportunity to take the relationship a step further. Those who become fans through Facebook may also choose to follow your Twitter posts, and in turn, share the information with their friends, who come back to the source: you. It’s a snowball effect which can translate into large numbers of prospective clients. According to Facebook, the average user has 130 friends. Inherent to the platform is the visibility, openness, and sharing that’s readily embraced by its users. On a statistical level, the further you go to make a personal connection to that community, the better your odds are for having those existing numbers make a difference toward you achieving your goals. Client Retention Once the connection has been established through Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc., and appointments have been made, the same tools can be used to retain patients. Members of your staff, or even yourself (if you’re the one maintaining the pages), can send appointment reminders, messages, and follow-up information to clients via these platforms—which is both effective for time and negligible on cost. “Remember that these platforms offer a significant advantage over traditional marketing vehicles: the ability to host two-way conversations with visitors. Create opportunities for engaging 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 34


conversations with patients through these platforms to build long-term relationships,” says Eiserloh.

taking full advantage of the benefits social media connectivity has to offer.

Don’t be tempted to rely on automated messages to communicate with your client base; remember, this is all about personal connections!

Keep it Going Social media is an effective way to connect to people directly, which can have a very positive effect on your business.

It’s not uncommon to find doctors and healthcare providers on social media platforms such as Twitter, who pass off the same few automated replies to those on their friend list that are seeking information on a condition they may be experiencing. In taking the easy way out, their contact list can view the same repeated automated responses over and over again, which in effect, negates their credibility. In taking the robo-reply route, followers lose interest and click the dreaded “unfollow” button.

Remember to take an honest approach; you’re not trying to pull the wool over anyone’s eyes, you should genuinely try to make connections that could be tomorrow’s lasting client relationships. With that perspective in mind, enjoy yourself and have fun with the technology--it’s hard not to. Just remember to schedule some adjustments amid all those status updates. :)

Avoid the canned replies and invest time into the medium. “While it is often free to participate in these platforms, the investment is time,” says Eiserloh. “The more time you invest in social media, the more you will get out of it.” A human voice in a world of automation is easy to pick up on, as is concern and empathy. If the aim of social media is to connect people, and in this case use that foundation to form a patient/healthcare provider relationship where trust is a hallmark, don’t crash your chances of success before they have a chance to really get off the ground.

[

Many blogging platforms, such as Wordpress and Blogger, have the capability to install a Facebook or Twitter button directly on the page.

[

My patients are the secret to my success, thanks for following me! You guys rock!

The Pioneering Spirit Social media isn’t limited to the heavy hitters like Facebook and Twitter. Something as simple as a blog can also be extremely effective. Blogs open the lines of transparency and communication in ways 140 characters can’t possibly compete with. Use your own speaking voice to reiterate who you are, your goals, services, and personal experiences in the health and wellness industry. Be sure to reply to the questions and comments voiced on your blog. Keep in mind that you should be opening a dialog. Or, if you don’t fancy yourself much of a wordsmith, have someone in your office maintain a blog on your (or your practice’s) behalf. Many blogging platforms, such as Wordpress and Blogger, have the capability to install a Facebook or Twitter button directly on the page. This can streamline your Web presence, making it that much easier for followers to access your content and updates across several platforms. When coupled with the various mediums we’ve already discussed, you’ll find you have a strong marketing portfolio, 35 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

Your relationship status may be “complicated”­– marketing your practice shouldn’t be!


BUYS THE BEST

FOR YOUR BUSINESS

Chiropractic: The best kept secret in healthcare

The best kept secret, guide to a healthier life NERVE ROOT*

1.

Avoid unnecessary chemical toxins (caffeine, nicotine, sugar, alcohol, preservatives).

2.

Eat a well-balanced, nutrition dense diet. (A diet that consists of 75% fruit and vegetables. Decrease consumption of dairy products, red meat and processed foods). Continue with Chiropractic care. (Consider your future health and do not confuse lack of symptoms with optimal well-being).

3. 4.

For more than 50 years, chiropractors have relied on Parker SHARE Products to build and grow their practices. Our products set the standard in the industry for quality and excellence. Which ones are in your practice, and which ones should be?

Maintain a positive mental attitude.

5.

Drink at least 2 liters of water daily.

6.

Receive proper rest (7-8 hours per night).

7.

Perform the exercises recommended by your chiropractor.

8.

Participate in an active lifestyle. (In addition to the exercises recommended by your doctor, it is important to exercise at least twice per week).

9.

Eliminate unnecessary mental and emotional stress.

10. Enjoy quality time with family & friends.

Your Chiropractor’s Recommendations of care .......................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................................................... ..........................................................................................................................................

Report of Findings

each journey starts with one footstep Name:..............................................................

TM

Nobel Prize winner Hans Selye, Stress (1950).

Adaptability is probably the most distinctive characteristic of life . . . none of the great forces of inanimate matter are as successful as that alertness and adaptability to change which we designate as life.”

Welcome to Chiropractic

Spinal Nerve Function

Chiropractic: The Best Kept Secret in Healthcare

Teach every patient that the spine is more than a support column by showing them how the spine and nervous system relate to body function. Item #223969 ($19.95 per pad of 100)

This brand new, wellness-based Report of Findings folder is an essential communication tool for every office. Item #224166 ($59.95 per pack of 50)

4 Stage Vertebrae Set This model features four pairs of life-size lumbar vertebrae in three stages of degeneration. Item #544128 ($129)

PERSONAL APPOINTMENT CALENDAR MULTIPLE APPOINTMENT PROGRAM (MAP)

Name: ___________________________________________________ Date Appointment Scheduled: _________________________________________ Re-Exam: ________________________________________________ Re-X-Ray: _________________________________________________________ Regularly scheduled adjustments are one of the most important factors in recovering and maintaining your health through chiropractic. All muscles, ligaments, tendons, and cartilage must be strengthened and realigned to hold the vertebrae in position. Thus, a regular schedule of treatment must be given priority.

Despite how nutrient dense your diet is,

Please familiarize yourself with the appointments listed below. These must be kept to maximize benefit. If a situation arises, such as vacation where you may need to make an appointment change, please notify us in advance. We promise to do everything possible to help you not only regain, but also maintain your health. Your cooperation in keeping your scheduled appointments is sincerely appreciated.

you cannot expect to fully digest and absorb

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10_3972

TIME: Day ______________ @ _________ am - pm Day ______________ @ _________ am - pm © 2010 Parker Share Products

To Reorder Forms: Call 800.950.8044 or visit www.parkershareproducts.com

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Help your patients commit to their long-term care plan with these 24-month calendars. Carbon copies allow both you and your patient to have a mapped-out schedule of every visit. Calendars are available for; July 2009June 2011; 2010-2011; 2011-2012. Item #223988 ($166.60 for Pack of 100)

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Visit our website at www.parkershareproducts.com 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

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Join us in bringing chiropractic to the world. Being a chiropractor is a tremendous privilege and a great responsibility. Your patients are putting their health in your hands and trusting your ability to unlock their body’s potential. Oftentimes, helping them achieve true wellness goes beyond the adjustment. So it’s good to know Parker SHARE can help with the rest.

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When you buy from Parker SHARE, you are also contributing to the future of our profession. We call it our 100 percent Commitment to Chiropractic. Simply put, we invest all of our proceeds back into chiropractic education, research, and public relations.

Why Chiropractic X-Rays?

scie ractic of life This portion RAC Chirop the essence n thro ve tion helps you TIC at massieveryone fact th e brain, dow along aNearly these daysCA follows much chiropr RE a of t th ou rm om fo practice of common sense preventafr then whether a me the routine cord, at lit- care – THIS IS GOOD! sulted. Freque es thhealth spinal etwork, in pulstive is n h im Unfortunately, seem simple o ew. T - the importance of a thorner ve , intelligent dy an ic ow oughlychiropractic X-ray examination is bo fl the beginning , am e yn p th d p emany. eate fe su overlooked by li th As a C matter of cr t t n ly uan eral tellige throughou atin chiropractors l, n fu sín do mal, – Why Chiropractic X-rays? pted power u ma or The question rr n nation, toone s te su nin ¡CO s ing u system, give – sometimes arises, and for those who do patients N QUIRwho s u vo not fully understand, more detailed clarifiChiropractic OP ner . ¿Sufr h in lt ea cation will be helpful. The purpose of this e simple conditi way ural h STE d the is totspresent of the facts so you cantortîcolias,Usupposedly D dm e lebrochure av en h d m o s ce d lo o r ispla your edecision ine based on knowledge, ractor dmake Refer o las de espa lor en th sp Chirop out that rather encias lda, : iscs inthan fear. inal o ner piern2.as,Analyti ng do Robe pointi ebrae and d cord or sp of rt an chi Oncem your Balti A. Leac de p viosism al chiropractor more, h, flowmay recommend an o? isospr e vert * the spinYour X- eligro nothing e MD Teorías Q th th m , r Éstas ui © te n roprac 1986 al y que References: James wee or ticas, pinch rayalin the diagnosis of your case for q pathoet k n in b g you from obt pág. en Lee A. Hadley, M.D., Anatomico-Roentgenographic oc ca Balti M. Cox d ue eralm ican ion analyticalerreasons. 110, more, , ve and bl icatand Will Studies of the Spine, p. 30, Springfield, Ill., Thomas. logical MD Dolor de enhas iams quiro las sufrehe/she , ©19 te yet nerves l commun y. When a n gy Espa &W Anat 85 lda, ilkin omía necisesthembau ta pág. s, Febige const práctico what de Roy W. Hildebrandt, Chiropractic Spinography, p. 164, bod 8, W ita ve ener this vi and the 1. r, Ph Gray, pá illiam Hillmark Publications, Des Plaines, Ill. ilade of ner restricts & aviso antes p .condition; lphia, g. 18, ed Dolo isvie brain this flowPathological: Will itado e PA, © u is th ki ed d re y ns po e d means that 1959 , This esimply your la Doctor r Cha be done Edited by Charles May Goss, Gray’s Anatomy, pp. 17-18, ed, . cabe of nerviosto en se tos rles th bo an organs May Twenty-seventh Edition, Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia, Pa. is pinch brain to za q irrita r un o Gos Chiropractic máresponsi, feelsdthat it is his/her es u e u s, Le s d ss e se th ti osacenh a& , to be certain there are no complicario. pMisalignment ued bility from back cells d e e an th re d su tions in your case which might ordaches causing Nerprevent atltyo pressu ed, an 1 viosiHea signs th spina sm alguisn the delay your recovery. The X-ray bestodanger within hed e , del a pincthe suffer. a vear means by which he/she canper “look z, es ha que cause ma si inside” ay ve can todo qu stenofciam and determine the exact condition the tam X-rays assist your Doctor of

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We also make it simple for you to run an efficient, effective practice through our office and business products. Designed with your success in mind, our easy-to-use patient forms and clinic supplies are setting the standard within the profession.

