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JANUARY 2020

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Summer Camp Planning It’s time to get a jump on summer fun!

8 TIPS for Keeping Kids Healthy All Winter POST-HOLIDAY TOY OVERLOAD


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Boston Parents Paper | January 2020


Contents

January 2020

Volume 35 • Number 5

Summer Camp Adventure It’s never too early to start planning for summer fun! 11 10 QUESTIONS TO ASK When Starting Your Camp Search 12 DAY CAMP OR Overnight Camp 13 5 LIFE LESSONS Learned at Camp 14 SUMMER CAMPERS Environmentalists of Tomorrow

11 W H AT ’ S I N S I D E

16 Open Adoption 2020

6 Family F.Y.I.

• 2020 Camp and Summer Expo • Celebrating Dr. King • Keeping Kids Healthy this Winter

10 Post-Holiday Toy Overload

How to Unclutter the Toys

TM

Boston Parent 841 Worcester Street Suite 344 Natick, MA 01760 • 617-522-1515 info@BostonParentsPaper.com Visit us online at BostonParentsPaper.com

PUBLISHER Parenting Media, Inc ART DIRECTOR | Debbi Murzyn

19 Family Calendar

• Black Bear Birthday Party • Oshogatsu! Japanese New Year • Martin Luther King Jr. Day • And much more...

Boston Parents Paper is published monthly by Parenting Media Inc. Please note that the advertisements in this magazine are paid for, which allows this magazine to be free to the consumer.

CALENDAR EDITOR | Grace Batmale

60,000 copies of Boston Parents Paper are distributed to more than 1600 locations in the region. Past issues are available on our website, www.BostonParentsPaper.com

ADVERTISING SALES Holly Castro, David Morney

Send letters to the editor or article submissions to editor@bostonparent.com. Submit events to our Family Friendly Calendar at bostonparentspaper.com/event/

ASSOCIATE EDITOR | Jean Abernathy

January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

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TM

2020 Camp & Summer Expo he t e v a S Date

Held at:

Dedham Health & Athletic Complex

200 Boston Providence Hwy., Dedham BostonParentsPaper.com

Meet camp directors and learn about more than 65 day and overnight camps as well as summer programs for all ages and interests. Sponsors:


Saturday, January 25, 2020 11am – 2pm Just Some of the Exhibiting Camps: Bridgton Sports Camp

Einstein’s Workshop

Brimmer Summer Programs

Empow Studios STEM Summer Camps

Camp Birch Hill

Everwood Day Camp

Camp Bournedale

EXPLO

Camp Cedar Hill

Fleur de Lis Camp

Camp Chickami

FUSE School & Program

Camp Common Ground

Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts

Camp Favorite

Grotonwood Camp & Conference Center

Camp Frank A Day

Hale Day Camp

Camp Hale

JCC Grossman Camp

Camp Kaleidescope

KIDS 4 CODING

Camp Maude Eaton

Letgo Your Mind STEM Programs

Camp Med-O-Lark

LINX Camps

Camp Menotomy

MFA Summer Programs

Camp Pikati

New England Base Camp

Camp Quinebarge

Nobles Day Camp

Camp Rice Moody

PJ Library

Camp Runels

Pilgrim Pines / Camp Squanto

Camp Stonewall

Steve & Kate’ Camp

Camp Terrier

Summer Institute in Global Leadership

Camp Wabasso

Sweet Meadow Farm

Camp Wind-in-the-Pines

Tabor Summer Camp

Cardigan Mountain Summer Session

Teen JUST-US Boston

Central Rock Gym Summer Camp

the hive

Coding FUNdamentals at Codeverse

The Innovation Institute

Dedham Community House Summer Camp

The JamZone

Dedham Country Day Camp

The Skating Club of Boston Skating Academy

Dedham Health Summer Program

Wellesley Theatre Project

Delphi Academy Summer Camp

West Suburban YMCA

Dexter Southfield Summer Camps

YMCA Camp Abnaki

Edge on Science

YMCA of Greater Boston Camps

EF International Language Campuses

And More!

January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

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Family F.Y.I. Looking for a Summer Camp? Don’t miss the Boston Parents Paper 2020 Camp & Summer Expo on Jan. 25, from 11am – 2pm, at Dedham Health & Athletic Complex, 200 Boston Providence Hwy., Dedham. Meet with staff from more than 65 day and overnight camps and summer programs. To register to attend the fair please go to: https://bostonparentspaper.com/summer-camp-expo.html

SNOW DAYS A

nxious over the very thought of how to entertain your kids during the next snow day? Try these activities:

SCAVENGER HUNT: Instruct kids

to search the house for the best items to build a snowman. Extra points for creativity.

RELAY RACE: Get your driveway clear in a jiffy with a snow shoveling relay.

HOT COCOA CONTEST: Set up a quirky hot cocoa bar for

an afternoon snack. Kids choose their own mix-ins. Then do a taste test of each. Whoever came up with the yummiest combo wins!

BUILD A FORT: Help your kids make a fort using your

couch or chairs and covering with blankets. Once secured, give your kids flashlights so they can read or play games underneath.

$

I

Cost of Child Care

t comes as no surprise to any New England parent that the price of childcare has risen 2,000 percent in the last 40 years. With more moms entering in the workforce at the end of the 20th century, child care moved from the unpaid mother at home to the world of salaried labor. Now we are seeing a highly regulated industry, with large costs for labor. The annual cost of center-based child care for an infant and a 4-year-old is $34,381 in Massachusetts, the least affordable state for families of infants or toddlers in center-based care, according to Child Care Aware of America.

Celebrating Dr. King

W Martin Luther King Memorial, Washington DC

6

hile legislation was signed in 1983 to create the federal holiday to mark the birthday of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., it wasn’t until 1994 that Congress designated the date as a national day of service. Their slogan is it’s a “day on, not a day off.” Americans of all ages are encouraged to do good in honor of Dr. King’s vision for a united community.

Boston Parents Paper | January 2020

TOP BABY

Names in 2019 Liam and Charlotte top the list of the most popular baby names in 2019, according to BabyNames.com. Here’s the top baby names. MALE

FEMALE

1. Liam 2. Oliver 3. Theodore 4. Declan 5. Henry 6. Owen 7. Finn/Fynn 8. Caleb 9. Emmett 10. Benjamin

1. Charlotte 2. Amelia/ Emilia 3. Violet 4. Aria/Arya 5. Aurora 6. Ava 7. Olivia/Alivia 8. Vivienne/ Vivien/Vivian 9. Nora/Norah 10. Scarlett

Camp Is Not Just for Kids

S

ure, you might currently be huddled around your fireplace in an attempt to stay cozy this winter, but it’s already time to start thinking about where your little ones will be enjoying a campfire this summer. It may be of interest to know that, according to the American Camp Association, 38 percent of camps offer family opportunities. This means that if you want to ease your child into the idea of a sleepaway situation, there’s likely a camp that will take your entire family for a session.


