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parenting is a trip!

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‘ANGST’ and ‘SCREENAGERS’ May 10 and 22

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• 5 Mom-Ventures (With or Without the Kids) PAGE 28 Are they ready for a night away? Are you? 41

MEET BOTHELL’S BRAND NEW SCHOOL Hear from the moms behind Washington Prep 46

WHEN IT’S NOT JUST A HEADACHE Expert advice on helping parents prevent stroke 10

Family Adventure Guide inside

MAY 2018

SUMMER SLEEPAWAY ADVENTURES AHEAD!


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inside

feature PAGE 16

MAY 2018

What

Motherhood Means to Me 7 essays on its ups and downs Parenting

4  NEWS AROUND TOWN 6  DEAR READER

What motherhood (now) means to me: becoming Bubbie Laynie

8  CRIB NOTES

From recent research to gaga gear

10 WELLNESS

How to help women prevent stroke

12 TEENS TAKE ACTION

Local teens make change happen

41 AGES + STAGES

Is your kid ready to sleep away from home?

42 CUT THIS OUT

PHOTO COURTESY FLICKR / SAVOR SEATTLE FOOD TOURS SPICE & INK PHOTOGRAPHY

Self-care for the whole year

28

46 SOMEONE YOU SHOULD KNOW

The moms behind the new Washington Preparatory School in Bothell

FAMILY ADVENTURE

SEATTLE + NORTHWEST

’cause parenting is a trip!

EAT • PLAY • GO with kids

SUMMER 2018

GUIDE

Out + About

22+27 M  AY CALENDAR 28 5  MOM-VENTURES

Great ideas even when it isn’t Mother’s Day • Your summer bucket list

Advertising Sections

• Small towns, big fun • Why Portland’s still worth it • Got a kid who hates to hike?

14–15 Foreign Language Resources 23–26 King County Library System 33–39 Camps • Arts • Activities NWAIS Schools 43 44–47 Schools + Preschools

• Visit a volcano near you • Meet the new Iceland

SUMMER!

parentmap.com/adventure

Family Adventure Guide inside

COVER: PHOTO OF BUBBIE SHU PROVIDED BY ALAYNE SULKIN

8

41 parentmap.com • May 2018 • 3


news

News Around Town

Head Upstream

Visit the new Nordic Heritage Museum

Meet real-life robot builders

The wait is over! After years of planning and

Zip on over to America’s Car Museum in Tacoma on

fundraising, The Nordic Heritage Museum

May 19 for a chance to meet real-life robot builders.

in Ballard will debut its new museum and

Members of The SOTAbots, a local robotics team of

cultural center on May 5. The modern

high school students, will visit the museum from 11

all around Pioneer Square). Tickets are on sale

57,000-square-foot museum sits smack-dab

a.m. to 4 p.m. to discuss designing, programming and

now for the event, which runs June 1 to 3. And if

in the middle of Ballard and includes brand

building robots. Visitors will also get to create their

you can’t go in person, KEXP will be featuring live

new spaces for exhibits and education.

own designs with provided building materials. The

streams of performances throughout the weekend

There’s also a café and store to celebrate all

event is free for museum members and included in

on their Facebook page. upstreammusicfest.com

things Nordic. nordicmuseum.org

museum admission. americascarmuseum.org

For those who missed it last year, there’s a new music festival in town: Upstream. This three-day music fest features more than 200 rising stars from around the Northwest. While not all of the acts are kid-centric, your music-loving tween or teen will love the variety and local feel (acts play

Giving Together

THE NONPROFIT MomsRising

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Please join us each month as we promote, support and learn about an extraordinary local nonprofit. We will highlight the good works of organizations that strive to improve the lives of families and invite you to join us in giving precious time or money.

PHOTO COURTESY MOMSRISING FACEBOOK

2018

4 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

This is where moms and people who love them go to change the world. From changing laws around gun safety to advocating for paid leave, MomsRising has a network of more than a million working for change across the country.

THE GOAL Achieve economic security for all moms, women and families in the United States.

VOLUNTEER action.momsrising.org/signup/get_involved_momsrising DONATE action.momsrising.org/donate/defend


NORTHWEST FOLKLIFE IN PARTNERSHIP WITH SEATTLE CENTER

M AY 2 5 T H - 2 8 T H 2 01 8 S E AT T L E C E N T E R

FOR THE PEOPLE BY THE PEOPLE Suggested daily donation: $10 per person | $20 per family

VISIT THE DISCOVERY ZONE FOR FAMILY FUN! Who Knew Going to the Dentist Could Be So Much Fun?

, cause parenting is a trip!

Dr. Roger Lucas, DDS Pediatric Dentist

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Mention this ad to receive a FREE electric toothbrush at your exam!

18833 28th Ave, Suite B, Lynnwood parentmap.com • May 2018 • 5


dear reader

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With GET, enjoy tax-free savings that are guaranteed to keep pace with tuition. When it’s time for school, use it anywhere in the country.

Enroll Now LEARN MORE AT:

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What Motherhood Means to Me: Becoming Bubbie Laynie

M

y gorgeous mother Shulamit (Z”L)* is on the cover of this month’s issue. Looking at the photo, I’m thrust back in time to 1961 when the camera captured that moment. I will always remember my mother’s famous smile. It reflected her passion for life, which I’m told that I inherited. When she smiled, her chocolate brown eyes simultaneously lit up, suggesting that life is grand and that everything is possible. I wish we would have seen more of that smile. Despite all her glory, my mother wasn’t a particularly peaceful person (despite her first name’s relation to the Hebrew word shalom, meaning “peace”). But while her existence was far from tranquil, it was magnificently filled up with devotion and commitment to her values and her family. My mother was the fourth of six children, born of immigrant parents who escaped Poland just before millions of Jews were murdered in death camps. As new Ari and Bubbie Shu Americans, her family suffered extreme hardships including the death of my grandfather. His passing left my grandmother a widow with six kids ages 4 to 14. My grandmother was forced to buy her family’s entire apartment building to avoid being evicted (once again) because of her loud and rambunctious progeny. Raised in the shadow of those mandatory strengths required for survival, my mother set extraordinarily high standards for her own children but I wouldn’t trade her vivacious spirit, impeccable integrity and unconditional love for other supposedly perfect parental traits. Pictured above in matching sweaters knitted by yours truly, you’ll see my mother, who became known as Bubbie Shu. She’s holding her first grandchild, my eldest daughter Arielle. Now about to turn 32, Ari recently announced that she and her princely husband, Adam, will be having a child this fall. I am overjoyed to become a Bubbie myself. My first task as a Bubbie-in-training: Sit by Ari’s side and explore the depths of wisdom in the essays featured in this month’s issue (p. 16). From flexibility to acceptance, strength to appreciation, these are life-saving tools to which all mothers — indeed, all parents — can relate. Another lesson I hope to impart to my daughter as she becomes a mother: It takes a village. And I fully intend to be there for her, Adam and my grandchild in the way that grandparents should be: with wide open arms and hearts full of pure and unconditional love. * Of blessed memory

6 • May 2018 • parentmap.com


ParentMap

May 2018, Vol. 16, No. 5 PUBLISHER/EDITOR Alayne Sulkin

EDITORIAL

MANAGING EDITOR Elisabeth Kramer OUT + ABOUT EDITOR

Nancy Chaney

CALENDAR ASSISTANT Dora Heideman COPY EDITOR Sunny Parsons CONTRIBUTORS

Nancy Schatz Alton, Will Austin, Meredith Bland, Deanna Duff, Samantha Facciolo, Malia Jacobson, Kate Missine, Jenn Morson, Tamiko Nimura, Rachael Mitchell Okerlund, Todd Powell, Sa’iyda Shabazz, Elisa Taylor, Ruchika Tulshyan

PARENTMAP.COM

DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER

Lindsey Carter

PUBLISHING ASSISTANT

Nicole Persun

SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIST

Diana Cherry

ADVERTISING SALES + PARTNERSHIPS MANAGER, ADVERTISING SALES AND PARTNERSHIPS

Ben Demar, Ida Wicklund

AD OPERATIONS MANAGER Elisa Taylor ADVERTISING CLIENT SERVICES SPECIALIST

Jessica Collet

ADVERTISING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Amanda Brown SALES ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Dora Heideman

MARKETING/EVENTS EVENT OPERATIONS Tara Buchan EVENT + MARKETING COORDINATOR

Mallory Dehbod

EVENTS ASSISTANT Zoe Bloom

ART + PRODUCTION DESIGN + PRODUCTION, PRINT MAGAZINE

Emily Johnson

PRODUCTION DESIGN Amy Chinn

ADMINISTRATION FINANCE MANAGER Sonja Hanson BUSINESS ANALYST Carolyn Brendel ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT + DISTRIBUTION

Angela Goodwin

PARENTMAP EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Benjamin Danielson, M.D.

ODESSA BROWN CHILDREN’S CLINIC

Joan Duffell COMMITTEE FOR CHILDREN John Gottman, Ph.D. THE GOTTMAN INSTITUTE PROFESSOR EMERITUS, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

Laura Kastner, Ph.D.

PSYCHIATRY + BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

Bea Kelleigh

VICE PRESIDENT AT DOVETAILING, LLC

Yaffa Maritz, M.A.

LISTENING MOTHERS + COMMUNITY OF MINDFUL PARENTS

Ron Rabin THE KIRLIN FOUNDATION Daniel J. Siegel, M.D.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MINDSIGHT INSTITUTE ADVERTISING INFORMATION

206-709-9026 or advertising@parentmap.com Fax 206-709-9031 CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS

calendar@parentmap.com EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS

editor@parentmap.com DISTRIBUTION distribution@parentmap.com SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@parentmap.com

ParentMap is published monthly PMB #190, 7683 SE 27th St. Mercer Island, WA 98040 ADMINISTRATION 206-709-9026, parentmap.com SUBSCRIPTION RATES 1 year: $24; 2 years: $40

All rights reserved; reproduction in whole or part without permission prohibited ©ParentMap 2018 • Printed in Oregon

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 7


all about baby Find Your Village Being a new parent can be really isolating, but baby, we’ve got your back. ALLI ARNOLD

Notes

Sign up for our weekly eNews for the best in outings and advice ’cause parenting is a trip!

h

parentmap.com/enews

From Recent Research to Gaga Gear

Have You Heard?

Eating during labor isn’t necessarily a bad thing Wondering if you’ll be confined to noshing on ice chips during your next childbirth? Talk it over with your doctor. According to a study in the “American Journal of Nursing,” there was no increase in risks for women who were allowed to eat and drink during labor. When scientists examined an estimated 2,800 women between 2008 and 2012, they found that eating and drinking during labor wasn’t all too troublesome in most cases. Although some women shouldn’t eat, it is something to bring up with your doctor before the big day.

Co-sleeping can be a conundrum Moms who co-sleep with their babies may experience depression or feel judged, say Penn State researchers. Moms who were still co-sleeping with infants after the six-month mark were 76 percent more depressed, on average, than those who moved the baby into a different room, according to a study published in “Infant and Child Development.” 8 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Babies can age us A new study in the journal “Human Reproduction” found that having a child can accelerate cellular aging. That process occurs in all people as we age and is typically marked by the shortening of telomeres (the end caps on our chromosomes). This study, however, found that having a child aged woman the equivalent of 11 years. (That doesn’t mean women who have kids will die 11 years sooner than they would have if they didn’t have kids, the researchers noted.)


For That One Time You Get Out of the House Feeling stir-crazy? Never fear. We’ve found the best nature outings, coffee

Anxiety disorders are REAL, COMMON and TREATABLE

See pg. 47

shops, story times and more for babies and toddlers. Get ideas and get out there at parentmap.com/babyoutings.