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DISPELLING THE MY THS OF M ASSAGE Overcoming Outdated Ideas of Massage Therapy

39 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


For many, the perception of massage is a service solely performed for relaxation, or something a bit more nefarious. Misinformed notions still linger in regards to the industry, but skilled massage therapists and myotherapists are finding new ways to distance themselves from outdated and erroneous ideas. “Sexual connotations with massage have lingered, but we’re definitely seeing a shift from outdated undertones.” says Dr. Drew Riffe, Director of the Parker School of Massage Therapy. “Part of the solution is learning to address trained industry professionals in the proper nomenclature.”

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“The less desirable connotations regarding massage first began to change in the 1960s and 70s.”

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Dr. Riffe explains that the terms “masseuse” and “masseur” were originally linked to those who were limited in their expertise, such as those who only practiced Swedish massage. Unfortunately, it was also used by those who used massage as a front for what’s basically the sale of sexual services. “The less desirable connotations regarding massage first began to change in the 1960s and 70s. During that time, stronger government regulations were imposed. However, medical justification for massage research really didn’t take hold until the 1980s,” says Riffe. Perception vs. Research In the 1980s, scientific studies conducted by the University of Miami began to attach real, definable benefits to massage therapy. One person who was key to establishing massage therapy as a proven science, and breaking through perceptions of the uninformed, was Tiffany Field. Field began conducting research studies into the benefits of massage therapy in 1982, after she observed the benefits on her daughter, who was born prematurely. Her research yielded impressive results long before the medical benefits of massage was widely accepted by physicians or the general public.

Pick up your local community newspaper and flip to the back pages. Chances are, you’ll find a treasure trove of women and men offering massage services that fall on the questionable side of reputable. These businesses, with their lackluster qualifications and shady clientele, seem to overshadow the hard work and training that goes into becoming a licensed massage therapist.

In 1992, Field established the Touch Research Institutes at the University of Miami School of Medicine. Through research initiatives conducted by the TRI, massage therapy was shown to aid those suffering from autism, anorexia, fibromyalgia— even cerebral palsy and various spinal cord injuries. “Her research definitely gave credibility to massage as a form of physical therapy and opened the door for studies across the country,” says Riffe. “Throughout the 80s and into the 90s, the research was there and massage therapy began to receive its due respect by the medical community. That played a huge role in educating the public and overcoming misconceptions.” 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 40


Dr. Riffe says that in the latter part of this decade, the perception shift for massage turned a corner for those in health and wellness fields, as well as those working in the mainstream medical community.

“Have a mission statement, and communicate that to your clients,” says Dr. Riffe. “Parker offers business classes, as well as continuing education classes that can help graduates formulate their own marketing approach.”

“Go into major hospitals and you’ll find massage therapists on staff. They operate under the medical umbrella in most capacities these days. Professional sports teams even have massage therapists working with athletes. It’s a much different atmosphere now, clearly due to that early research,” says Riffe.

These days, it seems much of the misinformation on masseuses, masseurs, and massage therapists may come down to how the qualified, licensed professionals market themselves.

Proof Positive For massage school graduates, the road to success is less dependent on their ability to maintain and run a small business practice, which is largely the case for chiropractors. The employment opportunities within hospitals, as well as the large scale recruitment for massage therapists to work alongside doctors and physical therapists is a plus for the graduating massage therapy student, along with the training available to tomorrow’s massage therapist. “Education goes a long way,” says Dr. Riffe, speaking about the training available to students interested in participating in the programs offered by many top-tier massage therapy schools. “If you want to establish yourself as a trained professional, it certainly helps to have a name like Parker on your resume.” In effect, that is due to the additional hours of certification needed to complete the rigorous training at Parker School of Massage. Over 100 hours beyond what is required in the state of Texas, Parker requires more from their graduates, and in turn, those same graduates are predisposed to skills and training right out of school that competing massage therapists often lack. “When you look at the requirements for graduation, it entails a much larger scope than the minimum required to obtain licensing. However, you’ll also find our graduates hold more lucrative professional positions that competing graduates from other schools are unable to attain, based on the superiority of Parker’s massage program,” says Riffe. Parker’s message program entails a wide varieties of specialization, including myofascial release, neuromuscular therapy, shiatsu, reflexology and hydrotherapy. Furthermore, the advanced training qualifies graduates to work under the title of myotherapist; expert of the muscular system. “The research in the 1980s really established a scientific foundation for massage therapy, and myotherapists, but these days, receiving an education at Parker goes far beyond erasing the antiquated idea of massage in the eyes of the misinformed.” Overcoming the Stigma If an education at Parker can speak volumes about the skills you hold as a massage therapist, the manner in which you communicate your training, skills, and experience is just as important. 41 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

“Along with the work in hospitals, many massage therapists are marketing themselves as integrated healthcare providers, working alongside chiropractors and wellness professionals in a multipronged approach,” says Riffe. Regardless of the semantics, it is clear that partnering with other health and wellness professionals can be a huge benefit for the recent graduate or even established myotherapist. “In effect, that separates you right there,” says Riffe. “Someone who comes out of a school such as Parker, with a varied and impressive skill set, will be able to open doors that others— specifically those who you find in the classifieds—would never be able to open.


Name:

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Touching the Lives of Others Have you dreamed of a job that will give you the opportunity to change lives? A rewarding education in Massage Therapy can make it possible.

Study Various Massage Techniques Swedish, Deep Tissue, Myofascial, Neuromuscular, Shiatsu, and Reflexology give you the skills needed for a successful practice. Discover the art and science of therapeutic massage by enrolling in Parker College of Chiropractic’s renowned Massage Therapy program. Parker School of Massage Therapy prepares students for the profession by operating with the same dedication that has allowed Parker College of Chiropractic to uphold 25 years of proven success educating wellness professionals.

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Parker School of Massage Therapy | 2560 Electronic Lane | Dallas, TX 75220


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44


THE FUTURE OF

INTEGRATIVE HEALTHCARE st

How 21 Century DCs and MDs Will Share Elbow Room in Hospitals and Clinics

45 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


For much of its history, chiropractic, and chiropractors, have found themselves at odds more often than not with the mainstream medical community. Traditionally, chiropractors have not found gainful employment within hospitals due to a dismissive attitude by the medical community in regards to the lack of scientific evidence behind many chiropractic areas of expertise, such as treatment of subluxations. Equally as such, chiropractic has widely criticized the mainstream medical community for the its over-reliance on medications and surgery that often pose dangerous side effects to a patient’s well-being. Additionally, conventional medicine’s approach of only treating problems, and not root causes of ailments, is seen as short-sighted and irresponsible by many in the chiropractic community. Houses Undivided Those on the leading edge of healthcare in this country have already witnessed what many professionals will most likely experience in their careers; a focus on total patient care.

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In the United States, the nature of healthcare is changing— which includes the legislation, approach, and practice.

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“I’ve found the integrative healthcare approach to be extremely rewarding,” says Dr. James Rosenberg, National Director of Chiropractic Care for Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA). Dr. Rosenberg has generated a large amount of publicity as an integrative healthcare provider and highly respected chiropractor working in a high-profile role for an internationally respected organization for cancer treatment and research. For the past five years, Dr. Rosenberg has been the leading chiropractic specialist on a team of medical and healthcare professionals at the Cancer Treatment Center of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center. The collaborative staff is as remarkable for their varied composition as the effectiveness of the results they have achieved. With over 30 years experience, Dr. Rosenberg understands how chiropractic can serve as an integral factor in the total patient care experience. His presence in the cancer treatment process has been extremely beneficial for those suffering from the side effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy—both of which exert a great deal of stress on the body’s neuromusculoskeletal system. The approach toward total patient care at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America has transformed the traditional healing and treatment process experienced by cancer patients. A staff of surgeons, medical doctors, chiropractors, physical therapists, acupuncturists and mind-body healthcare providers commune to share results on the effectiveness of each area of specialization and its effectiveness on a patient-by-patient basis. “I was immediately impressed by the way the staff at the CTCA works together. There’s a level playing field. Our team frequently meets to discuss what is and what isn’t working for each patient. Ideas are shared and validated within the group,” says Rosenberg. “When it comes to total patient care, the patient’s best interest is always the first priority, with an emphasis on their comfort and quality of life. In keeping with that interest, no one voice carries more weight than another.” Patient Endorsed Care Another way integrative care differs from the traditional approach is the increased power patients have in directing the types of care and treatment they receive. In an integrative healthcare system where there is a leveled playing field and a greater peer-to-peer, collaborative relationship among healthcare providers, the competition to monopolize services is absent. In this model, patients share feedback regarding their individual preferences and preferred treatments to a team of chiropractors, medical doctors, massage therapists, and physical therapists. The power held by the patient supersedes the sometimes acrimonious relationship between different types of healthcare providers. 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 46


“The input from patients on the types of pain relief they find most effective encourages an optimal way of dealing with total patient care, without the competition for services commonly found in the healthcare industry,” says Dr. Rosenberg.

[

The CTCA has earned a rating above 90 percent by patients who have found the integrative approach to be both highly effective and extremely well tailored for treating their needs.