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January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

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Family F.Y.I. Leaving your Child Home Alone By Cassandra Slater, BA, CPST

L

eaving a child alone for the first time is a big step in their development and knowing when they are ready can be challenging, as it’s different for every child. If it were only up to the law in Massachusetts, any child over ten could be left alone. Determining whether a child is ready to be left alone extends much further than the law, however. If a child is mature enough to take care of themselves, they will know what to do in an emergency situation, where to find a trusted adult, and how to reach parents in an emergency. It might take time and practice to drill the answers to these questions into your children’s heads, but will be well worth it to ensure they stay safe every time.

Once you’ve determined that your child is ready to be left home alone without an adult, create a safe environment by limiting access to dangerous areas, such as the garage, laundry room, or rooms with firearms. Use common child home-safety equipment such as cabinet locks or medication lock boxes to create boundaries so children know which areas are safe to play in and which need to be left alone. Write down all emergency numbers on a sheet of paper and place it on your family fridge for easy access. You should include any family member or family friend that the child views as a trusted adult.

8 TIPS for Keeping Kids Healthy All Winter

W

hat parent doesn’t want to arm themselves with some extra protective health rituals during cold and flu season? Cold weather and shorter days mean spreading germs around the close quarters we share with our families and then inhaling the general populations’ viruses and mucus whenever we leave the house! So short of not breathing or moving to a warmer and more humid climate where the influenza virus isn’t as happy, what can you really do to keep your kids healthy? Make sure everyone has their flu shot (No-September’s not too early, and Yes-January is still better late than never), remember your own self-care is an integral part of parenting, then give your kids an immunity boost with these practical tips!

1. Maintain Routine Keep sleep and mealtime rhythms consistent, regardless of what they may be. Following cyclical patterns that repeat regularly allow every system in the human body to stay in balance and assimilate, absorb, and utilize food for optimal nourishment.

2. Go Out and Play Getting bundled up and outdoors in wintertime is invigorating for mind and body, essential for exercise and reducing lethargy, and the perfect time to soak up some sunshine and increase those falling vitamin D levels naturally so you don’t end up with decreased winter immunity and a deficiency in March.

3. Aromatherapy Stimulating and spicy aromas promote overall well-being and are the perfect antidote to cabin fever and too many snow days. A few drops of essential oils like juniper, clove, and orange in a home diffuser will go a long way. Or surprise your kids with a fizzy bath bomb or scented shower tablet! Want to add a little more life and style to your home? Grab some eucalyptus leaves next time you visit your local florist and scatter them in vases to naturally scent rooms throughout your house.

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Boston Parents Paper | January 2020

Run through what they should do if there is a fire in the home or if strangers approach the house. Set out easy-to-make meals that do not require the stove or microwave to prepare. This will prevent any kitchen incidents that could lead to injury or fire while you aren’t home, as well as limit mess. Until you know your child is capable of making safe decisions while home alone, do not allow them to have friends over when you are gone. Also, clearly state what a child can and cannot do when you are not home; such as leave the house, use the stove, use knives, or anything that could put them at risk for injury. Mobile phones make it very easy to keep in contact with children from afar, so set up regular check in times throughout the day to make sure they are staying safe and following the rules you’ve laid out for them.

By Alyson Gregory

4. Wash Hands You know why. The research is irrefutable—this is the single most effective way to protect your kids from getting or spreading infections and illnesses. So pick a song they should hum while lathering up and scrubbing underneath their fingernails if they need a refresher course, and don’t forget to dry: damp hands spread a thousand times more germs than dry ones according to research.

5. Humidify the Air Studies show the flu virus thrives in cold, dry air and that humidity levels above 40% will actually deactivate influenza virus particles. Humidifying the air at home can decrease chances of infection, make the air feel warmer inside, and replace some much needed moisture to heal those cracked lips your kids keep licking!

6. Spice Things Up According to Ayurveda, adding winter warming herbs and spices like ginger, clove, turmeric, fennel, or cinnamon to porridges and hearty soups and stews will boost immunity, cut down on mucous production, and keep the digestive fire burning strong. Ayurvedic spiced milks before bedtime are deeply nourishing, promote sleep, and the perfect way to treat your child before bed.

7. Hydrate Tired of finding your child’s water bottle full at the end of the school day? Making sure your kids stay hydrated is all-important in wintertime when dehydration can be less noticeable, but can be challenging during the week. Try herbal teas like peppermint at breakfast or as part of an after-school snack to boost fluid intake, and enjoy a little quality time preparing them together!

8. Ditch the Ice Avoid anything iced as it extinguishes agni, or your digestive fire. According to Ayurveda, once this happens, there is not a strong enough “fire” to properly digest food and transform into the deep nourishment that kids especially need. So, ditch the ice in those smoothies, drink fluids warm or at room temperature, and replace treats like ice cream with a homemade or best ingredient baked good!


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• • • HOW TO HANDLE • • •

Post-Holiday Toy Overload By Laura Weiler

T

he holidays are filled with celebration, food, family... and toys. So. Many. Toys. If dolls, Legos, art supplies, and games have taken over your house, fear not—it can be reclaimed! As a mom of two girls and someone who organizes other people’s homes for a living, I have seen lots of playrooms, bedrooms, and living rooms that are overrun with toys. And I’ve noticed that having too many choices seems to overwhelm kids. It’s more fun to play when there’s space to spread out. And you’d probably enjoying sitting down in your living room without seeing toys strewn about. So how do you unclutter the toys?

REMOVE TOYS YOUR KIDS HAVE OUTGROWN. If they’ve aged past it, it’s time to go. If it’s an absolute treasure worth saving for future grandkids, pack well and move to the attic. Anything else can be passed on to friends or family with younger kids, the library or doctor’s office, or donated to charity.

LOOK FOR TOYS WITH BROKEN PIECES AND MISSING PARTS. Game or puzzle missing multiple pieces? Headless Barbie doll? Car with three wheels? Say goodbye. When you have a surplus of toys, broken ones are unlikely to be played with.

LOOK FOR THINGS THAT NEVER GET USED. If it never leaves the shelf, it probably won’t be missed.

INVOLVE THEM IN THE PROCESS—OR DON’T. If your kids are old enough and receptive, ask them to choose things to donate. Knowing their rarely used toys will make another kid happy can be really motivating. Or maybe your kids don’t want to part with anything, played with or not...it’s very common! If that’s your situation, declutter when they’re not home, or sleeping, to make it less of a battle.

