Page 1

’cause

parenting is a trip!

The

DAD Issue Quirky Land mar ks Visit these off-the-tour-map Seattle spots These local parents reflect on fatherhood 12

ULTIMATE SUMMER READING LIST 6 events that’ll get them excited about reading 35

HAVE A COOL SCHOOL BREAK

How to have fun when it’s just too hot outside 19

MAKE A SPLASH AT THIS NEW SPOT PDZA makes waves with a new aquarium 32

JUNE 2018 EAST

FATHER’S DAY: 5 ESSAYS ON DAD

p. 22


Ÿ Medica�on Management Ÿ Overall Wellness Checkup

www.icanpediatrics.com

Ÿ Pa�ent Care Plans Ÿ Pediatric Urgent Care Ÿ Auditory Screening Ÿ Early Detec�on of Hearing Loss Ÿ Listening Strategies Ÿ Amplica�on Op�ons 2 • June 2018 • parentmap.com E 0318_ICAN_1-2h_fixed.indd 1

2/13/18 4:45 PM


inside JUNE 2018

PHOTO COURTESY PDZA

SEE THE NEW AQUARIUM AT PDZA • page 32 •

Parenting

Out + About

4  DEAR READER

20–21 J UNE CALENDAR 22 6  QUIRKY LANDMARKS

The cup of coffee that changed my life

6  NEWS AROUND TOWN 8  CRIB NOTES

TO VISIT THIS SUMMER

Keep Seattle weird by visiting these off-the-tour-map spots

From recent research to gaga gear

32 N  EW AQUARIUM MAKES A

10 TEENS TAKE ACTION

SPLASH AT TACOMA’S ZOO

Local teens make change happen

PDZA awash with new marine habitats and old faves (jellies!)

19 CUT THIS OUT

Have fun indoors when it’s too hot out

6 books with 6 matching local events

38 SOMEONE YOU SHOULD KNOW Local student pushes for gun safety with his dad’s support

22

Advertising Sections

Feature

18 Birthdays 29–31 Camps • Arts • Activities 34–39 Schools + Preschools

12 T  HE DAD ISSUE

A collection of essays on what being a dad means in 2018

COVER PHOTO COURTESY PIXABAY

8

PHOTO COURTESY THEVERYHUNGRYCATERPILLAR.COM NEW YORK GALLERY

35 AGES + STAGES

35 parentmap.com • June 2018 • 3


dear reader

The Cup of Coffee That Changed My Life

I

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met Alayne Sulkin, the CEO and publisher of ParentMap who typically graces this page, in a coffee shop on Capitol Hill. Alayne and I weren’t supposed to meet. In fact, I was there interviewing for a different job. But, sitting on the barstool next to mine, she overheard my mention of ParentMap, a local magazine where I’d just started freelancing. “ParentMap?” she said, leaning over. “I’m the publisher!” I should have known then what an impact ParentMap would have on my life. It’s been two years since that fateful cup of coffee. Since then, I’ve been assistant than associate and now, recently, managing editor. Throughout, I’ve worked with a variety of inspiring women. Watching them juggle work, family and life in “We have an general has shown me that the struggle is real and that it’s not mine to carry alone. expression for We have an expression for this, one that we’re fond of saying at ParentMap: this, one that “It takes a village.” we’re fond I’ve seen that village work. It’s made of the women I meet in coworking of saying at spaces throughout the Seattle area to talk ParentMap: ‘It about story ideas and editorial budgets. They’re juggling early dismissal and late takes a village.’” afternoon deadlines. They’re drafting weekly newsletters when the kid’s home sick. They’re writing feature stories after parent-teacher conferences. They’re doing all that and they’re raising kids. Good kids, too. I’ve met a few of them. These women show me that it’s possible. It’s hard but it’s possible and, most importantly, it was worth it for them. I bet you can relate to that struggle. Many of us can. They’re writing and editing ParentMap. They’re reading it. They’re you. As managing editor, my job is to tell you good stories. If you have one or feedback that you’d like to share, I invite you to email me (beth@parentmap.com). I can’t promise I’ll respond to each and every one of you but do know that I’m there and I’m listening. Your contribution — as a parent, as a reader, as a member of our community — is too important to ignore. — Elisabeth Kramer

4 • June 2018 • parentmap.com


ParentMap

June 2018, Vol. 16, No. 6 PUBLISHER/EDITOR Alayne Sulkin

EDITORIAL

MANAGING EDITOR Elisabeth Kramer DIGITAL CONTENT EDITOR Vicky McDonald OUT + ABOUT EDITOR Nancy Chaney PUBLISHING ASSISTANT Nicole Persun CALENDAR ASSISTANT Dora Heideman COPY EDITOR Sunny Parsons CONTRIBUTORS

Gemma Alexander, Nancy Schatz Alton, Will Austin, Jen Betterley, Maegen Blue, Jessica Graham, Brett Hamil, Malia Jacobson, William Kenower, Kimberly Mecham, Doug Miller, Christopher Shiple

DIGITAL MARKETING DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER

Lindsey Carter

SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIST

Diana Cherry

ADVERTISING SALES + PARTNERSHIPS MANAGER, ADVERTISING SALES AND PARTNERSHIPS

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AD OPERATIONS MANAGER Elisa Taylor ADVERTISING CLIENT SERVICES SPECIALIST

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MARKETING/EVENTS EVENT OPERATIONS Tara Buchan EVENT + MARKETING COORDINATOR

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EVENTS ASSISTANT Zoe Bloom

ART + PRODUCTION DESIGN + PRODUCTION, PRINT MAGAZINE

Emily Johnson

PRODUCTION DESIGN Amy Chinn

ADMINISTRATION FINANCE MANAGER Sonja Hanson BUSINESS ANALYST Carolyn Brendel ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT + DISTRIBUTION

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PARENTMAP EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Benjamin Danielson, M.D.

ODESSA BROWN CHILDREN’S CLINIC

Joan Duffell COMMITTEE FOR CHILDREN John Gottman, Ph.D. THE GOTTMAN INSTITUTE PROFESSOR EMERITUS, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

Laura Kastner, Ph.D.

PSYCHIATRY + BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

Bea Kelleigh

VICE PRESIDENT AT DOVETAILING, LLC

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LISTENING MOTHERS + COMMUNITY OF MINDFUL PARENTS

Ron Rabin THE KIRLIN FOUNDATION Daniel J. Siegel, M.D.

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parentmap.com • June 2018 • 5


news

News Around Town

Local fifth-grader publishes first book

New school opening in Bellevue

Stop by a rockin’ outdoor block party

published an illustrated children’s book called

doors this year at the former Bellefield Office Park

nonprofit and adventure travel site Outdoor

“All About Me: Truth or Fiction” (available on

conference center building on 114th Ave. SE. The

Project is hosting an all-ages block party on

Amazon). Diagnosed with autism at the age of

two-story, 13-classroom early childhood education

June 30 at Optimism Brewing. The event is part

8, Taylor wrote the book the same year. “JaMar

facility will include a brand-new 5,000-square-foot

of Outdoor Project’s series of summer festivals

has always been creative, imaginative and looked

playground area. As of publishing, the school is

hosted all over the country, from Austin in May

at things differently than most children his

actively enrolling for infant and pre-kindergarten

to Charleston in October. What can you expect?

age,” says his mom JaVohn Perry. To celebrate

classes. This will be the second Primrose

Music, food, gear demos, raffles and booths

his new book, Taylor will be hosting a reading

School in Washington state, joining the more

from local and national outdoor companies.

at Fairwood Library in Renton at 11:30 a.m. on

than 375 Primrose schools across the country.

And all proceeds benefit Wild Salmon Center!

Sunday, June 3.

primrosewestbellevue.com

outdoorproject.com

Giving Together 2018

Please join us each month as we promote, support and learn about an extraordinary local nonprofit. We will highlight the good works of organizations that strive to improve the lives of families and invite you to join us in giving precious time or money.

PHOTO COURTESY MEETUP.COM/SEATTLE-STAY-AT-HOME-DADS-GROUP

Meet 10-year-old JaMar Taylor. Taylor recently

6 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

Primrose School of West Bellevue will open its

Hey, outdoorsy readers! Check this out: The

THE NONPROFIT

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parentmap.com • June 2018 • 7


all about baby Find Your Village Being a new parent can be really isolating, but baby, we’ve got your back. ALLI ARNOLD

Sign up for our weekly eNews for the best in

Notes

outings and advice ’cause parenting is a trip!

h

parentmap.com/enews

From Recent Research to Gaga Gear

Have You Heard?

