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2017/2018

Greater Boston Education Guide Finding the Right School for Your Child From the publishers of TM

Enrichment • Preschools • Private Schools • Special Needs


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Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

www.cfsmass.org • 617.354.3880 rsvp to cfsadmission@cfsmass.org


2017/2018

Greater Boston Education Guide

Take the guesswork out of finding the right private school for your child, from start to finish.

Finding the Right School for Your Child

Contents 4

Why Consider Private School?

16

Tips for a Great Essay

6

The Private School Search: Where to Start?

18

Preparing for the Interview

8

Basic Timeline for Applying to a Private School

20

The Acceptance and Decision

10

Make the Most of Your Campus Visit

22

Financial Aid: Basics You Need to Know

23

Myths About Financial Aid

12

Shadow Days

24

Private School Directory

14

Applying to a Private School

26 Public and Private School Organizations

Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

3


Why Consider Private School?

Private schools can point to low student-teacher ratios, freedom from state standards and testing, and lots of extras like music, foreign languages, and art that are underfunded or nonexistent in public schools.

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any parents feel that their children will thrive better in what they believe is a smaller, safer environment with more room for personal attention. And while public schools must follow a curriculum heavily influenced by state standards, private schools have more freedom to customize lessons to students’ individual ways of learning. Private schools can also point to low student-teacher ratios, freedom from state standards and testing, and lots of extras like music, foreign languages, and art that are underfunded or nonexistent in public schools. Rest assured, promise school experts, there is a school out there to suit every child. There are two primary sorts of private schools— independent schools and parochial schools. Independent schools are defined as nonprofit private schools with their own governing board of trustees. While most people commonly refer to independent schools as private, lumping them in with parochial and for profit schools, they are distinct because they are nonprofit and self-governing.

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Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

Parochial schools, where tuition is typically one-third that of independent schools, offer traditional instruction and have solid reputations. Families who are “in-parish,” that is, who live within the schools’ official parish boundaries or volunteer and participate regularly in the parish, get first priority. Otherwise the application procedures are similar to independent schools. When considering private school education, think about these benefits:

High academic standards Independent schools nurture intellectual curiosity, stimulate personal growth, and encourage critical thinking. A larger percentage of students at independent schools are enrolled in advanced courses than in public, parochial, and other private schools.

Small classes and individual attention Independent schools have low student-teacher ratios that encourage close connections with students. The median ratio in schools that are members of the National Association of Independent Schools in 2015–2016 was


8.6 students to 1 teacher (meaning that half have a higher ratio and half have a lower ratio).

Excellent teachers They usually teach in their areas of expertise and are passionate about what they do. With more autonomy within the classroom, teachers are able to develop a full understanding of how each student learns and what interests and motivates each individually.

Greater likelihood of a student completing a bachelor’s degree or graduate degree education for the whole child Independent schools nurture not just students’ intellectual ability and curiosity but also their personal and social growth and civic conscience. Opportunities extend well beyond the classroom to athletic competitions, artistic pursuits, and school leadership experiences.

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Inclusiveness Schools maintain diverse and vibrant student communities and welcome and respect each family. In 2014–2015, students of color were 29 percent (up 6 percent since 2008–2009) of total independent school enrollment nationally.

A community of parents who actively participate in their children’s education Independent schools promote regular communication among students, parents, and teachers to ensure everyone is working toward the same goals for the student.

The opportunity to choose a school with a mission You can select a school whose philosophy, values, and teaching approach is right for your child. 

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5


The Private School Search: Where to Start?

An easy, simple way to begin thinking about which private school may be right for your child is to look at how the school is structured.

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ith every private school brochure flashing photos of smiling students thriving in science labs and onstage, it can be hard to tell schools apart. But on closer look, each school has its own personality, spanning a wider range of educational styles and often offering smaller classes than public schools. Some have distinct educational philosophies like Waldorf or Montessori. Others focus on music, offer a girls-only student body, a year-round schedule, or teach their curriculum exclusively in French. There are schools with impressive art, sports, drama, and science programs. Some are K–5 or K–8, others only grades 6–8, and still others are K–12. All of these schools have the luxury of complete freedom in designing curriculum because they are not subject to the state testing standards imposed on public schools. An easy, simple way to begin thinking about which private school may be right for your child is to look at how the school is structured. For example, some schools do not assign homework and others group different grades together in one classroom. It’s not too soon to start thinking about fall of 2018 if your child is about to begin her last year of preschool or is in fifth or eighth grade. And starting a year before

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Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

you actually need to—that is, a full two years before your child would start at a new school—can also help relieve anxiety. The timeline for what can be a rigorous search for private schools begins with open houses and tours starting in September; applications in December and January; and acceptance or rejection letters in early March. The sooner you can start checking out schools that interest you, the better, whether those schools are independent or parochial. Parents who have been through the process before recommend the following combination of first steps: • Look hard at your finances to see what kind of tuition your household can, or is willing, to handle. Find out if there are extra costs for books, computers, or afterschool care, and if the school offers financial aid. • Weed out schools that won’t work because of things like location or early start times. • Learn basic facts like the number of students and student-teacher ratio. • Consider your child’s particular learning style by consulting with current teachers (from preschool or day care, for example). • Think about your family’s educational philosophy. Ask