0518_Angst_1-16.indd 1

Gear We’re Gaga For Celebrate the new parents in your life with these ideas

A PAIR OF AWARDWINNING EARMUFFS Ever heard of HearMuffs? These kid-sized headphones are perfect for your concert-going kiddo, and

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6/1/15 10:14 PM

Communication Assessment and Intervention Birth through Adolescence • Articulation/ • Down Syndrome Motor-Speech • Language Delay • Autism Spectrum • Social Skills Disorders • Fluency/Stuttering

Learning here IS fun and games Appointments available in Seattle/Wallingford, Bellevue, and West Seattle

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are guaranteed to keep young ears safe. Find them in blue, green, orange, red and white. lucidaudio.com/hearmuffs

#ArmMeWithBooks

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A ONESIE WITH A MESSAGE It’s hard to pick between the

84.88% of those

cute onesies at Love Bubby.

surveyed in a recent ParentMap poll say they are adamantly opposed to arming educators.

“Always Fierce,” “Little Activist,” “Mama Is My Queen” — how do we choose?! The best part: Mom can get a matching shirt. shoplovebubby.com

Most parents, educators, and kids agree:

A TOOL TO HELP THEM TEETH

Guns don’t belong in the classroom.

This one comes from mom Tasha Mayberry of Connecticut. When her son started teething, she needed help. And so the FreezieTeethie was born.

parentmap.com/never-again

Learn more on the product’s

supports common sense gun reform.

Kickstarter. Follow us on

to join in our fight to end gun violence NOW.

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 9


CARING FOR OUR NEIGHBORS MEANS ACTUALLY BEING IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD.

wellness

Stroke of Insight

How to help women prevent stroke By Malia Jacobson

SAMMAMISH

F PRIMARY CARE FOR EXPEDIA EMPLOYEES SENIOR HEALTH CLINIC–PRIMARY CARE + OVERLAKE MEDICAL CENTER– HOSPITAL CAMPUS CONCIERGE CARE PRIMARY CARE

Our primary care clinics offer same-day appointments and are conveniently located throughout the Eastside. With today’s busy schedules we know it can be difficult to find time to see the doctor, that’s why we designed our clinics to minimize your wait time and get you back to your day.

overlakehospital.org/clinics

eeling drained and stressed was normal for Alizabeth Rasmussen of Bellevue, a fulltime paralegal, part-time writer and mom of a teenage son. So when she felt “tired and spacey” after work one day, she wasn’t concerned. A few minutes later, her arm went briefly numb and she felt a familiar migraine-type headache behind her eyes. Still, she was just 45, healthy and active. This couldn’t be anything too serious. But when she sat down to Google her symptoms and found she could type only garbled nonsense, she knew something was wrong. She called 911 and headed straight for the ER. There, she learned she’d experienced a transient ischemic attack (TIA), or a mini-stroke. The next day, she had a second stroke, which was more damaging. “I could have died,” Rasmussen says. “But thanks to my age and good health, I pulled through, thank God.”

Women and stroke risk BELLEVUE�������ISSAQUAH�������KIRKLAND�������REDMOND�������SAMMAMISH

10 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Rasmussen’s experience isn’t unique, says neurosurgeon Dr. Abhineet

Chowdhary, director of Overlake Medical Center’s Neuroscience Institute. A leading cause of disability worldwide and the thirdleading cause of death behind heart disease and cancer in the United States, stroke happens when blood flow to the brain is blocked. The resulting damage to brain tissue can be fatal. Survivors can experience permanently impaired speech, movement and facial expressions. Stroke is widely considered a “male” ailment, which hurts prevention and treatment efforts aimed at women, Dr. Chowdhary says. “Even though women may not think about their stroke risk, women are more likely to die from stroke than men, and they tend to suffer worse outcomes afterward.” Women’s stroke risk ramps up during certain life stages. Pregnant women and those on hormone replacement therapy face increased risk, as do women who get migraines. Dehydration and stress increase the risk, too. Though women aren’t the only ones letting


“Because stroke symptoms differ for women, their strokes tend to go unrecognized and untreated.” their tanks run dry, literally and figuratively, they’re more likely to neglect self-care, especially during the busy child-raising years.

Signs of stroke Because stroke symptoms differ for women, their strokes tend to go unrecognized and untreated. Delayed treatment can mean more damage to the brain, Dr. Chowdhary says. Men are more likely to experience the classic stroke symptoms like numbness in the face or on one side of the body, sudden confusion or disorientation and trouble seeing and walking, but women experience stroke differently. In women, stroke’s primary symptom is headache. “It’s not uncommon for a woman to mistake a stroke for a regular stress headache, take a couple of aspirin and go to bed,” Dr. Chowdhary says. Some women also get hiccups or chest pain, but don’t realize those symptoms can indicate stroke. Neglecting stroke symptoms can be debilitating or fatal, Dr. Chowdhary says. “Here at Overlake, neurologists treat stroke quickly with IV medications that break up the clot. We also offer a stroke intervention called mechanical thrombectomy, in essence allowing

us to fish out clots. And, we have an in-patient facility to help stroke patients recuperate.” Even with top-notch healthcare, recuperation can be slow. In the years following her strokes, Rasmussen worked tirelessly to regain her speech and writing. “Words were my life, both professionally and personally,” she says. Today, she’s using those words to teach other women as well as leading Overlake’s stroke survivor support groups. Habits like maintaining a healthy weight and normal blood pressure, exercising for at least 30 minutes most days and keeping alcohol use moderate (fewer than two drinks per day) helps reduce risk. But stroke can happen to anyone, even impeccably healthy people, Rasmussen says. 0518_peps_1-4.indd “I thought strokes couldn’t happen to someone my age, but age doesn’t matter when it comes to stroke,” she says. “I’ve met so many people younger than me with my story … previously healthy and vibrant young people who are now recovering from a stroke. Healing is a lifelong process. I fought that at first, but now, it rings true.” n

#EnoughIsEnough 1

4/10/18 9:59 PM

Their friends were murdered right before their eyes. Now they’re using their voices to speak for those who can never speak again. That’s why we’re handing them the mic.

Malia Jacobson is a Tacoma-based freelance writer specializing in health topics. Sponsored by:

We’ll do everything we can to amplify their voices. Overlake Medical Center and Clinics are committed to offering the highest quality, compassionate medical care for you and your family. Learn more about your health care options at overlakehospital.org.

parentmap.com/never-again supports common sense gun reform. Follow us on

to join in our fight to end gun violence NOW.

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 11


FREE

teens take action

Meet Jahlil Kirby

Local teens make change happen By Elisabeth Kramer

Y

ou don’t have to look far these days for an example of a teen taking action. From March for Our Lives to #MeToo, young people are making positive change happen — and they’re doing it in our very own city. You’ve already met a few of these changemakers. Every month since January, we’ve profiled a local teenager who’s making a difference. Many are involved in the Gates Foundation Discovery Center’s Youth Ambassadors Program (YAP), a year-long service learning program for high school students designed to educate, engage and empower youth. Still more have found other ways to improve their communities. This month, we talk to Jahlil Kirby, a student at Lincoln High School in Seattle who’s pursuing his love of music. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity and length.

Who am I? I’m Jahlil Kirby. I’m 18 and a junior at Lincoln High School. I recently worked on a guitar and spoken word performance for the 2018 Teen Action Fair at the Gates Foundation Discovery Center. I’ve also attended a program at MoPOP for the past two years and plan to do it again this summer. It’s called The Residency and focuses on youth development through hip-hop. [The Grammy Award-winning musicians] Macklemore and Ryan Lewis created it. Basically, the program takes a bunch of kids in King County and introduces them to the music industry, from sound production to writing lyrics. They also pay you a small stipend. It’s one of the coolest programs I’ve ever seen. I learned a lot about the music industry, networking and how to present myself. They showed me how to make music a business rather than a hobby. They increased my skills and confidence to talk to people about my music. Sponsored by:

S. L

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SPIR N I E V EA

At the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, we believe all lives have TUESDAY–SATURDAY, 10AM–5PM NEXT TO SEATTLE CENTER | 440 FIFTH AVENUE NORTH DISCOVERGATES.ORG | @DISCOVERGATES

12 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

equal value. We are impatient optimists working to reduce inequity. Explore interactive exhibits and find ways you can take action at the Gates Foundation Discovery Center, discovergates.org


What I’m up to I’ve been involved with music since I was 8 years old. I’ve always wanted to do as much as I can with it. I started by playing the guitar. I wanted to be the next Jimi Hendrix; the first song I learned on the guitar was “Sweet Child O’ Mine.” I wanted to spread out, too, so I started playing the trombone in seventh grade. I do everything that I can to improve my music skills and practice all the time!

Want to get involved, too? What I recommend Honestly, I think you should just do whatever you’re interested in. There are too many free ways to learn about what you want to do. For example, I learned a lot about music production from watching videos on YouTube. Just get out there and do what you can. Be a learner. n

“Just get out there and do what you can. Be a learner.”

Elisabeth Kramer is managing editor at ParentMap.

#NeverAgain 19 years since Columbine. 5 years since Sandy Hook. 2 months since Parkland. This is one anniversary we aren’t looking forward to: the next school shooting. It doesn’t have to be this way.

Let’s stand up and say NEVER again. parentmap.com/never-again supports common sense gun reform. Follow us on

to join in our fight to end gun violence NOW.

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 13


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BEING BILINGUAL IS GOOD FOR YOUR BRAIN! A Caring Community Inquiry-Based Curriculum Multicultural Experience The French Immersion School of Washington offers students ages 2.5 through Fifth Grade an excellent bilingual education in a welcoming environment that encourages critical thinking and curiosity. FISW students benefit from an inquirybased, bilingual, and multicultural education. The value of the innovative and dynamic curriculum goes well beyond the language.

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On Raising a Bilingual Child When I became pregnant, my husband and I consciously decided to speak our mother tongue — Hindi — more frequently and to eventually make it our primary language at home. We have many reasons for the switch. New research shows that language lessons start in the womb. Naturally, we wanted our child to feel connected with our roots in India, and to get a jumpstart on acquiring native proficiency before he learns English outside our home (as I know he will). There’s also the ubiquity of our language; some estimates claim Hindi is the fourth most widely spoken language in the world (Mandarin being the most widely spoken). Plus, being bilingual can make people smarter, have better job prospects and could even delay the onset of dementia and Alzheimer’s. But in my own experience, being a bilingual child creates identity challenges. Learn how the author navigates them at parentmap.com/ bilingual-parenting. — Ruchika Tulshyan

Tour Tuesdays, 9am Find out more at fisw.org

Double feature film screenings of two IndieFlix documentaries

French Immersion School of Washington 4211 W. Lake Sammamish Pkwy SE, Bellevue, WA 98008 14 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Q&A with local experts

See pg. 47


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THE FIRST FRIENDS SCHOOL IN WASHINGTON STATE PRE SCHOOL– 8TH GRADE

OPENING FALL 2018

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Mandarin/English Immersion with daily Spanish exposure. Research shows that biliteracy positively impacts executive functioning, and is linked to higher intelligence. It also develops people who are more confident moving across different languages and cultures.

Continual, consistent learning that minimizes summer learning loss and optimizes learning gain.

BE A FRIEND Located on 5 stunning acres a mile from downtown Bellevue. 556 124th Ave NE, Bellevue

OPEN FOR PRE SCHOOL /PRE-K ENROLLMENT FOR FALL , 2018

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT US AT IFSCHOOL.ORG

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 15


feature

What

Motherhood Means to Me

Appreciation

W Reflection

hat does motherhood mean to you?