H

olly Schindler at the University of Washington (UW) has some good news for dads: You’ve got this. It’s not a message many new dads hear, says Schindler,

who’s an assistant professor in early childhood and family studies and educational psychology at the UW. In a recent presentation for the UW College of Education, Schindler discussed her research to find better ways to support dads. During the past three years, Schindler and her team have sent a team member to the homes of new fathers every week. The team member records Dad and baby interacting. In-between visits, Schindler’s team creates a video highlight reel that, Schindler explained, shows “Dad doing really great things with his child.” “We then show Dad his highlight reel and focus on specific parenting skills,” she said. “We explain to Dad why those skills are so important.” Dads who completed the program engaged more positively and more frequently with their young children. They also saw decreases in parenting-related stress and any problems in their children’s behavior. Even better news? Dads gained confidence in their parenting, which benefited the whole family.

8 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

Holly Schindler discusses her work to strengthen fathers’ parenting skills, using video highlights of what they’re already doing well.


celebrate the start of summer. We’ve rounded up the best spots for ice cream in the Seattle area. Pretty sweet, huh?

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6/1/15 10:14 PM

parentmap.com/icecream

Gear We’re Gaga For Celebrate the new parents in your life with these ideas

A BIB WITH A TINY SAILBOAT You know Feltman Brothers as a quality line with a vintage look.

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3/15/18 8:53 PM

A PAIR OF BABY BOOTIES We kind of think these look like Uggs for your baby and you know what? We don’t hate

Their friends were murdered right before their eyes. Now they’re using their voices to speak for those who can never speak again. That’s why we’re handing them the mic.

it. They also serve a practical purpose: No more searching for your little one’s lost socks! vivigz.com

A BOTTLE THAT FIGHTS AGAINST COLIC

We’ll do everything we can to amplify their voices.

This bottle from Tommee Tippee has a sci-fi look that helps fight colic, according to a survey of 200 parents. How does it work?

parentmap.com/never-again

Tommee Tippee credits the breast-like nipple shape and heat

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parentmap.com • June 2018 • 9


FREE

teens take action

Meet Beth Girma

Local teens make change happen By Elisabeth Kramer

I

n recent months, we’ve seen teens all over the country leading the way and using their voices for positive change. That’s what the young people in our monthly series Teens Take Action also do. These are Seattle-area teenagers who are making big things happen in their communities. Often, that’s thanks in part to their work with local programs, from the year-long service learning Youth Ambassadors Program (YAP) at the Gates Foundation to monthly commitments at some of our area’s bestknown museums. By educating, engaging and empowering youth, these programs offer teens a way to take their ideas on how to improve the world and make them real. This month, we talk to Beth Girma, a senior at Edmonds-Woodway High School, about how her work with the Gates Foundation Discovery Center and the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) has helped her learn more about herself and, by extension, her contribution to the world. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity and length.

Who am I? I’m Beth Girma. I’m 17 and a senior at Edmonds-Woodway High School. I’ve been involved with the Gates Foundation’s Discovery Center Youth Ambassadors Program for a year; I learned about it at last year’s Teen Action Fair [hosted annually at the Discovery Center] but it was the Center’s summer workshop at the foundation that really grabbed me. I was in a weeklong workshop where every day we’d come in and work on a new project. We got to advocate for different nonprofits and learn about their work; that really inspired me. I’ve also been a part of the Teen Arts Group at SAM for two years. We give regular tours to the public and we also host an event called Teen Night Out. It’s basically a big celebration at the museum with performers and music. Plus, everything in the museum is free for [high-school aged] teens to explore. Sponsored by:

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10 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

equal value. We are impatient optimists working to reduce inequity. Explore interactive exhibits and find ways you can take action at the Gates Foundation Discovery Center, discovergates.org


CARE THAT’S OUT OF THIS WORLD! “Stepping outside of my comfort zone unleashed so many different interests and opportunities.”

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Stell StellarKids.com With both programs, I had a chance to experience something that I always was interested in but didn’t think I could get into. I learned a lot about my own interests that way.

What I’m up to During the summer workshop [at Gates], I got to advocate for a nonprofit called One By One. They help women in developing countries who’ve had serious injuries due to an obstructed birth and often struggle to get the medical attention and community support that they need. I had a strong personal connection with One By One: They do work in Ethiopia, which is where my family is from. While working with the nonprofit, I talked to my mom about the project. We talked about how she knew women, including friends and distant family members, who had suffered birth complications. Some had lost the support of their families. Others had even passed away. Learning about that personal connection really made me want to do more work and got me really interested in nonprofit advocacy, an interest I want to learn more about in college.

#NeverAgain 19 years since Columbine. 5 years since Sandy Hook. 3 months since Parkland. This is one anniversary we aren’t looking forward to: the next school shooting.

Want to get involved, too? What I recommend Look for programs like the ones at the Gates Foundation and at SAM and encourage your kids to try them. I was very nervous working with both of these groups but they were the best things I could have done. Stepping outside of my comfort zone unleashed so many different interests and opportunities. It made me want to make the most of what I can do as a person. n Elisabeth Kramer is managing editor at ParentMap.

It doesn’t have to be this way.

Let’s stand up and say NEVER again. parentmap.com/never-again supports common sense gun reform. Follow us on

to join in our fight to end gun violence NOW.

parentmap.com • June 2018 • 11


feature

The

DAD Issue S

ome families have no dad. Others have two. Still more have a dad who doesn’t

live nearby or a dad who died or a dad who’s at home full-time. Fatherhood, like parenthood, has no one definition. You’ll see that in this collection of essays. These stories offer a sense of what being a dad means in 2018. For one writer, that means using chess to teach his son (and himself) a lesson. For another, how to use the night before his son’s big baseball game to bond. For still another, how to field the surprised reactions of friends and family that guess what? He’s actually pretty good at this dad thing. These are stories that, we hope, stick with you and your family long past Father’s Day. We know they will for us.

12 • June 2018 • parentmap.com


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By Doug Miller

T

He was right about Trout. He he night before my son’s first real baseball game, I knew that the Angels center fielder, seized the moment. who wasn’t even 24 years old, had Here’s a chance, I thought, to be already won one American League a “real dad.” To teach a life lesson. Most Valuable Player award and To connect with him in a common finished in the top two of that language we share — the one of vote in the past four consecutive balls and strikes and protective seasons. cups. That last one especially. His But occasionally we fathers tell mom could never identify with our sons things that even they don’t that. know. And occasionally, albeit And so I looked my 7-year-old in significantly less so, they listen. the eye and dropped the huge news “Trout hit 36 home runs on him: “Starting tomorrow, other in 2014,” I explained, reading kids are pitching to you for the first statistics off my phone. “He led the time. This isn’t dads American League kneeling down in with 111 runs batted the dirt and lobbing in. He had 173 Here was some it to you underhand hits. He scored 115 until you hit it. Now runs. He stole 16 wisdom that they’re going to be bases. These are all would ride throwing hard. Now amazing numbers. they’re trying to get But you know what shotgun with him you out. And guess else he did?” for the rest of his what? They’re going At this point, to succeed. A lot.” my son, I’m sure, life: failure. His eyes widened, was wishing he maybe from the was anywhere somewhat sudden but talking to me, but somehow he had absorbed and serious injection of life and all enough of my line of questioning to that bigger-than-baseball stuff. Or respond. maybe I had a piece of lettuce stuck “What?” in my teeth. Either way, here was “He struck out. A lot. Mike Trout some wisdom about the discovery struck out 184 times. The most in of something that would ride the American League. That means shotgun with him for the rest of his he struck out just about every life: failure. third time he was at the plate. And I asked him if he knew who Mike he made outs other ways enough Trout was. times that he was out more than 70 “Duh,” he said. “He’s the best percent of the time. Which means baseball player in the world. Do most of the time.” you think I’m stupid?” My son couldn’t believe it. The Already we were getting great Mike Trout? somewhere.