BRIMM R

1880

how students are tested, and how teachers convey expectations and teach classes. • Make a list of what matters most. Perhaps it’s that the school is diverse, emphasizes the arts, or has a grassy play area. It could also be that your child needs before-school care, elementary grades only, or a dance studio. • Talk to families whose children already attend those schools and don’t be afraid to ask tough questions. • If your child is entering kindergarten and has a fall birthday, research schools’ age cutoffs. Private schools usually prefer that children turn 5 before entering kindergarten. • Once you’ve got a list of schools to check out, create a list of open house dates and other application or registration deadlines. • Above all, ignore the neighborhood and cocktail party chatter and pay attention to your own instincts and observations. And always, as parents move through this lengthy process, they should reflect on the desires, needs, and learning styles of their child, and apply a different process depending on the child’s age. There are things that are clear about a fifth-grader (like how they handle homework and social conflict, whether they favor sports or the arts) that aren’t evident yet with a preschooler. Parents of eighth-graders have the easiest and the hardest time with this. While it’s easier for the parents of a middle-schooler to pinpoint the social tendencies and learning style of their 13-year-old, that teenager often has thoughts of her own about which school to attend. The school search process is a stressful one, but with some advance preparation and a cool head, it doesn’t have to be onerous. And you might even gain some new insight into yourself and your child along the way. 

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Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

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Discover

A month-by-month guide to the application process.

Basic Timeline

Thayer

At Thayer you work hard and you can join so many

different clubs, sports, and arts

activities—that all fit into the school day.

Although not every school follows the exact schedule, many follow similar timetables for admission. The following is a timeline to help you in the admissions process.

AUGUST

(of the year before you want your child to attend)

❑ Define your ideal school.

❑ Review the test websites to learn about procedures and test dates, see sample questions, and purchase testpreparation books.

❑ Find schools that match your child’s needs.

❑ Call schools to schedule individual tours, class visits, interviews, and “shadow ❑ Research and ask questions days”. of schools on your preliminary list.

SEPTEMBER

❑ Attend local school fairs to gather material and impressions from multiple schools. ❑ Browse schools’ websites to learn more about their programs and philosophies. ❑ Request admissions and financial aid material by phone or online.

Mia Matos ’22 Activities & Interests: Science, Music, Ensemble, Chorus, Drama

Learn more about Thayer Middle School at

❑ Continue scheduling tours, interviews, class visits, and standardized or school-based tests ❑ Visit schools during open houses, attend information sessions, and take tours. ❑ Finalize the list of schools to which you will apply. ❑ Take required standardized admission tests, if applicable.

❑ Create a calendar of pertinent admission and financial aid deadlines for the schools to NOVEMBER which you are considering ❑ Continue scheduling tours, applying. interviews, class visits, and ❑ Ask elementary schools about standardized or school-based their test schedules and make tests appointments. ❑❑ Continue to watch for open ❑ Register for any standardized house events you may want tests required for admission. to attend.

www.thayer.org/middleschool 8

OCTOBER

Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18


for Applying

Introducing

To a Private School

❑ Request teacher recommendations from your child’s current school. ❑ Start working on applications, financial aid forms, student questionnaires, and essays.

DECEMBER

❑ Continue to watch for any open house or school events of interest. ❑❑ Request transcripts at the end of your child’s first semester. ❑❑ Complete any remaining applications, questionnaires, etc. Most application materials are due as early as December or as late as February.

JANUARY

❑ Pay attention to deadlines: Most schools’ applications are due in January or February, along with tests scores, references, transcripts, and financial aid forms.

5th Grade in 2018-19!

FEBRUARY

❑ Don’t miss the deadlines: Most schools’ applications are due in February at the latest. ❑ Visit schools or have your child participate in a student shadow day if you haven’t already.

MARCH

❑ Watch for school decisions starting in mid-March. ❑ Watch for financial aid decisions about this same time. ❑ If your student is accepted by multiple schools, decide which school your child will attend ❑ Sign and return enrollment contracts and deposits.

APRIL TO SEPTEMBER

❑ Attend events and activities for new parents and students during spring and summer.

www.thayer.org

JOIN US FOR OUR 2017-18

OPEN HOUSES UPPER SCHOOL MIDDLE SCHOOL (Grades 9-12) (Grades 5-8) Sat, Oct 28, 2017 9:30am—12noon

Sat, Nov 4, 2017 9:30am—12noon

WINTER OPEN HOUSE (US & MS)

Reprinted with permission from the National Association of Independent Schools, www.nais.org.

Monday, Jan 8, 2018 | 5:30pm—8pm

Thayer Academy 745 Washington Street, Braintree, MA 02184 Accessible by the Red Line (Braintree

Station)

Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

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Making the Most of Your Campus Visit

Because the visit is so crucial to deciding on your child’s school, you should make the most of the opportunity.

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ou’ve looked at the websites, glanced through the glossy brochures, and even heard friends talk glowingly—or not—about the private schools on your short list. Now it’s time to actually set foot on campus. More than anything else, visiting the school—seeing the classrooms, walking around the grounds, and talking to faculty and students—will give you and your child the best sense of whether this is the best environment for your child to learn and thrive. Because the visit is so crucial to deciding on your child’s school, you should make the most of the opportunity. Private school experts offer these suggestions for what to ask about, look for, and consider before, during, and after the visit. Do some pre-visit research. Read up on the school’s history, educational philosophy, and accomplishments. Ask for information about student-teacher ratios, teacher experience, arts classes, sports, and other extracurricular activities, special programs for students needing academic support, and expectations for parental involvement. Decide ahead of time if there are specific classrooms, facilities, or departments that you or your child want to visit.

