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A TEACHABLE MOMENT Dr. Susan Bartell | A DAD’S LIFE Kurt Goerke | MONEY TALKS Dave Ramsey

SAFE TEEN DRIVER Saving Lives, Every Day

Parent Guide PICKS THE

BEST FAMILY CARS OF 2012

dave ramsey: A 5-year-old Financial Rock Star

Win-Win for all Kids All Children’s Hospital and Johns Hopkins Fall 2011 | www.ParentGuide.com

tamPa Bay’s Best family DOCTORS


Family Cooking Classes provided by All Children’s Hospital and sponsored by Kohl’s Department Stores We’ll be measuring spices, grating cheese, washing veggies, drizzling olive oil and much, much more! Did you know that kids are more likely to try new foods if they play and active role in choosing and preparing them? Join us and together you and your child can help each other form lifelong healthy eating habits. Children gain confidence in the kitchen and parents get an opportunity to make mealtime family time. Checkout the All Children’s Hospital website for more information on the tasty classes and culinary events sponsored by Kohl’s Cooks for Kids all year long-

www.allkids.org


editor’s NOTE

HEALTHY, HAPPIER THIS FALL AND BEYOND

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utumn, that glorious time of year when we Floridians herald the arrival of cooler weather, finally. A time when football is full gear while baseball winds down. A time when weekends are booked with fun events. And a time when of course, the holidays are upon us: Halloween, Thanksgiving and Chanukah, Christmas, Kwaanza and New Year's, all hitting so quickly there's hardly a moment to breathe.

Our Parent Guide® fall issue takes a practical look at health. This year, we help you take charge of your health with an informative section you’ll want to keep on hand--a section dedicated to the area’s best doctors. With information provided by our partner, Best Doctors, you'll find more than 250 listings of doctors for women's and children's and family health—doctors that have been included in these lists because their fellow doctors recommended them for this honor. And it couldn't come at a better time because, as we all know, following this beautiful autumn weather is cold and flu season. This issue also includes articles and information highlighting one of the Tampa Bay area's best nonprofits--Safe Teen Driver. Car crashes are leading cause of death among teens, and Safe Teen Driver founder Bruce Murakami has made it his mission to stop it. For 13 years, since the death of his own wife and daughter in a car crash caused by a teen, Murakami has committed his life to saving others. His story and program are nothing short of remarkable. And finally, if you've thought about buying a new car, you won't want to miss this special section devoted to the best family cars of 2012. You'll find something for everyone regardless of taste or budget. Plus, you'll get all the tips you need to know to decide what ride works best for your family. So take a few minutes during the gorgeous fall weather, kick back and read your Parent Guide®. And when you're finished, go find your child, kick back and read your favorite book together. don’t forget to log on to our exciting new website for MORE great resources for your family, super contests including great give-aways than ever before!

GeodieBaxterPadgett Executive Editor Geodie@parentguide.com

Parent Guide®

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Publishing Group SPECTRUM COMMUNICATIONS MEDIA GROUP President JACk HAll Executive Editor GEODIE BAxTER PADGETT Associate Editor CHRISTINE SIlvA Creative Director PAPANDE NEWMAN Web Editor AlEx CIvIlETTI Mailing/Dist MD@PARENTGUIDE.COM Social Media CRySTAl WEIR CARPENTER Event Director ANDREA FESkOWETz Marketing/Partnerships MP@PARENTGUIDE.COM Products/Reviews SAGE@PARENTGUIDE.COM PARENT GUIDE® 13575 58th St. N. Suite 157 • Clearwater, FL 33760 727-538-4137 info@parentguide.com

Become a fan on FACEBOOk! Follow us on TWITTER! For marketing and advertising opportunities, e-mail INFO@PARENTGUIDE.COM or call JACk HAll AT 727-538-4137 Contributing Writers DR. SUSAN BARTEll, kURT GOERkE, MIRANDA JENSON, SHANNON kEllEy PATTEE, DAvE RAMSEy, GEORGIANNE RIlEy-PRICE

Parent Guide® is published four times a year and is distributed to readers at no charge. Unless otherwise noted, all photographs, artwork, designs and editorials printed in Parent Guide® are the sole property of Spectrum Communications Media Group. No portion of this magazine may be duplicated or reproduced without the express written permission of Spectrum Communications Media Group. Parent Guide® and Spectrum Communications Media Group are not responsible for typographical errors, the accuracy of information provided or the actions of our advertisers. Readers should verify advertising information with advertisers. Unless otherwise specified, all advertising specials are only valid until the publication of the next issue. Parent Guide® reserves the right to designate one company per advertisement and to refuse any advertising for any reason. The views expressed in the Parent Guide® are not necessarily those of the publisher. Parent Guide® assumes no responsibility for the outcome arising from the contents of the publication. Copyright 2011 by Spectrum Communications Media Group All rights reserved.