“ ”

“But, but, but … ” he said. For once in our coexistence, I did the interrupting: “But,” I said, “I have some good news for you.” During the boy’s first two seasons of “coach pitch,” prior to this seminal moment, I’d watched in silence from the wooden bleachers as kids succumbed to pressure — some from within, but mostly from overbearing parents. Kids would make errors at shortstop and cry. They’d whiff at 12 straight pitches and cry. They’d let a line drive into the gap in left center go right by them because they were looking at a 737 making its final approach to Sea-Tac. And they’d keep looking at the plane, not even realizing they were maybe supposed to cry. So I knew what was coming. Tougher competition. Kids hitting kids with pitches because they had no clue where the ball was going once it left their hands. And a lot more crying. “You’re going to mess up,” I told him. “You’re going to swing and miss. But you’re also always going to get another chance. Another at-bat. Another game. There’s no reason to get bummed out about it. Get in there the next time and hit.” He smiled. He got it. But there was one last thing he needed to know. “Dad,” he said, “do you mess up a lot, too?” “Yes,” I told him. “Just ask your mother.” Doug Miller is a writer and father who lives in the Seattle area.

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parentmap.com • June 2018 • 13


feature

DAD

continued from page 13

You Seem Like Such a Good Dad!? By Brett Hamil

On The Oregon Coast

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Plan your getaway at www.visitrockawaybeach.org 14 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

S

ince becoming a father two years ago, I’ve noticed a common reaction among friends and family. They regard my competent, engaged parenting as if they’re watching a dog ride a tricycle. They all say the same thing: “You seem like such a good dad!” It’s uttered with a hint of genuine surprise — a question mark hovering behind the exclamation point — that I find a bit bruising to the ego. Exactly how bad of a dad did they think I’d be? If I’m being honest with myself, I can understand their amazement. I had no idea what type of dad I’d be, either. My life’s résumé doesn’t exactly scream “nurturing caregiver.” The first infant I ever held for more than an obligatory 20 seconds was my own. Before him, I had no interest in babies. Thrust one into my arms and I’d immediately start scanning the room for the nearest capable adult. I certainly never pictured myself posting Instagram Stories from the toddler gym, or getting so stoked when we finally manage to snag the shopping cart with the built-in kid car at PCC. I enjoy being a dad, and my loved ones are simply expressing relief at this turn of events. They’re happy to see me assume the mantle of “dadhood.” They’re rooting for me, if perhaps a bit overeagerly. But there’s more to it than that. When I mentioned all the rave reviews I’ve been getting, a mom friend pointed out that people rarely praise women in the same way because it’s expected of them. For moms, unswerving maternal devotion and domestic proficiency are considered minimum requirements. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that women

continue to do 50 percent more of the household chores. The bar remains much lower for dads than moms; guys like me get bonus points for basic parenting. This can cut both ways: Some of my dad friends grumble that even though they’re the primary caregivers, people still remark upon seeing an unaccompanied father with kids in tow that he’s “babysitting,” thus downgrading a full-time occupation to something you can outsource to the teenager down the block. And let’s not even get started on that obnoxious moniker from the early ’80s, “Mr. Mom.” Given the deeply ingrained double standards around parenting, it’s worth noting that some of my most feminist friends are among those who give me the biggest props for being a decent dad. But why give me credit for something they experience as unacknowledged debt? I’ve puzzled over this phenomenon, and I’ve come to understand what my feminist friends already know: It’s in everyone’s best interests to encourage empathetic and committed dads. We’re going to need a whole lot more of them to undo all these lopsided, outdated parenting expectations. If that means I get a little extra praise for fulfilling basic duties that women have shouldered without fanfare for millennia, I suppose I can take the compliment, albeit with reservations. I am a good dad — or at least I aim to be — so thank you for noticing. Just try not to act too surprised about it. Brett Hamil is a comedian, writer, cartoonist and host of the political comedy talk show “The Seattle Process.”


Missed Corrections By Christopher Shiple

M

y mother and father did I spend a ton of time with my a good job of raising us. kids. That’s what we’re supposed You can put a checkmark to do, right? But now I worry that in all the big boxes: My siblings and my being with them so much I attended good schools, we were has been at the expense of their encouraged to follow our interests learning to be more independent. and we never really wanted for They seem to have trouble being anything. by themselves, and whenever But, like all parents, there were there’s a problem, their first some things that they could have instinct is to come running to done better. Mom and Dad, rather than trying My folks were so busy providing to see if there’s something they for us that they didn’t spend as much can do about it. time with me as I would’ve liked. I My kids don’t snack too much, was a bit on the chunky side, and and they eat balanced meals … but I always wished they had helped I may have been too uptight about me do something their diets. about it. And I was Recently, my wife always shepherded and I discovered a out of the room so It turns out that pile of empty junk the grown-ups could food wrappers hidden trying to correct chat, even though in our basement. I was often very my parents’ My 6-year-old son interested in what had apparently been mistakes might they were talking sneaking treats for about. Going to have been a quite some time; college ended up we found stashes mistake. being a huge culture of empty wrappers shock for me when squirreled away I finally discovered throughout the house. just how sheltered I Similarly, our kids were never really was growing up. allowed soda. It became this So, when I was finally blessed mythical substance that they enough to become a father, I schemed to obtain whenever Mom decided to fix these problems. I and Dad weren’t looking. When promised to spend as much time as Childless Uncle took them to a possible with my kids. I vowed to fair last summer and let them pick carefully monitor their diets so they whatever they wanted to do, they would grow up healthier than I ever chose the snack bar line over and was. And I pledged to educate them over so they could choke down as about life, making sure that they much soda as the human stomach understood why the world was the can hold. Childless Uncle was only way it was. too happy to oblige. It turns out that trying to correct In my efforts to open up this my parents’ mistakes might have been a mistake. great big world around us to our

kids, I read them newspaper headlines over breakfast and recapped what was happening. I also let them listen in on some grown-up conversations to help them learn that people have different thoughts about things. But it’s one thing to explain Deflategate to your kids and quite another to give them an age-appropriate recap of Sandy Hook. In trying to “fix” the things our parents did wrong, do we sometimes overcorrect? Definitely. But I always try to keep in mind that my three kids seem to be turning out fine. And that it’s okay

to adjust our own thinking as parents. Now, I let my kids order soda at restaurants, plus I started setting timers to encourage them to do stuff by themselves. I still read them headlines in the morning, though, because when they ask me questions about the world and we can talk about it, that’s one of my favorite things about being a parent. Christopher Shiple has been writing professionally for 20 years. He became a dad 10 years ago, and it’s been uphill ever since.

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Becoming Dad By Malia Jacobson

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missed, I’m also learning to mourn ention Father’s Day, and some of these losses. I’ve made peace I immediately think of with my past, mostly. And while I burgers, beer and the first hints of summer in the sun-starved can’t change it, I can make up for a Northwest. For me, the holiday few things I didn’t get growing up. always revolves around food and That’s meant facing up to the most family. Just not my own dad. essential type of self-care: Parenting I grew up with a complicated dad myself. In particular, learning to who abused alcohol and sometimes, become my own inner dad. The kind his kids. Sometime in my early 20s, of dad I think my dad wanted to when keeping him in my life became be. The inner voice that sets limits. more painful than keeping him out, That gently prods me to file my we fell out of touch. He died seven taxes and save for retirement. The years ago. one questioning whether the person Growing up, the difference between causing me pain is really worth my my dad and those of my friends was time. The one who tells me to take painfully obvious. Their pride in my work, that it’s dads doled out advice, okay to be smarter than mowed the lawn and my date and to never sell goofed around. To myself short. All the wise, I’m learning me, these dads were patient, steady stuff a dad to become my like zoo creatures — might provide. fascinatingly foreign Of course, mothers own inner dad. curiosities. Fun to visit. can and do provide this Not part of real life. type of parenting all the Each June, people time. But those of us who heap praise on their grew up with missing or dads, and I look on. I don’t feel unavailable dads have to work hard jealous or bereft. I’m more like an to understand, and then fill, the space outsider invited to a friend’s family fathers occupy in their children’s reunion. I’m cool with all the fuss heads and hearts. And we work at being made, even if I can’t relate. becoming the kind of adult capable of Whatever my friends got from the fathering we needed, decades ago, their dads, things they treasure and and probably still need today. trot out on Father’s Day, I didn’t get. This hasn’t been simple or speedy, And while I think I turned out okay, especially since I’m also busy being a these times make me think about mom to my own kids. So, I’m not in what I missed by growing up without the running for dad of the year yet. a close father figure. But I’m learning, finally, to be patient Seeing my kids with their own with myself, with the person my dad father, and now with my partner, was and with my own inner dad. gives me a cherished window into And this Father’s Day, I’m buying the long list of things kids get myself a beer. from the good men in their lives. Malia Jacobson is an award-winning Security. Playfulness. Consistency. health and parenting journalist and Unconditional love. mom of three. As I’m learning about what I

“ ”

16 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

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FINDS A CLAM. TRIES ONE AT DINNER. PROGRESS. MILESTONES, JUST A FEW MILES AWAY.

