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ARCHITECTURE P O RT F O L I O collection of academic and creative work // admission for M. ARCH

PA R I S A

MARD

MEHDIABADI


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Shelter from the storm Photographer’s studio Capitol hill health + wellness In between | adaptive reuse Harvest restaurant Urban oscillation Cherry chair


SHELTER FROM THE STORM

AUTUMN 2009 . ARCH 300 FINAL PROJECT .

Prof. Doug Zubebuhler, Rob PeĂąa, Elizabeth Golden, Nina Franey

Shelter from the Storm, located at the beginning of the path leading to the Cleveland Memorial Forest acts as a threshold and a marker of the beginning and end of one’s journey through the site. The structure is divided based on the nature of activities, passive and active, with the space in between forming the sunken path leading to the forest. The construction of the structure is based on timber framing bypass system that focuses primarily on registration and sizing of different structural components.

Cleveland Memorial Forest Seattle, WA 10 weeks

S COOKING T O R A G E

EAT

DINING

C I R C U L A T I O N

REST/ STORAGE R

S L E E P ES S L E E PT

CONCEPT DIAGRAM illustrating spatial relationship between different volumes.


A East Elevation illustrating the relationship of the structure to the surrounding context.

SECTION A-A defining the relationship of the active and passive spaces in relation to the sunken path.

A

A

A

SITE PLAN

EXPERIENTIAL VIEW as approaching the Shelter


BALLARD AVE NW

VERNON PL SITE PLAN of Ballard neighborhood

PHOTOGRAPHER’S STUDIO WINTER 2010 . ARCH 302 FINAL PROJECT . Professor Peter Cohen + Jeniffer Dee

Design of this structure was inspired by the work of Vera Lutter. Her photography was done by the use of a camera obscura. The long exposure of camera obscura resulted in ghostly images devoid of humans and/or any moving objects. The scale and subject matter of the photographs were usually large in size and monumental in scale. Use of camera obscura also resulted in reversal of light and dark colors. The design similarly plays with the idea of solid and void, suspense and monumentality. As a result, the solid, which usually anchored on the ground, is lifted up into the air. The random cylindrical supports create fluidity and movement for the light of the gallery space. The mass supported by the cylindrical columns, though seemingly solid from outside is actually carved out completely with a singular office space floating in its interior. The container like structure of the office space is similar to the shipping containers that were used by Vera Lutter as a medium for photography. Consequently, the immensity and ghostly light of the space becomes an ever evolving container for different experiences and uses of the visitors and artists, hovering slightly above the city grade line.

Ballard neighborhood Seattle, WA 10 weeks

“Instability, uncertainty, suspense, and monumentality are entities that I consider and think about; they inform my work.” -Vera Lutter

URBAN INFILL

DIAGRAM conceptual development.

PUSH FOR LIGHT

CREATE VOIDE BY LIFTING MASS

SUPPORT MASS


APPROACHING VIEW from Ballard Ave. NW

VERNON PL

STREET ELEVATION within the context of Ballard neighborhood.


INTERIOR VIEW suspended office space + display room


STUDIO + EXHIBITION SPACE

MEETING + OFFICE

FLOOR PLAN second floor

MODEL IMAGE showing perforated building facade.

STUDIO + EXHIBITION SPACE

STORAGE

MEETING + OFFICE

GALLERY SPACE

LONGITUDINAL SECTION illustrating folding planes that create the studio and gallery space.

W.C.

W.C.

MODEL IMAGE showing the gallery space on the ground floor.


CAPITOL HILL Health + Wellness Center SPRING

Professor

2011 .

ARCH 302 FINAL PROJECT .

Brian McLaren + Bradley Khouri

SITE ANALYSIS photo collage illustrating movement around the site.

Repeating elements and movement through the site became the primary inspiration behind the design of the Capitol Hill Health and Wellness Center. The urban strategy for this project, located at an industrial neighborhood in Seattle, is to extend the sidewalk into the site and slowly direct and compress the circulation of people through the structure. This in turn leads to symbolic creation of an internal alleyway in the building where movement is ever present and visible. The alleyway not only serves as a main artery but also as an open space where major spaces open up for light and ventilation. The spaces surrounding the alleyway thus penetrate, occupy and shape the experience through the site. The design of the project focuses more in creating a journey within the inbetween space of the alleyway rather than getting people from one point to another. The spatial arrangement of different activities is mostly based on interconnection and functional overlaps. The sub grade level holds the multipurpose and support spaces such as lockers and equipment storage room while the grade level hosts the more public functional spaces such as the cafĂŠ and the reception area. The next level houses the administrative and exhibition area on top of which rests the main exercise room and studios. The internal alleyway thus becomes the main artery where the public moves from the sub level to the highest point in the structure.

Capitol Hill neighborhood Seattle, WA 10 weeks

CONCEPT MODEL translating observation of movement through the site.


LONGITUDINAL SECTION illustrating movement through the alleyway and different functional overlaps.


MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS

transformation of concept models to final design.

STREET ELEVATION showing the context of the building within the Capitol Hill neighborhood.


STORAGE

GALLERY+ GIFT SHOP

MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM

CAFE

STREET LEVEL PLAN displaying the internal alleyway + compression of movement through the structure.

PERSPECTIVE the concept of movement is present throughout the structure.


HARVEST RESTAURANT FALL 2011 . ARCH 400 FINAL PROJECT . Professor Judith Swain

C

B

C

B

A

A

A

A

C

B

FLOOR PLAN C

B

SECTION A-A showing site section and the relationship between different buildings in the site.

