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Outdoor Recreation Management Professional preparation for individuals seeking careers in recreation management, wilderness and protected area management, nature guiding and writing, interpretation, and outdoor and environmental education. National Parks & Forests

State & Local Parks

Nature Centers

Museums & Historical Sites

Nature-Based Tourism

In the United States national parks and forests provide millions of visitors with opportunities for recreation, solitude, learning and adventure.

State and local parks provide a wide array of outdoor recreation opportunities for the public.

Nature centers and environmental education programs provide a rich source of outdoor recreation experience for youth and adults.

Interpretation and education are two of the primary functions of many museums and historical sites.

Nature-based tourism is growing in importance as local communities realize the value of their cultural and natural resources as a potential economic engine.

Professionals working in these areas work as campground hosts, environmental educators, interpreters, area managers, and backcountry guards or rangers.

Majors in ORM may choose to seek employment in any of the following agencies: *State Parks *State Forests *State Wildlife Refuges

Majors may seek employment with the following agencies: *National Park Service *USDA Forest Service *Bureau of Land Management *US Fish & Wildlife Service *Others

*Regional park systems. *County park systems. *City park and recreation programs.

Majors in ORM may choose to seek employment in any of the following types of nature centers. *Local and regional public nature centers.

Majors in ORM may choose to seek employment in any of the following types of museum/historical sites? *Historic monuments, parks, and buildings. *Living history museums.

Majors in ORM may choose to seek employment with the following types of naturebased businesses. *Commercial guide service

*Regional interest group related nature centers (i.e., Audubon Society, Nature Conservancy)

*Natural history museum.

*Outdoor education programs at resorts and destinations.

*Zoological gardens.

*Adventure travel .

*Botanical gardens.

*School and university related outdoor recreation programs.

*Eco-tours and other ecofreindly businesses.

*Aquaria *Cruise line industry.

“Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in, where nature may heal and give strength to the body and soul.” –– John Muir

Craig Rademacher, Ph.D.

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MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Introductory Courses EXP 105 Personal Dimension of Education PSY 202 Adult Development & Life Assessment. Major Course Requirements (48 semester credits, all 3 credit courses) Courses listed in the recommended sequence.

SOC 120 Introduction to Ethics and Social Responsibility CRJ 201

Introduction to Criminal Justice

BUS 340 Business Communications ORM 100 Foundations of Outdoor Living ORM 125 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure ORM 225 Outdoor Activity Program Planning

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History & Philosophy Valued “The parks do not belong to one state or to one section.... The Yosemite, the Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon are national properties in which every citizen has a vested interest; they belong as much to the man of Massachusetts, of Michigan, of Florida, as they do to the people of California, of Wyoming, and of Arizona.” –Stephen Mather, First Director of the National Parks The appreciation and valuing of our national heritage is often tied to our understanding and use of our national parks, forests and other wild lands. A thorough understanding of our natural heritage, as manifest in public lands and recreation resources, will be one of the goals of the Outdoor Recreation Management major. As professionals Ashford University graduates will be able to connect the people, events, policy, and modern practice to this heritage. This will provide a grounding that will serve graduates for a lifetime regardless of which area of outdoor recreation management they pursue.

ORM 300 Outdoor Recreation History, Resources, and Values

Students will also develop an understanding of the evolution of nature appreciation, environmentalism, and the process of forging policy in the modern age.

ORM 325 Recreation Administration & Leadership

The history and philosophy of outdoor recreation will be a valued component of this major.

ORM 330 Readings in Outdoor Recreation: Nature & Meaning

Technology Skills Valued

ORM 350 Interpretation I: Foundations & Guided Services ORM 352 Interpretation II: Self-Guided Media ORM 400 Wilderness and Protected Area Management ORM 420 Nature-Based Tourism ORM 450 New Media in Natural and Cultural Resource Interpretation ORM 460 Outdoor Recreation Facility Design ORM 470 Recreation Research & Evaluation Degree is 120 credits: 48 Major Core, 46 General Education, 26 Electives. *See full course descriptions on page 3.

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“For tomorrow belongs to people who prepare for it today.” – Proverb Several things are certain about the future of outdoor recreation. First, it will be in increasing demand. Second, outdoor recreation resources will become more highly pressured and scarce. Third, management of outdoor recreation activities and resources will become more sophisticated and complex. These ideas speak to the importance of future professionals who are well educated and technically skilled at handling decisions and information in the workplace. Future outdoor recreation management professionals will have to not only understand the dynamics of management but they will be increasing drawn into managing information, designing effective communication, and outreach to both near and distant communities that have a stake in outdoor recreation decision making and access.

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Through the ORM curriculum Ashford University students will be exposed to and learn to design a diverse set of interpretive communication media: Signs, brochures, newsletters, personal presentation, and new and portable media. How visitors receive information about parks and forests in their homes, on their cell phones, and even on-site is currently evolving quickly. The ORM curriculum is designed to stay on top of these changes and help graduates step into their positions as leaders in the use of technology in outdoor recreation management.