[

According to the CTCA, satisfaction among patients treated under this approach is atypically high. Industry standards indicate a patient care rating of 75 percent is considered high. The CTCA, through their innovative approach, has earned a rating above 90 percent by patients who have found the integrative approach to be both highly effective and extremely well tailored for their needs. Additionally, 92 percent of patients surveyed indicated they prefer and would recommend the integrative method as opposed to traditional models of treatment. When compared to the national hospital average of only 55 percent, it’s clear that the integrative method is highly effective. Challenges for Chiropractors The system, with its numerous benefits, isn’t above certain challenges or without its detractors. Throughout history, DCs and MDs have largely remained segregated; therefore lingering ideas can sometimes hinder the collaborative approach to patient care. “There can be a bit of a challenge initially, as MDs come together with DCs. Some in the medical community possess a misinformed view about the education and training it takes to become a doctor of chiropractic, as well as the validity in the types of treatment we offer,” says Dr. Rosenberg. However, Dr. Rosenberg says that many of those misconceptions are often reversed once other healthcare providers experience the healing art of chiropractic first-hand. “We make it a point to provide chiropractic treatment to everyone, from surgeons to hospital facility crews. Once people experience adjustments and chiropractic care, their preconceived notions disappear. They really become believers,” says Rosenberg. Following the Integrative Healthcare Movement For today’s graduating chiropractor interested in working in an integrative healthcare capacity, there are a few important factors to consider. “Focus on education. Your own education and and educating those in the medical community on the benefits of chiropractic as an ingredient in integrated care,” says Rosenberg. 47 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

Rosenberg advocates a grassroots approach to educating the public and other healthcare providers. “Volunteerism as a means to increase the knowledge of those outside the chiropractic community can be highly effective,” says Rosenberg. Furthermore, speaking the language of those in the medical community can be a way to open doors as a prospective integrative care provider. “Talk the talk,” says Rosenberg. “Physicians aren’t interested in hearing the philosophical arguments for chiropractic. Focus on chiropractic’s definable benefits and results which can be charted and measured.” There is also an emphasis on research as a tool to open doors. As more quality research into the healing benefits of chiropractic becomes available, beyond treating pain in the spine, opportunities for integrative healthcare will arise. Advancing Into the Future The means by which total patient care will be advocated and advanced is through the testament of those who have received such care. “I’ve seen many cases of patient health drastically improve, where it most likely would not have had this team of professionals with complementary skills not been an integral part of the treatment. Everything from esophageal cancer to bone disease, my skills, and the broad effort by our team, has made a difference in our patients’ quality of life,” says Rosenberg. By all accounts, the adversarial perceptions of yesteryear will disappear as chiropractors and members of the greater medical community evolve with each other into the 21st Century. “The more we get the word out, the better we’ll all be, and most importantly, the better we’ll be able to provide care to patients,” says Rosenberg. A sentiment many would echo, regardless of their expertise.


Lynn Name:

Lynn Na sato

Employed at Parker Since: Department:

September 20 09

Office of Enrollment

My Department’s Proudest Ach Funniest Parker Memory from

ievement of 2010:

2010:

dur ing Dr. Ma ncini’s Ro ast and Toa st!

Enrollment has exc eed ed goa ls for two trimesters.

Watch ing the executive tea m “cut a rug” on the dance floo r

Executing a rec ruitment pla n that enc ourage s pro spective stu dents from all ove r the wo rld to attend Par ker For 2011, I’m Look ing For ward

to:

My sta ff brings a wid e ran ge of cultural and life experience s to the tab le — wh ich is extremely help ful in bui ldin g relation ships wit h pro spective stu dents. What Ma kes my Department Spe

cia l:

Th e fam ily-based culture. I have never been a par t of an institution that tre ats stu dents, facu lty, and sta ff wit h suc h a hig h level of respect! What Ma kes Parker Specia l:

48


WHATS IN YOUR BAG? There’s a popular photo-project floating around the interwebs called “what’s in your bag?” It’s pretty simple. Find someone, have them show you what’s in their bag, and take a picture of it. Not in a Homeland Security type way; more of a ‘what can’t you live without’ exercise. Simple, right? For student’s at Parker, we thought it’d be fun to take a peek inside their purses and backpacks to find out what they lug around on a daily basis—and what accoutrements they never leave home without.

49


José Negron - “I never leave home without sunflower seeds. You never know when you will need a snack!”

Kent Clark - “I have a library of notebooks; you can never take enough notes!”

Olga Negron - “As much as I use my adjusting equipment, I never leave without a scrunchie.”

Amber Woods - “Highlighters and pens. It all comes down to highlighters.” 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 50


The PARKER

FILES College

Development

51 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

Alumni

Massage

Continuing Education

Clinics

Seminars

Student Life


WHAT’S IN A NAME? What Transitioning from “College” to “Universit y” Means for Parker

Parker College of Chiropractic is an established leader among chiropractic institutions. For nearly 30 years, Parker’s reputation for academic rigor, highly respected faculty, and unparalleled clinical and business training have set the college apart. However, as the healthcare field expands and evolves, Parker recognizes the need to offer additional holistic health care programs to its current and future students. In keeping with Parker’s stance as a proactive learning institution, this vision to offer additional wellness degrees, and an expansion of current programs is part of the school’s long term strategy. Therefore, in Spring 2011, Parker will transition to Parker University—College of Chiropractic. While Parker will always remain deeply rooted in chiropractic, and its top-tier status as a chiropractic learning institution will remain paramount, a greater number of health and wellness degrees will be offered. This expansion of degrees will compliment the school’s foundation of chiropractic. “This is a fantastic opportunity for current and future Parker students,” says Matt Eiserloh, Chief Marketing Officer at Parker. “To have an edge as a doctor of chiropractic in today’s market,

you need to have specialty training. As part of Parker’s long-term strategy of keeping our students as well-prepared as possible, Parker will offer programs in kinesiology and nutrition, such as a Master of Sports Sciences, Master of Health and Nutrition, Bachelors of Health and Wellness and so on. This is the needed edge for professionals seeking employment in growing specialty fields, such as sports medicine.” The enthusiasm is not limited to the staff at Parker; current students are also positively greeting news of the transition to university. “I think it’s a great achievement for the school, and I think the expanded programs will offer a great advantage over other institutions. I couldn’t be more pleased,” says Kent Clark, who will be part of the first graduating class from Parker University in 2011. Amid the transition, the focus to remain a leader in chiropractic education, along with the charge to expand opportunities in holistic healthcare education is renewed. The prestige, appeal, and capacity to diversify educational opportunities will intensify Parker’s status as the leading chiropractic and holistic-based educational institution in the country. 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 52


A Year in Review: Headlines and Events from 2010 ACA and ICA Presidents Visit Parker Parker College of Chiropractic President Dr. Fabrizio Mancini invited Dr. Gary Walsemann, President of the International Chiropractors Association (ICA), and Dr. Rick McMichael, President of the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) to speak to Parker students. Dr. Walsemann and Dr. McMichael are uniting and working together to ensure the progression of the profession. They asked for the students’ support, energy, and focus. They also encouraged them to be the best chiropractors they can be by going the extra mile and getting involved in chiropractic organizations.

Grand Opening of Parker’s Flower Mound Wellness Center On August 10, 2010, Parker held a ribbon cutting ceremony opening the Flower Mound Chiropractic Wellness Center. The 5,836 square foot community-based center features the latest in practice design and technology. The center features private adjusting rooms, passive and active therapy, a patient education room, x-rays, nutritional counseling, a supplement store, and more. The center also offers Parker student interns a real world experience that is second-to-none and that will prepare them to open and build successful practices.

Parker Awards $8K in Research Grants Parker College of Chiropractic awarded two chiropractic research grants of $4,000 each. The grant recipients include Cleveland Chiropractic College, University of Kansas Medical Center, and Southern California University of Health Sciences.

Dr. Mancini Meets with Surgeon General Alongside more than 5,000 influential health and fitness professionals, Dr. Fabrizio Mancini attended the largest international fitness event in the world—the IDEA World Fitness Convention in Los Angeles, CA, where Dr. Regina M. Benjamin, U.S. Surgeon General, and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa celebrated health and well-being. Supporting Dr. Benjamin’s vision for a healthy and fit nation, the event included a walk with several hundred participants including Dr. Mancini.

53 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

For the past two years, Parker College has generated research funds for the profession in order to provide expanded grant programs and research opportunities.

Dr. Mancini Celebrates 11 Years as Parker’s President In 2010, Dr. Fabrizio Mancini celebrated his 11th anniversary as president of Parker College. He assumed the role when he was just 33-years-old, which at the time, made him the youngest college president in the U.S. history. He has successfully carried out the vision of the college’s late founder, Dr. James W. Parker by developing Parker into one of the most innovative chiropractic colleges in the world.


Parker Helps Colombia Establish FirstEver Chiropractic Association Due in part to the numerous contributions Parker has made in Colombia, the country established the first and only Colombian Chiropractic Association, Asociación Colombiana de Quiroprácticos (ACQ), in 2010. With more than 45 million people, Colombia has only four chiropractors to serve the entire country. Parker and the ACQ understand the need for more chiropractors and believes in working together under a professional association to attract more chiropractors to the country and work towards the official government regulation of the profession.

Parker College Students Provide Care During South American Games Seven Parker College student interns from the Student Abroad Program in Colombia joined the Olympic Health Care Staff at the 2010 South American Games. Interns provided chiropractic care for the country of Colombia where they made history by becoming the “champion of the games” for the first time. The South American Games are a multisport event that develops between the South American countries belonging to the Sports South American Organization.

Parker Celebrates National Public Health Week

Jerry Rice Joins Parker Seminars Las Vegas Legendary NFL wide-receiver and three-time Super Bowl champ Jerry Rice scored a touchdown among attendees at Parker Seminars Las Vegas 2010—the world’s largest chiropractic seminar—by sharing all the ways he champions chiropractic. He was joined onstage by fellow chiropractic supporter Linda Cohn, veteran sportscaster and the first woman to report for ESPN. Both Rice and Cohn are spokespeople for the Foundation for Chiropractic, an organization dedicated to generating positive press for the chiropractic profession. They both traveled to Parker Seminars to encourage chiropractors to continue delivering natural, quality healthcare to patients around the globe.

Parker’s First Annual President for a Day

On October 25, 2010, Parker College President Dr. Fabrizio Mancini swapped places with Steven Chalk, a Tri-Four Parker student. Dr. Mancini attended Steven’s classes, and “President Steven” attended meetings and ran the Office of The President on Dr. Mancini’s behalf. Acting as president, Steven Chalk met with presidents from the International Chiropractic Association and American Chiropractic Association. Additionally, Mr. Chalk greeted World Federation of Chiropractic members, and met with Parker Chairman Bill Nardiello.

Parker College held its first annual National Public Health Week (NPHW), sponsored by Drucker Labs. This year’s theme was “A Healthier America, One Community at a Time.”

Filling in for Steven, Dr. Mancini attended his classes, took an exam, met with patients in the clinic, and even worked out with other Parker students at the Standard Process Student Activity Center.

NPHW is an event of the American Public Health Association (APHA). The APHA is the largest public health organization in America with thousands of members nationwide representing all branches of health and medicine.