ROTATE TOYS. This works best for babies, toddlers and preschoolers. Instead of all toys out all the time, split them in half and after a couple weeks swap them out. It’s almost like getting new toys, but your house stays uncluttered.

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Boston Parents Paper | January 2020

CREATE A TEMPORARY HOME IF YOU’RE UNSURE ABOUT GETTING RID OF SOMETHING. If you’re worried your kids might miss something you declutter, move it out of sight. If they ask, get it out—but if they don’t mention the toy in the time frame you determine (1 month, 3 months, etc.), pass it on.

THINK OF CRAFTS AS AN EXPERIENCE AND NOT SOMETHING THAT MUST BE SAVED FOR ETERNITY. Craft kits are great...until there’s a year’s worth of slime, jewelry, and painted rocks in your living room. The fun is in making the craft—they’re not all keepers. Ask your kids to choose a few favorites to keep...or smuggle things out under the cover of darkness once they’re asleep. You can always take a picture of it first.

MAKE IT EASY FOR KIDS TO CLEAN UP—AND KNOW WHERE THINGS BELONG. Think about classrooms and day cares. Every single toy, game, art supply, etc. has a home, and when kids finish using it, that’s where it goes. The shelves, bins, etc. are labeled so everyone knows where things belong. Kids play with one thing, then clean it up before switching activities so the mess doesn’t get too big. You can use these strategies at home—I use them when I organize toys. Though I’ll admit the “clean up as you go” part is MUCH harder to implement at home... Sort the toys (i.e. Barbie dolls, baby dolls, Legos, Magna-Tiles) and designate a container for each category. Label it—if your kids aren’t reading yet, use pictures. Sturdy plastic bins can be cleaned, labeled, and easily carried around. Woven baskets are a great way to camouflage toys kept in the living room. Tossing toys into a bin is an easy way to clean up. It’s the rare kid who will color-code their Legos at clean-up time—keep it simple and you’re more likely to get them on board. So there you have it! Declutter those toys and enjoy easier clean up and a neater house.

Laura Weiler is a home organizer and founder of An Organized Start, a professional organizing company based in Easton, MA.


Camps and Summer Programs 2020

5

How does your camp handle special diet or physical needs?

6

In what way may I communicate with my child while they are at camp? With the staff?

7 8

Are there family visiting days?

TEN QUESTIONS TO ASK

IF LOOKING AT A DAY CAMP:

When Starting Your Camp Search

S

1

9

awareness, problem solving, and other areas pertinent to working with children?

election a camp for your Is the camp Accredited Is the price all-inclusive, or child can be exciting. You by the American Camp are there extra charges for know that camp is the right Association? What other choice. But now you need to regulations or licenses does uniforms, specialty programs, transportation, tee shirts & figure out which camp is the the camp follow? trips? right choice. The following is What kind of training does a list of questions designed to Is transportation available the staff receive on safety, help you steer your search: and what are the specifics? supervision, mental health

2

Can you provide references that I may contact?

3

4

Is before/after camp care available? If so, who cares for the children, and what activities are offered? Is there an additional cost?

10

Are meals provided? At what cost?

For more information about camp including helpful tips on finding the right camp, contact the American Camp Association New England or visit www.acanewengland.org.

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12/18/18 4:12 PM


Should They Stay or Should They Go?

D

DAY CAMP OR OVERNIGHT CAMP?

eciding between day camp or residential (overnight) camp is one piece of the decision for families. Camp is an experience and not limited to a singular location. Campers can develop the same skills, both hard and soft, whether they’re sleeping away from home or returning to their own beds each night. While there are differences between day and residential camps, above all else, the most important outcome of this decision is finding the right fit for your camper and family. This begins with knowing your camper. Many overnight camps begin taking campers between ages 7-9 years old. However, some children may be ready at 6 and some others may not be ready at 10. While there is no clear, linear checklist to determine whether day or overnight camp is right for your child, the following questions can help guide that conversation:

• What is the primary reason for wanting to go to camp? • Has your child ever spent multiple nights sleeping away from home? • What’s your budget for camp? • Can your child bath and dress themselves independently? • How far away from home do you want your child’s camp experience to be? • What activities are important to your camper’s experience? These questions can help begin a dialogue with your family about which camp experience is the best fit for you. The choice of day versus residential camp is one important aspect of the overall decision. But even then, make sure you follow up with those potential camps. Talk to directors. Ask for tours. Ask for references. Do your due diligence. In the end both you and the camp want this summer to be the first of many and the beginning of a great relationship.

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Boston Parents Paper | January 2020


5 LIFE LESSONS Learned at Camp

TAKE A RISK. One way to build confidence is to try something new. Camp is rife with safe, healthy opportunities for children to take a chance. This could mean climbing a 30-foot wall, trying out for the camp production of Peter Pan, riding a horse, or trying broccoli for the first time. At camp, young people learn how to take risks and learn from their outcomes.

L

IFE LESSONS. These are moments where the lightbulb goes off over child’s head. They understand the concept of two plus two. They see something they can’t un-see or learn something they’ll never forget. Over the last 150plus years, camp has provided opportunities for children and adults to discover or further develop many life lessons. Here are just a few. IT’S ALL ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS. Life doesn’t exist in a vacuum and no one can do this alone. Just like a classroom, children have opportunities at camp to share experiences with peers, develop friendships, and learn the ups and downs of getting along with others. By the nature of co-existing in the same space and enjoying similar experiences, camp encourages children to develop and maintain skills necessary to relationship building. I CAN DO THAT! Confidence! Camp thrives on self-efficacy in young people. Enjoying success in a healthy manner and learning to overcome obstacles or even failure are hallmarks of a camp experience. For both campers and staff, camp allows young people to feel proud when things go well and encourages resilience when they don’t.

IT’S A GREAT BIG WORLD OUT THERE. When a child goes to camp, they interact with peers and adults from places they might have never seen or even heard of. Campers might hear a new song or accent. They may meet someone from another state or country, and sometimes they run into people from home who become lifelong friends at camp. Camp is an opportunity to both try new things and meet new people. NOT ALL LEARNING HAPPENS IN A CLASSROOM. Last but certainly not least, campers discover that school does not have a monopoly on learning. Campers develop new skills, learn about their own passions and interests, and are exposed to ideas and experiences that don’t normally sneak into a formal classroom. Without knowing it, campers are learning every day by simply getting out and going to camp. For more information about camp and the benefits of the camp experience, contact the American Camp Association New England or visit www.acanewengland.org.