That’s the question we asked writers for this year’s May issue. The topic was on our minds, and not just because of Mother’s

Surrender

Day. At ParentMap, we think about motherhood a lot. Its responsibilities, its joys, its trials — motherhood asks so much of so many of us.

Adapting Letting Go

And what, we wondered, does it all mean? For some moms, it means navigating life’s challenges as the sole parent. For others, it’s about coming to terms with the choices of their own mother. Still more wonder how their mom ever did it all in the first place. Our writers are moms of all sorts: new, divorced, male. Their

Acceptance

stories don’t fit one narrative because there isn’t one. As one of our writers puts it, “That’s the biggest lesson I’ve learned from motherhood: No one actually knows what they’re doing.”

Fearlessness 16 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

And with that, we invite you to sit back and read on for seven stories about the ups and downs of motherhood.


Surrender

Rachael Mitchell Okerlund

O

n November 30, 2011, alone and with a heart wide open, I boarded a flight that would take me halfway around the world. My destination was a tiny yoga school in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India. Vaguely, this quest had something to do with purpose and fulfillment. Although I was unsure of the exact thing I was searching for, I was certain I’d find it there somewhere along the banks of the holy Ganges River, which carved the town into thirds. Six years to the exact day later, I embarked on the second great journey of my life: motherhood. Coincidence, maybe. But I’m more apt to believe the arrival of my daughter marked a lap of a cycle that began back when I planted my wide, flat feet firmly onto the mat in that magic place that felt more like home than home itself. What I found in India, what I found in yoga and what was reaffirmed when I gave birth to my daughter (and to myself as a mother) was the power of letting go. As the orange sun set on the foothills of the Himalayas and in a rooftop classroom with window frames frequented by smiling, sometimes sinister monkeys, I learned that, at its very core, the practice of yoga is abhyasa and vairagya — holding on and letting go. Strength and flexibility. Effort and surrender. What I learned on my hands and knees on the floor of my birthing center, naked in my divine power, my tiny daughter about to take her first

breath, is that motherhood, like yoga, occurs at this junction of effort and surrender. In both of these spaces, and with the great effort of becoming, my self broke into infinity, revealing my ego and with it, the chains of “shoulds,” the empty wanting, the lies we tell ourselves and the lies we believe. With each breath I take as a mother, there is resistance, and then there is the quiet but mighty voice of surrender. The freedom of letting go. The power in simply existing, right there, in a moment, exactly as it is, exactly as you are. I am not the mother I thought I’d be, the one my ego tells me I should be. I am the mother I am. When you view motherhood through the lens of surrender, you accept your body and you thank it, despite the sometimes foreign feeling of it. You move more fluidly through sleepless nights, undone laundry and dishes, the idea that you should have showered by now. Mostly, you experience time in a new way. “It goes by so fast, so savor every moment,” they say. It does go by fast. And you never know the futility of savoring it until you’ve studied a groggy, milk-dripped smile and the line of a tiny body, a body you made, under the moonlight, so desperate to save a moment, you exhale to keep your heart from breaking. Motherhood is that exhale. Rachael Mitchell Okerlund is a witchy desert-dwelling writer and new mom with an affinity for books, tacos and the moon.

e

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parentmap.com • May 2018 • 17


feature

Acceptance

Fearlessness

Jenn Morson

M

y mother loves to tell the story of bringing my twin brothers home from the hospital. My parents’ car, a 1975 Ford Maverick affectionately known as “The Lemon” because of its color and reliability, carried their sudden family of seven from Philadelphia back to Maryland. In the back seat, each of my older sisters, ages 7 and 9, held a newborn twin. My mother hadn’t given birth to these twins, my brothers. That had been my biological mom, her sister-inlaw, who died shortly after childbirth. She was, suddenly, a new mother once again, the nine months of pregnancy condensed into a few days’ time. How will this work? she must have wondered. How will I take care of them? What happens to all the plans I made, now that my children are in school? There were no car seats. No cribs. No preparation. My brothers slept in laundry baskets next to their bed, one of them prone to episodes of apnea. My family’s community rallied, offering blankets, clothing and food. The twins became everyone’s children. The older siblings learned how to change diapers and give bottles. These were my parents’ sons, not nephews. It was never a question. Two years later, I was 5 and joined the family. The details are complicated and unimportant, but again, the parents who raised me didn’t blink. This time, instead of two cute, squirmy babies, they got an emotionally damaged kindergartner. Now a mom myself, I sometimes think

18 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Meredith Bland

about how I would have handled that, suddenly having to parent someone else’s child. I wonder if I could do half the job my parents did. Motherhood means doing what is best for your children, whether it brings you personal joy or personal agony. My mom — the one who raised me even if she wasn’t biologically related to me — lived this on a daily basis. I never saw her so much as lie down for a nap. For my mother, this also meant having to parent three children who had a different mother before her. As such, she also had to answer all of the inevitable questions and musings of those who lost the woman who gave birth to them. She made room for our family of origin by making sure we stayed in touch with relatives, visiting them often and seeking out any answers she didn’t have. She even tried to preserve various customs and pass them along, although the attempts were often less than successful, like the time she prepared and insisted on celebrating an authentic Seder meal. Not that long ago, at a church picnic, a sweet older woman asked my mother, “Whatever happened to your nephews? The twins?” My mother stared at her blankly, replying, “I don’t have any twin nephews. You must have me confused!” Her answer was sincere. She had no idea whom this woman was talking about because she never had twin nephews — just twin sons. Jenn Morson is a writer living and working outside of Washington, D.C., with her husband and their four children.

I

t happens nearly every day when I pick up my children from school. As I wait in the hallways and chat with the other parents, some child will walk past me and stare at my hand. Their faces grow serious. They stare without blinking. And they are so lost in their confusion that they don’t see me looking back at them, waiting for a reaction. I was born with no fingers on my right hand. The teasing started in third grade. Once puberty hit, I started hiding my hand in the sleeve of my longsleeved shirts. I did it constantly, to the point where I wore sweaters at summer camp. But kids grow up, and by the time I got to college, people knew to keep the looks brief and the comments out of earshot. I grew up, too, and became confident in myself and at peace with the fact that I’m different. Or so I thought. I can always tell when another adult notices my hand for the first time. There’s that pause that’s one second too long to be a passing glance and one second too short to be a stare. But younger kids don’t know that they aren’t supposed to stare. I’ve seen more than a couple of children go into a trance, their eyes following my hand as though it were a hypnotist’s watch. In the beginning, I was able to laugh it off. But as my kids have gotten older, the stares have changed. There’s an understanding now that my hand is a “disability.”

That it’s more than just different, it’s weird and even scary. I know the thoughts behind those stares because I heard them when I was their age from the kids I went to school with. I’ve realized, to my dismay, that I have to introduce my disability to a whole new batch of open, honest and curious elementary school students — my kids’ schoolmates. Parenting frequently makes us relive both the good and bad of our childhood. In this case, it’s forcing me to deal with issues of self-esteem, pride and difference that I thought I had conquered. It’s become a kind of midlife growing up. I have to stand up for myself and for every other disabled adult and child out there by being open about my disability and refusing to hide it. More than anything else, refusing to be ashamed of my hand is important because I’m a mother. It’s not just the eyes of those other children that are on me; it’s my children’s eyes as well. My children see how I respond and how I hold myself in public. I have to push myself to be brave for them, not just to let them know that disabilities are nothing to be ashamed of, but to let them know that their mother loves herself — all of herself, unconditionally. Just like I love them.

Parenting frequently makes us relive both the good and bad of our childhood.

Meredith Bland is a freelance writer who lives with her family in Seattle.


CINDER EDNA BASED ON THE BOOK BY ELLEN JACKSON ADAPTED FOR THE STAGE BY TED RYLE

MAY 11 - JUNE 3, 2018

Letting Go Elisa Taylor

I

’m a planner. I make lists. I print out residency schedules and school menus and stick them to the fridge. Friends marvel that I have my summer camping trips and day camps all set up by the end of February. I have a paper calendar in my purse because a mom has got to be able to see the whole month at a glance. I’ve kept a pocket calendar since 1983! In my dog-eared collection of little booklets is recorded the plan I had for my life — college deadlines, my hair appointment for engagement photos, the first day I felt my babies flutter inside me. Future calendars would hold anniversaries, family trips and so many milestones as my husband and I raised our children together as a loving, supportive team.… Spoiler: That’s not how things are turning out. My life — and motherhood, in particular — has become a challenge in learning to deal with not being able to have a plan. Sometimes it feels like living with something that you didn’t realize you signed up for, like the fine print just keeps getting added to the contract after you already signed. In choosing to become a mother, I knew that there could be complications, that serious and life-altering things could happen. You prepare yourself as well as you can, for both the expected and the unknown, but until you’re living it, there’s no

way to plan for how you will react. You just go. Weaning, potty training, puberty, ER visits, diagnoses, individualized education plans, divorce, parenting plans, finding therapists for the kids — I have all the books. I read all the articles. I work for a parenting magazine, so, believe me, I’m up to speed. The experts tell you to be your child’s parent, not their friend; that your children will be eager for your favor, your approval, your attention; that being a pretty good parent is good enough. But the stakes just keep getting higher. Or, at least that’s how I feel as my kids get older. What do you do when your child tells you they hate that they can’t count all of their ribs in the mirror? That they tried cutting themselves to see how it felt? That they like their stepmother better than you? How do I manage the conflict that rises when my experience, wisdom and authority clash with their experience, sense of self and struggle for autonomy? What happens when putting my foot down for what is best for my child means possibly losing my relationship with them? All of a sudden, the balance of power has tilted nauseatingly in the other direction as I find myself seeking my child’s approval and love. These days, as the mother of a teen, motherhood for me means understanding how little influence I have at the end of the game. The experts tell you that a teen will separate themselves from their parent as a necessary stage of

My life — and motherhood, in particular — has become a challenge in learning to deal with not being able to have a plan.

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development. It still sucks. I find myself, way before I’m 0518_seattle_artist_league_1-16.indd 1 4/16/18 ready, witnessing that not only is my child their own ship, but they’ve already tossed the line back on the dock and they’re drifting away. I don’t get a do-over. I did my best, yet no matter what I did right, things still might not be okay. Connecting parents to build a loving I live with the regret of the things community of families of color I did wrong and can apologize for JOIN our FOCS Parent Groups, but not fix, and with the pain of monthly events and resource sharing missing this person I love so much Register and Info at focseattle.org while they’re standing right there in front of me. Motherhood for me means 0418_foc_1-16.indd 1 EW 3/15/18 N letting go. It means finding my sea legs as plans are made and plans for kids ages 3 to 9 dissolve, and persevering as we keep moving forward. I can still, at least, book the exact campsite I for kids age 10 up want, on the weekend I want it, and It’s fun and it really works! write it down in my paper calendar.

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Elisa Taylor is a Pacific Northwest native, single mother of two and the ad operations manager for ParentMap.