The event, sponsored by Four Seasons Dallas and Papas Brothers, was a fantastic experience, and gave insight into what it is like to walk in each other’s shoes. 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 54


Lunch and Learn 2010 FOOD AND THOUGHT Parker College coordinates a multitude of “lunch and learn” sessions over the course of the year, where students learn from alumni, business leaders, and presenters on a variety of topics over their lunch hour. In 2010, Parker organized over 30 events. The program is a great success and offers first-hand insight for students into the following topics: • Marketing your (future) chiropractic practice • Engaging leadership opportunities • Deeper understanding of business practices • Tools for patient acquisition and growth • Technique and nutrition • Areas of specialization, and the need for diversified skills Parker looks forward to welcoming more speakers to our campus in 2011—which is sure to be a filling hour for both the mind and stomach!

55


Parker’s 2010 Assembly Lineup Thrills and Educates Students One part of Parker’s commitment to providing students with real-world information entails bringing high profile and distinguished speakers to our campus. Here’s a look at some of our exciting guests from 2010.

Jason Deitch Dr. Jason Deitch, co-author of the bestselling book Discover Wellness, How Staying Healthy Can Make You Rich and founder of the Discover Wellness Center spoke during an all-school assembly. With a different approach to healthcare, Dr. Deitch provided students with strategies to communicate to the public. He also advised students to determine what kind of practice they want to build before they begin to form it. Joe Dispenza Dr. Joe Dispenza’s book Evolve Your Brain: The Science of Changing Your Mind connects the subjects of thought and consciousness with the mind and body. He is also featured in the award winning film “What the Bleep Do We Know?” Dr. Dispenza presented enlightening lecture, illustrating how quantum physics, neuroscience, and biology relate to chiropractic. Mark Victor Hansen Chicken Soup for the Soul co-creator Mark Victor Hansen spoke to students about possibility, opportunity, and action. For more than 30 years, Hansen has created powerful change in thousands of organizations and millions of individuals. Mr. Hansen stressed the importance of having goals and explained that each person in the audience is here to have a ‘magnificent life’. He encouraged everyone to write their goals down and look at them four times a day.

Dr. Fabrizio Mancini Dr. Mancini, president of Parker College of Chiropractic, presented “Leadership is a Choice” to Parker students, faculty, and staff. His assembly explained how leaders are not born— they are made. He spoke about others that have inspired him throughout the years and the importance of having them in the profession to advance chiropractic. Sue Morter Dr. Morter presented her lecture “The Integrated Entrepreneur– How and When Success Happens.” Dr. Morter believes it is essential to align your business, practice, and healing modalities in ways that represent your core values. She discussed how to accomplish this by revealing the strategies and visionary practices she has used to create great success within and beyond the healthcare industry. Jeff Spencer Dr. Jeff Spencer presented his lecture, “Tour d’You: How to Become a Chiropractic Superstar.” Jeff competed in the 1972 Olympics and is a California State Cycling Champion—as well as noted author. He has worked with athletes in the Olympics, Tour de France, WTA, NASCAR, Motocross, and numerous triathlons. Dr. Spencer charted the roadmap to becoming a chiropractic sports superstar.

In addition to these names, four successful members of Parker’s Alumni Association addressed students about their post-graduate experiences. Parker is proud to open our campus to such a diverse and illustrious lineup. 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 56


Development Parker Welcomes Development Vice President JoLynne Jensen, CFRE In order for Parker College to continue down a path of fiscal and economic prosperity, the need for fundraising to play an increased role in development was recognized by Dr. Mancini and the board of trustees. Per this directive, the executive team engaged a fundraising consultant to conduct an audit in an effort to improve the effectiveness of the development department. This audit was conducted by Ms. JoLynne Jensen. As a result of her spectacular service in undergoing a thorough development audit, her expertise, and her impressive experience, Ms. Jensen was invited to join Parker College as vice president of development. She officially joined the Parker family November 1, 2010; merging the Offices of Alumni Relations and Development. For two years prior, Ms. Jensen served as a fundraising and nonprofit management consultant for organizations from Dallas to Tokyo. Ms. Jensen is no stranger to the field of higher education, having previously served at Texas Woman’s University as the vice president of institutional development, at the University of Dallas, and at her alma mater, Wayne State University. Additionally, Ms. Jensen brings nearly two decades of fundraising experience at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, most recently as vice president of development. She was responsible for raising millions in contributed income annually, leading a $55 million capital campaign, and planning a $100 million endowment effort.

Foot Levelers Donates $250,000 to fund new Chiropractic Wellness Center in Flower Mound Parker hosted a VIP reception to thank Kent Greenawalt and Jamie Greenawalt for their $250,000 donation to fund the active care area in the Flower Mound Wellness Center. The new 5,836 square foot community-based center is located at 1190 Parker Square in Flower Mound, TX, and features the latest in practice design and technology with private adjusting rooms, passive and active therapy, a patient education room, x-rays, nutritional counseling, and a supplement store. “We are so happy to be in Flower Mound,” said Dr. Fabrizio Mancini, president of Parker College. “We are excited to provide chiropractic care and support the community in living healthier, happier lives just as so many of our other patients in the Dallas area do.” Foot Levelers is the leading provider of custom-made orthotics, which balances the body by balancing the feet. Throughout its history of increasing success, Foot Levelers has had a positive influence on nearly every facet of chiropractic. Parker is grateful to be the recipient of this generous donation and partner with such a great company.

Kent Greenawalt and daughter, Jamie, get ready to taste the custom baked cake during the VIP recognition reception.

In recognition of her 30 year commitment to the profession and the $132 million she has directly raised as a development professional, the Greater Dallas Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals honored Ms. Jensen as the 2009 Outstanding Fundraising Executive. Parker College is proud to have Ms. Jensen as part of the family, and looks forward to achieving amazing results together. Dr. Mancini presents Kent Greenawalt with a cowboy hat for his generous donation of $250,000 to the Flower Mound Wellness Center. 57


Second annual

Parker Gala

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 58


The Parker College Honor Roll of Donors Believing • Embracing • Investing • Belonging Thank you to the following donors for their gifts to Parker College A.J. Bart, Inc.

Dr. Mark Burdette

Drucker Labs

Dr. Paul Graves

Stanley Johnson

Mel Abraham

Dr. Charlotte Burgess

Dr. Ruth Durkee

Jesse Green

Dr. Karen Jorgensen

Victor Abraham

Dr. Marcella Brukhard

Bob & Denise Jones

Dr. Rachael Bryant

Dynamic Chiropractic/DC Practice Insights

Timothy Gunn

Dr. Curtis Adams

Harold Hadley

Dr. Heather Jones

Judith Adams

Dr. Richard Busch

Dr. Cecil Halsell

Dr. Kimberly Junemann

American Black Chiropractic Association

Dr. Clark Byroad

Dr. Cara Hall

Dr. Jennifer Kasten-Van Winkle

Dr. Michael Hall

Dr. Kathryn Keegan

Dr. Ricky Hanks

Dr. Michael Kenemuth

Dr. Toby Harmon

Dr. Tracy Kennedy-Shanks

Dr. Dennis Harris

Kennedy Technique/Systems

Dr. Eric Harrison

Dr. James Kennell

Lainey Hashimi-Clark

Ketchum, Inc.

Dr. Andrew Hatch

Dr. Leah Killian

Dr. Allen Haynes

Dr. Billie King

Dr. Marsha Heikkinen

Dr. Raymund King

Dr. Paul Heikkinen

Dr. Robert Kipp

Dr. Jack Herd

Dr. Amy Kitching

Dr. John Hinwood

Dr. Ken Kitching

Dr. To Kim Hoang

Dr. Steven Kleinfeld

Dr. Laura Hobson-Shoemaker

Dr. David Kling

Terri Holley

Dr. Kamla Knight

Dr. Michael Holloway

Barry Knopp

Dr. Ken Hong

Dr. Michael Knott

Dr. Barry Honigsfeld

Dr. Randy Koski

Dr. Zhi-Jiang Huang

Dr. Michelle Krenek

Dr. Joseph Huffman

Dr. Dan Kurth

Dr. Dallas Humble

Dr. Kieran Kuykendall

Dr. James Hummel

Dr. Stephen LaFay

International Chiropractors Association

Lafayette Instrument

American Chiropractic Association American Chiropractor Magazine

Dr. Brenda Byroad Café Cipriani Dr. Chad Carpenter Hyla Cass Catapult Systems Dr. Patricia Cates Dr. Homero Cavazos Centre for Powerful Practice Cheat – Lose Weight without Dieting

Lisa Fellers recognizes Tina Drucker of Drucker Labs as the Presenting Sponsor for the Second Annual Parker Gala.

Dr. Liz Anderson-Peacock Association of Chiropractic Colleges

EBM Corporation Dr. Jeffrey Eidsvig Matt Eiserloh Dr. Jacquelyn Elbel Erchonia Medical Heidi Farrell Dr. Karen Feeney Lisa Fellers Filardi-Vinyard and Associates Barry Firstenberg Dr. Dan Fleishman Dr. J Michael Flynn

Dr. James Chestnut

Foot Levelers, Inc.

Dr. James Chicoine

Foundation for Chiropractic Progress

Chiro-One Wellness Centers Chiropractic Economics Chiropractic Leadership Alliance Chiropractic Ortho, Inc. Chiromission.com Dr. Christi Chism Dr. Dena Churchill

Aviall

Keith Clark

Dr. Lori Baggett

Cleveland Chiropractic College

Dr. Jeffrey Baier

Dr. Ana Cobian-Silver

Ellen Backes

Dr. Christopher Colloca

Victor Ballesteros

Dr. Brett Comeau

Jennifer Barham-Floreani

Dr. Philip Cook

Dr. Jerry Barker

Dr. Philip Cordova

James Beasley

Dr. Jeffrey Cottingame

Dr. Douglas Bedichek

Dr. Lawrence Cottle

Dr. Jesus Bernall

Dr. Trevor Crane

Dr. H Black

Edna Craven

Dr. Roberta Blair

Crazy Water

Dr. Patrick Bodnar

Dr. Walter Crooks

Dr. Sheila Bonnett

Dr. Randy Curtis

Tony Boudreau

Dr. Renee Dallaire

Clifton Boyd

DAV Productions

Dr. Robert Boyle

James Denito

Brad Bukey & Associates

Dr. Doug DeShazo

Dr. John Brimhall

Discover Wellness

Dr. Harold Brinkley

Keith Doan

Charles Brody

Dr. Jack Donovan

Dr. Misty Browning

Douglas Labs

59 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

Jim Fox Phillis Frase Brenda Frederiksen Dr. Patrick Freud Paul Fulchino Future Health, Inc. Dr. Shawn Fyke Dr. Benjamin Galyardt Dr. Scott Garber Dr. Armando Garza Dr. Patrick Gentempo Dr. Gene Giggleman Dr. Nathalie Godbout Dr. Troy Godsey Dr. Esmeralda Gracia Dr. Cameron Grant

IPS Advisors Dr. David Jackson Dr. Jason Jaeger Dr. Ali Jafari Barbara Jindra

Dr. Gilles Lamarche Dr. Jason Lamarche Dr. Wright Lassiter Donna Leach Dr. Nicole Lederman Dr. Scott Lenz Dr. Rose Lepien Dr. Tommy Lightfoot Lighthouse Health Dr. Troy Liming Dr. Debora Logan Dr. Sandra Lohman Dr. John Longenecker Dr. Mark Losack Dr. Aaron MacArthur

Parker students and donors are recognized on stage during a Parker Assembly.