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BOSTON UNIVERSITY CAMP TERRIER TERRIER 2020 CAMP 2019

Monday 8:30am-5:30pm Monday-- Friday Friday ••8:30am-5:30pm June 1517 - August WeekSessions Sessions June - August21 16 •• 11 Week Camp Terrier Options:

Arts Recreation (Ages 5 -58) Arts &&Recreation (Ages - 8) Sports &&Recreation (Ages - 13) Sports Recreation (Ages 7 -713) Choose your focus: swimming • sailing • climbing • court sports

DanceArts Arts (Ages (Ages 88- 13) Dance - 13) CompetitiveSwimming Swimming (Ages 8 -915) Competitive (Ages - 15) Junior Lifeguarding (Ages 11 11 - 15) Junior Lifeguarding (Ages - 15) Outdoor Adventures (Ages1111 - 15) Outdoor Adventures (Ages - 15) bucamps@bu.edu 617-353-CAMP bu.edu/fitrec/camp This camp must comply with regulations of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (105 CMR 430.000) and be licensed by the City of Boston Board of Health.

January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

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CAMPS & SUMMER PROGRAMS deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum

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Boston Parents Paper | January 2020

C

ampers are the future stewards of the environment, and the grass is looking greener. According to a study conducted in 2015 by the National organization of the American Camp Association, Nature/Environmental Education programs as well as Gardening programs make up 31% of new programs being added to camps based on interests of campers. Camps in New England have been providing an ideal setting for creating environmental awareness in children for over 150 years! Living closely with the Earth while at camp, campers learn to appreciate and care for the world around them. They experience it as members of an ecosystem, which allows them to understand and appreciate biodiversity on a personal level. Camp gives children the opportunity to explore how their choices have an impact on other animals and on the Earth. It often sparks interests that can become lifelong hobbies, lifestyles, and careers – environmental and earth sciences, gardening, farming, oceanography, geology, and so much more. Whether located in a field or forest, on an island or a school campus, a park or a dedicated woodland reserve, camp program offerings maximize the use of the site where the camp is located. Experiential learning at camp happens naturally when camp leadership implement common-sense and sound practices in their programs. Training counselors to instruct kayakers not to pick the water lilies as they paddle around the pond or lake; hikers on an overnight trek return with more trash than they took with then; organic gardens planted for educational purposes are done so in locations where they can be left for the rest of the year. These experiences in the natural world are transformational – so much so that campers return home with real world knowledge of environmental awareness and a focus on reducing their negative impact on the environment. They return home with an enhanced appreciation of the outdoors and their role in the ecosystem. Children who attend summer camp go on to have a greater appreciation for natural parks and wildlife preserves for the rest of their lives – many will even go on to pursue interests in the environment or the sciences in college, the workplace, the community, and their families. While you’ll find varying degrees of environmental expertise and focus from camp to camp, summer camps today are building on the proud tradition of providing children with opportunities to experience and enjoy nature and the environment in ways that will sustain our collective future. Though one can’t know if the namesake of the next national park will credit their experience to summer camping, we are positive they won’t mention NOT interacting with nature and the environment.


CAMPS & SUMMER PROGRAMS

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January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

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A message to those whose lives will be touched by open adoption in 2020 By Abbie E. Goldberg, Ph.D.

T

he New Year is a time to reflect on the past and consider the future, and to focus on one’s individual and shared (e.g., family) goals and commitments. Some families are embarking on a life-changing commitment in 2020: they will be introducing a child to their home through adoption. We live in a time when “open” adoptions are the norm (the majority of adoption agencies facilitate “matches” between birth and adoptive parents in which some information is exchanged between parties before and/or after the adoptive placement). Years ago, this meant mailing photos and letters to loved ones (sometimes with the agency as the intermediary) once you’ve parted ways. In today’s information age, it could mean much more frequent and direct contact. In my new book, “Open Adoption and Diverse Families: Complex Families in the Digital Age” (2020, Oxford University Press), I share research I uncovered over the course of a decade of interviewing lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents in open adoptions at various points during their children’s childhood. What I’ve found was that even when adoptive parents faced challenges in their relationships with birth families (i.e., birth parents dropping out of contact due to mental health or addiction issues), they were generally very grateful to be in open adoptions. Families who are embarking on an open adoption should consider these questions: What happens when adoptees have access to information about their birth family early on in their lives and can contact these individuals as they grow up? How is having access to birth families beneficial—and what unexpected complexities does it bring? What types of unique family dynamics arise in open adoption arrangements, and how do adoptive and birth families manage them? These are some of the questions I explore in my book. Research from the past few decades shows that children who have access to their birth families as they grow up are ultimately more satisfied with their adoptions, and have fewer unresolved questions about their background (e.g., reasons for placement, medical history). Adoptive parents I’ve interviewed recognized the numerous ways in which access to birth family members positively

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Boston Parents Paper | January 2020

impacted their children and families. For example, white parents who adopted children of color were grateful for family members who could serve as valuable racial/ethnic role models for their children and important sources of support when navigating issues that they, as white people, did not have first-hand knowledge of (e.g., preparing for and addressing racial bias and discrimination, questions about skin and hair care). Similarly, parents whose children encountered unexpected medical issues were grateful to learn about their family’s medical history. Gay fathers especially valued that birth mothers were an important female presence in their children’s lives—and were often interested in a level of emotional intimacy with birth mothers that was more rare in other types of families. More often than not, adoptive parents were either satisfied with the level of contact they had with birth families, or wanted more contact than they currently had. In a minority of cases, however, birth families reportedly (i.e., by adoptive parents’ accounts) wanted more contact, or a different type of contact, than what adoptive parents had in mind. Such boundary challenges were difficult to negotiate amidst a desire not to alienate birth family members. Families dealt with such boundary management issues in a variety of ways, including relaxing their own preferences to accommodate the relational request, talking through their hesitations with the birth family (resulting in even better communication in their relationship in some cases, and to hurt feelings in others), or maintaining their boundary (i.e., not accommodating the

request or overture), sometimes with little explanation or communication. A note of caution: much in the same way that relationships with extended family can be complicated, some parents I interviewed wrestled with feelings of disappointment or frustration when birth parents could not fully “show up” for the children, often for the same reasons—unstable lives or difficult histories—that led them to choose adoption in the first place. Overall, the parents I’ve interviewed were grateful that they chose open adoption, disappointed when the adoption was not as open as they assumed or expected, and in those cases, were often committed to continuing to reach out to birth family members over the course of their children’s lives in the hopes that they would eventually reconnect or reestablish contact. Open adoption is not a practice that is lived in a day; it is fluid, complex, and often changes over the life course. It involves decisions and dynamics that will need to be (re)negotiated again and again. There will be moments of frustration and sadness—as well as moments of deep joy and gratitude. I encourage you to draw on all the resources at your disposal—humor, patience, family and friend support, and outside experts—to prepare for whatever this extraordinary life change will bring.