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Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

If possible, visit on a regular school day, arrange to observe a classroom, and stay to sample a school lunch. General impressions count, but so do the details. Take note of what the grounds and classrooms are like, but also pay attention to specifics: are the bathrooms clean; do staff seemed organized and ready for your visit; what library, science, and technology resources does the school offer? In the classrooms or on the playground, notice if the students look engaged and well-behaved, including when they transition from one activity or classroom to another. How do students interact with their teachers? Do the teachers seem cheerful and knowledgeable? How do the teachers manage the classrooms or handle discipline? Talk to as many teachers and students as possible. Find out about homework policies and workloads, the social environment, and opportunities to do arts, sports, and other nonacademic activities. If the school offers shadow-a-student day for interested students, your child has the opportunity to ask questions of potential schoolmates more freely than if you’re around. After you and your child finish the visit, jot down your general impressions before leaving. Try to imagine your child in one of the classrooms, or walking the halls. How does that idea look and feel? Remember gut feelings can be important, too. 


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The Park School 171 Goddard Avenue Brookline, MA 02445 617-277-2456 Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

11


Beacon Hill Nursery School

Shadow Days

Over 60 Years of Excellence In Early Childhood Education

OPEN HOUSE

Wednesday, September 27 Monday, October 23

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An RSVP to admissions@bhns.net is appreciated, but not required

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We can’t wait to meet your children, but this event is for adults only. We want to give you our undivided attention!

Established 1986

Celebrating 31 Years of Excellence

Accepting Applications

Toddler Preschool Pre-Kindergarten

A

fter all the open houses, information nights, school tours, and interviews, the best way for kids to evaluate a school is to spend a day on campus. Luckily, most schools offer shadow days for older students (usually those entering middle school or high school). Prospective students are matched up with a current student for an entire school day. They go to classes, share time during breaks and lunch, and get an insider’s tour of the campus—experiencing firsthand what it feels like to be a student at that school.

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Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

Things to know: • Typically, shadow days can be scheduled anytime from October to May. • Visitors are often required to respect the school dress code. • Visiting students are usually allowed to shadow a current student they already know, as long as the request is made in advance. • If prospective students do not know any current students, the school will assign one based on interests in academics, extracurricular activities, etc. • Shadow days are just for students; no parents allowed. • Don’t worry if your student goes to a P.E. class. Your kid will be OK. 


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Applying to a Private School While admissions officers want to be helpful, don’t call too often, overload them with additional information about your child, or try to impress them with your business or social contacts.

Y

our first step is to research and visit schools, ideally starting the search at least a year before you plan to submit the application for your child. It takes time to determine which school is the best fit for your child. Navigating the application process can be overwhelming, but it can also be exciting, too. Here are tips, from the National Association of Independent Schools, on how to get you and your child into the right school. • After creating your short list of schools, call or email the school’s admissions office to find out about open houses, school tours, private visits, or other events that will allow you to get to know the school as best as possible. The school’s admissions office will also tell you about application requirements—including deadlines and costs. While each school has its own criteria for admitting students, the typical application package involves: • A completed application form, usually available from the school’s website, and application fee.

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Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

• Parent or guardian statements. • A transcript of your child’s grades from her current school. • Results from standardized tests or a schooladministered test. For middle school grades and above, the most common tests are: the Independent School Entrance Examination, or the ISEE; the Secondary School Aptitude Test, or the SSAT; the High School Placement Test, or HSPT, for Catholic schools.

Depending on the grade to which you are applying, some schools might also ask for: • Student writing samples. • Student portfolios. • A formal interview, though for elementary school students, the interview more often consists of a teacher observation or individual or groupadministered diagnostic tests. Remember, school admissions officers are there to help you complete your applications in a timely


manner. They also want to make sure that the process is a positive experience for you and your child and that there is a good match between your child and the school.

Joyful Journeys

Try to avoid:

Independence Instilled

• While admissions officers want to be helpful, don’t call too often, overload them with additional information about your child, or try to impress them with your business or social contacts. • Don’t jump on the bandwagon of applying to a school just because your child’s peers are applying. Similarly, don’t just apply to a school because it is one of the “top” schools in the area and boasts of its graduates who go to the Ivies. Be realistic about your child’s strengths, interests, and personality; she may not be an Ivy League kind of kid. • Don’t shy away from disclosing vital information about your child or family—notably about any special academic needs your child has or about your family’s financial need for tuition help. While most private schools cannot afford to meet the academic and financial needs of all students they would like to admit, you won’t increase your child’s chances of acceptance by failing to be upfront about certain information. And if the school turns your child down for any special issues, it’s likely the school was not a good fit. Don’t miss application deadlines. But if you do, some schools have rolling admissions and admit students throughout the school year. 

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The Meadowbrook School of Weston provides academically inspiring and uniquely joyful education to students in grades JK-8. We meet children where they are and guide them as they grow into their potential in a distinctly supportive learning environment. Learn more about how we’re REDEFINING RIGOR at meadowbrook-ma.org.

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Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 | 6:30 – 8:00 PM PRE-K – GRADE 4

Monday, Dec. 4, 2017 | 9:00 – 11:00 AM Pre-register at Fessenden.org/OH17 or call 617-630-2300 THE FESSENDEN SCHOOL | 250 WALTHAM STREET, WEST NEWTON, MA Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

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Tips for a Great Essay Aside from the interview, writing the essay can be one of the most stressproducing steps in the application process.

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pplication essays provide ways for private school admissions officers to get to know students beyond their grades, test scores, and basic biographical information. They provide insight into a student’s personality and interests—to help determine if the school is the right fit for your child and vice versa. Aside from the interview, writing the essay can be one of the most stress-producing steps in the application process. But these suggestions from private school organizations can break the task of writing the essay into manageable steps and guide your child to crafting a work that makes him stand out to admissions officers.