Dr. Don & Brandi MacDonald Dr. Debra Macko


Dr. Celia Maguire

Monte H. Greenawalt Foundation

Dr. Arthur Peterson

Dr. Judith Shwabe

Dr. Darrin Walters

Carol Ann Malizia

Dr. Calvin Morgan

Petty, Michel and Associates

Sherry Slayton

Dr. David Walters

Dr. Fabrizio Mancini

Cheryl Moss

Dr. David Phipps

Dr. Alan Smith

Dr. Charles Ward

Dr. Mark Mandell

MPA Media

Dr. Sharon Pignolet

Dr. Jason Smith

Dr. John Ware

Daniel Mangini

Dr. Samuel Murphy

Dr. Joseph Pilsl

Dr. Kyl Smith

Dr. Christian Warneke

Dr. Lawrence Markson

Andy Nadel

Dr. Frank Piranio

Dr. Scott Smith

Dr. Mary Warren

Dr. Chad Martin

Bill Nardiello

Charles Pittman

Dr. Kirtland Speaks

Dr. Alisa Wasserman

Dr. Farshid Marzban

Lynn Nasato

Dr. Eric Plasker

Lisa Speaks

Dr. Robert Watson

Maximized Living

National Board of Chiropractic Examiners

Dr. Ron Poe

Dr. Jenn Spencer

Dr. Charlotte Watts

Tom Pritchett

Spidertech

WAVE Manufacturing

Pro-Solutions for Chiropractic

Dr. Lloyd Spiers

Steve Weller

Dr. Sidney Pruitt

Spinal Research Foundation

Dr. Ron Wells

Patricia Ptak

Standard Process Inc.

Dr. Matthew Westrich

Dr. Joy Raab

Dr. Cheryl Steffins

Dr. Todd Whipple

Dr. Christopher Ragan

Dr. Lawrence Stolar

Dr. Mary White

Dr. Shadi Rahmani

Dr. Mary Stroud

Fern Wilkens

Dr. Charles Raper

Dr. Douglas Sullivan

Dr. Tracy Wilson

Dr. E.J. Raven

Jackie Stevens

Dr. Rosanna Winter

Ronnie & Judy Rawls

Swingle-Collins & Associates

Dr. Shane Wisehart

Dr. Camille Reagan

Dr. Dani Talamantez

Dr. Tina Witkowski

Don Reagan

Dr. Betsy Taylor

Dr. Dennis Woggon

Cynthia Reed

Texas Chiropractic Association

Dr. Joshua Woggon

Renaissance Associates

Texas Chiropractic College

Dr. Robert Wolff World Congress of Chiropractic Students

Dr. Nikisha McDaniel

Dr. Gilles Lamarche and Dr. Mancini congratulate student scholarship recipient Kendra Pomeroy during the Donor Recognition Luncheon.

Dr. Roger McDowell

National Chiropractic Council

Dr. Jaime Rivera

Dr. Stephen Thaxton

Dr. Phillip McGraw

Natural Partners, Inc.

Dr. Glenn Robinson

Dr. Kenneth Thomas

Dr. Alan McKown

NCMIC

Dr. Paula Robinson

Thumper Massager

Dr. Susan McMahan

Dr. Mindy Neal

Dr. James Roggenbuck

Dr. Leon Tom

McWilliams & Association

Dr. Linda Nelson

Dr. Clifford Rompf

Dr. Dan Traxler

Dr. Frank Means

Neuromechanical Innovations

Dr. Chantal Rouleau

Dr. Nathan Unruh

Dr. Ronen Mendi

Dr. Thuy Nguyen

Dawn Roland

Dr. Samuel Urbina

Dr. Kash Merrill

DT Nguyen

Dr. Jeremy Rowse

Dr. Francia Valladares

Dr. Michel Methot

Northwestern Health Sciences University

Dr. Ryan Rowse

Robbie Metzger Dr. Rene Mierzejewski

Warren Nugent

Dr. Eric Russell

Debbie Miller

Nutri-West

SAGG Services

Dr. Brandon Mills

Dr. Anjum Odhwani

S.A.M. Company

Mintiva Holdings

Dr. Stacey Olson

Safeway/Randalls/Tom Thumb

Antonio Olvera

Dr. Juan Sanchez

Dr. Gene Orlowsky

Richard Sapio

Janet Owen

Dr. Kristina Sargent

Dr. Greg Page

Dr. Vincent Scheffler

Dr. Walter Parish

Scott Schilling

Parker College Alumni

David Schiner

Association

Dr. Gary Schoutsen

Dr. Bruce Parker

Dr. Edward Schroeder

Dr. Erin Van Veldhuizen

Dr. John Parson

Dr. Rhonda Schroeder

Dr. Troy Van Biezen

Dr. Bart Patzer

Dr. Alex Shiu

Dr. Cynthia Vaughn

Dr. Georgina Pearson

Dr. Dazzle Shrestha

Dr. Christopher Venable

Dr. Wendy Pehonsky

Sign Shop

Dr. Ramah Wagner

Performance Health

Sherman College

Dr. Stephen Waldrop

Dr. Denise Perron

Self-Esteem Seminars

Casey Walker

Dr. Glen Peterson

Dr. Judy Seibert

Dr. Jon Wall

Parker College inducts Dr. Cheryl Hawk into the Drugless Research Hall of Fame during the Second Annual Parker Gala held at the Las Vegas Parker Seminar.

World Federation of Chiropractic Dr. Rick Wren Dr. Christopher Zaino Zeo, Inc. Dr. Yan Zhang

Dr. Ron Rupert

Steve, Charlie and Matt Shanks, family owners of Erchonia Medical, donated $100,000 to fund the new Erchonia Laser Health Care Center in the Parker Wellness Clinic.

To find out how you can support Parker College and become a member of the Honor Roll of Donors, please contact the Office of Development at 877.971.9525 or visit our website at www.parkercc.edu/development.

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 60


Alumni Relations 2010 was a highly productive year for Parker’s Office of Alumni Relations. From celebrating the colleges first-ever 25th class reunion, to numerous receptions, After Hours programs, and scholarships awarded, here are some highlights from the past year.

m 2010 o r f s t n e Eve Veg a s Notabl ina rs L a s Pa rker Sem

eption at ing lu m ni Rec A l a u n n ni Gat her • A ex a s A lu m T f o y et ract ic Soci eon • Ch irop m ni Lu nch ement A lu g a n Lu ncheon a M ty y A lu m ni ap er • Integ ri Th e g l of Ma ssa eon ver Schoo m ni Lu nch • First-e at ion A lu ci o ss A ic eption Ch iropract lu m ni Rec • Tex a s ociat ion A ss A las ic ct tion in Dal a Ch iropra nion Recep eu • Florid R ss la ing & C n Homecom s Lu ncheo • A nnual ion Awa rd at ci o ) ss A ss of 1985 A lu m ni inner (Cla • Pa rker D n io n th la ss Reu ver 25 C on s • First-e n Rec epti ss Reu nio la C l a n • Add it io First-ever 25th Class Reunion Dinner (Class of 1985)

Social & Viral Marketing Efforts

The office sends messages daily through Facebook and Twitter on topics ranging from the newest Lifetime Members, alumni clinics, college news, upcoming alumni and campus events, and news on graduates. The department’s Facebook fan page has over 800 followers, one of the most active college fan pages. Additionally, over 200 “tweeters” followed 450 tweets in the last year from Twitter.com/ParkerAlumni.

Graduate Benefits

The Office of Alumni Relations began offering “non-professional” benefits to all graduates in late 2010. These benefits will not be associated with the professional benefits offered to Parker Alumni Association members. They are designed to help support the personal and financial well being of our graduates, such as discounted pricing programs, health insurance and retirement plans, car rentals, and travel discounts. Information will be mailed to all graduates in early 2011.

Parker Alumni Association

The Parker Alumni Association presented a check of $5,000 to the college to fulfill its final payment of the $25,000 pledge made in 2008. Not only was the donation the largest in the association’s history, the donation was paid off two years earlier than expected, which helped renovate a lounge and classroom space for the chiropractic interns. 61


2010 Parker Alumni Association Scholarship Recipients In 2010, three $1000 scholarships were awarded. A total of $19,000 in scholarship money has been given out since 2008. The association has been building a peer network that has made a difference in the lives of students. Participation in the alumni association not only keeps graduates connected to the pulse of Parker, but also helps prepare the next generation of professionals to positively impact the chiropractic community. Help us lift up tomorrow’s successful doctors by becoming a member of the Parker Alumni Association in 2011! Winter 2010 Recipient: Andrew Oteo ‘10 Andrew Oteo is a man of compassion, optimism, and drive. His lively devotion to chiropractic is evident in the positive manner with which he represents this profession. Andrew’s strengths lie in compassionate service and spreading the chiropractic message. As a student, he led and supported many worthy causes. In his limited free time, Andrew successfully launched The Chiropractic Wellness Connection, a strategic marketing opportunity made up of numerous local DCs. Andrew’s natural ability to lead makes him a promising doctor and exemplary graduate of Parker College. He also helps the enrollment department with tours and recruiting events.