Parent Guide®

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natural family photography

Blueberry

Freckles

photography

Babies l Maternity l Children l Families

COLUMNS & DEPARTMENTS 5

EDITOR’S NOTE

Embrace the fall, find the right car and get the best doctor.

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MONEY TALKS

Dave Ramsey applauds a 5-year-old financial rock star and explains why more is better with house down payments.

36 A DAD’S LIFE

www.blueberryfreckles.net

Every-dad Kurt Goerke works without a net, but with a sense of humor, when finding ways to keep his kids safe.

43 TEACHABLE MOMENT

America’s family psychologist, Dr. Susan Bartell, talks turkey about why manners matter, especially at the holiday season.

Heidi Joyner Heidi@blueberryfreckles.net

727-389-9029

GUIDES

PAGES 12-19 BEST DOCTORS

Nearly 250 listings of Tampa Bay’s best doctors for family medicine, women’s health and pediatric needs. Doctors are voted in by their peers.

Photograph by Blueberry Freckles Photography


FAll 2011

ON THE COvER Photography by

Blueberry Freckles Photography

PARENT GUIDE

®

contents THIS MONTH’S FEATURES

PAGES 30-33

PARENT GUIDE’S TOP FAMILY CARS OF 2012

Parent Guide breaks down the top family cars of 2012 including those features that really make the car family-worthy.

ALL CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AND JOHNS HOPKINS: TAMPA BAY KIDS GET THE BEST OF BOTH

20

ADHD AND THE BRAIN

25

The new partnership between All Children’s Hospital and Johns Hopkins is a win-win situation for parents, kids and the community,

What happens in the brain with a child who has ADHD or autism? Dr. Robert Melillo is on the cutting edge of research in the area of developmental disorders, and he explains what’s going on.

SAFE TEEN DRIVER

Founded by Bruce Murakami to help stop the number one killer of teens, Safe Teen Driver is a unique driving education program that saves lives.

26

GENESIS

38

MONTESSORI ACADEMIES

40

THE UNDECL ARED WAR ON CHILDHOOD

45

FOUR YOUNG BROTHERS STAY TOGETHER...FOREVER

46

An interview with the school’s leader Melissa Nurrenbrock as well as an overview of the school, its successes and offerings.

Sonja Johnson talks about the success of the Montessori Academies and the value of a Montessori education.

Expert Dr. Kim John Payne helps families find their way to peace and joy in this chaotic, more, more, more world.

November is national adoption month and what better way to honor it than with a story of a family who adopted four siblings so they could stay together.


money TALKS

Featuring Money Advice I Dave Ramsey

Give the kid a hand! Big down payment Dear Dave, Is it always a good idea to put the maximum amount of money you can afford into a down payment when buying your first home? David

Dear Dave, Several months ago, my 5-year-old son told me he wanted a Nintendo DS. He does little things around the house for me, and at his grandparents’ place, so I told him he’d need to save his money and buy it. Well, he did! He’s got enough for the console, but not to pay the sales tax. Should I help him out? Nina Dear Nina, Are you serious? Yes, you should pitch in and pay the sales tax! It’s not like he’s 15 or 20. This kid is just 5 years old, and he’s a financial rock star. I think we can cut him a little slack on this one. The older they get, the more hardcore you need to get as a parent when it comes to financial responsibility. But this child is already learning a great principle that will last him the rest of his life. If you’re willing to sacrifice a little bit, you can accomplish anything. Don’t let this be a one-shot deal. He needs a new goal right now, so go out and find something he’s as excited about as that Nintendo DS. Then, let him start working on that one. I’m telling you, if we could send some people to Washington who understand what your son already understands, this country would be in great shape! —Dave

Dear David, Absolutely! Even though most people can’t pay cash up front for a home, you always want to make as big a down payment as possible on any home you buy. Making a down payment of at least 20 percent helps you avoid private mortgage insurance, plus the whole idea is to pay that sucker off and become debt-free as fast as possible. Also, avoid 30-year mortgage plans. Stick with a 15-year, fixed rate loan. Now, when it comes to putting money toward your down payment, make sure you don’t touch your emergency fund of three to six months of expenses or your retirement savings. Those things are off limits. But scrape together any other extra cash you can, pile it up, and apply it to your down payment. You’ll be glad you did! —Dave

* For more financial help, please visit daveramsey.com.

Parent Guide®

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These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America速 20112012 database, which includes over 45,000 doctors in more than 40 medical specialties. The Best Doctors in America速 database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com, or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors web site.