Read the directions carefully Don’t write a two-sentence essay if the school asks for one page, but don’t write more than one page. And, don’t turn in a typed essay if the school wants it handwritten.

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Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

Tell the school what it wants to know Schools often provide an essay prompt, so you need to respond to it. That said, the prompts—such as “recount some activity or event that challenged you in a positive way”—usually allow the applicant lots of leeway to write about a range of topics.

Be real Don’t write what you think an admissions officer wants to hear—because you really have no idea. Write about what you know and what excites you.

Start early Do not wait until the night before the application is due to begin writing. Brainstorm and work out ideas with teachers, parents, or others early and give yourself time for revisions, if necessary, and copyediting.

Tell a story While the essay should have correct spelling and grammar and be legible, it doesn’t have to follow the


academic essay formula. A good strategy is to tell a story—even filled with dialogue or vivid description— to get your point across.

Get creative If you are an aspiring writer, for example, ask the school if you can write in verse, instead of the usual narrative.

Be concrete Stay away from generalizations, such as “singing by myself front of Join us atinone of our my school was challenging.” Instead, upcoming open provide details or an example of how houses! and why you were scared before that solo singing performance and felt triumphant afterwards.

Parents, this must be your child’s work While, as parents, you can provide feedback and help with copyediting, let your child do all the writing. And if you can’t help but get overly involved, consider asking a neutral third party—a teacher, another relative, or a professional consultant—to help your child edit her essay. 

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17


Preparing for the Interview Think of the interview as a two-way conversation that helps everyone involved—school staff, parents, and child—determine if the school is the right fit for your child.

T

he idea of your child having to interview to gain admission to a private school sounds downright terrifying. But private school experts say you shouldn’t think of the interview as a high-stakes interrogation. Rather, think of the interview as a two-way conversation that helps everyone involved— school staff, parents, and child—determine if the school is the right fit for your child. The structure of the interview also depends on the school and your child’s age. Typically, the applicant and her family come to the school to look around and talk with an admissions officer or other school staff. The staff might focus on talking with the parents, but with older children and high school students, an admissions officer might speak privately with the child in a formal or more casual situation. Given that the interview is an important part of the application process, and in determining if this

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Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

school is the best place to educate your child, here are some things you and your child should prepare for so the interview will go well, according to the National Association of Independent Schools and other private school organizations. With younger kids, the school staff will mostly talk to the parents, asking them to describe their child and what they hope their child will gain by attending this school. When students are old enough to be the key subject of interviews, they should be prepared to answer typical questions, such as: • Tell me about yourself: Help your child come up with an answer that doesn’t recite biographical facts but describes his interests and strengths in certain academic areas or extracurricular activities and allows him to talk up his accomplishments. • Why do you want to come to this school? The school wants to find out if the child understands


what makes the school unique and whether he sees it as a match for his own personality, academic strengths, interests, and aspirations. So, hopefully, during visits, or in talking to students and faculty, your child has encountered programs or a learning environment that excites him. • Talk about subjects or teachers you like: Help your child figure out certain coursework that has recently engaged him, such as a certain book in English class or a social studies field trip to see Egyptian mummies at a museum. Given that the interview is also a chance for you and your child to learn more about the school, help your child prepare to ask questions. Look at the school’s website or think back to visits and help him come up with a list of questions that reflects how the school might nurture his interests. “Will I be able to do dissections in sixth-grade biology?” “Can I audition for school plays in ninth grade?” “What about your study trips overseas?” “What are different ways I can fulfill my community service requirements?” The admissions officers will likely see your child’s curiosity as evidence of his interest in coming to the school. Parents and students should always be honest, experts say. But that doesn’t mean you should accentuate your child’s weaknesses, provide too much information about family challenges, or bad-mouth your child’s current school, even if this current school environment is mostly negative and the reason he’s trying to change schools. Instead, accentuate the positive: A child’s weakness or a family’s challenges are things he is working to overcome; or his current school simply isn’t the right fit for his unique needs and interests. 

PreschooL through grade 12

Learn and thrive in a bilingual, caring, and creative environment! www.isbos.org | 617- 499 -1459

TM

2017 TOP 5

I can’t wait to come back tomorrow!

Walk into a JCC Early Learning Center, r and you will see the children r, playing, moving and having fun. It’s hard not to feel f el their joy. fe

Newton Godine Early Learning Center

Hingham JCC Early Learning Center

333 Nahanton Street (Leventhal-Sidman Center) 617-558-6420 newton-elc@jccgb.org

1112 Main Street (Congregation Sha’aray Shalom) 781-752-4000 hingham-elc@jccgb.org

Sharon Gilson Early Learning Center

Brookline/Brighton JCC Early Learning Center

25 Canton Street (Temple Sinai) 781-795-4900 sharon-elc@jccgb.org

50 Sutherland Road, Brighton 617-278-2950 brookline-elc@jccgb.org

Everyone welcome

bostonjcc.org/earlylearning Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

19


The Acceptance and Decision

T

If You Are Not Sure

rejection or waitlist) notifications go out on a Friday in mid-March, and families then have seven days to decide where their child will attend. So how to make the decision? When you learn about your child’s acceptance, you will also learn about financial aid awards. If the grant you receive does not meet your needs, or if you are not awarded any aid, contact the school’s financial aid officer to learn about other options. The following are tips on choosing a school from the National Association of Independent Schools.