Only two hours from Seattle, Semiahmoo is the perfect place to experience the moments with your kids that you live for. And with paddleboarding, art classes and pickleball, you can try something new, too.

Visit Semiahmoo.com or call 360.318.2000.

FIELD TRIP PACKAGES Storytelling Guided tour

GROUP TOURS HibulbCulturalCenter.org

Hibulb Cultural Center 6410 23rd Ave NE Tulalip, WA 98271 Located less than a mile west of I-5 exit 199.

Outdoor scavenger hunt Listen to traditional stories in the longhouse Canoe Guided tour Gallery scavenger hunt Sand and design your own cedar paddle necklace Weaving Guided tour Weaving scavenger hunt Weave your own cedar mat pendant parentmap.com • June 2018 • 17


B

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H Supe r Si lly

Not Sc ar y

Charles The Clown Charles The Magician

A true children’s comedian –Billboard Magazine

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4 Ways to Have the Best Summer Birthday Party Ever

• • • 1

Blow a big bubble! Make a “human bubble” for kids — a perfect party addition for the kiddos out there who love all things bubbles. How to do it: Create a homemade bubble solution and grab a hula hoop.

2

 ake a photobooth. Nothing beats taking silly photos on your M birthday and that’s exactly why we can’t get enough of this neat idea. Bonus: Use free online cut-outs as photo props.

3 Paint a picture. A

12/7/16 12:26 PM

fabulous opportunity for letting your mini Picassos show off their artistic side in the sunshine, these large “canvases” are simply repurposed cardboard boxes (so clever!).

4 Try an experiment.

YOUR FAMILY IS OUR SPECIALTY

Perfect for a summer science-themed party, try this open-ended activity that’s easy to set up for your littles: Add baking soda to muffin tins for each child, and then set out vinegar, along with a variety of items for experimenting, including droppers, food coloring and glitter.

Enjoy over 25 Rides & Attractions, All-inclusive Birthday Parties Corporate Events, and U-Pick Fields too! Opens Mother’s Day Weekend in May - October remlingerfarms.com 0617_remlinger_1-8h.indd 1

Get even more ideas at parentmap.com/summer-birthdays. — Jen Betterley

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18 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

BIRTHDAY PARTIES • 10 RESERVED TICKETS • ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BUFFET • FIRST PITCH AND MORE! KID’S PARTIES START AT $275

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The Good Loser By William Kenower

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One afternoon we found ourselves in a very tight game. I’d made a mistake early on, and he’d capitalized on it. I surveyed the board and understood that he had the advantage. All at once I was no longer a father teaching his son. The vaporous threat of loss filled my heart, and I felt that old urgency to save myself from the worst of all possible outcomes. I moved, he moved, I moved and then he moved — taking my queen. For a moment, panic and loathing gripped me. I was doomed. How could I have been so stupid? Then I looked up from the board and saw Sawyer. His face was alight. He was doing it: He was beating his dad. At that moment, a very different switch was thrown in me. As I made my next move and as I watched him close in on my king, I felt more than just a father’s pleasure at watching his son succeed. Gone completely was the threat of failure and loss, replaced that day with love — the very opposite of what I had always feared waited for me in losing. When we were done, I shook his hand and put my arm around his shoulder. “You were trying to win, weren’t you?” he asked. “You bet,” I said. And I had. William Kenower is the author of “Fearless Writing,” and the editor-inchief of “Author” magazine. Learn more at williamkenower.com. u

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Have Fun Indoors When It’s Too Hot Out

G  et out of the house. Go to the library. Visit an indoor play space. Browse at a bookstore. Count the variety of fish at the local pet store. Head to a museum. Give everyone a few bucks and let them go wild in the dollar store.

Give toys new life.

Gather up stuffed animals, bandages and a doctor’s kit, and voilà! The junior veterinarian is in. Or, set chairs in rows and give the kids boarding passes and pretzels to play airplane.

3 

Play with water, indoors.

Ice cubes in the sink become icebergs for toy ships and mini sea captains to maneuver around. Dolls and rubber duckies can take bubble baths.

4

Have a nosunscreen-needed beach day.

Lay beach towels on the living room floor and pass out fruit drinks with umbrellas. Dig your fingers into kinetic sand and play indoor volleyball with a balloon or beach ball.

!

our older son, Sawyer, until he was y father was a gamer 18. Once he was in his late teens, before there was such a thing. Sawyer began to worry about During my childhood, he his future. Though he had hated and I bonded over everything school and couldn’t cope with from whiffle ball and football to its rules or social pressures, he canasta and poker to Rail Baron, feared that homeschooling hadn’t Dungeons & Dragons and 1776. prepared him for adulthood. I learned a lot playing games When he was feeling low, he’d call with my dad. I learned about himself a loser. strategy and how to get better at I decided as a part of his something with practice. I also schooling that I’d teach him to learned that doing anything was play chess. Sawyer considered more fun when it had a purpose. it a “smart person’s game,” When I played a game with my and he often doubted his own father, we both played to win. intelligence. Though he took to Winning and losing chess right away, gave the game he had never consequences, really played a and with those strategy game All at once I was consequences came before, and so no longer a father a clear direction initially, like a and energy that the good dad, I played teaching his son. game wouldn’t have to teach him The vaporous otherwise had. and not to win. threat of loss filled What I didn’t Until, that is, he learn: what those understood that I my heart. consequences was taking it easy actually were. on him. “It’s no Like many fun if you don’t competitive people try to win! Just I know, I grew to play your best.” hate losing more than I enjoyed I didn’t think this was a good winning. That moment when I idea. Competitiveness was still understood that I had come up like a drug to me. As soon as that short of victory confounded me. I switch was thrown, no matter was a loser. What else do you call how much I loved my opponent, I someone who didn’t win? Within became the guy who had to win. that awful word was everything I Sawyer didn’t care. Play to win, feared about adulthood and life he commanded. So I did. And I itself — that maybe I don’t have won. And I won. Sometimes he’d what it takes to win at the most knock all the pieces off the board important game of all. when he lost. But he got better, I am now the father of two and the games got closer and boys. My wife and I homeschooled closer.

Ways to

5 

Go on a treasure hunt.

Send your kids all over the house hunting for clues. The final destination can be the freezer — where you’ve stashed Popsicles or ice cream. Then everyone put them to a taste test to determine their favorite flavor.

— Jessica Graham

parentmap.com • June 2018 • 19


june

SUNDAY

160511 Crossroads ParentMap Calendar ad f.pdf

1 5/12/16 3:46 PM MONDAY

TUESDAY

COURTESY NORTHWEST TREK WILDLIFE PARK

RITA E/PIXABAY

PICKS Bellevue Strawberry Festival, June 23–24

Slug Fest at Northwest Trek, June 23–24

Festival Sundiata, Seattle Center, June 16–17

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Bicycle Sunday. Take your family’s twowheelers out for a spin on this one of many car-free Sundays along the lake; helmets required. June 3, 17 and 24; 10 a.m.–6 p.m. FREE. Lake Washington Boulevard, Seattle. seattle.gov/parks Maritime Gig Festival. Grand parade, family fun run, music, yachts, car show, kids’ activities and more. Saturday–Sunday, June 2–3. FREE. Skansie Brothers Park and environs, Gig Harbor. gigharborchamber.net

Live Music Mondays. Live music by local guitar and ukulele teacher, Matt Lome. Mondays, 10:30–11:30 a.m. $18. Ages 5 and under with adult. Roo’s World of Discovery, Kirkland. roosworldofdiscovery.com ONGOING EVENT Let’s Play: Princess and the Pea. Live theater designed just for the preschool crowd. June 4–9. $5. Ages 0–5 with caregiver. Olympia Family Theater, Olympia. olyft.org

Toytopia. Last days to marvel at toys from your own childhood and share them with your kids. Through June 10. Included with admission. Washington State History Museum, Tacoma. washingtonhistory.org Reading with Rover. Young readers gain confidence reading aloud to trained therapy dogs. First and third Tuesdays, 6:30–7:30 p.m. FREE. Ages 5–10 with adult. Half Price Books, Redmond. readingwithrover.org ONGOING EVENT