Abbie E. Goldberg is a professor of psychology and director of Women’s & Gender Studies, at Clark University and author of “Open Adoption and Diverse Families: complex relationships in the digital age”


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January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

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CALENDAR Celebrate Lunar New Year

Welcome the Year of the Rat!

Celebrations from Friday, Jan. 31 and Sunday, Feb. 2 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30pm Boston Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum 308 Congress St., Boston bostonchildrensmuseum.org 617-426-6500

Explore how communities in Boston celebrate the Lunar New Year through dance, games, and art with a focus on Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese traditions. Join a variety of performances and activities with local artists.

January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

19


1 Wednesday - New Year’s Day First Night/First Day Boston Various locations, Boston. The two-day, city-wide celebration continues with live entertainment and ice sculptures. FREE. 617439-7700; firstnightboston.org

Hike Into the New Year for Families 9:30-noon, Broad Meadow Brook, 414 Massasoit Rd., Worcester. Hike or snowshoe on the sanctuary, looking for tracks and signs of wildlife as we follow the trails. Registration required. Adults $7, child $4. 508-753-6087; massaudubon.org

First Day Hike 10-11:30am, Oak Knoll Wildlife Sanctuary, 1417 Park Street, Attleboro. Ring in the New Year with a special hike! The First Day Hike is a national program encouraging people to explore nature with free guided hikes at state parks and sanctuaries on New Year’s Day. Pre-Registration Required. FREE. 508-223-3060; massaudubon.org

2 Thursday Icy Investigations 10-11am, The Discovery Museums, 177 Main St., Acton. Brrrr…Things are getting chilly at the Discovery Museum. Experiment with different types of salt as you explore the unique characteristics of this solid state of water. Add in some liquid watercolors and discover just how cool science can be! Free with admission. 978-264-4200; discoverymuseums.org

3 Friday Forest Fridays 10-10:45am, The Discovery Museums, 177 Main St., Acton. Take part in seasonal nature activities in the Discovery Woods or the Great Hill conservation land, no matter the weather! Free with admission. Fridays through Jan. 26. 978-264-4200; discoverymuseums.org

Fledgling Fridays: Chipmunks 1:30-2:30pm, Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary, 293 Moose Hill Parkway, Sharon. Create art, participate in STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art and Math) activities, listen to stories, and explore the outdoors every Friday afternoon. For children ages 3-5 and a parent/caregiver. Registration required. Adults, $5- $6; youth, $15- $18. 781-784-5691; massaudubon.org

New Year’s Hike 1-3pm, Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary, 113 Goodnow Rd., Princeton. Get started on New Year’s resolutions to get in shape and spend time outside with this hiking and snowshoeing excursion. Members, free; non-members, $13. 978-464-2712; massaudubon.org 5 Sunday

Nature Story Hour 9-10am, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan. Listen to a nature-themed story then take a short walk around the trails to learn about the animals and plants at the BNC. For families with children ages 0-3. Registration required. FREE. 617-983-8500; massaudubon.org

Backyard and Beyond: Winter Tracking with “PrimiTim” 10am-12pm, The Discovery Museums, 177 Main St., Acton. This class offers tools and techniques you can use if you ever find yourself cold, hungry, and alone in the wilderness. Our expert survivalist, Tim “PrimiTim” Swanson, will cover basic shelter building, wild edibles, water gathering, fire starting, tracking, and ways to get rescued by using natural and manufactured survival tools! Registration is required. Free with admission. 978264-4200; discoverymuseums.org

6 Monday MFA Playdates 10:15am, Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. Bring your toddler to enjoy story time and activities in the galleries. This month’s theme is Sculpture! Free with admission. 617-267-9300; mfa.org

7 Tuesday Habitat Restoration Workday 9:30-11:30am, Habitat Education Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 10 Juniper Road, Belmont. Start out the New Year by lending a helping hand and giving back to the Earth. Habitat needs the help of you and your family to remove invasive plants and restore natural species. Children 13 & up. FREE. 617-489-5050; massaudubon.org

Especially for Me: Sensory-Friendly Afternoon

4:30-8pm, The Discovery Museums, 177 Main St., Acton. Enjoy free admission and explore the museum at night on the first Friday of every month! Non-perishable food donations accepted. FREE. 978-264-4200; discoverymuseums.org

1:30-4:30pm, Discovery Museum, 177 Main Street (Rte 27) Acton. Come join in all the fun and explore the accessible Discovery Museum and Discovery Woods during this special evening event just for families with members on the autism spectrum. Your family can play, explore, experiment, and imagine together, while the museum is closed to the general public and headcount is limited. FREE. Registration required. 978-264-4200; www. discoveryacton.org

4 Saturday

8 Wednesday

Science on Screen: The Pirates! Band of Misfits

Early Explorers

First Friday Nights Free

10:30am, Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline. Before the film, hear a local expert discuss the process of evolution and how animals adapt to their environments. All ages. Adults, $9.50; youth, $7.50. 617-734-2501; coolidge.org

Junior Badge Workshop 10am-12:30pm, Broad Meadow Brook, 414 Massasoit Rd., Worcester. Broad Meadow Brook offers workshops for Junior badges and journeys. Registration required. Ages 8-11. $9. 508753-6087; massaudubon.org

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Boston Parents Paper | January 2020

10-11:30am, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan. Learn about nature through movement, games, stories and art. For families with children ages 3-6. Registration required. Adults, free; youth, $7. 617-983-8500; massaudubon. org

9 Thursday Nature Adventures for Children 1-3pm, Broad Meadow Brook, 414 Massasoit Rd., Worcester. Explore a new nature topic every month with crafts and


outdoor activities. Registration required. $14. 508-753-6087; massaudubon.org

10 Friday Wild by the Fire: Owls on the Prowl

Light-Up Night Sledding Dusk-8pm, Chestnut Hill Farm, 5 Chestnut Hill Rd, Southborough. Grab your sled and snow pants and get ready for an evening adrenaline rush with some night sledding! The farm will have their best hill ready for you with lanes lit up at night to guide your way. BYO hot chocolate! FREE. 508.785.0339; ttor.org