Fall 2010 Recipient: Anita Carrere ‘10 Anita Carrere is a caring and sincere woman with regard for her classes and classmates. Her enthusiasm and professional demeanor stand out immediately; making it evident that she is a leader among her peers. As a student, she serves as the Parker Student Body Secretary and the Parker SACA DC Coordinator. She is also involved on a national level with the Foundation 4 Chiropractic Progress and Chiropractic Voice. Always carrying a friendly smile, Anita exhibits the characteristics of a promising doctor of chiropractic. Her honesty, integrity, respect, character, servant heart, and positive attitude can only be matched by her love for chiropractic. Fall 2010 Recipient: Erin Spindler ‘10 Erin Spindler is a dedicated and committed woman with a wonderful vision for chiropractic. As chair of the 2010 World Congress of Chiropractic Students, she has spearheaded efforts to increase sponsorship funding by engaging the local chiropractic community. Erin has a contagious passion for serving others and has demonstrated admirable leadership skills as a student. Through her great initiative and diligence, Erin will without a doubt make an exceptional doctor of chiropractic.

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 62


Parker Alumni Association Awards Luncheon The Parker Alumni Association Awards Luncheon was held on September 24, in Dallas, TX. This was one of the first events fully funded by the association and those in attendance. Nearly 50 alumni and friends of the association gathered to see who received the annual awards. Those receiving awards: • 2010 Young Alumni of the Year: Dr. Sharla Robertson ‘05 • 2010 International Alumni of the Year: Dr. Tracy Kennedy-Shanks ‘95 of Australia • 2010 Alumni of the Year: Dr. Kevin Kanz ‘88

Lifetime Members Honored at Dallas Homecoming

Dallas homecoming is one of the largest gatherings of Parker graduates of the year! For Homecoming 2010, the Parker College Office of Development celebrated the addition of 100 new lifetime members to the Parker family since the 100 member milestone in 2007. The development team would like to personally thank and recognize each lifetime member for their support of Parker College. In addition, each member received a special gift to commemorate this remarkable achievement.

Parker Alumni Association Names Newest Board Members

The Parker Alumni Association elected four members to serve on its board of directors. Dr. Steve Brooks ‘99, Dr. Bart Patzer ‘93, Dr. Vincent Scheffler ‘07, and Dr. Mary Warren ‘00 will work to continue the vision, leadership, and legacy that have been established throughout the years.

63 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


After Hours Events in 2010 Dr. Richard Montes ‘95 and Dr. Cody Zepeda ‘08 January 19 - “From Parker to Practice: How to Get Started Before Graduation”

Drs. Jim Bob ‘04 and Cindy Haggerton ‘05 January 26 - “Husband and Wife Duo with a Birthing Center Next Door”

Dr. Kevin Maloney ‘02 February 4 - “How $500 Can Get You Started”

Dr. Janette Kurban ‘99 May 18 - “ABCs of Starting Your Practice”

Dr. Vincent Scheffler ‘07 May 27 - “Success as an Associate”

Dr. Robert Meyer ‘99 September 21 - “Inexpensive Ways to Be Successful”

Dr. Josh Woggon ‘10 September 30 - “Niche Marketing”

Dr. Troy Van Biezen ‘97 October 4 - “Working with Professional Athletes”

Parker College’s After Hours Clinic Visit Program allows students the opportunity to visit Parker Alumni clinics and speak with doctors and their staffs in a relaxed, casual atmosphere. By visiting local clinics, students can see how a clinic is set up, ask questions about office billing, advertising, hiring employees, or other related topics. Practicing chiropractors may choose to focus their visit based on personal expertise regarding practice management, patient retention, business management—or to simply allow the evening to remain open for questions and answers. 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 64


Consecutive Members The Parker Alumni Association is proud to thank the following individuals who have maintained their membership year after year after year.

10 Years

7 Years

Timothy S. Benner, DC, ‘85 Bruce Klinekole, DC, ‘95 Debra Rhodes-Cusker, DC, ‘88 Cheryl Silva, DC, ‘98

Harold Brinkley, DC, ‘88 Mark Burdette, DC, ‘00 Susan M Correia, DC, ‘94 Suhail Daraiseh, DC, ‘03 Donna Kobrin, DC, ‘00 Eric J Martin, DC, ‘87 Ricky L Nall, DC, ‘95 Mindy Neal, DC, ‘99 Kristine Nelson, DC, ‘92 Michael G Rider, DC, ‘92 Glen Silver, DC, ‘90 Elizabeth Spillman-Taylor, DC, ‘96

9 Years Jamie Bell, DC, ‘01 Gilbert Chad Blackwell, DC, ‘95 Michelle Dawn Crawford, DC, ‘98 Sara Lynn DeHart, DC, ‘96 Christopher Dembski, DC, ‘97 Lisa Douglas-Bell, DC, ‘01 Tiffany Hatfield, DC, ‘95 Gene Kimel, DC Neta Kimel, DC, ‘94 Carl Thomas Lail, DC, ‘96 Cheryl Lipton-VanDeSteeg, DC, ‘95 G Thomas McKinney, DC, ‘97 Rhonda McKinney, DC, ‘97 Bart J Patzer, DC, ‘93 Paul Pispidikis, DC, ‘97 Sidney C Pruitt, DC, ‘88 Christopher Waddell, DC, ‘01 Bryan Wiebe, DC, ‘95 Kevin Willhite, DC, ‘01

6 Years Seiichiro Ando, DC, ‘04 Luke Arnett, DC, ‘03 Jimmie Lee Brantley, DC, ‘95 Karl L Foster, DC, ‘91 Nicholas Kimel, DC, ‘04 Jimmy Labrecque, DC, ‘94 Ronald John Lehrer, DC, ‘94 Julie Powell, DC, ‘97 Scott H Smith, DC, ‘86 Nichole Snyder, DC, ‘02 Afsar Sokhansanj, DC, ‘02

8 Years

5 Years

Carol Born, DC, ‘91 James Chicoine, DC, ‘92 Jonathan A Goff, DC, ‘97 Nancy Hinders, DC, ‘89 Tiffany Labrecque, DC, ‘02 Frank Piranio, DC, ‘96 John Prokopiak, DC, ‘95 Mike Raper, DC, ‘87 Adrienne Richwine, DC, ‘97 Jose Silva, DC, ‘99 Kevin Lee Trippe, DC, ‘99 Andrea Wilson, DC, ‘99

Janet Adrian, DC, ‘94 Bobbie Jo Baier, DC, ‘98 Jeffrey Baier, DC, ‘98 Ryan Bass, DC, ‘98 William Braudt, DC, ‘00 Brad Collins, DC, ‘05 Kelly Henry, DC, ‘98 Brett Jungman, DC, ‘04 Jason Krause, DC, ‘99 Jeremy Schmid, DC, ‘04 Darren Taylor, DC, ‘96 Christopher Chae Tracy, DC, ‘04 Andrea Wilson, DC, ‘99

Contact the Office of Alumni Relations to see how close you are to becoming a consecutive member. askalumni@parkercc.edu | 888.772.5867

Welcome to the Alumni Association!

Recognizing our newest Lifetime Members from 2010

180) Dr. Paul Graves ‘98 181) Dr. Heather Jones ‘96 182) Dr. C Brett Venable ‘07 183) Dr. Michelle Krenek ‘09 184) Dr. Joseph J Pilsl II ‘03 185) Dr. Joshua A Woggon ‘10 186) Dr. Tom K Lightfoot ‘02 187) Dr. Troy C Van Biezen ‘97 188) Dr. Philip L Cook 189) Dr. Rachael L Bryant ‘07 190) Dr. Christopher E Ragan ‘89 191) Dr. Christopher R Zaino ‘05 192) Dr. Eric G Russell 193) Dr. Nathan K Unruh ‘99 194) Dr. Debra A Macko 195) Dr. Chantal Rouleau ‘89 196) Dr. Jeremy S Rowse ‘02 197) Dr. Ryan T Rowse ‘02 198) Dr. Rene Mierzejewski 199) Dr. Chad A Carpenter ‘99 200) Dr. Errol J Raven ‘02 201) Dr. Alex Lik Chi Shiu ‘96 202) Dr. Carol Watkins ‘10 203) Dr. Cecil B. Halsell ‘01 204) Dr. Joseph P Huffman ‘00 205) Dr. Ali M. Jafari 206) Dr. Kyl L. Smith ‘93 207) Dr Karen C Feeney ‘97 208) Dr Kristina Sargeant 100% of a Lifetime member’s fee goes to the Alumni Association Endowment Fund. Membership is available to any person who believes in supporting this fund. Future editions of ParkerLife will continue to recognize new members. To become a Lifetime Member, contact Timothy A. Gunn, Director of Alumni Relations, at 888.PR.ALUMS or complete the membership form on the next page.

Thanking our 2010 Business Members ELITE

Life Nutrients 65

For information on these companies visit www.parkercc.edu/alumniassociation.


MEMBERSHIP FORM Calendar Year 2011 PAY ONLINE

LIFETIME MEMBER

www.parkercc.edu/alumniassociation

Membership Fee + Addt’l donation

$1500 +________________

$300 due with application – balance may be paid in four (4) consecutive monthly installments. Engraved plaque will be sent when paid in full. 100% of Lifetime Membership fee goes to the Alumni Association Endowment Fund.

Cut here

 Easy Pay Option: Please automatically charge my credit card on the 15th of each month based on the above mentioned payment schedule.

ANNUAL MEMBER

Membership Fee* + Addt’l donation

 Parker Alumni  Non-Parker Graduate  Recent Graduate (graduated in ’09 or later)  Student

$75 +________________ $75 + ________________ $50 +________________ FREE

*25% of fee goes to the Alumni Association Endowment Fund with remaining going to annual budget.

 Automatic Renewal: Continue my membership until _________________. I understand my credit card will be kept on file and charged in November of each year. (Service is provided for your convenience and can be cancelled at anytime by calling the Office of Alumni Relations at 888.PR.ALUMS).