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feature

Adapting

Reflection

Sa’iyda Shabazz

Tamiko Nimura

I

have always known that I was going to be a mother. Even as a young girl, when I would waffle between wanting to be a teacher, a princess and a movie star, I always knew that being a mom was a part of those plans. I was going to find a nice man who resembled my favorite celebrity, we’d have an awesome wedding, we’d be financially secure and then, when the time was right, we’d have a kid or two. Yeah, right. The reality of my becoming a mother was significantly different than I always imagined it. My pregnancy was a complete and total surprise. Honestly, the timing could not have been worse. I was unemployed, and while I was in a long-term relationship, we weren’t married at the time. We were in no way ready for a child, but I just knew we would be perfectly capable of adapting to parenthood. It was going to be a huge and difficult learning curve, but I had always wanted to be a mother — and nothing was going to stop that. Those first few months after my son was born were by no means easy. My son’s father grew increasingly distant, while I was at home with a fussy newborn who wanted to nurse all day and stay up all night. I was constantly trying to keep myself from drowning in the isolation and misery of early motherhood. With little support,

my life constantly felt like it was falling apart. But, this tiny little creature totally depended on me for everything. My love for him was what kept me going. When my son was about 3 months old, his dad literally sent me and my son to go live with my parents. As a single first-time mom, I had to figure everything out on my own. There’s no road map for parenthood; that’s especially so for single moms. We’re figuring things out by ourselves with no one to tag in when it gets hard. Every day, I still feel like I’ve been thrown into the deep end and I have to figure out how to swim. Most days, I’m barely treading water. And that’s the biggest lesson I’ve learned from motherhood: No one actually knows what they’re doing. Sure, I thought I knew how it was all going to go, but the truth? There’s nothing easy about motherhood. When you’re tasked with the responsibility of keeping another person alive, there’s not a single moment where the weight of that reality isn’t crushing your chest. But the uncertainty and the worry are what make the journey even more beautiful. But knowing that every minute your heart is walking around outside of your body and you’re getting to watch it grow? That’s the best part of the job.

As a single first-time mom, I had to figure everything out on my own.

20 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Sa’iyda Shabazz lives in Los Angeles.

I

think about the mothering that my mother never had. Bedtime reading: nighttime showers already taken, youngest daughter on my lap, oldest daughter snuggled close by. We’ve just finished reading Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.” My mother is there in the living room, too. When I’ve finished the evening’s chapter, she sighs wistfully. “That was nice. No one ever read to me when I was growing up.” I know the outline of my mother’s childhood years through broad brushstrokes, but it’s the small details that hit me the hardest. And this detail is one I’d never heard before. For the first 10 years of her life, my mother grew up in the Philippines with extended family, before coming to the United States with a family she barely knew. I think about the mothering that my mother never had.

o

I think about the mothering that I had. When I started first grade, I was scared and worried. But after making it through that first day, I came home to a mother excited to talk. “Tell me all about your day,” she said. “I want to hear everything.” So, I told my mom about my new friend Sheri, whom I met on the playground. I told her how the teachers had a hard time pronouncing my first name. I told her about how my classmates and I, forced to stay in our seats during lunchtime, began to scoot around the room in our chairs. It was all the minutiae of childhood. And no matter what, the invitation was always there: “Tell me about your day.”

o

I think about the mothering that I do now. There’s a black office chair in our kitchen; it might be one of the most important chairs in our house. Sometimes my youngest daughter sits in the chair on her knees, swiveling from side to side, telling me about playground drama and school projects. Sometimes my oldest daughter sits in the chair with her legs crossed, telling me about middle school lunchroom politics. These conversations are usually better than the “How was your day?” conversations that happen right after school. I think they’re better because the girls initiate them. These conversations are part of the bedrock of my mothering. I credit my mom for the chair. In our house, it’s a tangible invitation to my daughters: “Tell me all about your day.”

o

When I think about what my mother missed and when I look at my own daughters, who have grown up happily in a childhood replete with mothering, my heart aches. How was my mother able to parent so well, not having known her own mother during those early years? How did she learn to mother herself? Each Mother’s Day, may we summon the extraordinary generosity of will and imagination that mothering requires. May we hold space for the mothers whom many of us haven’t had. May we honor the mothers we have in all of us. Tamiko Nimura is a freelance writer living in Tacoma.


Appreciation Todd Powell

I

once said something stupid during my junior high home economics class. When my teacher asked whether I helped out with the dishes at home, I quipped, “No, that’s my mom’s job.” “Oh, really,” said my teacher, who reported the comment to my mom. It’s not that I was being snarky. In my mind, I was stating a plain fact: My parents had forged a division of labor in their marriage, with my dad working outside the house, and my mom working inside. Nor was I suggesting that dishes were strictly women’s work. Little did I know what was ahead — a bit of karma for being a smart-alecky teenage chauvinist. Fast-forward two decades to the arrival of my first child, Sophie, and the realization that I had taken on a huge responsibility as a stay-at-home parent. I was now Mr. Mom, and, yes, I had plenty of dishes to do, along with all those diapers to change. That first Mother’s Day after Sophie was born, my mother-in-law commented that it should be my day, too. I smiled but demurred — I wasn’t going to detract from my wife’s well-earned position as a mother.

Still, I had taken on a role that I never would have aspired to when I was 14. The youngest of four boys, I grew up in a family helmed by a dad who was born and raised in the South, taught us the chivalrous acts of Southern gentlemen and liked to joke that children should be seen and not heard. My dad also had a penchant for recounting the patrilineal line of descent in his family, as if my oldest brother stood in line to inherit a dukedom. Patriarchy may have been the established vehicle in our family, with my dad being the keeper of the keys, but motherhood is what really kept the household wheels greased. It wasn’t until I took on many of the roles of traditional motherhood, however, that I truly appreciated the job my mom had done. Not just with the diapers and dishes, but with the doctors and dentists, the tending to bruises on the exterior and the tending to bruises on the interior, the refereeing of sibling spats and the Zen-like ability to be in the moment when one child is having a meltdown while the other is trying to feed the dog a chocolate bar.

I’ve learned . . . just how multifaceted the concept of motherhood can be.

I used to chuckle at the fact that my mom taped the Golden Rule to our family’s bathroom mirror, where we’d see it every day while brushing our teeth. But she knew that raising four boys really just boiled down to how you treated others. My mom is 87, still going strong and providing a role model for me. Every week she drives a friend’s husband to kidney dialysis, just so her friend can have a break. She likes to come over to our house and weed the garden. She does whatever she can to help others — to nurture

them, to treat them how she would have them treat her. Sometime after my second daughter, Ava, was born, my dad told me he could have never done what I did. I took this statement as the highest compliment possible from a man whose perspective on gender roles had softened over the years. He had called my mom a saint on numerous occasions, in part because he knew how valuable her unpaid job was in our family. What’s more, I see in my wife — a woman working in the tech industry and pursuing her dream as a musician — a person who demonstrates for our daughters what moms can achieve in this world. I’ve learned, too, from all the mothers I’ve known over the years, just how multifaceted the concept of motherhood can be. And I’ve realized, many times over, that the karma I earned back in junior high wasn’t the bad kind but the good. I consider myself a very lucky dad. An award-winning writer, Todd Powell has been a stay-at-home father for the past 16 years.

u

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Kids and families celebrate wildlife, nature, and gardening

Sat. May 12 / 10am–3pm / FREE Enjoy a variety of free hands on activities, educational exhibitors, live music and Pla nt 50+ vendors. Sa le

12:00 NOON Ella Bella Bee and the Pollinators perform!

Ar C rats & f ts

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Tukwila Community Center, 12424 42nd Ave // BackyardWildlifeFestival.org

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 21


may

SUNDAY

MONDAY

1

PICKS

FLYING HERITAGE & COMBAT ARMOR MUSEUM

TANKFEST

NORTHWEST

Northwest Folklife Festival, May 25–28

SAT MAY 26, 9:00 AM EVERETT, WA FLYINGHERITAGE.COM

SHONDA RANSON/PIXABAY

6

Memorial Day Parade, Arlington, May 28

ParentMap ‘Angst’ and ‘Screenagers’ film screenings, May 10 and 22

Seattle Aquarium Beach Naturalist Program, multiple dates and locations

Kodomo no Hi Children’s Day. Enjoy crafts, tasty food from local vendors, martial arts, taiko performances, kids’ tea ceremony, games and more. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. FREE. Japanese Cultural Community Center, Seattle. jcccw.org Nordic Museum Grand Opening. Celebrate this cultural museum’s move from quaint schoolhouse to modern marvel with family festivities. Saturday–Sunday, May 5–6. Seattle. nordicmuseum.org

7 Play to Learn. Community play and circle time. 10 a.m. FREE. Ages 6 and under with adult. Madison Complex, Tacoma; additional weekly times and locations online. playtacoma.org Three Billy Goats Gruff! Help the Billy Goats outsmart the troll in this dynamic, interactive half-hour show. May 7–12. $5; ages 2 and under free. Ages 0–5 with families. Olympia Family Theater. olyft.org

22 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

May Day Celebration and Potluck. Bring flowers to craft a crown, a dish to share and your community spirit. 5 p.m. FREE. Woodland Park near the horseshoe courts, Seattle. fremontartscouncil.org Kitty Literature. Call ahead for your child to practice reading with shelter cats; 20-minute sessions. Monday–Friday, 3–6 p.m. FREE; preregister. Ages 5–10. Seattle Humane, Bellevue. seattlehumane.org ONGOING EVENT

8 Meditation for Baby and Me. Music for babes followed by meditation practice for grown-ups every second Tuesday. 10:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. FREE. Adults with infants. Sahaja Meditation Center, Seattle. seattlemeditation.org ONGOING EVENT Game Night. Learn a new game with the fam at this super popular toy store. Tuesdays, 6–7 p.m. FREE. Ages 5 and up with adult. Top Ten Toys, Seattle. toptentoys.com ONGOING EVENT

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Mother’s Day at Cedar River Watershed. Celebrate human moms, plus moms in the Watershed, with refreshments and a casual stroll. 10 a.m.–3 p.m. FREE. Cedar River Watershed Education Center, North Bend. seattle.gov Second Sunday at Morse Wildlife Preserve. Take Mom to explore this wild spot, perfect for a family nature stroll and only open a handful of dates per year. 9 a.m.– 3 p.m. FREE. Graham. tahomaaudubon.org

Ms. Bee’s Play Place. Interactive, playbased activities help promote social, emotional and language development. 10–10:45 a.m. FREE. Ages 0–5 with adult. King County Library, Fairwood Branch, Renton. kcls.org Monday Cheapskate. Among a few weekly discount sessions, this one offers free admission to the preschool crowd. 9:30– 11:30 a.m. $6.87; ages 5 and under free. Sprinker Ice Arena, Tacoma. co.pierce.wa.us ONGOING EVENT

Tuesday Play Day. Drop-in play time just for families of children with special needs. Tuesdays, 10–11:30 a.m. Pay-as-you-will admission. Ages 1–6 with families. Children’s Museum of Tacoma. playtacoma.org ONGOING EVENT Reading with Rover. Young readers gain confidence reading aloud to trained therapy dogs. First and third Tuesdays, 6:30–7:30 p.m. FREE. Ages 5–10 with adult. Half Price Books, Redmond. readingwithrover.org ONGOING EVENT

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Lacey Spring Fun Fair. Carnival, car show, kids’ activities, lip sync contest and lots more. Saturday–Sunday, May 19–20. FREE. Saint Martin’s University, Lacey. laceyspringfunfair.com Mushroom Maynia. Puget Sound Mycological Society promises “family fungi fun” at this mushroom growing and harvesting fest with crafts and nature walk. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $3/person or $5/family. Center for Urban Horticulture, Seattle. psms.org

Low Sensory Play Time. Special play time features a limited number of kids and a calm environment. Monday, Noon–2 p.m. (additional times online). $20; preregister. Ages 0–10 with adult. Roo’s World of Discovery, Kirkland. roosworldofdiscovery.com ONGOING EVENT Paws to Read. Kids practice reading with sweet therapy dogs. Monday, 3–5 p.m. FREE. Ages 5–10 with adult. Everett Public Library, Evergreen Branch. epls.org ONGOING EVENT

‘Screenagers’ and ‘Angst’ Double Feature. Join ParentMap for one or two timely documentaries: “Screenagers” at 5 p.m. followed by Q&A, then “Angst” at 7:30 p.m. $15 advance each film. Ages 12 and up. Seattle Children’s Hospital. parentmap.com/filmscreenings Mom & Baby Yoga. Gentle yoga for new moms. Tuesday, 11:30 a.m.; Thursday, 2 p.m; Saturday, 10 a.m. $20. Moms with infants. Seattle Holistic Center. seattleholisticcenter.com ONGOING EVENT

Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum 27 Tankfest Northwest Advertsing28 Wild Waves Opening Weekend. Take- 4.28” x Memorial Day Parade. Parent Map 1.66” - full color Honor our veteradvantage of early-season ticket prices and ans at this moving annual parade. 10 a.m. start the summer with a splash. Saturday– 4/2018 FREE. Along N. Olympic Avenue, Arlington.