Once You Decide

he application is completed, interviews and shadow days are all done—all that’s left is waiting for the acceptance letter (or email) and then the big decision. Usually, acceptance (or

What to Do If You’re Accepted • If you’re certain about the school, say yes—but feel free to take the full seven days to sit with the decision to make sure it feels right.

Deciding on a School • Discuss the options as a family. • Make a pro and con list for each possible school. • Revisit your notes from tours and open houses. Follow your heart. Revisit your wish list to make sure you’ve fulfilled your priorities. Be sure that your child will thrive in the independent school community you choose.

20

Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

• Consider a second visit to the school; have your child do a shadow day if she hasn’t already. • Ask to talk to some teachers. • Talk to graduates or current families of the school—especially any who have come from your child’s current school. • Encourage your child to talk to other students.

• Be sure to contact the school you choose by the reply deadline. • Let all schools where you were admitted know of your final decision so they can contact other families on their waiting list. • Return your signed enrollment contract and tuition deposit.

If You’re Waitlisted • Call the school right away and let admissions officials know that you are very interested. Stay in touch with them throughout the summer. Sometimes children can be accepted off the waitlist just days before school begins.

If You’re Rejected • Consider other schools. • Ask the school for feedback about what factors made the difference. Try to approach the issue in a nonjudgmental way; tell the admissions staff you want to get information that can help your child do better in the future. 


We Open Up New Worlds to Students on the Autism Spectrum.

A World of Exploring Fine Arts.

A World of Advanced Technology.

A World of Achievement.

discover your inner child

A World of Health and Fitness. League School of Greater Boston provides students on the autism spectrum with the tools to develop the communication skills, social skills and life skills needed to succeed both now and in the future. We are a non-profit school whose students come from 50 different communities in Massachusetts and beyond. If you would like to learn more about any of our exceptional programs, contact Gayle Overbey, Admissions Coordinator at 508-850-3900, X171 or via e-mail at goverbey@leagueschool.com.

leagueschool.com Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

21


Financial Aid: Basics You Need to Know What is financial aid? Monetary assistance that schools provide to reduce educational costs to families. Most financial aid takes the form of grants that do not need to be paid back.

Where does financial aid come from? Most aid is provided directly from the school and distributed on the basis of financial need.

What does “financial need” mean? Need is the difference between educational expenses—especially tuition and fees—and your family’s ability to pay those expenses.

IInfant f (1 month) h) through h h Pre-K P K

Open Year Round Mon–Fri • 7am-5:30pm

Coding Classes

We offer a pleasant mix of fun & education to develop young minds!

www.CSRecitations.com

• Breakfast, lunch & snack prepared on site • Two age appropriate playgrounds & large indoor play space • Individual classrooms with well-rounded curriculum including: fieldtrips, computers & music

The Village Pre-School 25 Cummins Highway, Roslindale

617-323-5141

22

Kids and Teens

* Learn to Program * Improve Math Skills * Develop Creativity * Improve Critical Reasoning * Take AP Comp Sci * Compete for Awards * Learn Arduino

Now enrolling in Natick!

RECITATIONS THE ADVANCED COMPUTER SCIENCE ACADEMY

Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

The Math Club

TM

2017 TOP 5

REGISTER NOW FOR FALL Inspiring preparation for the Mathematical Olympiad Contest and Applied Mathematics Challenge - 2018 for elementary and middle school students.

21 year program with high success rate

• Fun and supportive learning environment • Builds strong math foundation • Critical thinking techniques

781-860-9012 www.TheMathClub.com


How do schools determine financial need? They ask you to fill out financial statements that give them a picture of how much you can afford to contribute toward education. After calculating the difference between your resources and their tuition and fees, they weigh the resulting financial need against their available financial aid funds and their policies.

What is the income level at which a family is no longer eligible for aid? There is no specific income limit. If you feel you cannot pay all the costs yourself, it’s worth the effort to ask whether aid is available.

What is the timeline usually like?

NEWTON SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN Open Houses: Thursday, November 2 Friday, November 3 9-11am & 4-5pm Saturday, November 4 9am-12pm Thursday, May 3 Friday, May 4 9-11am & 4-5pm Saturday, May 5 9am-12pm

Since 1982

• Professional Staff • Toddler, Preschool & Transition Program • Music & Movement • Spanish & Gymnastics • 7:30am - 5:45pm • Summer Program Available

25 Lenglen Road, Newton MA (617) 965-1705 newtonschoolforchildren.com

Do you have questions

about your child’s special education needs? The Call Center at the Federation for Children with Special Needs helps parents just like you, every day.

Reach Us: 617-236-7210 | M-F | 10am - 3pm Informing, Educating, Empowering Families. Support our Annual Appeal!

Be sure to ask each school for All proceeds benefit our work to help families of children with disabilities. its unique deadlines. For schools fcsn.org that do not have rolling admissions, here are some approximate dates that many schools tend to follow: 1711_6th_v3.indd 1 9/15/17 • Sept. or Oct. in the year before you want to start in the new school: Begin your school search. • Nov. or Dec.: Begin the financial aid application process. • Jan. or early Feb.: Your admission applications are due. • Jan. or Feb.: Your financial aid applications are due. The International Private School • Late Feb. or early March: Schools send out admission decisions. Grades K—5  Immersion Curriculum  Accepting applications • March or April: Schools send out financial aid decisions. (Bay Area schools often include this School of Early Global Education information with the acceptance letter.) Infant—Jr-K  Full immersion curriculum  Open enrollment Again: Contact individual schools for exact deadlines. Each Join us for an OPEN HOUSE school’s deadlines may be different.  Saturday, October 14 and November 4 10:00a—12p Reprinted with permission from the National Association of Tuesday, December 12 6:00p—7:00p Independent Schools, www.nais. org.