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Evergreen Mountain Bike Festival. Pedalheads and newbies alike enjoy bike shows, demos, skill clinics and more at Duthie Hill Park. Saturday–Sunday, June 10–11. Free entry; fee for some activities. Issaquah. evergreenmtb.org Second Sunday at Morse Wildlife Preserve. Explore this land preserve’s remarkable diversity of habitats on one of a handful of open dates per year. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. FREE. Graham. tahomaaudubon.org

Monday Cheapskate. Free skating for the preschool set. 9:30–11:30 a.m. $6.87; ages 5 and under free. Sprinker Ice Arena, Tacoma. co.pierce.wa.us ONGOING EVENT Magic Monday. Local magicians perform in the cozy quarters of the bookstore. 7–8 p.m. FREE. Third Place Books – Ravenna, Seattle. thirdplacebooks.com

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Fenders on Front Street. Lots of dads are car guys — bring yours to admire vintage cars, listen to music and enjoy family activities; pancake breakfast, too. Front Street, Issaquah. fendersonfrontstreet.com Festival Sundiata presents Black Arts Fest. Live music and dance, activities, workshops, food and more showcase African-American culture and its roots. Saturday–Sunday, June 16–17. FREE. Seattle Center. seattlecenter.com/festal

Fenders on Front Street, Issaquah, June 17

Pride Parade and PrideFest, June 24

20 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

Meet-Up Monday. Meet up with friends for discounted play. Mondays, 10 a.m.– noon. $7.70 with discount; adults and under age 1 free. Kids under 48 inches in height. WiggleWorks Kids, Bellevue. wiggleworkskids.com ONGOING EVENT A Child’s-Eye View of Fort Nisqually. Experience a day in the life of child of the 1850s. Daily, 11 a.m.–5 p.m., through Sept. 16. Included with admission; ages 3 and under free. Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, Tacoma. fortnisqually.org

Carnation Farmer’s Market. Stock up on delicious produce grown a stone’s throw away. Tuesdays, 3–7 p.m. Items for purchase. Carnation. carnationfarmersmarket.org Hairspray. A teen takes her big hair and follows her big dreams in this high-energy musical. Through July 1. $38–$80. Ages 8 and up. Francis J. Gaudette Theatre, Issaquah. villagetheatre.org

19 Pool Playland. It’s swim time for parents and tots in the warm pool. Daily, 11 a.m.– noon, through Sept 9. $3.75–$5.50; under age 1 free. Ages 0–5 with caregiver. Pop Mounger Pool, Seattle. seattle.gov/parks/ aquatics ONGOING EVENT Mother Soulstice. An evening for moms and expectant moms to connect with each other and support resources. 6:30–9:30 p.m. FREE; RSVP on Facebook page. Georgetown Ballroom, Seattle. mothersoulstice.com

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Taste of Tacoma. Bring your appetite for tasty creations and live music, plus a family fun zone and carnival rides. Friday–Sunday, June 22–24. Free entry; food and activities for purchase. Point Defiance Park, Tacoma. tasteoftacoma.com Pride Parade and PrideFest. Celebrate all people and families with a joyous parade and Seattle Center festival. 11 a.m.–8 p.m. FREE. Seattle. seattlepridefest.org

Toddler Time. Tots play with cars, wagons, bikes, slides and more. Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8:30 a.m.–noon. $2. Ages 0–3 with adult. Issaquah Community Center. ci.issaquah.wa.us ONGOING EVENT Indoor Playground. Bounce, balance, roll and play. Monday–Saturday, various times. $10; adults free. Ages 1–5 with caregiver. Seattle Gymnastics Academy, 3 Seattle locations. seattlegymnastics.com ONGOING EVENT

Summer Sounds at Skansie. Enjoy Nate Botsford’s enchanting, feel-good tunes on the first night of this series. Tuesdays through Aug. 14, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Skansie Brothers Park, Gig Harbor. cityofgigharbor.net ONGOING EVENT Family Folk Music Concert. Come laugh, dance, and sing along with this Washingtonnative, award-winning family band, The Harmonica Pocket. 6:30–7:30 p.m. FREE. Huntamer Park, Lacey. ci.lacey.wa.us


THURSDAY KIM FARRELL

WEDNESDAY

Vashon Sheepdog Classic, June 7–10

FRIDAY 1 Mommy Matinees at the Admiral. Get out of the house for a movie; bring your baby. Check website for times. $10; ages 5 and under free. Historic Admiral Theater, Seattle. farawayentertainment.com Cinder Edna. Last weekend to experience this exciting twist on a classic fairy tale. Through Sunday. $13–$19. All ages. Olympia Family Theater. olyft.org

Evergreen Mountain Bike Festival, Issaquah, June 9–10

6 Story Time for Kids. Settle in for new and classic kids’ books, plus activities and refreshments. Wednesdays, 11 a.m. FREE. Ages 2–5 with caregiver. University Book Store, Mill Creek. bookstore.washington.edu ONGOING EVENT Walk Tacoma 100 Years Ago. Explore what Tacoma was like a century ago on a 1–2 mile walk with kids’ activity from Children’s Museum of Tacoma. Noon–1 p.m. FREE. Frost Park, Tacoma. cityoftacoma.org

7 Nordic Stories at New Nordic Museum. Enjoy the first Nordic Stories in the museum’s stunning new home. 10–11 a.m. FREE. Ages 2–6 with adult. Nordic Museum, Seattle. nordicmuseum.org Family Toy Boat Building. Monthly craft time hones creativity and teamwork. First Thursday, 2–5 p.m. Donations appreciated. Center for Wooden Boats, Seattle. cwb.org

8 Chihuly Garden Stroller Tour. An early-morning tour for caregivers with tots in tow. 7–8 a.m. $24. Parent with child 0–2 in stroller or front-facing carrier. Chihuly Garden and Glass, Seattle. chihulygardenandglass.com Vashon Sheepdog Classic. Watch skilled, hard-working pups directing sheep traffic. Thursday–Sunday, June 7–10. $10; ages 10 and under free. Misty Isle Farms, Vashon Island. vashonsheepdogclassic.com

SATURDAY 2 State Parks FREE Day. Explore a scenic state park with no Discover Pass required to park. June 2, 9, 10. discoverpass.wa.gov Duvall Days. Parade and family fun fest includes bouncy houses, dinosaurs, live music and more. Saturday–Sunday, June 2–3. FREE. Main Street, Duvall. duvalldays.org Pagdiriwang Festival. Celebrate Filipino culture, arts and history with food, music and more. Saturday–Sunday, June 2–3. FREE. Seattle Center Armory. festalpagdiriwang.com

9 Free Fishing Weekend. No fishing license required statewide; other rules apply. Saturday–Sunday, June 9–10. wdfw.wa.gov Lake to Lake Bike Ride. Explore Bellevue on a long or short family ride. 9 a.m. $20; ages 9 and under free. Lake Hills Community Park, Bellevue. parks. bellevuewa.gov Strawberry Festival. Entertainment, kids’ activities, food trucks and berries. Noon– 4:30 p.m. South Bay Grange, Olympia. bkmusicalproductions.com

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Low Sensory Play Time. Special play time in a calm environment. Wednesdays, noon–2 p.m. (check website for additional times). $20; preregister. Ages 0–10 with adult. Roo’s World of Discovery, Kirkland. roosworldofdiscovery.com ONGOING EVENT Drop-In Play Group. Meet other families while kiddos play, read, sing and have snacks (bring some to share if you like). Wednesdays, Fridays; 10:30 a.m.–noon. FREE. Ages 0–5 with adult. FamilyWorks Resource Center, Seattle. familyworksseattle.org

Marysville Strawberry Festival. The carnival opens today for this community celebration, including Kiddie and Grand Parades (Saturday, June 18) among other activities. June 9–17. FREE. Various venues, Marysville. maryfest.org Seattle Aquarium Beach Naturalist Program. Explore tidal life at area beaches on super low-tide days. 9:30 a.m.–1 p.m. FREE. Multiple Puget Sound beaches; check website for locations and dates. seattleaquarium.org ONGOING EVENT

Explore the Shore at Owen Beach. Stroll the beach with a naturalist to search for limpets, hermit crabs and other sea life. Noon–2 p.m. (also June 28, 11 a.m.–1 p.m.). FREE. Ages 5 and up with adult. Owen Beach at Point Defiance Park, Tacoma. pdza.org Shrek the Musical. Last weekend to enjoy this fun musical about being true to yourself. June 1–17. All ages. $18–$21. Auburn Avenue Theater. auburnwa.gov