10-11:30am, Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary, 208 S Great Black & White Gala for St. Mary of the Assumption Road, Lincoln. Go for an owl prowl, then warm up by the fire and hkcHarvardCoopSociety1701.eps School1 12/6/16 8:14 AM have your own hootenanny. For families with children ages 2-5. 7–11pm, Emmanuel College, 400 Fenway, Boston. St. Mary of the Registration required. $16. 781-259-2200; massaudubon.org Assumption School is starting renovations and is celebrating this time of growth and prosperity with a gala! This event will honor Imagine, Sing & Learn: Penguins of the South ANUARY Marty Walsh, Mayor of Boston for all that he has done for the 10am-11:30am, Joppa Flats Education Center, 1 Plum Island community. 508-395-6213 Turnpike, Newburyport. These fun-filled morning programs are OOPOur structured IDS perfect for both you and your active preschooler! activities include hands-on science, music and movement, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7 11:00 AM a thematic snack, and an outdoor adventure at if the weather BIRD STORIES AND CRAFT complies. For families with children ages 3-6. Adults, $9; youth, $8. 978-462-9998; massaudubon.org SATURDAY, JANUARY 14

J C

Full Moon Hike

K

at 11:00 AM CELEBRATE PETS WITH STORIES AND A CRAFT

7-8pm, Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary, 293 Moose Hill Parkway, 21 Sharon. Discover the beauty of Moose SATURDAY, Hill under aJANUARY shining full at 11:00 AM moon. Learn owl calls, test your nightSNOW vision,DAY search skies WITHthe STORIES AND after CRAFT for constellations, and experience the sanctuary hours. We will explore most of the time without flashlights, but feel28 SATURDAY, JANUARY free to bring one for the hike back. This program is designed for at 11:00 AM HAY FAT CHOY adults and families with children ages 6GUNG and older. Registration CELEBRATE CHINESE NEW required, $6- $9 per person. 781-784-5691; massaudubon.org YEAR WITH STORIES AND CRAFT

11 Saturday

are celebrating their 14th birthday in January, and guests are invited to join the festivities! Stop by the exhibit to meet the zookeepers and ask questions, and be sure to sign Smoky and Bubba’s giant birthday card before grabbing some birthday cake! Free with admission. zoonewengland.org

Junior Artists 10:30am-12:30pm, Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. Enjoy a weekly free drop-in creative morning for families with children ages 5 to 8. Look closely at art, make art, and have fun! Free with admission. 617-267-9300; mfa. org

Icy Investigations 11am-2pm, The Discovery Museums, 177 Main St., Acton. Brrrr…Things are getting chilly at the Discovery Museum. Experiment with different types of salt as you explore the unique characteristics of this solid state of water. Add in some liquid watercolors and discover just how cool science can be! Free with admission. 978-264-4200; discoverymuseums.org

THE

EVERY TUESDAY at 11 AM STORYTIME Children ages 1 to 6 and their Black Bear Birthday Party caregivers are welcome to join us for stories snacks. 10am–2pm, Franklin Park Zoo, 1 Franklin Park Rd,and Boston. All events are free and open to Black bears Smoky and Bubba the public.

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14 Tuesday

17 Friday

Tinker Tuesday: Exploring Plastics

Wild by the Fire: Winter Rabbit

10-11am, Discovery Museum, 177 Main Street (Rte 27) Acton. Explore the possibilities of reusing what is usually throw away. You’ll be investigating and looking at various plastics in new ways. The possibilities are endless when investigating repurposed recyclables. FREE. Registration required. 978-2644200; www.discoveryacton.org

10-11:30am, Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary, 208 S Great Road, Lincoln. Learn some tracking tips and discover who is out and about, above and below the snow. For families with children ages 2-5. Registration required. $16. 781-259-2200; massaudubon.org

15 Wednesday Early Explorers 10-11:30am, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan. Learn about nature through movement, games, stories and art. For families with children ages 3-6. Registration required. Adults, free; youth, $7. 617-983-8500; massaudubon. org

Coyote Club 3:30-5pm, Habitat Education and Wildlife Sanctuary, 10 Juniper Road, Belmont. This after-school program helps children expend pent up energy, become familiar with the sanctuary, problemsolve and learn to work together. For ages 5-10. Registration required. $18. 617-489-5050; massaudubon.org

Warm and Wooly 3:30-5pm, Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary, 208 S Great Road, Lincoln. Feed the lambs their evening hay, then use their wool to make something soft. For families with children ages 2-8. Registration required. $16. 781-259-2200; massaudubon.org

Belmont World Film Family Festival Various times and locations. Feature-length films, shorts and workshops comprise this popular festival, themed around “Where Stories Come Alive!” Through Jan. 20. $6-12. 617-4843980; belmontworldfilm.org

Fledgling Fridays: Winter Survival 1:30-2:30pm, Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary, 293 Moose Hill Parkway, Sharon. Create art, participate in STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art and Math) activities, listen to stories, and explore the outdoors every Friday afternoon. For children ages 3-5 and a parent/caregiver. Registration required. Adults, $5- $6; youth, $15- $18. 781-784-5691; massaudubon.org

18 Saturday Milbury Days 9am-4pm, Broad Meadow Brook, 414 Massasoit Rd., Worcester. Residents of the town of Millbury receive free admission to Broad Meadow Brook four times a year, thanks to the generosity of Wheelabrator Millbury. Free for residents. 508-753-6087; massaudubon.org

SCHOOLS AND PRESCHOOLS

MAKE THE MOST OF PLAYTIME LAUNCH RIGHT IN WITH . . .

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Pencil

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Paper towel tube

2. Draw a rounded 1. Lay a toilet

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Small piece of cardboard

Markers or paint

3. Cut out

Scissors

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Paper

5. Glue your cut tube on top

of the cardboard in the shape of a spacecraft, and let it dry.

the shape.

4. Trace the bottom

of a toilet paper tube on top of another. Then cut out the round shape.

6. Color or paint your spacecraft.

You can also decorate it with stickers. Place a small toy inside and go for a ride. Tell a story about where you’re going!

TinkerActive Workbooks cover essential skills using curriculum-based exercises and interactive tinkering, making, and engineering activities using common household materials!