4:34 PM

Creative.

Confident.

Bilingual.

Or call to schedule a tour at your convenience!

75 Sgt William B Terry Drive

Hingham, MA

781.741.5454

www.suescuela.com

Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

23


Myths About Financial Aid Myth: An independent school education is out of reach for all but wealthy families. Reality: Tuition can be expensive. But hundreds of private schools offer financial assistance to make sure that the students they’ve admitted have a realistic chance to enroll, no matter what their families’ financial status.

Myth: All schools our child applies to will offer our family the same financial aid package. Reality: How much aid you receive may vary—a lot—from school to school. The amount a school can offer depends on factors such as the size of its endowment, its tuition costs, and its philosophy about providing aid. If your decision to send your child to an independent school depends on getting some financial help, it pays to apply for aid at more than one school.

Myth: The deadlines for admission and financial aid are the same.

school (the deadlines are usually on the school’s website), and be sure to keep track of what you must do when. Do not wait to begin the financial aid process until after you receive an admission decision. It pays to complete both admission and financial aid applications at the same time, even if they’re due on different dates; plus many schools require that they be done at the same time.

Myth: The financial aid application process is complicated. Reality: There’s some truth to this one, but schools’ financial aid offices are working hard to make the process as clear and convenient as possible. More than 2,100 schools use SSS, School and Student Services by NAIS, to help them make financial aid decisions. This means you may only have to fill out one form to apply for financial aid at several schools. The form and instructions are available online. In addition, many schools offer financial aid workshops, and staffers welcome your calls any time you have questions.

Reality: Often the deadlines are not the same. Check with each

Mount Alvernia Academy Faith First, Learning Foremost

Preschool - Grade 6 20 Manet Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 24

Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

Myth: If we tell the school our family needs financial aid, this might hurt our child’s chances of being admitted. Reality: The typical school will not reject a qualified student’s admission application because the child is applying for financial aid. That said: Admission is not a guarantee that the student’s family will receive financial aid. The amount of aid depends on the family’s eligibility and the funds the school has available.

Myth: It’s too intimidating to talk to the school about our private financial matters. Reality: The school is your very best source of realistic information about the procedures and timelines for getting aid and of advice about the types of financial assistance available. The members of the financial aid staff want you to turn to them for help. Really.  Reprinted with permission from the National Association of Independent Schools, www.nais. org.

Open House Wednesday, October 18th 8:30-10:30 am Sunday, November 5th 11:00 am - 1:00 pm National Blue Ribbon School

www.maa.school


PRIVATE SCHOOL DIRECTORY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Preschools • Elementary Schools • Middle & High Schools • Special Needs Schools Grades (abbreviations): PS: Preschool, PreK: PreKindergarten, JrK: Junior Kindergarten, K: Kindergarten Accreditation and License: AISNE (Assoc. of Independent Schools of New England) AMS (American Montessori Society) AMLE (Association for Middle Level Education) ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) CIS (Council of International Schools) EEC (Early Education and Care)

AD

GR Atrium School 69 Grove Street, Watertown 617-923-4156 atrium.org

?

D

VE

ER

S ES

ICG (The Independent Curriculum Group) MAAPS (Massachusetts Association of 766 Approved Private Schools) NAEYC (Ntl. Assoc. for the Education of Young Children) NAIS  (Ntl. Assoc. of Independent Schools) NEASC (New England Association of Schools & Colleges) S

AM

R OG

R RE PR OG FTEL CA PR NAL A / R O E IO RE O MM DDIT FO CH SU A BE S NT

E LLM

RO

EN

M RA

ID? LA ? A & S ION I AT NC TION NSSHIP M A O I R A N O AT ER FI RT INF DIT B TS PO EP ANS RE MEM ER C C H AC TR AC OT

PreK Grade 8

135

7:30am; 3-5:30pm

Y

Music + Music Integration, violin, performing arts, studio art, theater, Spanish, library, STEAM, physical education, sports teams.

Y

N

AISNE, NAIS

Middle school cross country, track, Science Olympiad, rowing, service learning, theater, PreK full-day and half-day options.

Beacon Hill Nursery School 74 Joy Street, Boston 617-227-0822 bhns.net

Preschool -K

130

Yes

Y

Private preschool toddler (2.0) thru Kindergarten. We offer both morning and afternoon toddler and preschool programs.

Belmont Day School 55 Day School Lane, Belmont 617-484-3078 belmontday.org

PreK Grade 8

274

Yes

Y

After school enrichment classes, free monthly Saturday concerts for preschoolers, annual speaker series open to the public.

Y

Y

AISNE, NAIS

Bernice B. Godine JCC Early Learning Center Located at the Leventhal-Sidman JCC 333 Nahanton Street, Newton 617-558-6420 bostonjcc.org/earlylearning

6 wks. 5 yrs.

Yes

Y

Swim lessons and enrichment classes for children, as well as fitness, arts and cultural opportunities for the family.

Y

N

NAEYC

Dedicated to providing a rich and nurturing environment filled with Jewish values and traditions. Enrollment available for Fall 2017 school year. Limited availability for 2016-2017 school year.

Brimmer and May School 69 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill 617-738-8695 brimmer.org

PreK Grade 12

390

Yes

Y

After-school music program and clubs, design lab, outdoor classroom, signature diploma programs. New STEAM, Innovation, and Makerspace

Y

Y

AISNE, AMLE, ASCD, CES, ICG, NAIS

Located on the T at Chestnut Hill and busing service.