Fremont Solstice. Anything goes at this center-of-the-universe party with live music, kids’ activities, dog parade (Sunday, 2:30 p.m.) and the memorable Solstice Parade (Saturday, 1 p.m.) Saturday–Sunday, June 16–17. FREE. Seattle. fremontfair.com Free Train Rides for Dad. Treat your dad to a scenic train excursion. Saturday– Sunday, June 16–17, $10–$20; ages 2 and under and dads free. Northwest Railway Museum, Snoqualmie. trainmuseum.org

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Spring Museum Fun Days: Summer Kick-off! Enjoy outdoor arts, crafts and activities while kicking off the summer season! Wednesday–Monday, June 20–25. Pay-as-you-will admission. Ages 0–10 with adult. Children’s Museum of Tacoma. playtacocma.org Parents’ Night Out. Kids enjoy a night of pizza, fun and museum play while you take a break. 6–9 p.m. $20–$35. Ages 4–10. KidsQuest Children’s Museum, Bellevue. kidsquestmuseum.org

27 Conservatory Story Hour. Cozy up among the plants for stories and crafts. 11 a.m.–noon. $3 suggested donation. Ages 3–8 with adult. W.W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory, Tacoma. seymourconservatory.org Interactive Animal Tour. Meet and interact with a variety of farm animals. 2–3 p.m. $10 per child; preregister. Ages 3 and up. Keep It Simple Farm, Redmond. kisfarm.com

Make Music Day. It’s an all-comers jam session and live performances at many spots around Seattle and the Eastside. Check website for times and locations. FREE. makemusicday.org/seattle Power of Produce Club. Kids, take your adults to the Bellevue Farmers Market to try new foods and compete in weekly health challenges to earn market credit. Thursdays, 3–7 p.m. FREE. Ages 3–12. Bellevue Presbyterian Church. bellevuefarmersmarket.org ONGOING

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Kids Day! Kick off summer with a day of kid-focused fun: obstacle course, inflatables, face-painting, instrument petting zoo, mini golf and more. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. FREE; some activities have fee. Les Gove Park, Auburn. auburnwa.gov Garden Tots. Drop in for themed nature arts, crafts and activities. Friday, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. through August. $10 per family. Ages 2–6 with adult. Kruckeberg Botanic Garden, Shoreline. kruckeberg.org

Bellevue Strawberry Festival. Scrumptious strawberry shortcake, family fun area, live entertainment and more. Saturday–Sunday, June 23–24. FREE; select activities have fee. Crossroads Park, Bellevue. bellevuestrawberryfestival.org Slug Fest. Celebrate our slimy, silly, slowmoving, Northwest co-habitants with games and crafts. Saturday–Sunday, June 23–24, 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Included with admission. Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, Eatonville. nwtrek.org

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MaST Center Discovery Days. Spend time studying marine critters. Thursdays, 4–7 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. FREE. MaST Center, Des Moines. mast.highline.edu ONGOING EVENT Music at the Marina. Reggae master Clinton Fearon kicks off this summer series; get food truck fare for a picnic. Thursday and Saturday through Aug. 30, 6:30–8:30 p.m. FREE. Port Gardner Landing, Everett. everettwa.gov

Summer Story Time. Meet up at this historic cabin site for pioneer-themed stories and crafts. Fridays, 11 a.m.–noon through Aug. 31. Pay-as-you-will. Ages 3–8 with families. Job Carr Cabin Museum, Tacoma. jobcarrmuseum.org Live Animal Show. Sheruff entertains and educates about sustainability with a cast of animal and human co-stars. Daily, noon and 3:30 p.m. Included with admission. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, Tacoma. pdza.org

Washington’s Wilderness Coast. Beachthemed arts and crafts all day and wild coast presentation at 2 p.m. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. FREE. WET Science Center, Olympia. wetsciencecenter.org Bike Helmet Fitting & Giveaway. Fun health activities, games and demos for the whole family; free bike helmets for children ages 1–18 (must be present). 1–4 p.m. FREE. Garfield Community Center, Seattle. seattlechildrens.org

parentmap.com • June 2018 • 21


6 out + about

Quirky

Keep Seattle weird by visiting these offthe-tour-map spots By Gemma Alexander

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an Seattle stay weird? As construction continues to boom around the city, my family, like many longtime residents, has worried about whether Seattle will lose its quirky character. We’ve taken solace from an unusual source: the new Amazon Spheres. Amid a sea of high-rises, those greenhouse domes prove that Seattle hasn’t completely abandoned its love of the eccentric. We may have lost The Blob on Queen Anne and the historic Central District house built by Gold Rush rogue George Carmack, but Seattle has plenty of weirdness left for those who know where to look. We’ve put together a list of (mostly) obscure, only-in-Seattle landmarks that are fun to visit in the summer. Naturally, we’ve focused on those that kids will enjoy, so no matter how much you might love it, you won’t find the “Singles” building (at 19th Avenue E. and E. Thomas Street) on this list.

22 • June 2018 • parentmap.com


r a ks

Summer • 1 L ake View Cemetery CAPITOL HILL, SEATTLE

Lake View Cemetery on Capitol Hill has been

a pilgrimage site for martial arts and film fans for decades. So many people visit the graves of Bruce Lee and his son, Brandon, that the cemetery provides a map on its website. Pay your respects and then head to the Chinatown–International District to visit the Wing Luke Museum, currently showing the fourth exhibit in a series about groundbreaking artist, philosopher and actor Bruce Lee. nearby Volunteer Park, where kids can run around and, depending on the weather, cool off in the wading pool or warm up in the Conservatory. Early next year, you can add fine arts to your martial arts pilgrimage when the Seattle Asian Art Museum reopens after renovations. INFO: Free. 1554 15th Ave. E., Seattle

>>

FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS / RICHARD CASSAN

PRO TIP: After a spin through the cemetery, visit

Lake View Cemetery parentmap.com • June 2018 • 23


out + about

Quirky Landm arks continued from page 23

• 2 H  enry Murals

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEATTLE

In about 2008, a series of whimsical murals started appearing around Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood. Each quixotic painting was populated by surreal animal characters and signed “Henry.” Artist Ryan Henry Ward exploded on the Seattle scene through sheer persistence. At times homeless and working for free in the early days, he has now sold more than 2,000 canvases, yet he still makes murals. You’ll find more than 200 Henry murals around Seattle, with the highest concentration near his studio in Ballard. Start your search for Henrys with the goldfish house at Nickerson Street by the Fremont Bridge, and end at Naked City Brewery in Greenwood, which also sports a Henry. PRO TIP: Once you know about Henry murals, you’ll

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• 3 Luna Park Café WEST SEATTLE

Alas, distant memory is all that’s left of Luna Park, the West Seattle amusement park that was once considered the Coney Island of the West. It closed down in 1913. But more than 100 years later, the memory lives on in the Luna Park Café, the artifact-filled, family-friendly diner that has been serving up nostalgia and fries since 1989. Kids especially love the Batman-themed car in the café. kind of family? Emerald Kitty, West Seattle’s

cat café, is filled with adoptable kitties and only a three-minute walk away. INFO: 2918 S.W. Avalon

Way, Seattle

Gum Wall in Post Alley

PHOTO COURTESY LUNAPARKCAFE.COM

PRO TIP: Are you a two-café

Luna Park Café

• 4 Gum Wall DOWNTOWN SEATTLE

This famous, always-gross landmark originated in the 1990s, when clubbers standing in line for shows in Post Alley used the walls to dispose of their gum. In 2015, the city cleaned up the wall — removing 2,350 pounds of chewed gum — but visitors quickly restored the landmark to its sticky glory. Today, it’s as good a photo op as ever. PRO TIP: If you’re inclined to

make a personal contribution to the wall, nearby Ghost Alley Espresso sells gum. INFO: Free. 1428 Post Alley,

Seattle

>>

parentmap.com • June 2018 • 25


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out + about

Quirky Landm arks continued from page 25

• 5 F remont Troll FREMONT, SEATTLE

Every child familiar with fairy tales knows that trolls live under bridges. Fortunately, the Fremont Troll underneath the north end of the Aurora Bridge doesn’t eat billy goats or people. The ironic self-portrait of artist Steve Badanes is quite happy eating bugs (of the Volkswagen variety). It used to be possible to hang out with the troll by yourself, but nowadays the troll is crawling with people at all hours of the day and night. PRO TIP: While you’re in the neighborhood,

check out Fremont’s other public art pieces, such as the ivy dinosaurs and the oftdecorated “Waiting for the Interurban” and Lenin statues. Use the walking guide at fremont.com to help you find them all.