Ballard’s Syttende Mai Parade, Seattle, May 17

TUESDAY

Monday, May 26–28. $17 and up; ages 3 and under free. Wild Waves Theme & Water Park, Federal Way. wildwaves.com Bicycle Sunday. Take your family’s two-wheelers out for a spin on this one of many car-free Sundays along the lake; helmets required. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. FREE. Lake Washington Boulevard, Seattle. seattle.gov/parks

arlingtonwa.gov Memorial Day Weekend Train Rides. Enjoy train rides this holiday weekend with special discounts for military (with ID) and their families. Saturday–Monday, May 26–28. $5–$20; ages 2 and under free. Northwest Railway Museum, Snoqualmie. trainmuseum.org

29 Seattle Aquarium Beach Naturalist Program. Investigate what low tide reveals. Find times and locations online. FREE. seattleaquarium.org ONGOING EVENT Marvel Universe of Super Heroes Exhibition. In the largest exhibition ever at MoPop, journey through 80 years of Marvel history and marvel at the iconic original artifacts. Daily, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Museum admission plus $8. Museum of Pop Culture, Seattle. mopop.org


WEDNESDAY


JUNE 1– AUGUST 31

KING COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

FOUNDATION


WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

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Lil’ Diggers Playtime. Behold the enormous sandbox of kids’ dreams. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday; 9:30–11 a.m. or 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. through May 24. $8. Ages 5 and under with adult. Sandbox Sports, Seattle. sandboxsports.net Story Time for Kids. Get comfy and listen to great new and classic stories. 11 a.m. FREE. Ages 1–5 with caregiver. University Bookstore, Mill Creek. ubookstore.com ONGOING EVENT

PJ Library Neighborhood Song & Story. Jewish storytelling for families; all welcome. 11 a.m. FREE. Ages 1–8 with caregiver. Third Place Books Seward Park, Seattle. jewishinseattle.org ONGOING EVENT Toytopia. Share your favorite childhood toys with your kids. Tuesday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. through June 10. Included with admission. Washington State History Museum, Tacoma. washingtonhistory.org

Small Frye: Storytelling + Art. Stories spring to life with Seattle Children’s Theatre at this first Friday story time with a craft 10:30–11:45 a.m. FREE; preregister for craft. Ages 3–5 with caregiver. Frye Art Museum, Seattle. fryemuseum.org The Wizard of Oz. Bring the entire family to see this classic tale with all the familiar songs to go along with it. Friday–Sunday through May 12. $10–$15. Bellevue Youth Theatre – Crossroads. bellevuewa.gov

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Conservatory Story Hour. Enjoy stories and crafts amid the verdant surroundings. 11 a.m.–noon. Suggested donation $3. Ages 3–8 with adult. W.W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory, Tacoma. seymourconservatory.org Let Me Be Myself: The Life Story of Anne Frank Exhibit. Last few chances to see this moving exhibit relating Anne’s life to youth today. Wednesday and Sunday through May 30. $5–$10; preregistration required. Holocaust Center for Humanity, Seattle. holocaustcenterseattle.org

‘Angst’ Film Screenings. See the groundbreaking film that will help your family tackle anxiety; Q&A after each screening. 5 or 7 p.m. $15 advance, $18 at door. Ages 12 and up. Sammamish High School, Bellevue. parentmap.com/angst Tugboat Story Time. Get your sea legs on and board a tugboat for stories and fun. 11 a.m. Suggested donation $2. Ages 1–8 with caregiver. Center for Wooden Boats, Seattle. cwb.org ONGOING EVENT

Northwest Paddling Festival. Get out on the water with demo kayaks, canoes and paddleboards. Friday–Saturday, May 11–12. Free entry; small fee for tours and demos. All ages. Lake Sammamish State Park, Issaquah. northwestpaddlingfestival.com Art Walk and Recycled Arts Festival. Fun for the whole family featuring a kids’ area, food trucks and all kinds of super-cool art. Friday–Saturday, May 11–12. Free entry; food for purchase. Phinney Center, Seattle. artupphinneywood.com

Cinco de Mayo Celebration. Community celebration with music, parade, kids’ activities and more. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. FREE. El Centro de la Raza, Seattle. elcentrodelaraza.org Free Comic Book Day. Find a participating shop near you and pick up your FREE comic. freecomicbookday.com

12 Remlinger Farms Opening Weekend. Celebrate moms with a day out at the fun park with a mini steam train, hay maze, pony rides and more. Saturday–Sunday, May 12–13. $13.75–$15.75; under age 1 free. remlingerfarms.com Mother’s Day Saturday Sail. Free boat rides (paddle, row, motor or sail) as well as fun activities such as toy boat building. Arrive early as sign-ups fill quickly. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Cama Beach, Camano Island. cwb.org

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Ballard Church Indoor Play. This neighborhood church opens its doors for families with tots to stop by and play. Tuesday– Friday; various times. FREE. Ages 0–8 with adult. Ballard Church, Seattle. ballardchurch.com ONGOING EVENT Hairspray. A teen takes her big hair and follows her big dreams in this high-energy musical. May 10–July 1. $38–$80. Ages 8 and up. Village Theatre, Issaquah. villagetheatre.org

Third Thursday at Tacoma Museums. Romp (gently) around the Museum of Glass, Tacoma Art Museum and Washington State History Museum FREE on third Thursday evenings. museumofglass.org, tacomaartmuseum.org, washingtonhistory.org 17th of May Parade. Celebrate Norwegian Independence Day with the awesome Syttende Mai parade in Ballard. 6 p.m. FREE. Along Market Street, Seattle. 17thofmay.org

Tot Shabbat. Gather with other families to celebrate with songs and snacks; play time after. 9:45–10:30 a.m. FREE. Ages 0–5 with adult. Stroum Jewish Community Center, Mercer Island. sjcc.org Free Admission Night. Free family date night the third Friday evening of the month. 5:30–9 p.m. Ages 1–12 with families. Imagine Children’s Museum, Everett. imaginecm.org

Ray Evans Memorial Fishing Event. Kids get instruction, equipment and the chance to reel one in. 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. $15; preregister for time slot. Age 5–14. American Lake Park, Lakewood. cityoflakewood.us A Glimpse of China: Chinese Culture and Arts Festival. Festal celebrates 5000 years of Chinese culture with performances, activities, food and more. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. FREE. Seattle Center Armory. seattlecenter.com/festal

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Toddler Time. Open-early play gym lets the little ones burn off energy with bikes, slides and toys. Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.– noon. $2. Ages 3 and under with caregiver. Issaquah Community Center. ci.issaquah.wa.us ONGOING EVENT Story Time for Kids. Get comfy and listen to great new and classic stories. Wednesday, 11 a.m. FREE. Ages 3–7 with caregiver. University Bookstore, Mill Creek. ubookstore.com ONGOING EVENT

Shoreline Indoor Playground. Large gym is ideal for banishing the wiggles. Monday– Friday, 9:30–11:30 a.m. $2–$2.50. Ages 1–5 with caregiver. Spartan Recreation Center, Shoreline. shorelinewa.gov ONGOING EVENT Toddler Dance and Play. Little ones have a blast dancing, singing, and acting out their favorite tunes in this class! Stay after class to play in toddler gym. Thursday, 11:30 a.m.–2 p.m. FREE through May. Ages 2–3 with caregiver. Salsa N’ Seattle. salsanseattle.com

30

31

Wild Wednesday. The last Wednesday of the month enjoy free admission to this fun indoor play space with a two-item food donation. 9 a.m.–8 p.m. FREE with donation. Ages 1–14. PlayDate SEA, Seattle. playdatesea.com Toddler Tales & Trails. Kids and caregivers enjoy story time and nature stroll. Wednesday and Saturday, 10–11 a.m. $2. Ages 2–5 with caregiver. Seward Park Audubon Center, Seattle. sewardpark.audubon.org ONGOING EVENT

Toddler Gym. Seattle’s neighborhood community centers offer free tot play times. Monday–Saturday, various times. FREE. Ages 5 and under with caregiver. Seattle. seattle.gov/parks ONGOING EVENT Family Nature Class. Explore a topic with learning stations and a nature walk. Thursday–Saturday, 9:30–11:30 a.m. $19/ adult-child pair; preregister. Ages 2–5 with caregiver. Washington Park Arboretum, Seattle. uwbotanicgardenscatalog.org ONGOING EVENT

Northwest Folklife Festival. Iconic festival showcases a huge array of talent including performances especially for kids. Friday–Monday, May 25–28. $10/person or $20/family suggested donation. Seattle Center. nwfolklife.org Cinder Edna. Come experience this exciting twist on the classic fairytale. May 11– June 3. $13–$19. All ages. Olympia Family Theater. olyft.org

Free Family Weekend Walk. Themed walk with games and hands-on activities. Second and fourth Saturdays through June. 1–2:30 p.m. FREE. Ages 2–12 with adult. Washington Park Arboretum, Seattle. uwbotanicgardenscatalog.org ONGOING EVENT Tankfest Northwest. Inspect tanks and other military vehicles and enjoy kids’ activities. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $15–$25; ages 5 and under free. Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum, Everett. flyingheritage.com

FLYING HERITAGE & COMBAT ARMOR MUSEUM

TANKFEST

NORTHWEST

SAT MAY 26, 9:00 AM EVERETT, WA FLYINGHERITAGE.COM

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 27


out + about

• 5 Mom-Ventures

(With or Without the Kids)

These are good ideas even when it isn’t Mother’s Day BY KATE MISSINE

I

t’s no secret that being a mom is a 24/7/365 job. But

everyone needs a break sometimes. With Mother’s Day on the horizon, it’s prime time to recharge our batteries. Maybe that means getting away from it all or perhaps you’d prefer to try an all-new experience with the whole family. Whatever the case — whether you’re ready to fly solo, enjoy a night out, plan a weekend away or bring the whole family along — these getaways are all about Mom, Mother’s Day or any day.

28 • May 2018 • parentmap.com


• 1 Taste

the sweet life

If anyone deserves a treat, it’s Mom — and we don’t mean finishing your kids’ stale Halloween candy. Indulge in some of the sweetest tastes Seattle has to offer with the decadent Chocolate Indulgence tour (savorseattletours.com). Bring along a girlfriend (or even the fam, if you’re feeling generous) for this two-hour excursion to some of the city’s finest chocolatiers, bakeries and dessert destinations. Learn about the cocoa bean’s origins and fascinating journey, see how luscious confections are made and, of course, sample! On the tasting menu: truffles, drinking chocolate, cheesecakes, pies and even presidential desserts served in the Oval Office. Come hungry! Savor Seattle, First Avenue and Pine Street, Seattle Tours start at $51.99 per person. >>

PHOTO COURTESY FLICKR / SAVOR SEATTLE FOOD TOURS / SPICE & INK PHOTOGRAPHY

The Chocolate Indulgence tour by Savor Seattle

Three generations of contemporary American artists offer their perspective on Black culture and representation. During your visit, pick up our Family Tips guide, developed in partnership with Kids & Race, to focus your exploration of the exhibition.