® ® ampa Bay parents have turned to the Parent Guide®, Tampa Bay’s original resource for the entire family, for almost 14 years for trusted information and resources for their families. With this in mind, Parent Guide® is proud to partner with Best Doctors in providing this trusted and valued information for our families. With in this special issue Tampa Bays favorite family magazine brings the list of the Best Doctors for children and families in Tampa Bay. Our Best Doctors list is based on peer review — yes, the recommendations are from doctors. Since 1989 Best Doctors in America Inc., has been compling these lists and has been accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME¨). With over 200 doctors, representing dozens of specialties devoted to women, children and families, this exclusive list within Parent Guide® special issue including our award winning editorial will provide the trusted, expert information families hunt for when they look for the right doctor for their needs. And more important, it’s all derived from those who know the medical profession best--other doctors like you! In addition to the list, Parent Guide® has chosen to spotlight a few of the doctors in their respective category to enhance and provide more information to the reader in their decision making process. Our Parent Guide® team is confident with our award winning editorial that parents have come to expect and trust for their families for 14 years including this special list and our special mini features of doctors and their practice will be huge win for the parents with children of Tampa Bay who want the best for their families! Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. “Best Doctors”, “The Best Doctors in America” and the Best Doctors star-in-cross logo are registered trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license. Copyright 2011, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.

2011 Bay Area Best Doctors Listing

A Parent Guide Exclusive Guide

T

Family medicine Colin S. Beach Family Care at Tampa Palms 15285 Amberly Drive Tampa, FL 33647 Phone: 813-979-6978 Susan Beers Betzer 461 Seventh Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-823-0402 Jerry Wayne Bishop St. Anthony's Primary Care 3085 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North St. Petersburg, FL 33704 Phone: 727-822-3238 Joedrecka Brown Morton Plant Mease Primary Care 12780 Race Track Road, Suite 205 Tampa, FL 33626 Phone: 813-814-2534 Harrison James Brownlee, Jr. USF Physicians Group Department of Family Medicine 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-974-2201 Adam A. Brunson Carillon Sports and Family Medicine 12225 Twenty-Eighth Street North, Suite B St. Petersburg, FL 33716 Phone: 727-561-4303 Sean T. Bryan Turley Family Health Center 807 North Myrtle Avenue Clearwater, FL 33755 Phone: 727-467-2400 Ana B. Charles Dunedin Primary Care 180 Patricia Avenue Dunedin, FL 34698 Phone: 727-733-4193 Dorothy Theresa Christman 2122 Alternate 19, Suite B Palm Harbor, FL 34683 Phone: 727-785-1998 Eric Emmanuel Coris USF Physicians Group Division of Sports Medicine 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-974-2918 Bruce Edward Day 5741 Ninth Avenue North St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-345-5765 Thomas E. Esposito Pasadena Family Medical Associates 630 Pasadena Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33707 Phone: 727-345-7100 Corey H. Evans Florida Institute of Family Medicine -Point Brittany 5101 Brittany Drive South St. Petersburg, FL 33715 Phone: 727-867-2151 Roy W. Finley Skyway Family Practice 1100 Sixty-Second Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33705 Phone: 727-866-3166 Ernest Lane Frierson Northeast Family Medicine 8950 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.


Street North, Suite 180 St. Petersburg, FL 33702 Phone: 727-576-8900 Eduardo C. Gonzalez USF Physicians Group Department of Family Medicine 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-974-4235 John A. Gross St. Anthony's Primary Care 116 First Street North St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-895-5210 Pamela C. Grover Morton Plant Mease Primary Care Dunedin Primary Care 180 Patricia Avenue Dunedin, FL 34698 Phone: 727-733-4193 Frederic J. Guerrier Roser Park Medical Center Department of Family Medicine 500 Tenth Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-898-4461 Richard J. Ina Florida Medical Clinic 4450 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite C Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-975-1727 Gigi Claire Lefebvre Lagniappe Medical 6600 Thirtieth Avenue North St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-381-4463 David Alan Levine 4957 Thirty-Eighth Avenue North, SuiteB St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-522-8878 Paul Lewis Turley Family Health Center 807 North Myrtle Avenue Clearwater, FL 33755 Phone: 727-467-2400 Candice C. Linton Bay Pines VA Healthcare System Department of Medicine 10000 Bay Pines Boulevard Bay Pines, FL 33744 Phone: 727-398-6661 Dolores K. Lowe JSA Medical Group Tarpon Springs Primary Care Center Manatee Village Shopping Center 713 South Pinellas Avenue, Suite A-1 Tarpon Springs, FL 34689 Phone: 727-935-0200 Gregory Walter Mitchell Florida Institute of Family Medicine - Bay Way 4951 Thirty-Fourth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33711 Phone: 727-867-8641 John V. Murray, Jr. Pasadena Family Medical Associates 630 Pasadena Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33707 Phone: 727-345-7100