The Active Way to learn through play 22

Boston Parents Paper | January 2020

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MFA Playdates 10:15am, Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. Bring your toddler to enjoy story time and activities in the galleries. This month’s theme is Sculpture! Free with admission. 617-267-9300; mfa.org

Guided Snowshoe Walk

Geared for kids ages 5-12, you won’t want to miss this improv show packed full of high energy and family-friendly funnies. Adults, $10; youth, $5. 413-658-1126; carlemuseum.org

19 Sunday Oshogatsu! Japanese New Year Celebration

11am-12pm, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan. Learn how to snowshoe and hit the trails for a leisurely 11am-4pm. Boston Children’s Museum, 308 Congress St., Boston. Dance with Taiko drumming beats, pound Mochi sticky hike. Snowshoes available to rent. Ages 5 & up. Registration rice, parade with Shishi the lion, and relax with Chado the tea recommended. $7. 617-983-8500; massaudubon.org ceremony! Try hands-on activities such as Koma spinning Family Owl Prowl tops, Fuku-warai lucky laugh game, Origami (giant & wearable origami), Omikuji fortune telling and more! Free with admission. 5-7pm, Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary, 113 Goodnow 617-426-6500; www.bostonchildrensmuseum.org Rd., Princeton. Learn all about owls in an indoor introduction followed by a short hike to listen for owls who might be nearby and other nighttime wildlife. Adults, $9; youth, $6. 978-464-2712; Nature Story Hour 9-10am, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan. massaudubon.org Listen to a nature-themed story then take a short walk around the trails to learn about the animals and plants at the BNC. For A Green New Year 1-2:30pm, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan. families with children ages 0-3. Registration required. FREE. 617983-8500; massaudubon.org Why wait until April to celebrate the earth? Add a little green to your new year! Discover some ways to help the earth while creating recycled art, handmade paper and other green products. Registration required. Adults, $9; youth, $9. 617-983-8500; massaudubon.org

SCHOOLS AND PRESCHOOLS

Critter Day 2:30 & 3:30pm. Boston Children’s Museum, 308 Congress St., Boston. Join in on live animal programming on monthly Critter Days. Free with admission. 617-426-6500; www. bostonchildrensmuseum.org

Happier Family Comedy Show 3-4pm, The Eric Carle Museum, 125 West Bay Road, Amherst.

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20 Monday - Martin Luther King Jr. Day Belmont World Film Family Festival Various times and locations. Feature-length films, shorts and workshops comprise this popular festival, themed around “Where Stories Come Alive!” Through Jan. 20. $6-12. 617-4843980; belmontworldfilm.org

Free Zoo Admission 10am–4pm, Franklin Park Zoo, 1 Franklin Park Rd., Boston. Enjoy free admission to both Franklin and Stone Zoo in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. zoonewengland.org

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Fee Free Day, Enjoy free admission to National Parks, Forests and Wildlife Refuges nationwide. FREE. nps.gov/planyourvisit/ fee-free-parks.htm

MLK Day Open House 10am – 5pm, Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. Surround yourself with art and culture with free activities, art making, tours and performances. FREE. 617-267-9300; mfa.org

Sledding Party 1-4pm, Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Road, Harvard. Get the family outdoors at Fruitlands Museum with a Winter Fun Sledding Party! There will be hot cocoa and s’mores around the outdoor fire pit to warm you up between sledding runs down the many wonderful hills, enjoy a winter scavenger hunt, and head out on the trails. There is so much fun to be had for all ages in the winter woods! $5 per nonmember. 978-456-3924; fruitlands. org

Martin Luther King Jr. Tribute Concert 7pm, Symphony Hall, 301 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. Boston Children’s Chorus presents Still I Rise, their annual MLK concert. This signature concert shines light on the historic artists and performers who struggled to be seen and recognized. Tickets are $15 and up. 617-778-2242; bostonchildrenschorus.org

21 Tuesday Tinker Tuesday: Balancing Toys 10-11am, Discovery Museum, 177 Main Street (Rte 27) Acton. Let’s play around with the science concept of balance! Explore several different stations where you can test what makes toys and objects stay put or topple over. FREE. Registration required. 978-264-4200; www.discoveryacton.org

22 Wednesday Fireside Farm Fables: Snow Hens 10-11:30am, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan. You’ve heard of snowmen, but have you met any Snow Hens? It may be winter but chickens are doing just fine with all of their feathers. You’ll meet some of the flock, share some stories with them and have a clucking good time. For families with children ages 2-5. Registration required. $13- $16. 617983-8500; massaudubon.org

Backyard and Beyond: Winter Warmth 11am-12pm, The Discovery Museums, 177 Main St., Acton. We’ve made it through our first month of winter, wearing jackets, mittens and scarves to keep warm as the weather gets

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Boston Parents Paper | January 2020


colder. Do you ever wonder how animals keep warm? Test the insulating properties of feathers, fur, fat and fleece, which will keep you the warmest? Free with admission. 978-264-4200; discoverymuseums.org

children ages 2-5. Registration required. $16. 781-259-2200; massaudubon.org

Imagine, Sing & Learn: Polar Bears of the North 10am-11:30am, Joppa Flats Education Center, 1 Plum Island Turnpike, Newburyport. These fun-filled morning programs are perfect for both you and your active preschooler! Our structured activities include hands-on science, music and movement, a thematic snack, and an outdoor adventure if the weather complies. For families with children ages 3-6. Adults, $9; youth, $8. 978-462-9998; massaudubon.org

23 Thursday Nature Adventures for Children 1-3pm, Broad Meadow Brook, 414 Massasoit Rd., Worcester. Explore a new nature topic every month with crafts and outdoor activities. Registration required. $14. 508-753-6087; massaudubon.org

Habitat Restoration Workday

24 Friday Wild by the Fire: Turtle Time 10-11:30am, Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary, 208 S Great Road, Lincoln. Visit with a turtle, hear turtle tales and pretend what it would be like to spend the winter in bed. For families with

1-3pm, Habitat Education Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 10 Juniper Road, Belmont. Have a teen in need of some community service hours or are you and your family looking to lend a helping hand and give back to the Earth? Habitat needs the help of you and your family to remove invasive plants and restore natural species. Ages 13 & up. FREE. 617-489-5050; massaudubon.org

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781-890-8480 • www.BayStateSkatingSchool.org January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

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6:30-8:30pm, Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary, 293 Moose Hill Parkway, Sharon. Join local astronomers for a look at the stars and other night objects through big telescopes. Drop in for all or some of the evening. Event subject to weatherrelated cancellations. Ages 6 and up. FREE. 781-784-5691; massaudubon.org

25 Saturday Superbowl of Birding 5am-7pm, Joppa Flats Education Center, 1 Plum Island Turnpike, Newburyport. Celebrate the joy of winter birding with our everpopular annual event! Each January, birding teams of all ages go head-to-head in a 12-hour race to spot as many species as they can. Registration required. $35. 978-462-9998; massaudubon.org

31 Friday Fledgling Fridays: Rocks 1:30-2:30pm, Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary, 293 Moose Hill Parkway, Sharon. Create art, participate in STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art and Math) activities, listen to stories, and explore the outdoors every Friday afternoon. For children ages 3-5 and a parent/caregiver. Registration required. Adults, $5- $6; youth, $15- $18. 781-784-5691; massaudubon.org

Celebrate Lunar New Year

Busy Bees’ Wax the Tanglewood Marionettes. Reservations required. FREE.