ON VIEW THROUGH MAY 13 visitsam.org/figuringhistory This exhibition is organized by the Seattle Art Museum. Special exhibitions at SAM are made possible by donors to

Lead Sponsors

Lead Foundation Sponsor The Robert Lehman Foundation

Major Sponsors Baird National Endowment for the Arts PHILLIPS

Image: Installation view of Figuring History: Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas at Seattle Art Museum, 2018. Photo: Natali Wiseman

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 29


out + about 5 Mom-Ventures continued from page 29

PHOTO COURTESY THE YOGA LODGE / MICHAEL STADLER • STADLER STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY

The Yoga Lodge on Whidbey Island

• 2 Get

Zen

Hiding in the bathroom no longer cuts it as Mom’s peaceful reprieve. If you can, head out for a couple of days and visit the tranquil wilderness of Whidbey Island. Unplug, reflect and reconnect with nature (and yourself!) in the sanctuary of The Yoga Lodge (yogalodge.com), a serene retreat near the village of Greenbank. Lovely individual or shared guest rooms; 10 acres of forests, trails, ponds and wildlife; and an array of yoga workshops and drop-in classes are yours to explore. Take a friend along or find inner peace in solitude as you perfect your asanas and listen to songbirds. Stop by Greenbank Farm (greenbankfarmwineshop.com) on your way home for one of its signature pies and a bottle of local wine to bring back! The Yoga Lodge, 3475 Christie Rd., Greenbank Room rates start at $75 per person.

presents

MINI

MAESTROS An informal concert series especially for children ages 2-8 and their grown-ups! Once Upon A String Featuring a string quartet February 18 | 2:30 p.m. 3-2-1 Brass Off! Featuring a brass quintet March 18 | 2:30 p.m. Percussion On Parade Featuring a percussion ensemble April 15 | 2:30 p.m. Peter and the Wolf Featuring full symphony and Sarah Ioannides, conductor. No instrument petting zoo. May 6 | 2:30 p.m.

Great Value! Family Series 4-Pack from

70

$

includes box office fees

Single Tickets from

7- 10

$

$

plus box office fees

Held in Schneebeck Concert Hall, University of Puget Sound, 14th and Union, Tacoma. Arrive one hour early for instrument petting zoo! (No petting zoo for Peter and the Wolf)

Purchase tickets today: SymphonyTacoma.org | 253-591-5894 Series sponsor:

30 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Sat. • May 19 • 10:00 am – 6:00 pm Sun. • May 20 • 11:00 am – 5:00 pm Join us for 2 days of FREE Fun for everyone!

Saint Martin’s University | Free Parking & Admission*

Join us for two days of FREE FUN for everyone! Activities include pony rides, games, rides, and live stage entertainment as well as arts & crafts and food vendors. On Sunday enjoy the annual Car Show! VISIT: www.laceyspringfunfair.com FOLLOW US: Facebook & Twitter for up to the minute information!

* Parking is very limited, plan to use off-site parking & free shuttle, visit website for details.


• 3 Get

a Russian-style rub

A day of pampering in a soothing spa is a no-brainer when it comes to indulgence. But for those looking for an experience that’s just a little more out there, a trip to Banya 5 (banya5.com) in South Lake Union may be in order. A one-of-a-kind fusion of traditional Russian, Turkish and Finnish

bathhouses, Banya 5 isn’t your ordinary day spa. Start off in the parilka, a Russian-style dry sauna with intense heat; if you’re feeling brave, beat yourself with the provided birch branches, which is supposed to stimulate tone and circulation. PHOTO COURTESY BANYA / FACEBOOK

Next, take a plunge in the cold pool. It’s admittedly not for the faint of heart, but it is exhilarating! (A warm saltwater pool, hot tub and eucalyptus-scented Turkish steam room are also available.) Try a massage or a body scrub of local honey and cocoa butter, help yourself to some herbal tea as you relax or read in the lounge, or even catch some shut-eye in the nap room — you know you need it! Banya 5, 217 Ninth Ave. N., Seattle

>>

Admission starts at $45, services extra.

Banya 5 in South Lake Union

CARE THAT’S OUT OF THIS WORLD!

Mukilteo (425) 290-5500 Everett (425) 212-1810 11,000 sq ft Hands-On Exhibits

Preschool Program Special Events

Parties & Field Trips School Break Camps

www.SkagitChildrensMuseum.net

Mill Creek (425) 381-4990

Admission $6.25 per person

Monday-Saturday 10:00am-5:00pm Toddler Tuesday 8:30am-10:00am Sunday 12:00pm-5:00pm

Stell StellarKids.com

Closed some holidays

Located in Burlington, WA :: Tel: 360.757.8888

www.VisitSkagitValley.com

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 31


out + about Mom-Ventures continued from page 31

On The Oregon Coast

PHOTO COURTESY LET’S GO BALLOONING

Let’s Go Ballooning

• 4 Fly

Seven miles of beach. Unlimited family fun.

32 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

The Herbfarm

PHOTO COURTESY THE HERBFARM

Plan your getaway at www.visitrockawaybeach.org

high

Ever dreamed of soaring really high? Make this fantasy a reality — grab your special someone and embark on a mesmerizing float in a hot-air balloon over beautiful Sammamish Valley, followed by libations in our own wine country of Woodinville. Let’s Go Ballooning (letsgoballooning.com) offers sunrise and sunset flights from July through September. Rise to heights of 1,500–4,000 feet in the air and take in breathtaking views of the Seattle skyline and Puget Sound. Once you’re back on solid ground, you’ll be treated to a Champagne and fruit juice toast or wine and appetizers at Matthews Estate Winery (matthewswinery.com). End the day with a tour and sampling of the world-class wines at any of Woodinville’s more than 60 wineries and dine at one of the area’s fantastic restaurants; The Herbfarm (herbfarm.com) is ideal for a treat. Feeling especially indulgent? Stop by the newly remodeled spa at luxe Willows Lodge (willowslodge.com) for one of its signature treatments. Let’s Go Ballooning, 425-487-8611 Call for pricing. >>


CAMPS • ARTS • ACTIVITIES BEST SUMMER CAMP EVER Horses, friends and fun!

SKILLS FOR THEATRE... SKILLS FOR LIFE

AND DYNAMICHEATRE T E IV ACT FOR CLASSES RE-K GRADE P H 12! THROUG

HWANG‛S TAEKWONDO HWANG‛S TAEKWONDO Summer Camps Summer Camp HWANG‛S Camp TAEKWONDO Summer HWANG‛S TAEKWONDO Summer Camp Summer Summer Camp ENROLL ! TODAY

www.phoenixfarm.com 206-229-2711

VillageKIDSTAGE.org

Camp HWANG‛S TAEKWONDO June 25th -25-Aug August 30th June 30 www.hwangs.com Summer Camp hwangs.com

www.hwangs.com

www.hwangs.com www.hwangs.com

June 25th - August 30th

Spend your summer at

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Online Registration Available!

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2/16/18 12:46 PM

SAMENA!

www.hwangs.com ReGIstEr nOW!

Registration for Bellevue Parks & Community Services’ summer day camps is now underway! Don’t miss out on a summer packed with fun, adventure, variety, and value.

Summer Camps •• Summer Camps ForAge Ages3-15 3-15 For

Swim Lessons •• Swim Lessons • Preschool www.samena.com (425) 746-1160

•• Before After Care Fitness&Classes

Visit parks.bellevuewa.gov/camps to find your fun this summer!

•• Fitness 3 PoolsClasses for hours

family fun • 3ofPools for hours of family fun

15231 Lake Hills Blvd. Bellevue 98007

Join today!

425-452-6885 parks.bellevuewa.gov

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 33


CAMPS • ARTS • ACTIVITIES Destination Science The fun science day camp for curious kids 5-11!

15 King County Locations 2018 Topics: Science Makers & Inventors Camp! Transforming Robots Camp! Amusement Park Science Camp! Rovers Rocketing to Space Camp!

Save $10/wk

FIND YOUR RHYTHM! All ages and skill levels | Year-round music classes and lessons Private instruction on 21 instruments and voice

Ends 5/31/18

destinationscience.org

COMMUNITY MUSIC DEPARTMENT | 253.879.3575 | communitymusic@pugetsound.edu

888-909-2822

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Summer Coding Camps 4/10/18 8:31 PM

Minecraft Modding Robotics & Electronics 3D Game Development and much more!

Learn more and register at 34 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

» For kids ages 5-18 » Week-long Full and Half-Day Camps » Locations throughout the Greater Seattle Area

CodingWithKids.com/SeattleCamps


out + about Mom-Ventures continued from page 32

it up

If you have a weekend to spare and don’t mind a bit of a drive, pack up the family — or a lucky friend — and head across the border to Parksville, British Columbia (about a five-and-a-half-hour trip, including a ferry ride). There, amidst the rugged coast and old-growth forests, the Tigh-Na-Mara Seaside Spa Resort (tigh-na-mara.com/en-us) is an oasis of luxury in the wild. Featuring log cabins and suites, this waterfront resort boasts an indoor stone grotto and mineral pools that promise to soothe your aches and pains. Spend hours going from warm-water soaks to the spa (try the Pacific Body Balance treatment, combining a sea salt scrub and thermal glacial clay wrap). Then, head up to dinner at Treetop Tapas & Grill without changing out of your bathrobe; order the Endless Tapas for an all-you-can-eat parade of exquisite and guilt-free, spa-inspired plates. Bringing the kids? Tidal pools, a playground, scheduled activities and, most importantly, babysitting services are available, so Mom can get her muchneeded R&R. Tigh-Na-Mara Seaside Spa Resort, 1155 Resort Dr., Parksville, B.C. >>

PHOTO COURTESY TIGH-NA-MARA.COM

• 5 Soak

Tigh-Na-Mara Seaside Spa Resort

CAMPS • ARTS • ACTIVITIES Registration is still open for ProjectFUN Summer Workshops and the Homeschool Program!

REGISTER TODAY!

Learn Lear Le arn n ab abou about outt ou ourr KK K-12 12 p programs rogr ro gram amss at at::

Learn more at: projectfun.digipen.edu

SUMMER PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES & INTERESTS YMCA OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY YMCA-SNOCO.ORG/CAMP parentmap.com • May 2018 • 35


CAMPS • ARTS • ACTIVITIES summer 2018 camps & classes

grades K - 12

Register Today!

eastsidecatholic.org/summer

SUMMER PROGRAM

Hamlin Robinson School

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Register Online at www.DigitalMediaAcademy.org

WILDERNESS AWARENESS SCHOOL

DAY - and - OVERNIGHT

SUMMER CAMPS SEATTLE & EASTSIDE LOCATIONS FOR AGES 4 to 18 Winner of ParentMap’s Golden Teddy award for

BEST NATURE CAMP 7 YEARS IN A ROW!

Your Future Starts Here. Parents’ #1 choice for STEM education since 2002.