Cambridge Friends School 5 Cadbury Road, Cambridge 617-354-3880 cfsmass.org

PreK Grade 8

180

7:15am5:45pm

N

Soccer, basketball, ultimate frisbee, world dance, piano, clarinet, violin and saxophone lessons, MakerSpace, drama.

Y

Y

AISNE

The Children's Workshop Multiple locations in Massachusetts and Rhode Island 401-334-0100 childrensworkshop.com

Infants PreK

Varies

Yes

Dedham Country Day School 90 Sandy Valley Road, Dedham 781-329-0850 dedhamcountryday.org

PreK Grade 8

265

Yes

Y

Interscholastic athletics, private music program, after-school enrichment: chess, robotics, jewelry making, math club, coding.

Y

Derby Academy 56 Burditt Avenue, Hingham 781-749-0746 derbyacademy.org

PreK Grade 8

329

Yes

Y

Extended day and after-school enrichment, instrumental program, interscholastic sports teams and Derby Summer Arts.

Fay School 48 Main Street, Southborough 508-490-8201 fayschool.org

PreK Grade 9

475

Until 6pm

Y

The Fessenden School 250 Waltham Street, West Newton 617-630-2300 fessenden.org

PreK Grade 9

526

7:30am5:30pm

We also offer a 10 week half-day summer program.

Y

NAEYC, BrightStars, QRIS

Emergent curriculum that emphasizes learning through play, Parent Communication App, Transportation to and from local schools, Nutritious hot lunch and snack provided.

N

AISNE

Classroom Observations for parents: Nov. 9, Nov. 30, Jan 19. Register online.

Y

Y

AISNE, NAIS

Optional 5- and 7-day boarding programs for grades 7-9.

Athletics, arts, world languages, Innovation Center for Technology & Engineering, public speaking, service learning and wellness.

Y

Y

AISNE, NAIS

Independent school for boys in PreK-9th grade, with boarding options for grades 5-9.

Y

Co-ed summer, sport and specialty camps offered June August.

Y

Y

AISNE

Independent school for boys in PreK-9th grade, with boarding options for grades 5-9.

Yes

Y

Focus on infusing Jewish culture and traditions with hands on learning experiences.

Y

N

NAEYC

We focus on building community and supporting each child’s academic, social and emotional development.

Gilson JCC Early Learning Center Located at Temple Sinai 25 Canton Street, Sharon 781-795-4900 bostonjcc.org/earlylearning

15 mos. 5 yrs.

International School of Boston 45 Matignon Road, Cambridge 617-499-1451 isbos.org

PS Grade 12

600

Until 6pm

Y

Bilingual program (French & English) from Pre-K - 8th grade; Choice of French Baccalaureate (taught in French) or International Baccalaureate (taught in English) in Upper School.

Y

Y

AISNE, CIS, IB, NAIS, NEASC, AFSA. French: AEFE, MEN, MLF

Jackson-Walnut Park Schools 71 Walnut Park, Newton 617-202-9772 jwpschools.org

18 mos. 6 yrs. K - Grade 6

400

Until 6pm

Y

Special topics such as music, art, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese and gym classes offered at both schools.

Y

N

AISNE AMS NEASC

Beautiful campus with an on-site garden and playgrounds for both programs.

Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

25


PRIVATE SCHOOL DIRECTORY

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

E

AD

GR

ED

RV

E SS

MS

A GR

O R R RE PR OG FTEL CA R PR AL A N / E IO RE OO DIT MM FO CH SU AD BE S NT

E LLM

RO

EN

? AM

ID? LA ? A & ION I AT NC TION IONS HIPS M A IN TA TAT ERS OR I B S F OR INF PT NSP RED EM R E E C A C M H AC TR AC OT

JCC Early Learning Center, Brookline/Brighton 50 Sutherland Road, Brighton 617-278-2950 bostonjcc.org/earlylearning

15 mos. 5 yrs.

Yes

Y

Swim lessons and enrichment classes.

Y

N

NAEYC

Family-centered, reflecting rich diversity of community. Experienced with bilingual children.

JCC Early Learning Center Located at Congregation Sha’aray Shalom 1112 Main Street, Hingham 781-355-7718 bostonjcc.org/earlylearning

15 mos. 5 yrs.

Yes

Y

Diverse community, welcoming to all families and faiths.

Y

N

NAEYC

Curriculum allows children to be actively engaged in learning. Classrooms filled with natural openended materials.

League School 300 Boston Providence Highway, East Walpole 508-850-3900 leagueschool.org

PreK Grade 12

Yes

Y

Y

N

Lesley Ellis School 34 Winter Street, Arlington 781-641-1346 lesleyellis.org

PreK Grade 8

7-8am; 3-6pm

Y

Y

N

NAIS

Providing a stimulating education to all students.

Magic Garden Children's Center 6 Ballfield Road, Lincoln 781-259-8161 magic-garden.org

15 mos Age 5

Yes

Y

May Center School for Autism and Developmental Disabilities 41 Pacella Park Drive, Randolph 781-437-1300 randolphschool.mayinstitute.org May Center School for Brain Injury and Neurobehavioral Disorders 596 Summer Street, Brockton 508-588-8800 brocktonschool.mayinstitute.org

166

After-school program, vacation program.

As a 12-month, full-day children’s center, Magic Garden is a resource for families seeking flexibility.

2.9 22 yrs.

Y

Programs based on applied behavior analysis (ABA).

N

N

MAAPS

5 - 22 yrs.

Y

Serves children and young adults with brain injuries, neurological diseases or neurobehavorial disorders.