NEW

Member name:_____________________________________________ Total enclosed: $________________________ Credit card number:_______________________________________________ Exp. date:____________________________________

 VISA

 AMEX

Credit card billing address:

 MASTERCARD  HOME

 DISCOVER

 CLINIC/COMPANY

Name as it appears on card:____________________________________ Signature:________________________________________ Please make check payable to Parker College of Chiropractic. Membership dues are non-refundable. Home Street:

__________________________________________ Clinic Name: ___________________________________________

__________________________________________ Street: ___________________________________________ City: __________________________________________ ___________________________________________ State: __________________________________________ City: ___________________________________________ Zip: __________________________________________ State: ___________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________________ Zip: ___________________________________________ Fax: __________________________________________ Phone: ___________________________________________ E-Mail: __________________________________________ Fax: ___________________________________________ Spouse Name: __________________________________________

 Check to keep private

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Please mail or fax completed form to: PARKER COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 2540 Walnut Hill Lane Dallas, Texas 75229-5668 888.PR.ALUMS Fax: 214.902.3484

ID#______________________PBLCN


Massage School Big news from Parker’s School of Massage in 2010: Enrollment is at an all-time high! Participation in the massage program is the highest it has been in the school’s history, and on a further positive note, is steadily growing!

Medical Massage Program Graduates First Class The Parker School of Massage Therapy recently began a medical massage internship program at the Children’s Medical Center in Dallas, TX. Working alongside current Children’s Medical Center massage therapists, the students are assigned to patients in the pain management center in an effort to provide relief. Students enrolled in the medical massage program are currently licensed massage therapists obtaining additional training.

Massage School Congratulates its 10th Graduating Class Parker School of Massage Therapy held a commencement ceremony for its tenth graduating class, presenting massage therapy diplomas to the students. Family, friends, faculty, and staff attended. “It’s so nice to witness their graduation day after seeing the hard work and tireless effort they each put into achieving this,” said Dr. Drew Riffe, Director of Parker School of Massage Therapy. In closing the ceremony, graduates took the massage oath demonstrating their commitment to providing the highest quality care to those who seek their service.

Medial massage is a specialized concentration that requires practitioners to have more extensive knowledge of muscular and skeletal conditions. Medical massage therapists provide care based upon soft tissue and joint exam findings and various other assessment procedures, such as history taking, observation, neurological testing, and muscle testing. This level of advanced training prepares massage therapists to work alongside other healthcare professionals in order to deliver the most comprehensive care to their patients. Studies show that approximately 30 percent of Americans are currently using massage therapy for health purposes, including injury recovery, pain reduction, headache control, and for their overall health and wellness.

67 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

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Continuing Education Keeping tabs on the latest trends and developments— and offering that knowledge to chiropractors, massage therapists, and wellness professionals to keep them operating at a competitive peak—is Parker’s Office of Continuing Education. In 2010, the department expanded its course catalog, and also honed in on what courses DCs are demanding most.

Animal Chiropractic Program at Full Gallop

1: for 201 n o z i r o H er, On the me to Pa rk nd rog ra m s co

erie s’ a g new p ive C a re S d bre a k in • Grou n e ‘Ch iropract ic Act fic ate’ prog ra m s. s th er ti such a ve Pri ma ry C a re C rati ill be ‘Integ ucation w tinuing Ed to c a mpu s n o C f o ffice back • The O e c om in g in g Hom g n ri b ! 1 201 er 20 -23, ce s er aud ien Octob l re ach w id il w s m ra a nd prog • Cla sses a st events. c eb w h w it

In 2010, Parker’s animal chiropractic continuing education program continued to be a huge success, meeting maximum attendee capacity quickly. The program is growing tremendously and Parker’s association—both nationally and internationally— in the field of animal chiropractic is gaining traction. Animal chiropractic, also called veterinary chiropractic, offers a drug-free approach to pet healthcare. The program stresses that pets receive routine animal chiropractic care to ensure they maintain a healthy spine and nervous system. For animal chiropractic care to be safe and effective, practitioners must be properly trained in animal adjusting. Parker is proud to have the only animal chiropractic program offered by a U.S. accredited chiropractic college where Parker students can join DCs and DVMs in a course of study that prepares them for certification.

A Colorful Expansion of Programs In addition to the exemplary programs geared for doctors of chiropractic, the department also expanded courses for massage therapists. The robust line-up of quality programs currently offered has gained the attention of massage therapists across the industry. Courses such as ‘Gross Anatomy for the Massage Therapist’, ‘Utilizing Cold Stone Therapy for Tension Headaches’, ‘Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization Technique’, ‘Prenatal Massage’, and ‘Massage for Oncology Patients’, were just some out the outstanding offerings that filled out the 2010 roster.

A Partnership of Mutual Success The Office of Continuing Education also built wonderful relationships with new co-sponsors, including: Standard Process North Texas, DCOnline, and ChiroContinuing Education.

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 68


A MO DEL CENTER FO R TH E FUTU RE

H ow Pa r ke r ’s N e w Fl ow e r M o u n d We l l n e s s C e n t e r S e r ve s Pa t i e n t s a n d I n t e r ns A l i ke

On August 10, 2010, the Parker Chiropractic Wellness Center in Flower Mound, TX, officially opened for business. After 25 years of serving patients in the greater Dallas area, the need to provide quality chiropractic care, as well as accommodate student interns with an advanced clinical learning experience, had outgrown Parker’s two existing clinics. On opening day, the ribbon was cut, handshakes and smiles were shared, and a brand new 5,836 square foot community-based center welcomed its first patient. One Wellness—Two Objectives In opening the new center, two objectives would be met. First, leading-edge chiropractic care with an emphasis on wellness education would be provided to the Flower Mound community. Secondly, interns would attain hands-on clinical experience in a “real world” setting. “The Flower Mound center [is] a prototype for more communitybased centers targeting young active families in suburban communities,” said Dr. Fabrizio Mancini, President of Parker College. “It’s part of a strategic plan to build awareness for chiropractic care, as well as educate students through real-world business experience.” The center offers many nuanced and specialty services based on treating patients through the art of chiropractic, as well as taking a wellness-based approach to how patients live their lives. Services such as physical examinations, correcting subluxations, adjusting, radiology, active care, and physiotherapy are paired with nutrition and fitness information to keep patients on a path to optimal health. Hands-On Experience The center also prides itself on the real world experience provided to students and interns—many of whom consider this model a perfect preparation for what they will face after graduation. “It’s been amazing,” says Mark Gunderlach, Tri-seven intern. “The experience of working alongside our successful staff doctors in a brand new facility is one-of-a-kind.” The hands-on experience Mark speaks of entails not only the delivery of patient care, but also a working knowledge of what it takes to open, operate, market, and maintain a thriving chiropractic practice. 69 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

“The timing couldn’t be better. I’ve seen what it takes to get a center up and running by working alongside the staff here. It gives me a one-up for when it’s time for me to open my own practice,” says Gunderlach. From working side-by-side with doctors to managing the daily business affairs of a community-based center, the Flower Mound experience is one of a kind. “In this doctor-based environment, the interns take a handson approach to examining, taking digital x-rays, and following through with the care plan to help the patient reach their optimal health level,” says Dr. Patricia Cates, instructor at the Flower Mound Wellness Center. Dr. Cates says the challenges that the interns face is understanding the business aspect of managing an outpatient center. From the importance of the first impression to scheduling follow-up visits, interns must understand the needs of each patient. A Model Center for the Future As the Flower Mound Wellness Center continues to prosper, inevitably, adding more centers under the Parker umbrella will be explored. For now, the wellness center is expanding its services to offer health talks, free screenings, and community appreciation events. The approach taken at the center is one of complete health and wellness. As this message gains traction in the community, the Flower Mound center will be ideally positioned to provide quality chiropractic and wellness services while also building tomorrow’s professional for years to come.


) y r r a L ( L awrence Name:

Dr. Lawrence Stolar

er Since: Employed at Park Department:

September 2003

Clinics

Proudest Achie My Department’s

vement of 2010:

ower Mound Clinic. The opening of the Fl

where we were y rt pa as m st ri Ch ic in year ’s cl 10: L ast 20 om fr y or em M Funniest Parker special clinic elves. e th s, le nk ri Sp d an es introduced to Sparkl tation of the en em pl im r fo s an pl g Finalizin king Forw For 2011, I’m Loo

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Specia l: hat Makes Parker

Staff and students! 70


Parker Chiropractic Wellness Clinics Live. Life. Better. You have endless opportunities to learn more about yourself and how to make the right choices for your lifestyle. Parker Chiropractic Wellness Clinics are dedicated to helping you make these positive choices.

At Parker Chiropractic Wellness Clinics, we specialize in providing customized care to meet your individual needs. We believe in integrative wellness: a multifaceted approach based on your lifestyle and desired goals. Our experienced team can create a plan that includes regular chiropractic care, exercise, nutrition, and stress relief that will dramatically improve your quality of life. Health is the single most important investment you can make, so discover a care plan that nurtures wellness in all areas of your life. Choose chiropractic!

Visit any of our locations and start living your life today! Dallas | Irving | Flower Mound

10 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

972.438.9355 www.parkercc.edu/wellness-center


Gilles Name:

Dr. Gilles Lamarche

Employed at Parker Since:

since November 2006) Department:

Off icially September 2008 (cont

Seminars, Development, Alumni,

ract prior as consultant

and Parker SHARE Products

My Department’s Proudest

Achieveme Fo growth even in a down economy. nt of 2010: r Seminars, it was our continued For Development, creation of name d student scholarships. Our Alumni depart ment reached 200 Lifetime M em bers. A nd our SHARE bookstore released, “The Well-Adjusted Soul.” For 2011, I’m Look ing Fo rw

ard to: Expanding the Parker bran d and helping more DCs and CAs achieve the practice th ey envision - thereby helping more people discover their maximized health potential! W hat Makes my Departm ent Special:

interact with every day. W hat Makes Parker Speci

al:

of chiropractic worldwide.

The people I have the opportunity

The vision and the compelling focu

to

s on improving the delivery 72


Seminars For 60 years, Parker Seminars has been the backbone of our educational and motivational reach into the world at large. For 2010, Parker Seminars is proud to announce that the office experienced continued growth—in light of economic downturn. The lineup for 2010 included the Las Vegas flagship seminar, as well as events in Dallas, Texas; Montreal, Quebec, Canada; and Rome, Italy. Each event was a victory, with specific successes highlighted below. Las Vegas Seminar Sells Out! Parker Seminars Las Vegas was an enormous success, with a large crowd packing the house. Honors, awards, motivation, and fellowship were shared in equal measure.