Join Us at Prestigious Locations Near You: University of Washington University of British Columbia Stanford University

Limited Space Available - Register for Summer Camp Today! 36 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

wildernessawareness.org


out + about Mom-Ventures continued from page 35

• 5 Farmers

Markets That the Kids Will Love, Too

Queen Anne’s popular market draws weekly crowds for its music scene, bounty of produce and food truck lineup. Young marketgoers explore cooking demos, hands-on experiments and more in the kids’ activity tent, and there’s a dedicated Roots to Shoots program that encourages adventurous taste buds. Queen Anne Avenue N. and W. Crockett Street, Seattle Thursdays, June 7–Oct. 11

Wallingford Farmers Market Plenty of shady picnicking space, a dizzying rainbow of colorful fruit and veg, and an award-winning playground make this urban market in Meridian Park a local family fave. Be sure to grab a refreshing treat from Seattle Pops on a sunny day! Meridian Avenue N. and N. 50th Street, Seattle Wednesdays, May 16–Sept. 26

Bothell Farmers Market Tucked away amidst the quaint shops of Bothell Country Village, this market is beloved by grown-ups for locally grown goodies and

Queen Anne Farmers Market performances by local musicians, while kiddos delight in face painting, freshly baked treats, a ship-themed playground and chickens roaming the road. 23718 Bothell Everett Hwy., Bothell Fridays, June 1–Sept. 28

Redmond Saturday Market Redmond’s bustling market features everything from fish to fancy French toast, crêpes to crafts. Pet parades, ponies, hula dancing and make-and-take crafts for kids make for family fun, too. And don’t miss the adorable baby goats from RainySunday Ranch! 7730 Leary Way, Redmond Saturdays, May–October

RainySunday Ranch at Redmond Saturday Market

PHOTO COURTESY RAINYSUNDAYRANCH.COM

Queen Anne Farmers Market

PHOTO COURTESY QUEEN ANNE FARMERS MARKET / FACEBOOK

April showers may bring May flowers, but May in Seattle brings something even more colorful: a fresh crop of seasonal farmers markets. These five picks make for ideal family-friendly foraging!

Tacoma Farmers Market at Point Ruston Enjoy stunning Puget Sound views as you shop for delicious local treats at the new market at Tacoma’s waterfront Point Ruston. Kiddos can frolic in the Grand Plaza’s cool splash park (stay after dark and enjoy a water light show). For more fun, skip the parking and get there aboard Tacoma’s Downtown to Defiance Trolley! Point Ruston Grand Plaza, 5005 Ruston Way, Tacoma Sundays, Aug. 6–Sept. 24 n Kate Missine is a lifestyle writer, food lover and a girly girl raising two little boys in beautiful Sammamish.

CAMPS • ARTS • ACTIVITIES Camp Killoqua Day and resident camp sessions for kids in grades K-12.

Caring staff, exciting programs, adventures every day!

425 258 KIDS

www.campkilloqua.org parentmap.com • May 2018 • 37


CAMPS • ARTS • ACTIVITIES Red Gate Farm An Equestrian Training Center in the heart of Sammamish, Washington.

Summer Day Camp AGES 6-12 Counselors 12 and over

Weekly Summer Horse Camp Sessions June, July and August

June 18 – August 24

Register today for a $25 Discount!

redgatefarmdaycamp.com Training

Lessons

Leasing

Sales

Jamie Smith - Trainer/Owner (425) 392-0111

3 – 14 years old Learning & Enrichment Outdoor Education Performing Arts Fine Arts Sports Day Camps m

Jump into dancing this summer! SUMMER CAMPS 2018

Find registration information online:

June 25-29 Jungle Safari July 9-13 Once Upon A Time July 16-20 Dance Extreme July 30-August 3 Dancing Through The Ages August 13-17 Summer Fiesta

Classes for ages 18 mth – Adult

www.evergreenschool.org

www.gttadance.com • 425-861-5454

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Think Your Kid Is Too Old for Summer Camp? Think Again

Ever heard of CITs? They are counselors-in-training, and are typically kids between the ages of 12 and 16 who work at some of our area’s premier camps and programs to get on-the-job experience. Last summer, my 15-year-old daughter spent the better part of four weeks as a CIT at Camp Fire’s Camp Sealth on Vashon Island. She still raves about the experience. “Being a CIT is great because you’re in the gray area: not quite a camper and not quite a counselor,” Caroline tells me. “And all that leadership stuff they did [with us]: A-plus!” Every CIT program is specific to the camp (you also might have heard the position called a “program aide” or “leader in training”); some require applicants to have previously attended the camp where they’re applying. Although there’s no official tally of how many such programs exist in our area, chances are good your camp has one. Just look for information on leadership and teen opportunities on a camp’s website. Get more details and find specific camps at parentmap.com/cit. — Nancy Schatz Alton

1/19/18 3:07 PM

The #1 Summer STEM Camp for Ages 7–18 Empower your child to take their STEM skills to the next level. From coding and game development to robotics and design, your child will develop in-demand skills and ignite lifelong passions—all within a fun, inclusive environment. Get ready for the best summer ever!

CAMPS & ACADEMIES

38 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Held at 150 prestigious campuses UW | UW - Bothell | Bellevue College Eton School | U of Puget Sound

,JYFGWTHMZWJFSIƴSIFHFRUSJFW^TZ iDTechCamps.com | 1-888-709-8324


CAMPS • ARTS • ACTIVITIES SUMMER FUN

Game Design

Drama • Music • Art • Dance

Digital Music

Celebrating

25 years!

Video Coding 3D & VR Seattle Center Phinney Center Mt. Baker

206-499-5787 summerfunseattle.org North Seattle & Fremont

0418_summer_fun_1-16.indd 1

206-577-7795

camptechwise.com

WILD CHILD SEATTLE

3/13/18 0518_camp_techwise_1-16.indd 10:18 PM 1

4/16/18 12:53 PM

Connecting with Nature Together

• Nature program based out of Seattle’s Carkeek Park • Habitat exploration for young children aged 18 mos–8 yrs and their adults

wildchildseattle.com

admin@wildchildseattle.com

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4/12/18 0518_wild_child_1-16.indd 4:40 PM 1

4/12/18 4:36 PM

Summer Music Day Camp with

SEATTLE GIRLS CHOIR Full Day Camp

for girls entering grade 2-5 2 sessions: July 23-27 & July 30-Aug 3

Musical Morning July 30-Aug 3

for girls and boys ages 4-6

sea attlegiirlschoir.o org parentmap.com • May 2018 • 39


Summer adventures. Life connections.

CULTIVATE

Courage • Curiosity • Resilience “This unique and exciting book shows us how to help children embrace life with all of its challenges and thrive in a modern world.” —Carol Dweck, author of Mindset

Our summer camps build social skills and provide incredible enrichment choices from theatre to climbing to art, fostering growth through once-in-a-lifetime experiences. Choose from age-based camps or theme-based including theatre, video production, inventing and more!

Ages 8 and up. Pick your weeks. Camp starts June 25th.

Daniel J. Siegel, M.D. AND Tina Payne Bryson, Ph.D.

Seattle | Redmond | Bellevue | Tacoma

www.aspiringyouth.net info@aspiringyouth.net

Available Wherever Books Are Sold

206.517.0241

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FIELD TRIP PACKAGES

2/12/18 9:34 PM

Storytelling Guided tour

GROUP TOURS HibulbCulturalCenter.org

Hibulb Cultural Center 6410 23rd Ave NE Tulalip, WA 98271 Located less than a mile west of I-5 exit 199. 40 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Outdoor scavenger hunt Listen to traditional stories in the longhouse Canoe Guided tour Gallery scavenger hunt Sand and design your own cedar paddle necklace Weaving Guided tour Weaving scavenger hunt Weave your own cedar mat pendant


ages + stages

3–13

I

Is Your Kid Ready to Sleep Away From Home? Better question: Are you ready? By Malia Jacobson

t’s nearly summer, and the family calendar is likely filling to the brim with picnics, barbecues and day camps. But what about that hallmark of summer — the overnight sleepaway experience? From campouts to sleepaway camp, overnight adventures away from home build confidence, selfreliance and yes, the all-important grit, per resilience researcher and author Michael Ungar, Ph.D. But don’t send kids packing quite yet. A little prep can help ensure that their summer overnights spark warm memories for years to come.

Preschool: Over the river and through the woods Tiny tots may be years away from sleeping in a rustic camp cabin, but sleepaway experiences are still possible. What’s more, they’re beneficial for the entire brood. Kids building confidence while parents enjoy uninterrupted sleep and some selfcare? Sounds like a win. So even though sleepaway camp doesn’t exist for toddlers, spending a night or two away from home — in the care of grandparents or other close kin — is a good first step toward building confidence and sleepaway skills. Once you’ve identified a relative or close friend who’s willing to host your child for a night, set a date a few weeks in advance. Mark the big day on a calendar so your child can help count the days. In the meantime, pay a few visits to the home with your child so they can get used to the new environment. Show them the space where they’ll sleep on their big night at Grandma’s. Now’s the time to take stock of potential safety issues, such as unprotected electrical sockets and steep stairs, and offer to bring over outlet covers, a portable child gate and any other tot-proofing gear that’s needed. Another potential hazard: nighttime diaper duty. If your little one isn’t toilet-trained, or if training is in process, talk over diaper details with your relative or friend. Make sure your child knows where and how to use the bathroom at the relative’s house — and that your relative understands your child’s cues for “potty” (not everyone is fluent in toddler-ese or infant sign language, after all). On the big day, send along a mattress cover and extra bedding with your child in case of an accident.

young as 5 years old, most local sleepaway camps Of course, a successful sleepaway experience accept campers at age 7 or 8. involves actual sleep. Encourage sweet dreams by Before your child turns 7, Bonney Lake mom providing familiarity and routine away from home; and former camp counselor Amanda Wedvik kids’ brains are primed to associate their normal Curb recommends day camps or very short camp bedtime routine with sleep. Ask your relative to experiences instead of a traditional week at camp. stick to your child’s regular bedtime (writing it “It depends on your child’s maturity level and down never hurts) and re-create at whether he’s slept away from you least a few elements from your child’s before,” Curb says. “Some children sleeping space — and keep the space “ M ost local are very independent, though! You dark, cool and quiet. know your child best.” If your child’s bedroom features sleepaway So, how do you know if yours blackout curtains and a white-noise camps accept is ready? First, and perhaps most machine, bring those along (a flat importantly: Do they want to bedsheet can sub for curtains in campers at go? (My eldest politely declined a pinch). Don’t forget your child’s age 7 or 8.” sleepaway camp until age 10, but favorite pajamas, security object and loved it thereafter.) If your child’s bedtime story. friends and siblings are jazzed When it’s time for the drop-off, about camp, but your child seems lukewarm, deliver hugs and kisses and say a quick goodbye; don’t push it. Encourage sleepovers with relatives prolonged parental exits can increase separation and close friends and enjoy family campouts and anxiety. Then, enjoy your night off! vacations; wait for them to come around to the idea. Elementary: ‘Hello Mother, Another sign of readiness: Can your child manage their own health care reasonably well? hello Father’ That means taking care of bathroom needs, caring Elementary school-age kids are often eager for for braces and retainers, remembering to drink their first sleepaway camp experience, with good enough water throughout the day and applying reason. The benefits of camp endure long after the bug spray and sunscreen as needed. Although fleeting days of summer: Per the American Camp the camp’s staff will probably manage any meds Association, 70 percent of campers report increased your child needs, they’ll still need to confidently confidence, 69 percent keep in touch with camp advocate for themselves in the presence of adults pals and two-thirds pick up long-term hobbies. they don’t know. >> Although kids can start sleepaway camp as parentmap.com • May 2018 • 41


cut this out

5

1

Ways to

Have a Little ‘Me Time’

Be honest.

2

Know what’s actually restorative for you, as opposed to what’s supposed to be relaxing. Make a list and keep it in an easily accessible location, like in your phone or planner. Refer to it as needed.

 ake the most of M downtime.

While you may not have lots of open space in your calendar, maximize the smaller pockets of time that you do have. Keep a book in the car or download it to your phone. Put a small notebook or sketchbook in your purse or the diaper bag for journaling or drawing.

3

!