Set in an old military housing site, Harvest Restaurant serves as an educational site as well as production and serving of locally grown produce. Organization of the buildings within this site is based on views as well as relationship to different gardens and food production and consumption cycle. Design of the restaurant complex aims to extend existing landscape while at the same time taking advantage of storm management techniques for irrigation purposes. Consequently, the classrooms, some of which will held cooking classes, face the restaurant and herb garden while the barn and custodian’s residence run parallel to the service path. View of the restaurant towards the vegetable gardens serves as an interactive opportunity for visitors to cultivate their own food ingredients that would be cooked and served to them.

Discovery Park Seattle, WA 10 weeks

CONCEPT MODEL extension of landscape over the structure of the restaurant.


SITE PLAN within the context of Discovery Park.

DIAGRAM concept development process.


SECTION C-C longitudinal section through the restaurant and the reflective pool.

SECTION B-B longitudinal section through the barn and seasonal gardens.


EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE reflective pool and adjacent cafe area.


Radiant floor heating

Green roof water recycling system for irrigation purposes.

WALL SECTION illustrating storm water recycling system for irrigation purposes.


DETAIL DIAGRAM of swing door with incorporated bench seating.


INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE of Harvest Restaurant


IN BETWEEN | Adaptive Reuse

WINTER 2011 . ARCH 491 FINAL PROJECT . Professor Kathryn Merlino

1965

Building 18 in Magnuson park is a decommissioned firehouse, abandoned for several years due to its structural decay and poor building performance. This adaptive reuse project explores the spatial and time relationship between Building 18 and the rich history of Magnuson Park as a naval base during World War II. After preliminary examination, the second story which was not original to the building, was removed in order to alleviate some of the structural load. Integration of a green roof connects the building to the rest of the site and provides a space for visitors to get a full view of the Magnuson park. In addition, a branch community library runs parallel to the historical runway, which in the past dominated the site. The space created in between the library and the fire station becomes a circulation space, symbolically representing a link between the site’s past, present and the future.

Magnuson Park Seattle, WA 10 weeks

CONCEPT DIAGRAM drawing connection from the history of the site for building position and site activation.


Build up roof construction over rigid insulation supported by plywood

Wood perlins supported by steel girders

2x4 lam. decking

Load bearing brick wih brick veneer

Cast in place floor slab on top of reinforced concrete

Load bearing wood frame with brick veneer or cement plaster board

EXPLODED DIAGRAM displaying existing building conditions+ structure .

Steel column


SITE PLAN

BUILDING FLOOR PLAN


EXPLODED DIAGRAM showing library structural system.

LONGITUDINAL SECTION showing circulation pattern.

INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE of the library with rotating display bookcases.


WALL SECTION showing door detail + green roof stabilization.


TRANSVERSE SECTION through the firehouse Pedestrian Pathway

Bike Shop

Bathroom Core

Restaurant Service Core

Restaurant + Dining Area

Exhibition


URBAN OSCILLATION

SUMMER 2011 . COMPETITION ENTRY .

With Kristopher Chan, Rachelle Byarlay and Janice Lo

Urban Oscillation is based on the idea of extending the practice of agriculture into the current city fabric. This oscillating landscape not only varies continuously depending on the time and season, but also by topography and community use. Treating the site as a communal space open to everyone allows for integration and outreach in each programmatic element furthering the space while providing seating and interactive opportunities for visitors. The site takes advantage of aquaponic agriculture which utilizes the best of aquaculture and hydroponic system for a sustainable closed loop food production cycle with the ability to serve Brooklyn and the city beyond, year round. The walking paths that connect different structures interrupt the oscillation of the farming landscape and creates the opportunity to participate and experience farming in the city.

Brooklyn Navy Yard Brooklyn, NY 8 weeks

*PERSPECTIVE towards the cafe area. *renderings done in collaboration with Kristopher Chan

DIAGRAM close loop food production utilizing aquaponic agriculture.

LONGITUDINAL SECTION illustrating relationship between acquaponic system and circulation.


laboratory/ research 1

Offices

Auditorium

LONGITUDINAL SECTION of auditorium.

Open Market Cafe + restaurant

Classroom

CAFE SECTION

DIAGRAM grey water recycling system for the community garden irrigation.


C H E R RY C H A I R

SPRING 2011 . ARCH 400 FINAL PROJECT .

Laura Yeats + Penny Maulden + Steve Withycombe

DETAIL IMAGE mortis and tenon connection

The idea behind this project was to minimize material, connection, and components needed to construct a chair. Consequently, the chair is distilled to four main pieces of a hand carved seat, two tapered front legs, and a laminated vacuum bent back that also functions as the back leg. Four primary mortis and tenon connections carry the weight from the seat to the front legs and the forces imposed to the back of the seat down to the ground. In addition, the connection points were further stabilized by hammering Wenge wedges which impose the dowel to expand for a tight connection. Furthermore, as the majority of the weight of a person seating on a chair is carried off the back leg, additional steps were taken to reinforce this connection; such as increasing the back lamination thickness at the connection points as well as cutting a small notch in the seat which helps nestle and stabilize the back.


Total of four mortis and tenon connections. Hand carved seat for maximum comfort. Notched seat connection for stability.

Laminated vacuum bent back.

Continuous wood grain for visual unity and structural strength.

Increased thickness at the joints for stability.

Contrasting leg forms for visual contrast.

EXPLODED DIAGRAM showing chair components + connections.


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