Legendary NFL wide-receiver and three-time Super Bowl champ Jerry Rice was among speakers at Parker Seminars Las Vegas. Rice credits his success on the field largely to chiropractic care. “If I had everything in alignment, I knew I could play my best football,” said Rice. His training routine included twice-weekly chiropractic adjustments which helped his body recover from all the hard hits and countless tackles. The Drugless Research Hall of Fame, founded by Parker College, honored Dr. Cheryl Hawk as the 2010 inductee during the second annual Parker Gala held at the Las Vegas Parker Seminar. The Drugless Research Hall of Fame is a recognition designed to showcase significant drug-free contributions in research worldwide.

At the 2010 seminar, Kent Greenawalt, President of Foot Levelers, was honored with the Philanthropy Award. He was recognized for his consistent support of Parker Seminars and Parker College in the mission to spread chiropractic wellness worldwide. Mr. Greenawalt and his family have contributed to the advancement of the chiropractic profession for years.

73 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

In addition to the events and highlights, Parker hosted the Second Annual Parker Gala during the Las Vegas Parker Seminar. Event proceeds benefited chiropractic research and the advancement of the profession. Sponsored by Drucker Labs— manufacturers and distributors of an all-in-one liquid nutritional supplement—the night was coined “the most elegant evening in chiropractic.” Seminar attendees, industry professionals, speakers, presenters, sponsors, and exhibitors were all in attendance for this the black-tie event.


“Attending his seventh Parker Seminar in a row, Dr. Kipp made a very strong commitment again and said that he would attend seven more in a row,” said Dr. Gilles Lamarche, Vice President of Parker Seminars and Parker SHARE Products. Dr. Kipp is a 2001 Northwestern University of Health Sciences graduate who has practiced in several states including Minnesota, Florida, New York, and currently owns Pro-Health Chiropractic in Southport, CT. Montreal Seminar Spotlights World Congress of Women Chiropractors The WCWC invited all women chiropractors and DC students to join them for a lively discussion of industry trends. The event was an excellent networking opportunity for fellowship, the sharing of stories, and career experiences.

Parker also held its largest Alumni reception in Las Vegas during the Las Vegas Seminar. Parker alumni and friends gathered and reconnected for the most well attended alumni event in the history of Parker College.

Parker Seminar in Rome Features Best and Brightest in Europe In cooperation with the Association for Italian Chiropractors (AIC), Parker Seminars participated in the largest chiropractic event held in Europe. The AIC is credited with excellent event management, as well as fostering the spirit of support and camaraderie for chiropractors across the European market.

... 1 1 0 2 r Fo ild on ues to bu

Dallas Seminar Honors Dedication to Service During this year’s Parker Seminars in Dallas, TX, several individuals were honored for their dedicated service to the chiropractic profession. Dr. Robert Kipp was recognized with the Grand Tour Organization (GTO) Award for his service to patients, the profession, and the community, as well as his commitment in continuing to study, learn, and update his abilities by attending seven consecutive Parker Seminars.

ntin e minars co e S r e 0, with th k 1 r 0 a 2 P m o inars entum fr rker Sem a the mom P f o y r ersa try in Las 60th anniv ts across the coun as ven sey Cit y— r, r e J hosting e d n a ouve rlando, d in Vanc a Vegas, O o r b a s r mina a! well as se , Australi y e n d y S nd Canada a

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 74


Student Life Sport-by-Sport Final Standings (Listed in First, Second, and Third Place)

Parker College Regains Top Spot of Chiropractic Athletic World

For the fifth time in the past six years, Parker College of Chiropractic owns bragging rights as the top athletic school among chiropractic colleges. On November 6-7, the Parker Patriots outdistanced runner-up Logan College for top honors at the 19th Annual Chiro Games in Cocoa Beach, Florida, 82-50.

Golf:

Logan, Palmer-Iowa, Parker

Swimming:

Parker, New York/Logan tie

Women’s Soccer:

Life, Parker, Logan

Softball:

Parker, Life, Palmer

Women’s Basketball:

Parker, Logan, Northwestern

Running:

Logan, Parker, New York

Beach Volleyball:

Parker, Life, Logan

Tennis:

Parker, Life, National

Men’s Basketball:

Logan, Parker, New York

Flag Football:

Palmer-Florida, Parker, National

Men’s Soccer:

Life, New York, Parker

Parker, which saw its run of four consecutive overall team tiles snapped last year by Logan, regained its “king of the mountain” status in record fashion this year. Patriot teams grabbed gold, silver or bronze in all 11 sports; an accomplishment achieved only once prior in Chiro Games history (also by Parker in 2005). The march to the awards stand for Parker began with gold medals in swimming (for the third consecutive year), softball, women’s basketball, beach volleyball and tennis. In addition, Parker claimed silver medals in women’s soccer, running, men’s basketball and flag football. The Patriots also picked up the bronze trophy in golf and men’s soccer. Logan College took home championship honors in golf, running, and men’s basketball. Other championships included Life University in men’s and women’s soccer and Palmer-Florida in flag football. The victory by Parker not only gave the Patriots their fifth overall championship in six years, but they have now claimed 10 titles in 19 years of competition. Palmer-Iowa ranks second in championships with six. 2010 also marked Parker’s 17th topthree finish, which is a Chiro Games record. 75 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu

Batter Up! Athletic Director Steve Weller

Events such as the Chiro Games, intramural, and other athletic events are helmed by Parker’s Director of Athletics and Recreation, Steve Weller. Steve brings a wealth of experience to Parker’s athletic portfolio as a former baseball player, a coast guard veteran, staff member for two United States Olympic Baseball teams (Seoul and Los Angeles), and recently completed his 16th year as official scorer for the Texas Rangers. Parker has won a total of five overall team championships in six years at the Chiro Games since Steve joined Parker. Great job teams, and thank you, Steve, for all your hard work!


Victor Name:

Victor Ballesteros

ker Since: Employed at Par Department:

July 2003

Student Affairs

om e many students overc so g in p el H : ievement of 2010 ch trimester A t e es th ud ro te P le p t’s m en co tm ar to ep ) D My nship, personal, etc. o ti la re , ic m de ca (a s their struggle am. and/or the DC progr practical jokes. e ic ff o er nt I from 2010: Funniest Parker

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ess being made gr ro p d an us at st Reaching university : to d ar rw Fo g k in For 2011, I’m Loo ew location. n e bl si os p a d ar w to other and ch ea r fo re ca y el n People that genui l: epartment Specia D y m es ak M t W ha

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great employees. d an ts en ud st t ea Gr 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 76


PARKER PUZZLES To tie up this edition of ParkerLife, we’ve whipped up a little cross-word puzzle to see if you’ve been paying attention. All of the clues correspond to the stories listed in this edition, so feel free to flip back and forth if you need a cheat sheet. Plus, test your Parker (and chiropractic) knowhow with some trivia questions. Answer them all correctly and this issue of ParkerLife is free! Wait, it was free already. Good luck!

1 2 3

5

6

7

4

8

9 10

11 14

15

12

13

16 17 19

18

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ACROSS 3) Dallas, Irving & Flower Mound 5) Healthier cola alternative for kids 7) Held in Cocoa Beach, Florida 10) The future of healthcare 13) Accentuate the __________________ 14) University of Miami massage research pioneer 16) Number of years Dr. Mancini has been Parker’s president 18) Month Parker transitions to university 19) CE specialty over 4,000 years old 20) Regulates blood glucose levels DOWN 1) Provider non-discrimination provision 2) Most time consuming entity on the Web 4) Collaboration, not _________________ 6) One in four offer alternative and complementary therapies 8) City that hosted 2010 Italy Parker Seminar 9) Number of nations that competed in 2010 South American Games 11) Location of UNEVE 12) Percent of expected growth to go toward advertising 15) Lunch and __________________ 17) Drugless Research Hall of Fame 2010 Inductee

Across: 3. Clinics | 5. Juice box | 7. Chiro games | 10. Integrative | 13. Positive | 14. Field | 16. Eleven | 18. April | 19. Acupuncture | 20. Breakfast Down: 1. Harkin Amendment | 2. Facebook | 4. Competition | 6. US Hospitals | 8. Rome | 9. Fifteen | 11. Mexico | 12. Ten | 15. Learn | 17. Hawk

Parker Minute 1. D.D. and B.J. Palmer formed an association for chiropractors. What did they name it? 2. Who coined the term “chiropractic?” 3. What are the top vertebrae of the spine? 4. In 1962, a female chiropractor, Dr. Norma Godfrey, appeared on the television quiz show “What’s My Line?” How many people watched the show that night and learned about chiropractic? 5. On what date did the original Parker campus open? 6. How many students were in Parker’s first graduating class? 1. Universal Chiropractors’ Association | 2. Civil War veteran and friend of D.D. Palmer, Rev. Samuel H. Weed | 3. Atlas and axis | 4. 19,000,000 | 5. September 12, 1982—also Dr. Parker’s 62nd birthday | 6. 27

77 2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu


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th y r a s r e v nni

2011 UPCOMING SEMINARS

A

ICA/Parker Symposium on Natural Fitness and Sports March 4-5, 2011 Renaissance Columbus Downtown Hotel Columbus, Ohio

Parker Seminars Orlando April 7-9, 2011 Walt Disney World Dolphin Resort Orlando, Florida

Celebrating Women in Chiropractic窶認irst Annual Conference May 20-22, 2011 Hyatt Regency Jersey City on the Hudson Jersey City, New Jersey

Parker Seminars Australia June 17-19, 2011 Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre Sydney, Australia

Parker Seminars Vancouver September 22-24, 2011 Sheraton Wall Centre Vancouver, Canada

Parker Seminars Las Vegas January 2012 Las Vegas Hilton Las Vegas, Nevada

Become a GTO Pledge by purchasing th ree (3) consec utive North Americ an Parker Sem inars.

Enjoy a $63 5 savings!

For more info rmation, visit our websit e at w w w.parkers eminars.com or call 888.72 7.5338

ONE VOICE FOR CHIROPRACTIC

2011 ParkerLife Magazine | www.parkercc.edu 10


Parker is leading the way for the chiropractic profession. This leadership extends beyond the education of the best and most prepared doctors in the world. The institution seeks to support and build a profession poised to offer effective health care choices to patients looking for a better answer. Today’s movement toward proactive health care is obvious and Parker College of Chiropractic is at the forefront of this revolution. At Parker College of Chiropractic, you will acquire the skills and wisdom to reach out into the world and transform lives. Contact the Office of Enrollment for information and start changing your world today!

Call 800.GET.MY.DC or visit our website at www.parkercc.edu/future

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Supporting your journey – ever y step of the way.

Parker Life: January 2011  

Parker University Magazine

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