Linda P. Murray Roser Park Medical Center Department of Family Medicine 500 Roser Park Drive South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-898-4461 Richard J. Oldenski Florida Institute of Family Medicine Bay Way 4951 Thirty-Fourth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33711 Phone: 727-867-8641 Michele D. Pescasio USF Physicians Group Department of Family Medicine 13330 USF Laurel Drive Tampa, FL 33620 Phone: 813-974-2201 Joel S. Prawer Florida Institute of Family Medicine Point Brittany 5101 Brittany Drive South St. Petersburg, FL 33715 Phone: 727-867-2151 Martha Ann Price 3211 Azeele Street Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-879-333 Christopher J. Purcell The Diagnostic Clinic Department of Internal Medicine 1301 Second Avenue, SW, Fourth Floor Largo, FL 33770 Phone: 727-584-7706 Arnold M. Ramirez All Florida Orthopaedic Associates 4600 Fourth Street North St. Petersburg, FL 33703 Phone: 727-527-5272 Cheryl Reed Pinnacle Health Group 2605 West Swann Avenue, Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-874-5500 Richard G. Roetzheim USF Physicians Group Department of Family Medicine 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-974-2201 Robert B. Rosequist Family Care of Land O'Lakes 1942 Highland Oaks Boulevard, Suite A Lutz, FL 33559 Phone: 813-948-3838 Mark Allan Shay Florida Institute of Family Medicine FIFM of Point Brittany 5101 Brittany Drive South St. Petersburg, FL 33715 Phone: 727-867-2151 Alan A. Smith 630 Pasadena Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33707 Phone: 727-343-2741 Family medicine Jeff rey John Sourbeer Turley Family Health Center 807 North Myrtle Avenue Clearwater, FL 33755

Phone: 727-467-2400 Joseph P. Springle Bay Area Family Practice 6350 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, FL 33707 Phone: 727-381-1144 Frank Allan Thompson St. Anthony's Primary Care 900 Carillon Parkway, Suite 402A St. Petersburg, FL 33716 Phone: 727-561-2450 Kevin B. Witt Bay Area Family Practice 6350 Central Avenue St. Petersburg, FL 33707 Phone: 727-381-1144 Laurie J. Woodard USF Physicians Group Department of Family Medicine 13330 USF Laurel Drive, Fifth Floor Tampa, FL 33620 Phone: 813-974-2201 Kira Katherine Zwygart USF Physicians Group Department of Family Medicine 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-974-2201 OBSTeTRicS and GynecOlOGy Jeff rey L. Angel Florida Perinatal Associates Department of Maternal and Fetal Medicine Medical Arts Building, Suite 250 13601 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-971-6909 Ignacio Armas Women's Care Florida Obstetrics and Gynecology Associates 116 Parsons Park Drive Brandon, FL 33511 Phone: 813-681-6625 Marisa Baker Lifetime Obstetrics and Gynecology 4321 North MacDill Avenue, Suite 205 Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-961-7440 Beth B. Benson All Children's Obstetrics & Gynecology Specialists 6450 Thirty-Eighth Avenue North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-344-6060 Marc A. Bernhisel The Reproductive Medicine Group 612 Medical Care Drive Brandon, FL 33511 Phone: 813-661-9114 Caryn L. Bray Women's Care Florida 13601 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Suite 160 Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-972-4488 Madelyn Butler The Woman's Group 2716 West Virginia Avenue Tampa, FL 33607

Phone: 813-875-8032 Jeff rey K. Carlson All Children's Obstetrics & Gynecology Specialists 6450 Thirty-Eighth Avenue North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-344-6060 Sheila Connery USF Health Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Tampa General Circle, Sixth Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8500 Laura S. Dill Partners in Ob/Gyn 2818 West Virginia Avenue Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-872-8551 Steven D. Gitomer Citrus Park Gynecology 6516 Gunn Highway Tampa, FL 33625 Phone: 813-969-2340 Sandra (Sandy) Goodman The Reproductive Medicine Group 5245 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite One Tampa, FL 33617 Phone: 813-914-7304 Steven L. Greenberg Insignia Care for Women 3268 Cove Bend Drive Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-971-4555 Mitchel S. Hoff man USF Physicians Group South Tampa Center for Advanced Healthcare Division of Gynecologic Oncology Two Tampa General Circle, Fourth Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-0807 Suzanne T. Icely All Children's Obstetrics & Gynecology Specialists 6450 Thirty-Eighth Avenue North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-344-6060 Michael W. Jaeger Women's Care Florida Partners in ObGyn 2818 West Virginia Avenue Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-872-8551 Galen Bruce Jones Insignia Care for Women 4150 North Armenia Avenue, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-876-0914 Mary Lee Josey South Tampa Medical Center Department of Gynecology 508 South Habana Avenue, Suite 350 Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-873-1426