 Look ahead.

4

If you have a particularly stressful day or hairy week coming up, create a buffer zone. Schedule downtime beforehand for exercise, mediation or just chilling. Then plan something fun for the weekend.

C  o-op self-care.

Find a jogging buddy, join a book club or form a writing group. Not only will you be connecting with others, but you’ll also have accountability.

ages + stages Is Your Kid Ready to Sleep Away From Home? continued from page 41 If your child seems confident and eager for camp, take the plunge and sign up — with a pal or two, if possible. Camp counselors generally recommend letting your camper pack their own bag, so they know exactly where to find that last clean pair of socks when they need it.

Tween and teen years:

Bring on the s’mores

In middle school and beyond, kids are ready to embrace the summer campout. Unlike little ones, kids older than 10 have the stamina for longer hikes, know enough to stay out of the campfire and can actually help you with camp chores (in theory, anyway). Sneaky bonus: Many state campgrounds feature notoriously weak or nonexistent cell and wi-fi service, so your wired kid will have to unplug from devices and connect with you. But what about actually sleeping under the stars? Even for older kids, sleeping in an environment that’s vastly different can make it hard to nod off. First, there’s the light factor; Pacific Northwest summers feature notoriously late sunsets, which usually means

later-than-normal bedtimes. Then there’s the temperature. Even in July, nighttime temps can nip down to the 40s. Add in strange noises and lumpy bedding, and you may have a tired tween, come morning. To encourage better sleep during campouts, start by picking a campground far from the highway or the main campground “loop.” It will be quieter than the more centrally located sites. Then, plan from the ground up: Invest in self-inflating sleeping pads. Be sure sleeping bags are approved for the temperatures you’ll experience; if you’re still rolling up hand-me-down sleeping bags from your own youth, consider upgrading. Next, head off camping insomnia by packing layered sleepwear and thick socks. And accept that for kids, camping is like a sleepover: Sleepaway doesn’t always equal sleep. Expect later bedtimes and less sleep throughout the trip, as well as fatigue hangover afterward — but know that the memories outweigh the tiredness, without a doubt. n Malia Jacobson is an award-winning health writer.

F LY I N G H E R I TA G E & C O M B AT A R M O R M U S E U M

TANKFEST

NORTHWEST

SAT MAY 26, 9:00 AM

Raising White Kids:

An Anti-Racism Conversation for All of Us Presented by Dr. Jennifer Harvey May 24, 2018 • 7-9pm

Powerful and difficult conundrums exist when it comes to raising white children in a society that is racially diverse, while also full of racial tension and inequity. Developing strategies for raising “healthy” (by definition, “antiracist”) white kids is a critical investment in the well-being and futures of all of our children. The conversation this lecture will enable us to have is for everyone.

The Well • 1606 5th Ave W, Seattle

thewellqueenanne.org/events

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5 

Mandate it.

It can be a hard truth, but the only person responsible for taking care of you is you. Give yourself the gift of time. — Jessica Graham

42 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

E V E R E T T, WA F LY I N G H E R I TA G E . C O M

SING WITH NORTHWEST GIRLCHOIR Music education and performance opportunities for girls grades 1-12! • Scholarships Available • Audition now for fall enrollment! www.northwestgirlchoir.org


Join the

KCTS 9 KIDS CLUB! Connect your family to a world of learning and discovery! • Be the first to hear about KCTS 9 KIDS events. • Visit the studio and choose a toy from our Treasure Chest! • Receive our KCTS 9 KIDS e-newsletter every month. • Enjoy all the full benefits of regular KCTS membership.

For details about how to join, visit KCTS9.org/kidsclub today!

S C H O O L S

OUR O UR UPLIFTING UPLISeattle’s FTINbestG SUMMkept SUMMER ERsecrets PROGRAMS PROGRAMS Apply online! Apply oOutdoor nline!

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adventures, free outings, parenting solutions for PRESCHOOL-ELEMENTARY Swimming Yoga every Natureage Art Sign up for ParentMap Visit livingwisdomschoolwa.org! eNews: (425) 772-9862 parentmap. com/enews

Outdoor Adventures + Free Outings Sign up for weekly eNews:

parentmap.com/enews

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S C H O O L S

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Learning Academy Preschool (2 years) Pre-Kindergarten (3-4 years) Kindergarten Prep (4-5 years) Low Ratios and Small Classes Qualified Instructors Enrichment Classes Swimming, Soccer and Active Play Whiteboard Learning

P R E S C H O O L S My Child’s Teacher Thinks There’s a Problem — Now What? As a teacher, I’ve worked with countless parents whose children have special needs. What follows are best practices drawn from years of teaching and from interviews with parents and experts. They’re not a step-by-step guide but offered in the hope that they might alleviate some worry, generate questions for consideration, and offer reassurance as you navigate the path ahead. 1. Arm yourself with information. One of the best things you can do is gather all the information you can. Understanding the manifestations and nuances of a diagnosis will make you a better advocate for your child. 2. Establish clear lines of communication. I can’t emphasize how important regular and open communication is between parents and teachers. Being upfront about your child’s diagnosis and needs will help teachers develop effective learning strategies. 3. Develop a plan of action. Learning that your child will face challenges can be one of the hardest things a parent has to digest. A teacher is a great resource in this process. Get more detail at parentmap.com/advice. — Samantha Facciolo

Learn more at proclub.com or (425) 861-6247 4455 148th Ave NE | Bellevue WA

(Open to non-club members)

GRADES

K-6

Child-centered learning in a warm Jewish environment - all are welcome. Classes for families and children from birth through Pre-K.

When school’s out for the day, we keep kids entertained, active and enriched. Homework Assistance • Sports & Games Science & Robotics • Leadership • Chess • Art

Call (425) 861-6247 for more information. Shuttle pick-up from select Eastside schools offered for added convenience.

44 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

Flexible schedules to meet your family’s needs. For more information, visit www.jrmpreschool.org or contact Shannon Solomon, Early Childhood Education Director, at 425.559.2571 or ssolomon@tdhs-nw.org.


S C H O O L S

+

P R E S C H O O L S

Anxiety disorders are REAL, COMMON and TREATABLE

Visit us in person to learn about our enriching programs, including Music, Art, PE, and STEM.

See pg. 47

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Daily Support Card

901 Lenora Street, Seattle

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9/12/17 4:07 PM

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someone you should know

Stacy Zhong and Lulu Bath

The moms behind the new Washington Preparatory School in Bothell By Nancy Schatz Alton • Photo by Will Austin

B

ecause of competition for too few spots and long waiting lists, Stacy Zhong failed to find an Eastside private school for her son. Lulu Bath’s friends kept asking her for boarding school recommendations in western Washington, but she found that the options were limited. While others may have been daunted by this lack of options, Zhong and Bath saw it as an opportunity. The longtime friends (20 years) and long-term business partners decided to create Washington Preparatory School (WPS). They envisioned a college preparatory school for sixth- through 12th-graders that included a boarding option for international students. Now, three years later, WPS will welcome its first 60 students in the fall. Those sixth- through ninth-graders will enter the school’s temporary front doors while its permanent campus of 11 buildings on 13.5 acres of land is being built across the street on State Route 527 in Bothell. On the roster: Zhong’s own children, a 10-year-old daughter and a 12-year-old son, who are most excited about the school’s robotics program and after-school option to learn how to build video games. (Bath is also a mom; her children are now adults.) Zhong and Bath — who co-own the popular Asian Food Center chain of food stores — met with ParentMap to discuss their vision for the future. (WPS’s interim head of school and International Baccalaureate (IB) coordinator, Joe Kennedy, also joined the interview to give further insight into the school’s programming.) Here are their aspirations for WPS, the community and their students.

What makes WPS stand out?

Bath: From our own business background, we know that students need more influence in how to build a business. [We’re also] focused on project-based learning. We want our students to be able to think more creatively. Kennedy: You look at the elements of being an entrepreneur, and our founders are the embodiment of entrepreneurship. We’ll teach

Zhong (right) and Bath

“The IB program builds balanced, inquisitive and reflective students.”

46 • May 2018 • parentmap.com

students how to apply what they know into realworld pursuits … [For example,] our STEEM program is different than traditional STEM programs because we added entrepreneurship to science, technology, engineering and math (hence the extra “E”). WPS will offer the IB curriculum rather than the often better-known Advanced Placement (AP) option. Why?

Zhong: The IB program is based much more on creativity than AP programs, where more memorization is required [for passing AP tests]. IB asks students to know the reasons for the results. Kennedy: The IB program builds balanced, inquisitive and reflective students, and it plays to the students’ strengths. Students learn there are no right answers. The goal is learning how to sit at the table with others and learn to figure out what you need to build a path. What are you most looking forward to with the school opening?

Zhong: We’re excited for students to have the chance to go to top-rated universities. It’s also been great to see the community excited about our school’s great program. Bath: In 20 years, we’ve done a lot of business together, but with this school, we’ve focused on education. [It’s been great] to help contribute to the community. How does your experience as entrepreneurs who work together influence your work creating a school?

Bath: We know to trust each other. Zhong: We also know how to find the right people and tell them our dreams for a top-notch education for each student. One step at a time with the goal in mind, we’re building a beautifully designed school with a great team of leaders. n Nancy Schatz Alton is a Seattle-based freelance writer, editor and creative writing teacher. She blogs about poetry, parenting and unanswerable questions at withinthewords.com.


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The Sammamish Montessori School In Redmond m

Call 425-883-3271 for a tour. ͻ Child-centered, joyful atmosphere with strong academic focus ͻdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞĚ͕DŽŶƚĞƐƐŽƌŝͲĐĞƌƟĮĞĚƚĞĂĐŚĞƌƐ ͻ Preschool and kindergarten ͻ Family owned and operated since 1977 ͻ^ƵŵŵĞƌ͕ďĞĨŽƌĞΘĂŌĞƌƐĐŚŽŽůƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐ ͻWƌĞƉWƌŽŐƌĂŵ͕;ƐƚĂƌƟŶŐĂŐĞƐϮПШЖͲϯͿ

Double Feature Film Screenings

in g N o w E n r o ll

www.sammamishmontessori.com ‡ 425-883-3271

• Toddler and preschool programs • Before and after care • Flexible schedule • 12 months to 5 year olds • Pre-K prep • Certified teachers • Issaquah location • Licensed by Department of Early Learning • Part of Early Achievers Program

thelearningnestpreschool.net

thelearningnestpreschool@gmail.com • 425-427-8445

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2/15/18 10:43 PM

By popular demand, ParentMap is presenting IndieFlix documentaries “Angst” and “Screenagers”. Each event will include a panelist of local experts leading an engaging Q&A with the audience. Bring your tween/teen!*

MAY 10

Two screenings of “Angst” at 5 p.m. & 7 p.m.

MAY 22

“Screenagers” at 5 p.m., “Angst” at 7:30 p.m.

parentmap.com/filmscreenings *Recommended for kids 12 and up.

parentmap.com • May 2018 • 47


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OUT OF D L R O W S I TH FUN! FlAg FoOtBaLl • BaSkEtBaLl • SoCcEr

ArOuNd tHe WoRlD SpOrTs

AlL SpOrT • GoLf • cHiLdReN’s tHeAtEr

DaNcE • RaCqUeT sPoRtS • TeNnIs

S.T.E.M. & RoBoTiCs • LeAdErShIp SyNcHrOnIzEd SwImMiNg • MeRmAiD JuNiOr LiFeGuArDiNg • SuPeR SaFe SiTtEr NINJA WARRIOR • OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

AgEs

3-18 proclub.com | (425) 885-5566 | 4455 148th Avenue NE, Bellevue, WA

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May 2018  

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