6–8:30pm, Boston Children’s Museum, 308 Congress St., Boston. Welcome the Year of the Rat! Throughout the weekend, explore how communities in Boston celebrate the Lunar New Year through dance, games, and art with a focus on Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese traditions. Join a variety of performances and activities with local artists. Through Feb. 2. 617-426-6500; WEST bostonchildrensmuseum.org

Matias Latelier, 10:30am, Regent Theatre, 7 Medford St., Light-Up Night Sledding

29 Par Sunday ents

calendar

3:30-5pm, Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary, 208 South Great 617-514-1644; jfklibrary.org. Road, Lincoln. A local beekeeper will describe the inner Birding, 10:30am, Boston Nature has workingsWinter of the Backyard hive, how bees create wax and how beeswax Center, 500 Walk Hill St., Mattapan. Learn to use been used throughout time. Members: $14.50; nonmembers: binoculars, go on a bird hike and create some seed and $17.50. Ages 3-12. is required. 781-259-2200; fruit art forRegistration the birds to enjoy. Registration required. massaudubon.org Youth, $7. 617-983-8500; massaudubon.org. Arlington. An Hill hourFarm, of magic and surprises from a Chilean Dusk-8pm, Chestnut 5 Chestnut Hill Rd, magician and mentalist. Adults, $10; youth, $8. Southborough. Grab your sled and snow pants and get ready for 781-646-4849; regenttheatre.com.

an evening adrenaline rush with some night sledding! The farm will haveSOUTH their best hill ready for you with lanes lit up at night to guide your way. BYO chocolate! FREE. 508.785.0339; ttor.org Tracking thehot Winter Wild Thing, 9am, Francis William

Bird Park, 251 Washington St., Walpole. See Jan. 14 listing.

Winter Warm Up, 2-6pm, World’s End, Hingham. Get 26 Sunday outdoors for hiking, sledding, snowshoeing, owl prowls tales around the campfire. Adults, $10; youth, free. Tracksand and Signs: Unfolding a Story 781-740-7233; ttor.org.

10:30-noon, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Family Owlsanctuary Prowl, 7pm, Blue Hills Museum, Mattapan. Hike the to search for Trailside animal tracks, chews, Canton Ave., Milton.may Practice and meet and scat.1904 Discover what animals haveowl leftcalls them and the some of the museum’s resident owls before going on a stories they tell. You can even make your very own Animal Track night hike to search for them. Registration required. $10. I.D. Book! Registration required. For children ages 5-12. Adults 617-983-8500; massaudon.org. free, Child $7. 617-983-8500; massaudubon.org Stargazing: Jewels of the Night, 7pm, North River

WildlifeWorkshop Sanctuary, 2000 Main St., Marshfield. Join Fairy House

astronomy enthusiast Peter Reed as he Park guidesStreet, you 1-2:30pm, Oak Knoll Wildlife Sanctuary, 1417 through the constellations. Registration required. Attleboro. Take a hike and learn about the legends of the$13. fairies 781-837-9400; massaudubon.org. and trolls that live at Oak Knoll. After, come back to the Nature Center to build your very own fairy house.  Pre-Registration Required. $25. 508-223-3060; ENTERTAINMENT massaudubon.org

The Science of Snow

J & JCelebrate Pony Rentals

everything in 2017 at

• Quiet, gentle, lovable ponies for any occasion at your place or the farm

1-2:30pm, Boston Nature Center, 500 Walk Hill Street, Mattapan. Join in and learn why all snowflakes are unique and discover how the properties of snow Puppets help Rosalita's animals survive in the www.rosalitaspuppets.com winter. Put617-633-2832 on a chef hat and use science to mix up some natural ice cream. Observe J & J Pony Rentals snowflakes up close, and enjoy all• that winter has to offer! Quiet, gentle, lovable ponies; Registration recommended. large and small available for Adults, free; youth, $9. 617any occasion. • Pony parties at your place or 983-8500; massaudubon.org

• Riding lessons for all ages and abilities

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Children’s Musician ice Award The Enchanted Forest, 10:30am, Coolidge Corner& Instructor Cho r eHarvard ner nne nn Win Wii290 W Theatre, St., Brookline. Artbarn, a youth Birthday Parties, community theater company, presents the tale of a Schools, Concerts, family vacation gone wrong. Adults, $13; youth, $10. Libraries 617-734-2501; coolidge.org.

Preschool & Elementary

NORTH Music Specialist Ward Winter Fest, noon to 3pm, Ward Reservation, Andover. Explore the property on a guided hike, orfor All! Lots of Participation & Fun bring your snowshoes and sled to play. Then warm up 508-358-1614 • www.franfriedman.com with refreshments by the fire. $10 per car. 978-886-5297; ttor.org.

BIRTHDAY PARTIES

31 Tuesday THEMED PARTIES AT DEDHAM HEALTH & ATHLETIC COMPLEX

781.326.2900

LASER TAG PARTIES LASER TAG PARTIES WEST Backwards Storytime, 10am, The Discovery Museums, PRINCESS ★ PIRATE ★ SUPER HERO ★ POP STAR DANCE 177 Main St., Acton. Celebrate National Backwards Day PARTIES SPORTS PARTIES ★ POOL with silly stories and activities. Free with admission. 978-264-4200; discoverymuseums.org.

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Birthday Parties, “Come Bounce Off Our Walls” Schools, Concerts, Libraries • 100% Private Birthday Parties • Open Bounce & Family Fun • Field Trip Programs • Glow & Rock Star Parties

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Valentine Card Making Party, 10am, The Eric Carle Museum, 125 West Bay Road, Amherst. Pop in to make special valentines for your family, friends or classmates. Registration recommended. $12 per pair or trio. ENTERTAINMENT 413-658-1100; carlemuseum.org. AND PARTY NEEDS

Boston Parents Paper | January 2020

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;We LOVE Tender Loving Care. The teachers are like family. They care for each child like their own family. They are knowledgeable in early childhood education as well as the gentle care for infants, toddlers and preschoolers!!â&#x20AC;? Woburn - 781-281-2983 | Weston - 781-703-5088 www.tenderlovingcarechildcarecenters.com January 2020 | Boston Parents Paper

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Experience dance in a creative environment under the direction of expert faculty at three convenient locations Ages 3–18 • July & August • Beginners welcome Save 10% when you register by Feb 15:

bostonballet.org/school Photos by Igor Burlak Photography and Evgenia Eliseeva.

Profile for Parenting Media

Boston Parent January 2020  

Boston Parent January 2020