Patricia Judson H. Lee Moffi tt Cancer Center and Research Institute Gynecologic Oncology 12902 Magnolia Drive Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-745-3980 Craig S. Kalter Florida Perinatal Associates 13601 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Suite 250 Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-971-6909 Kathleen Kilbride Partners in Ob/Gyn 2818 West Virginia Avenue Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-872-8551 Johnathan Lancaster H. Lee Moffi tt Cancer Center and Research Institute Center for Women's Oncology 12902 USF Magnolia Drive Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-745-3980 Catherine M. Lynch USF Health Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Tampa General Circle, Fourth Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8500 Frank B. Marsalisi 7035 Central Avenue, Suite B St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-347-8039 John H. Marston Women's Care Florida Partners in ObGyn 2818 West Virginia Avenue Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-872-8551 James C. Mayer USF Physicians Group Carol and Frank Morsani Center for Advanced Healthcare Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility 13330 USF Laurel Drive Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-947-7027 Joan McCarthy South Tampa Gynecology Harborside Medical Towers, Suite 440 Five Tampa General Circle Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-569-0740 Valerie C. Mechanik 2901 West Saint Isabel Street, Suite B Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-870-3890 Anthony M. Messina 2502 West Saint Isabel Street, Suite A Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-879-0233

OBSTeTRicS and GynecOlOGy David Charles Minton Partners in Ob/Gyn 2818 West Virginia Avenue Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-872-8551 Jennifer Mignon Nixon Lakeland ObGyn 1733 Lakeland Hills Boulevard Lakeland, FL 33805 Phone: 863-688-1528 Anna Kristina Parsons USF Health Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Tampa General Circle, Fourth Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8500 Michael Thomas Parsons USF Health Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Tampa General Circle, Fourth Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8500 Shayne M. Plosker USF Health USF IVF and Reproductive Endocrinology Two Tampa General Circle Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-0692 Jose Antonio Prieto St. Petersburg Maternal Fetal Medicine Associates 625 Sixth Avenue South, Suite 340 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-553-7903 Karen Raimer St. Petersburg Maternal Fetal Medicine Associates 625 Sixth Avenue South, Suite 340 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-553-7903 Pamela Dawn Schwartz The Watson Clinic Family Care Center 2140 East County Road 540A Lakeland, FL 33813 Phone: 863-680-7243 Bruce D. Shephard 4302 North Habana Avenue, Suite 300 Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-876-2496 Christopher Sloan Florida Perinatal Associates Department of Maternal and Fetal Medicine Medical Arts Building, Suite 250 13601 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-971-6909 Amy L. Solomon Women's Care Florida 13601 Bruce B Downs Boulevard, Suite 160

Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-972-4488 Samuel Tarantino The Reproductive Medicine Group 5245 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite One Tampa, FL 33617 Phone: 813-914-7304 Barry Stephen Verkauf USF Health Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Tampa General Circle, Fourth Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-0692 James C. Von Thron Insignia Care for Women 4150 North Armenia Avenue, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-876-0914 W. Gregory Wilkerson Insignia Care for Women 4150 North Armenia Avenue, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-876-0914 J. Kell Williams University of South Florida College of Medicine Medical Clinic 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-259-8500 Jerome (Jerry) Yankowitz University of South Florida Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Tampa General Circle, Suite Six Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8500 Timothy R. Yeko The Reproductive Medicine Group 2919 Swann Avenue, Suite 305 Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-870-3553 PediaTRic alleRGy and immUnOlOGy Alan Barton Halsey Partners in Allergy and Asthma Care 3658 Lithia Pinecrest Road Valrico, FL 33596 Phone: 813-681-6537 Craig Andrew Kalik Partners in Allergy and Asthma Care 3658 Lithia Pinecrest Road Valrico, FL 33596 Phone: 813-681-6537 Mandel Reid Sher 11200 Seminole Boulevard, Suite 310 Largo, FL 33778 Phone: 727-397-8557 John W. Sleasman All Children's Hospital Department of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Outpatient Care Center, Third Floor 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4150

PediaTRic aneSTHeSiOlOGy George Garcia Alvarez All Children's Hospital Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology 601 Fifth Street, South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4429 John H. Elinger Pediatric Physician Services Department 6941 801 Sixth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4429 Michael A. Garcia All Children's Hospital Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology 601 Fifth Street, South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4429 Jeff ery W. Miller Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 Linda Jo Rice Pediatric Physician Services 501 Sixth Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-8480 Glenn C. Vaughn Pediatric Surgery Centers Department of Anesthesia 10080 Balaye Run Drive Tampa, FL 33619 Phone: 813-490-6100 Lisa A. Velasquez All Children's Hospital Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology 601 Fifth Street, South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4429 Dien Vu Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4755 PediaTRic caRdiac SURGeRy Jeff rey P. Jacobs Cardiac Surgical Associates 625 Sixth Avenue South, Suite 475 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-822-6666 James Anthony Quintessenza Cardiac Surgical Associates 625 Sixth Avenue South, Suite 475 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-822-6666 PediaTRic caRdiOlOGy Alfred Asante-Korang Pediatric Cardiology Associates All Children's Campus, Suite 711 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4200 Michael L. Epstein All Children's Hospital All Children's Specialty Physicians