The Fremont Troll

PHOTO COURTESY FAUXTOGRAPHY / INSTAGRAM

INFO: Free. Underneath the Aurora Bridge on Troll Avenue N. at the intersection of N. 36th Street, Seattle

Waiting for the Interurban

• 6 Hat ’n’ Boots

GEORGETOWN, SEATTLE

PRO TIP: Oxbow Park has a small play structure. Or head to the cool

new playground at Georgetown Playfield, a half-mile away, before filling up at nearby Flying Squirrel Pizza Company. INFO: Free. 6430 Corson Ave. S., Seattle

>>

NANCY CHANEY

No Seattle landmark list would be complete without the Hat ’n’ Boots, a 22-foot-high set of cowboy boots and 44-foot-wide orange hat that dominate Oxbow Park in Seattle’s Georgetown neighborhood. Seattle artist Lewis Nasmyth originally designed the structures to house a gas station in Georgetown. In the 1950s, it was the most successful roadside attraction in Washington state, but its kitschy appeal wasn’t enough to draw customers off the newly completed Interstate 5 in the 1960s. Eventually, the beloved boots (and the hat) were saved when the City of Seattle recognized it as a historic landmark and moved it to Oxbow Park.

Hat ‘n’ Boots

parentmap.com • June 2018 • 27


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Quirky Landm arks continued from page 27

Strato-Spheres And about those Amazon Spheres: You can tour the three greenhouse domes (they are home to a 65-foot green wall and 40,000 plants) for free. But it takes some wrangling, as the Spheres are (understandably) very popular. At press time, there were two ways to visit. The first is to book a 90-minute tour of Amazon HQ, which happens twice on most Wednesdays and includes some time in the Spheres. Tours are limited to ages 6 and older. The second is to go during a public visiting day, which happens two Saturdays per month (no age restrictions). You have to register online, and new reservations open up 30 days in advance (and when people cancel), so keep checking back. seattlespheres.com

Gemma Alexander is a Seattle-based freelance writer with two daughters.

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28 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

PHOTO COURTESY SEATTLESPHERES.COM

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parentmap.com • June 2018 • 29


CAMPS • ARTS • ACTIVITIES 3 Ways to Get Your Kid Interested in STEM In an increasingly digital economy, science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills are becoming extremely sought-after in the job market. Parents, you can have a powerful and dramatic impact to foster your child’s interest in STEM. Consider these three tips. 1. Introduce creative problem solving at home. Encourage your child to brainstorm ways to introduce problem solving with a design or engineering focus. 2. Combine informal and formal learning through extracurricular activities. Introducing children to extracurricular activities that are fun and tap into STEM skills can increase long-term proficiency and interest in these areas.

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wildernessawareness.org E parentmap.com • June 2018 • 31


out + about

A w e N

m u i r qua

M

By Maegen Blue Mark your calendars: This summer a new aquarium is

coming to Tacoma’s Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium (PDZA), and it promises to be an attraction worthy of a day trip with the kids. The new Pacific Seas Aquarium will replace the old North Pacific Aquarium, which closed at the end of March. Popular exhibits, such as the native fish and “jellies” (jellyfish), will be moving to the new 35,000-square-foot space, which will also feature exciting new habitats and marine life never before seen at PDZA. In our house, my boys are most excited about Baja Bay, a 250,000-gallon habitat where visitors can walk through a curved glass underwater tunnel and see scalloped hammerhead sharks, green sea turtles and spotted eagle rays. Other features of note: the Coastal Kelp Forest exhibit; Northwest Waters, which will feature species native to the Pacific Northwest; and the Tidal Touch Zone, where kids can interact and even touch living sea creatures and enjoy educational activities. The new aquarium will be between the existing Wild Wonders Outdoor Theater and the Rocky Shores habitat, and never fear, the South Pacific Aquarium remains open. (You know, the place where you can spot sharks and gently touch stingrays.) Entry to the aquariums is included with regular zoo admission. And here’s a PDZA pro tip: Be sure to visit the theater and on-site playground for even more wild fun. Maegen Blue is the editor of Sounds Fun Mom, a blog for South Sound families. She lives in Puyallup with her husband and two boys.

32 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

PHOTOS ABOVE COURTESY PDZA


Makes a Sp lash a t Taco ma’s Zo o Be a PDZA Pro • Go as early in the day as you can. The animals will be more active, and you can beat the crowds. Alternatively, a visit later in the day can also be fun as the animals are inclined to perk up near dinner time, and the crowds tend to thin out. •W  hile there is plenty of food available for purchase, I recommend bringing your own for a picnic or trying one of the new options on the Ruston Way Waterfront. •G  et the list of daily presentations when you enter PDZA. Catching an aquarium feeding or a talk by an elephant keeper makes for an even more memorable trip. •G  eneral daytime admission to the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium is $17.95 at the front gate for ages 13–64, $16.95 for seniors 65 and older, $13.95 for youth ages 5–12, $9.95 for ages 3–4 and free for children 2 and younger. Pierce County residents and online purchasers save $2.

•T  he zoo is open daily from 9:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. until June 29, when hours change to 9 a.m.–6 p.m., June 30–Sept. 3. •P  arking is free. •T  he zoo is small enough to be walkable for most children, but strollers are available for rent, as are wheelchairs and lockers.

PHOTO COURTESY PDZA FACEBOOK > INSTAGRAM

• If you were to go even a few times this year, an annual pass would be a smart investment.

parentmap.com • June 2018 • 33


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ages + stages

3–16

Read It, Do It: A Super Summer Book List 6 books and 6 matching local events that will get kids reading By Nicole Persun

I

n the summer, nothing sounds better to us adults than a good book and a beach chair. But kids? Why pick up a dusty old tome when there are video games to play? There are, of course, a few solid reasons to hand them a book instead of a screen. First, reading can result in improved mental health and has been proven to foster empathy. It’s also a great way to boost focus, memory and vocabulary — not to mention, it’s cheap (and quiet) entertainment. Most importantly, it can help combat the dreaded summer slide, the classroom knowledge kids lose over the summer. Need we say more?

read it

read it

read it

“The Three Little Pigs” by Patricia Seibert Ages: Tots

Comic books! Ages: Varies, but mostly tweens and teens

“Winnie-thePooh” by A.A. Milne Ages: Tots and older

For kids who aren’t interested in dense hardbacks, consider indulging them with Marvel and DC. The stories might be about super characters, but they are grounded in human struggles, with more emotional depth than you’d think. Bonus: They feature incredible artwork.

Teach your little one about hard work and patience with “The Three Little Pigs.” If you don’t own a copy of this classic fairy tale already, consider picking up Patricia Seibert’s version. It’s delightful and — unlike some renderings — doesn’t include any scary pictures.

Get back to basics with the classic story of a boy and his bear. We’re all familiar with the Disney version, but the original book is truly a treasure. Whether you’re reading it to your child for the first time or revisiting it with older kids, “Winnie-the-Pooh” always delights.

do it Toy and Geek Fest Dates: June 30–July 1

do it

do it

Meet actors, artists, writers and other comic book superstars at the Toy and Geek Fest. With the fest featuring interactive displays, meet-and-greets and cosplay contests, your comic-crazed kid will be occupied for hours. Be sure to check out the Facebook page to see which Marvel and DC artists are making an appearance — and leave enough time to read their work before attending. PHOTO COURTESY TOYANDGEEKFEST.COM

Once you’ve read the book, attend this interactive musical version performed by members of the Seattle Symphony in a fun string duet, complete with animal sounds.

“Christopher Robin,” the movie Date: opens Aug. 3

This much-anticipated movie takes place after Christopher Robin has grown up. Stuck in a demanding job, Christopher has forgotten the joys of life. Luckily, Pooh shows up to help him >> rediscover his youth.