Innovation & Creativity Valued “Creativity involves breaking out of established patterns in order to look at things in a different way.” –Edward de Bono If we expect our students to innovate, to create, we must model that behavior. This is one of the fundamental goals of this curriculum. Offering outdoor recreation management online would be enough of a creative leap. But the technology and techniques to do this are available and have been for a while. It is just that few have applied the methods necessary. Fewer still have integrated truly creative methods to teach online. The Outdoor Recreation Management major will embrace innovation and creativity in a number of ways including: Rich Media: Courses within the ORM major will be designed to take advantage of audio and video technology that permits the use of rich media for online learning. In particular I hope to bring audio and video interviews and resource tours to students via the web. In addition screencasting will be used to enhance lesson content and present key theoretical concepts and demonstrate course related software. Portability: In an ever increasing hectic world being able to learn “on the go” can be very valuable. To that end ORM content will be designed to compliment delivery to iPods and mobile phones for easy access by majors. Variety: As there are a number of learning the provision of content in a variety of formats may prove valuable to majors. When possible multiple methods of content delivery will be used to enhance access and student learning. This will likely include using traditional texts, audio books, PDF documents, narrated presentations, digital audio and video, and others. We will model a paperless classroom.

Craig Rademacher, Ph.D.


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Course Descriptions (ORM) ORM 100 Foundations of Outdoor Living Introduction to basic outdoor living skills. Major topic areas include basic survival, rope craft, cooking and fires, health and safety, map and compass, gear and shelters and environmental awareness. ORM 125 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Introduction to leisure and recreation and the leisure service profession. Includes historical and current concepts, theories and philosophies of leisure, recreation and play as well as historical development of public and private resources for leisure and recreation and exploration of career opportunities.

ORM 330 Readings in Outdoor Recreation:

ORM 420 Nature-Based Tourism

Nature & Meaning

Provides overview of the link between the

Select readings in outdoor recreation that

natural environment and business operations

explore the relationship between humans and

in the eco-tourism industry. Issues of

the environment. Readings will include the

sustainability, adventure travel, cultural

outdoor recreation “classics� as well as new

impacts and recreation resource management

forms of nature writing.

will be explored.

ORM 350 Interpretation I: Foundations & Guided Services Develops skills and knowledge in environmental and historical interpretive services through planning, implementing and evaluating all types of performance interpretation, including interpretive talks, guided walks and tours, interpretive events and living history. New & Portable Media Production

ORM 225 Outdoor Activity Program Design Study of the principles, practices and

ORM 450 New Media in Natural and

organization of outdoor activity programs

Cultural Resource Interpretation

including activity selection, program formats,

Theory and analysis of portable media for use

needs assessments, program operation

in interpretive services, visitor outreach,

strategies, risk management, and evaluation of

public education, and resource management

programs.

by public and private recreation management organizations. Will include production of portable media program. ORM 460 Outdoor Recreation Facility Photo: National Park Service

Design Facility design as it relates to public parks, campgrounds, trail systems, visitor centers

ORM 352 Interpretation II: Self-Guided

and museums.

Media

ORM 300 Outdoor Recreation History, Resources & Values Studies resources, policies and history of governmental and non-governmental organizations with involvement in outdoor recreation. Examines human behavior in the natural environment and the benefits from this interaction. ORM 325 Recreation Administration & Leadership Study of the administration of public recreation agencies. Special focus on leadership as a function of management and public discourse. Craig Rademacher, Ph.D.

Planning, implementing and evaluating all

ORM 470 Recreation Research & Evaluation

types of self-guided interpretive services

Principles and methods for conducting

including publications, exhibits, signs, self-

research and program evaluation in outdoor

guided tours and trails, and multimedia

recreation management and leisure services.

presentations. ORM 400 Wilderness and Protected Area Management The management of the land as an environment for outdoor recreation. Includes evaluation of legislation, policy, and recreation management strategies as they apply to wilderness and other protected areas such as national and state parks. The ORM major is ideal for anyone interested in a career working in the great outdoors.

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Recreation Development Recreation development is a job not of building roads into lovely country, but of building receptivity into the still unlovely human mind. — Aldo Leopold

A Vision Of Online Outdoor Recreation To some the concept of offering outdoor recreation as an online curriculum seems strange. Nothing could be further from the truth. We are seeing the beginnings of online outdoor recreation in other universities. Most notable are Northern Arizona University and Stephen F. Austin State University in Texas. The NAU undergraduate program is in its early stages and has been stalled recently by budget shortfalls. The NAU program is designed for a parks and recreation management certificate. The SFA graduate program is designed for National Park Service personnel who are pursuing an advanced degree in interpretation.

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The Outdoor Recreation Management (ORM) program proposed for Ashford University represents a clear step toward bringing this exciting career

The ORM curriculum is designed to provide students with depth in the history and practice of outdoor recreation management while

Graduates of the Outdoor Recreation Management major will be prepared to seek placement with federal land management agencies like the USDA Forest Service and National Park Service as well as state

parks, local and regional park systems, nature centers, environmental organizations, historic sites and museums, camps, youth service organizations, and private guiding and tourism businesses. choice to non-traditional and place bound students seeking a BA degree. It may well the the first of its kind.

bringing innovation and creativity in areas of outreach, interpretation, and nature-based tourism.

Each course is capable of being designed for delivery online. Through technologies such as screencasting, audio and video podcasts, live and recorded interviews with professionals in the field rich educational media can be presented to majors to help them understand and visualize the outdoor recreation setting and profession. Outdoor recreation management is consistently successful in traditional university settings. At Northern Michigan University it is one of the most popular majors. My belief is that this type of major has strong potential value to Ashford University and its students. The timing is also excellent for offering an online ORM major that has few competitors in the market.

Craig Rademacher, Ph.D.

Outdoor Recreation Management  

Overview of new online outdoor recreation major.

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