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501 Sixth Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-3333 Jorge Manuel Giroud Pediatric Cardiology Associates All Children's Campus, Suite 711 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-322-4830 James Giff ord Henry Pediatric Cardiology Associates All Children's Campus, Suite 711 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33705 Phone: 727-767-4200 James C. Huhta Pediatric Cardiology Associates All Children's Campus, Suite 711 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4200 Richard Manuel Martinez Pediatric Cardiology Associates All Children's Campus, Suite 711 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4200 Jorge McCormack Pediatric Cardiology Associates All Children's Campus, Suite 711 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4200 Jeremy Ringewald St. Joseph's Children's Hospital Department of Pediatric Cardiology Medical Arts Building, Third Floor 3003 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 727-322-4820 PediaTRic caRdiOVaScUlaR aneSTHeSia Robert Dickerson Mobile Pediatric Anesthesiologist of Tampa Bay 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 Jeff ery W. Miller Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 PediaTRic cRiTical caRe David Seth Cooper Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 Perry Boyd Everett Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 John C. Haff ner St. Joseph's Children's Hospital

Department of Critical Care 3001 West Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-554-8521 John Edwin Monaco Brandon Regional Hospital Pediatric Critical Care 119 Oakfi eld Drive Brandon, FL 33511 Phone: 813-571-5245 William (Nick) Parilla Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 David Pettigrew Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 Daniel J. Plasencia St. Joseph's Children's Hospital Department of Pediatrics Medical Arts Building, Third Floor 3001 West Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-554-8093 Dan Riggs Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 Albert Saltiel Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 Michelle M. Smith Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 Arabela C. Stock Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 Richard E. Weibley Florida Pediatric Associates 1033 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street North, Suite 108 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4755 PediaTRic deVelOPmenTal and BeHaViORal PROBlemS Carol Lilly University of South Florida Division of Child Development and Neurology 13101 North Bruce B. DownBlvd. Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-974-0601

Eric Q. Tridas The Tridas Center for Child Development 4144 North Armenia Avenue, Suite 375 Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-876-8316 PediaTRic endOcRinOlOGy Barry B. Bercu All Children's Hospital Department of Endocrinology 501 Sixth Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 813-974-2201 Terry J. DeClue Pediatric Endocrine Associates Medical Arts Building, Third Floor 3001 West Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-554-8420 Frank B. Diamond, Jr. All Children's Hospital Department of Endocrinology 501 Sixth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 813-974-2201 E. Verena Jorgensen All Children's Hospital Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes 601 Fifth Street South, Third Floor St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4237 Allen W. Root All Children's Hospital Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes 501 Sixth Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4237 Dorothy I. Shulman University of South Florida All Children's Hospital 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 813-974-2201 Daniel T. McClenathan All Children's Hospital Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Outpatient Care Center, Suite 605 601 Fifth Street St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-822-4300 PediaTRic GaSTROenTeROlOGy Michele P. Winesett St. Joseph's Hospital Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology Medical Arts Building, Third Floor 3003 West Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-870-4948 PediaTRic HemaTOlOGy OncOlOGy Jerry L. Barbosa All Children's Hospital Division of Hematology and Oncology Outpatient Care Center, Third Floor 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4176

Gregory A. Hale All Children's Hospital Divisions of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Blood and Marrow Transplantation 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4176 Michael L. Nieder All Children's Hospital Blood and Marrow Transplant Program 601 Fifth Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-6856 Hardeo K. Panchoosingh St. Joseph's Children's Hospital Health Point Medical Group 4728 North Habana Avenue, Suite 102 Tampa, FL 33614 Phone: 813-321-6820 PediaTRic inFecTiOUS diSeaSe David Michael Berman All Children's Hospital Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease Outpatient Care Center 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4160 Juan Dumois All Children's Hospital Department of Pediatric Infectious Disea International Adoption Clinic 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4160 Patricia Emmanuel Children Medical Services Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease 13101 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-259-8800 Jorge Lujan-Zilbermann USF Health Department of Pediatric Infectious Disease 17 Davis Boulevard, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8800 PediaTRic nePHROlOGy Alfonso Campos USF Health Division of Pediatric Nephrology 13101 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-259-8760 Valerie M. Panzarino USF Health Division of Pediatric Nephrology 13101 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-259-8760 Sharon A. Perlman All Children's Hospital Division of Pediatric Nephrology Outpatient Care Center, Third Floor 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4181