N

N

Y

Y

AISNE, NAIS

Day and residential educational programs for children with ASD and other developmental disabilities.

Nationally recognized day or residential school. 24 hour care and services.

The Meadowbrook School 10 Farm Road, Weston 781-894-1193 meadowbrook-ma.org

JrK Grade 8

315

Until 5:45pm

Y

Mount Alvernia Academy 20 Manet Road, Chestnut Hill 617-527-7540 maa.school

PS Grade 6

305

2:40-5:45pm

Y

Robotics Club, After School Sports Program, Karate, Rugby, Lego Club, Singing Club, Interscholastic Basketball.

Y

Y

NEASC

Located on 7 acres overlooking Boston College's main campus. Blue Ribbon School. Exemplary High Performing school.

The Park School 171 Goddard Avenue, Brookline 617-277-2456 parkschool.org

PreK Grade 8

550

12-6pm

Y

Art, music, physical education, drama, science, math and robotics clubs, interscholastic athletic competition in nine sports.

Y

Y

AISNE, NAIS

Open House on Oct. 29, 12-3pm.

Park Street School | Park Street Kids 67 Brimmer Street & One Park Street, Boston 617-523-7577 parkstreetschool.org

Toddler Grade 6

323

3:30-5:30pm

N

Toddler-PreK: 8am-noon; Age 2.9+: Creative Afternoons, 1-3pm; Grades 1-6, Kindergarten-after school clubs/private music.

Y

N

AISNE Affiliate

PSS/PSK has avg. 10:1 ratio; passionate, nurturing teachers; fosters character, intentional play; arts/stem/content-rich program.

Pine Village Preschool Multiple Locations 400 Wester Avenue, Brighton 617-201-9088 mybilingualpreschool.com

Toddler PreK

Varies

8am-6pm

Y

Saturday school age Spanish classes, Mommy and Me and toddler Spanish playgroup.

N

N

Su Escuela 75 Sgt. William B Terry Drive Suite 1001 Hingham 781-741-5454 suescuela.com

Infant Grade 5

Yes

Y

Summit Montessori School 283 Pleasant Street, Framingham 508-872-3630 summitmontessori.org

Toddler Grade 6

94

7:30-8:15am; 3-6pm

Y

After-school enrichment programs.

Y

N

AISNE, AMS, NCPSA

Thacher Montessori School 1425 Blue Hill Avenue, Milton 617-361-2522 thacherschool.org

Toddler Grade 8

215

7am-6pm

Y

Basketball, soccer, skiing, hiking, yoga, performing arts, cooking/ baking and rock climbing.

Y

N

AISNE, AMI, AMS

Grades 6 -12

700

Yes

Y

Comprehensive sports, arts, technology and service programs.

Y

Y

NEASC

Thayer Academy 745 Washington Street, Braintree 781-664-2221 thayer.org

26

Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

Pine Village is a Full Spanish Immersion Preschool with six locations in Boston and Cambridge, one in Newton and one in Needham.

Discover Montessori and Discover Thacher. Open House: November 18; Information Sessions: October 18, December 7, January 11.


Public and Private School Organizations These local and national organizations offer information on a variety of educational options. Association of Independent Schools in New England 781-843-8440; aisne.org Provides services to members, including Massachusetts private schools, promotes educational leadership and offers an online directory of member schools. Bureau of Jewish Education of Greater Boston 617-965-7350; bje.org Central educational service agency for more than 100 schools or school units, youth groups, summer camps and adult education programs. Massachusetts Department of Education Information Services doe.mass.edu/infoservices Provides profiles of Massachusetts public school districts, and data on enrollment, dropout rates and plans of high school graduates. Massachusetts Home Learning Association mhla.org The oldest statewide home school organization in Massachusetts is a support, information and advocacy group. Website offers resources on homeschooling, support groups and more. Montessori Schools of Massachusetts 508-789-6546; msmresources.org Explains the Montessori education method and offers a list of Massachusetts Montessori schools. National Association of Independent Schools 202-973-9700; nais.org Provides a database of member schools plus tips for choosing and applying to a school, obtaining financial aid and more. National Catholic Educational Association 800-711-6232; ncea.org Information on a private, Catholic education from educators and institutions serving students in elementary and secondary schools, colleges and universities.

Special Needs Education Support Autism Society, Massachusetts 781-237-0272, ext. 17; autism-society-massachusetts.org. The local chapter of this national organization offers information on autism news and research, local treatment services, a calendar of events and more. Federation for Children with Special Needs – 617-236-7210; 800-331-0688 (in Mass.); fcsn.org – Advocacy, resources and information for parents and professionals. Massachusetts Branch of the International Dyslexia Association 617-650-0011; massbranchida.org Provides recommended reading materials for parents of kids with dyslexia, conducts professional development workshops and more. Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing 617-740-1600; mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/mcdhh Services for deaf and hard of hearing, including interpreting, case management and technology. Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 781-338-3000; doe.mass.edu – The State’s education website with information on special education, standardized testing, public schools and related topics. Special Needs Advocacy Network 508-655-7999; spanmass.org Offers support and referrals to Massachusetts special needs advocates and provides special education workshops and training.

Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18 | Boston Parents Paper

27


Become a part of the KinderCare Education Story. (It’s a Great One) Our Educators are the Heroes, and every child needs a hero!

Thank you for voting for all of the KinderCare and Knowledge Beginnings programs in Massachusetts.

www.kindercare.com 28

Boston Parents Paper | Greater Boston Education Guide 2017/18

2017 Greater Boston Education Guide