PHOTO COURTESY IMDB.COM

“The Three Little Pigs” Tiny Tots Concert by the Seattle Symphony Dates: June 8–9

PHOTO COURTESY SEATTLESYMPHONY.ORG

We all have that book that turned us into lifelong readers; perhaps it was “Little Women,” “Charlotte’s Web” or “Harry Potter.” If your child has yet to discover their own life-changing book, show them this extra-special reading list. Not only have we compiled a list of new and classic reads, we also included an adventure to go along with each book, because if there’s anything more exciting than developing a love of reading, it’s seeing our favorite stories jump off the page through music, theater, film and other portals. The suggestions are ordered by date of the corresponding event.

parentmap.com • June 2018 • 35


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36 • February 2018 • parentmap.com

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ages + stages Read It, Do It: A Super Summer Book List continued from page 35

read it

read it

read it

“The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle Ages: Tots

The “Goosebumps” Series by R.L. Stine Ages: 8 and older

“StarTalk, Young Readers Edition” by Neil deGrasse Tyson Ages: Tweens and teens

do it

Once you’ve read the book again and again all summer, take the littles to see the caterpillar come to life on stage. Featuring 75 puppets, this show at Seattle Children’s Theatre is certain to be an incredible spectacle.

do it Young Author’s Day with special guest R.L. Stine Date: Sept. 15

After a summer full of scares, meet the mastermind himself — and learn how to create your very own scary stories. The Pacific Northwest Writers’ Association is hosting R.L. Stine for its annual conference and free Young Author’s Day in September.

Based on Neil deGrasse Tyson’s popular podcast and talk show, this book tackles challenging STEM topics with a funny, fresh and relatable flair. It’s sure to satisfy even the most curious minds.

do it Neil deGrasse Tyson at The Paramount Theatre Dates: Nov. 26–27

It’s a long wait, but so worth it. After spending the summer memorizing awesome fun facts from “StarTalk,” take your kid to see Neil deGrasse Tyson in the flesh. Each night features a different topic: The first discusses science literacy, and the second is about adopting a “cosmic perspective.” n

PHOTO COURTESY FACEBOOK / NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON

PHOTO COURTESY THEVERYHUNGRYCATERPILLAR.COM NEW YORK GALLERY

“The Very Hungry Caterpillar” at Seattle Children’s Theatre Dates: Sept. 13–Oct. 21

If you have a kid who loves haunted houses and ghost stories around the campfire, get them started on the spooky “Goosebumps” series. With the series’ seemingly endless lineup of scary stories to choose from, they’ll be reading under the covers with a flashlight all summer long.

PHOTO COURTESY RL_STIME.COM

What better way to get your kids hungry for books than a classic like this one? For generations, “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” has eaten its way into our hearts. It’s only right for us to keep the tradition alive.

Nicole Persun is the publishing assistant at ParentMap.

More Ways to Get Kids Reading (and Writing!) Head to your local library:

Never underestimate the power of your local library. Most libraries have summer reading programs designed to turn even reluctant kids into voracious readers (and many libraries even have a summer reading program for adults!). If you already have an avid bookworm on your hands, consider sending them to a more freeform book club; many libraries host community-led book groups.

Head to your local bookstore: Like libraries, independent bookstores stay active with readings, book groups and other events. Check with your local indie bookstore to see what kinds of kids’ programs they have available. And while you’re there, take a spin through the children’s and young adult sections so your kid can pick out their own reads.

DIY: If you’re up for it, start a family book club, or if you have a summer road trip in your future, ditch the car radio for an audiobook.

Get writing: Local writing organizations such as Hugo House and the Pacific Northwest Writers’ Association host classes and writing conferences for kids. Looking for something longer? Check out ParentMap’s camps portal (parentmap.com/camps)

parentmap.com • February 2018 • 37


someone you should know

Kyler and Cory Parris

Local student pushes for gun safety with his dad’s support By Nancy Schatz Alton • Photo by Will Austin

C

ory Parris wasn’t surprised when his son Kyler took on a leadership role in the studentled March for Our Lives Seattle event. He remembers when 4-year-old Kyler would stand up on a tiny podium and talk like a politician. Fourteen years later, Kyler was one of the seven students who organized the March 24 event, during which roughly 50,000 students, parents and citizens marched for gun reform. “When I saw what the Parkland [High School] students were doing [after the Feb. 14 shooting at their Florida school], I felt horrible for not having done anything worth note when it comes to advocating for gun reform,” says Kyler. “Young people have always had power. I’m so proud that my generation has finally come together to use our voices.” Kyler and his friends have already announced their next action: Vote for Our Lives Washington, a two-pronged effort to register young voters and convince Washington state legislators to pass gun laws. “He’s made sure he’s not always [the] person that steps forward for an on-camera interview,” Cory says of his son’s work. “It’s cool and admirable that he has let other people get the majority of the credit.” Below, hear from both father and son as they discuss gun reform laws and family activism.

“It’s been eye-opening to see the amount of change that people can create.”

What have you loved about being part of the leadership group for March for Our Lives and now Vote for Our Lives?

Kyler: Working with this incredible group of students has changed my life. … Most students, including us, are just struggling to get by in their classes, yet we created a group that was 38 • June 2018 • parentmap.com

willing to spend late nights together to make the march happen. … It’s been eye-opening to see the amount of change that people can create. Tell me what excites you about the Vote for Our Lives campaign.

Kyler: We want voter registration to be led by a student in every high school in the state.

Voter registration is so huge because voting is the no. 1 way of getting involved. In the last midterm election in 2014, about 1 in 5 voters ages 18–29 voted. I think getting young people to vote is a powerful first step. I’m also excited about talking to our legislators about common-sense gun laws We’re not afraid to have the rough conversation. We’ll be fighting for people our age to know the truth of who’s willing to stand up for their lives. The more we can connect the people in power with the students, the more we can get them to understand how important this issue is to us. How have your parents inspired and supported you?

Kyler: We’ve always had real conversations. My parents are always happy to talk about more serious things: religion, poverty, the economy and things that are happening in the world. From my place of privilege in the suburbs, I learned what the problems are and wanted to figure out how to change the world. … My parents have always supported me as I try to make change in my community and the world. What’s surprised you about watching Kyler lead?

Cory: He’s made the conscious decision that he’s not going to let his discomfort stop him from doing something. He is a born leader, but at some point, he also said, ‘I’m not going to let my own insecurities stop me from trying anything.’ On a parental level, how have you helped Kyler?

Cory: We let him manage himself. It’s three months until he goes to college. He’s still our kid, but he’s also himself. Part of that is letting him find out where his own limits are. If he’s overcommitted, we let him deal with that. With Kyler, it’s always been about making sure he knows that he’s taking on a lot. He’s a great kid; there’s not a lot of us having to tell him what to do except, ‘Hey, try to dial it back a bit so you can get some sleep.’ n Nancy Schatz Alton is a Seattle-based freelance writer, editor and creative writing teacher.


S C H O O L S

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P R E S C H O O L S

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Get this: Most children lose the equivalent of eight weeks of math skills during summer vacation, with spelling and reading skills also sliding. But you can stop the slide! Fuse fun and learning with these handy games. They’re easy to take along to the beach and will keep young minds active all summer long. On the list: 1

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2

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 oldieBlox. What we love: G This is the first app for inspiring young girls to learn to code and animate with Goldie, a fierce and fun role model.

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901 Lenora Street, Seattle

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ENROLLING NOW FOR FALL!

Child-centered learning in a warm Jewish environment - all are welcome. Classes for families and children from birth through Pre-K. Flexible schedules to f^^mrhnk_Zfberl needs. For more information, visit www.jrmpreschool.org or contact Shannon Solomon, Early Childhood Education Director, at 425.559.2571 or ssolomon@tdhs-nw.org.

DISCOVER. GROW. INFLUENCE. Growing tomorrow’s leaders, today!

Visit our beautiful 13-acre K-12 campus!

seattlechristian.org

SeaTac, WA | K-12

206-246-8241 parentmap.com • June 2018 • 39


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OUT OF D L R O W S I TH FUN! FlAg FoOtBaLl • BaSkEtBaLl • SoCcEr

ArOuNd tHe WoRlD SpOrTs

AlL SpOrT • GoLf • cHiLdReN’s tHeAtEr

DaNcE • RaCqUeT sPoRtS • TeNnIs

S.T.E.M. & RoBoTiCs • LeAdErShIp SyNcHrOnIzEd SwImMiNg • MeRmAiD JuNiOr LiFeGuArDiNg • SuPeR SaFe SiTtEr NINJA WARRIOR • OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

AgEs

3-18 proclub.com | (425) 885-5566 | 4455 148th Avenue NE, Bellevue, WA

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June 2018 (East)  

June 2018 (East)  

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