PediaTRic neUROlOGical SURGeRy Sarah J. Gaskill USF Health Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair Two Tampa General Circle, Seventh Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-0904 Arthur E. Marlin USF Health Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair Two Tampa General Circle, Seventh Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-0904 Bruce B. Storrs All Children's Neuroscience Institute Department of Neurosurgery and Epileptology 601 Fifth Street South, Suite 511 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-8181 PediaTRic OPHTHalmOlOGy Magda Barsoum-Homsy Eye Institute of West Florida 148 Thirteenth Street, SW Largo, FL 33770 Phone: 727-581-8706 Steven Abraham Gross Center for Reconstructive and Aesthetic Ophthalmology 32615 US Highway 19 North, Suite Six Palm Harbor, FL 34684 Phone: 727-772-7712 Derek B. Hess All Children's Hospital Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology Outpatient Care Center, Suite 601 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-456-3288 J. Bruce Hess All Children's Hospital Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology Outpatient Care Center, Suite 601 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4393 PediaTRic ORTHOPaedic SURGeRy Scott Warren Beck Children's Orthopaedic and Scoliosis Surgery Associates 625 Sixth Avenue South, Suite 450 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-898-2663 Dennis Paul Grogan Shriners Hospital for Children Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 12502 USF Pine Drive Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-972-2250 Gregory Verl Hahn Children's Orthopaedic and Scoliosis Surgery Associates 625 Sixth Avenue South, Suite 450 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-898-2663

Alfred V. Hess Florida Orthopaedic Institute 13020 Telecom Parkway North Tampa, FL 33637 Phone: 813-978-9700 Dan E. Mason Shriners Hospital for Children Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 12502 USF Pine Drive Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-975-7130 Jeff rey B. Neustadt Children's Orthopaedic and Scoliosis Surgery Associates 2727 West Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Suite 720 Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 727-898-2663 PediaTRic OTOlaRynGOlOGy Thomas M. Andrews All Children's Hospital Pediatric Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Associates Outpatient Care Center, Suite 701 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-329-5400 Wade Russell Cressman Pediatric Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Associates Outpatient Care Center, Suite 701 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-329-5400 Michael Gurucharri Ear, Nose and Throat Associates 701 Manatee Avenue West, Suite 202 Bradenton, FL 34205 Phone: 941-748-2455 Karin S. Hotchkiss Tampa Children's ENT Section for Pediatric Otolaryngology 4200 North Armenia Avenue, Suite Five Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-262-1330 Peter W. Orobello, Jr. Pediatric Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Associates Outpatient Care Center, Suite 701 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-329-5400 Kathleen Wasylik Pediatric Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Associates Outpatient Care Center, Suite 701 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-329-5400 PediaTRic PlaSTic SURGeRy Ernesto Ruas 603 South Boulevard Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-1550 PediaTRic PUlmOnOlOGy Tony Kriseman Pediatric Pulmonary Associates 601 Fifth Street South, Suite 708 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4146

PediaTRic RHeUmaTOlOGy Robert W. Nickeson, Jr. All Children's Hospital Department of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Outpatient Care Center, Fifth Floor 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4150 Mandel Reid Sher 11200 Seminole Boulevard, Suite 310 Largo, FL 33778 Phone: 727-397-8557 John W. Sleasman All Children's Hospital Department of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Outpatient Care Center, Third Floor 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4150 and PediaTRic SPecialiST/cHild adOleScenT PSycHiaTRy Jeff rey L. Alvaro Pediatric Psychiatry 880 Sixth Street South, Suite 110 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-8477 Michael Bengtson USF Psychiatry Center 3515 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite E Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-974-8900 Glenn Catalano James A. Haley VA Hospital Medical Center Mental Health and Behavioral Sciences Service 13000 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-631-7121 Mark A. Cavitt All Children's Hospital Department of Psychiatry 880 Sixth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-8477 Steven Noah Kanfer 806 West De Leon Street, Suite 101 Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-250-0224 Tanya K. Murphy All Children's Hospital Rothman Center for Pediatric Neuropsychiatry 800 Sixth Street South, Fourth Floor North St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-8230 Kailie R. Shaw USF Psychiatry Center 3515 East Fletcher Avenue Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-974-8900 Saundra Stock USF Psychiatry Center 3515 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite E Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-974-8900

PediaTRic SPecialiST/ neOnaTal-PeRinaTal medicine Anthony E. Napolitano, Jr. West Coast Neonatology 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4313 Lewis P. Rubin USF Health Division of Neonatology South Tampa Center, Room 5091 Two Tampa General Circle Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8812 Roberto A. Sosa 601 Fifth Street South, Suite 601 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4313 Dean Theophilopoulos West Coast Neonatology 601 Fifth Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4313 PediaTRic SPecialiST/ neUROlOGy, ePilePSy Jose A. Ferreira Pediatric Epilepsy and Neurology Specialists 508 South Habana Avenue, Suite 340 Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-873-7367 PediaTRic SPecialiST/ neUROlOGy, GeneRal Raymond J. Fernandez Pediatric Neurology Associates 2508 West Virginia Avenue, Suite B Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-878-2191 Maria A. Gieron-Korthals University of South Florida College of Medicine Department of Pediatrics 17 Davis Boulevard, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-974-2583 J. Richard Gunderman West Coast Child Neurology 5106 North Armenia Avenue, Suite Five Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-879-7816 Steven Parrish Winesett All Children's Neuroscience Institute Department of Neurosurgery and Epileptology 601 Fifth Street South, Suite 511 St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-8181 neUROdeVelOPmenTal diSaBiliTieS Ernesto J. Millan West Coast Child Neurology 5106 North Armenia Avenue, Suite Five Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-879-7816 PediaTRic SURGeRy John P. (Jack) Coughlin 12220 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-631-5034 Enrique Grisoni HealthPoint Medical Group


Medical Arts Building, Third Floor 3003 West Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-554-8384 PediaTRic SURGeRy Charles Paidas USF Health Tampa General Hospital Department of Pediatric Surgery Two Tampa General Circle, Second Floor Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-844-7315 PediaTRic UROlOGy Yves L. Homsy Children's Urology Group 4712 North Armenia Avenue, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-874-7500 Dennis L. Hoover Children's Urology Group 4712 North Armenia Avenue, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-874-7500 Mark E. Kolligian Children's Urology Group 4712 North Armenia Avenue, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-874-7500 E. Michael Reisman Children's Urology Group 4712 North Armenia Avenue, Suite 200 Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-874-7500 PediaTRicS/GeneRal Yanina J. Abaunza Fiallos 18572 North Dale Mabry Highway Lutz, FL 33548 Phone: 813-964-1800 Melody M. Baade Pediatric Health Care Alliance 2803 West Saint Isabel Street Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-875-3896 Patricia Juarez Blanco University Pediatrics 8460 Cooper Creek Boulevard, Suite 101 University Park, FL 34201 Phone: 941-360-1266 Tommy J. Borrell 4620 North Habana Avenue, Suite 103 Tampa, FL 33614 Phone: 813-874-7334 Lori A. Bowers Pediatric Health Care Alliance 10729 Queens Town Drive Riverview, FL 33579 Phone: 813-672-3497 Robert A. Buzzeo Pediatric Health Care Alliance 1942 Highland Oaks Boulevard, Suite B Lutz, FL 33559 Phone: 813-948-6133 Christina J. Canody 5124 North Armenia Avenue Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-879-5716

Jose E. Colon HealthPoint Medical Group Van Dyke Pediatrics 4211 Van Dyke Road, Suite 101A Lutz, FL 33558 Phone: 813-968-7171 Sharon M. Dabrow University of South Florida College of Medicine Department of Pediatrics Two Tampa General Circle Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8700 Gabriele Hosemann Pediatric Health Care Alliance Brandon Community Offi ce 811 South Parsons Avenue Brandon, FL 33511 Phone: 813-685-4553 Gerard R. Hough Pediatric Health Care Alliance Brandon Community Offi ce 811 South Parsons Avenue Brandon, FL 33511 Phone: 813-685-4553 Patricia L. Jeansonne Pediatric Health Care Alliance Brandon Community Offi ce 811 South Parsons Avenue Brandon, FL 33511 Phone: 813-685-4553 Brian M. Kagan 4957 Thirty-Eighth Avenue North, Suite A St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-526-7420 Karalee Kulek-Luzey Pediatric Health Care Alliance 3222 West Azeele Street, Suite A Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-872-8491 Mudra K. Kumar USF Health Department of Pediatrics 17 Davis Boulevard Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-8700 Katherine Lewis Pediatric Health Care Alliance 2803 West Saint Isabel Street Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-875-3896 Tanya Liberato Pediatric Health Care Alliance 10729 Queens Town Drive Riverview, FL 33579 Phone: 813-672-3497 Carol Lilly University of South Florida Division of Child Development and Neurology 13101 North Bruce B. Downs Boulevard Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-974-0601 Fred I. Lipschutz Pediatric Health Care Alliance 4446 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite A Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-971-6700 Hugo J. Narvarte USF Physicians Group Department of Pediatrics 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard

Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-974-2201 Roopal A. Patel Pediatric Health Care Alliance 3638 Madaca Lane Tampa, FL 33618 Phone: 813-968-6610 Pamela M. Patranella 2855 North Fifth Avenue St. Petersburg, FL 33713 Phone: 727-323-2727 Emily T. Perkins Pediatric Health Care Alliance 4446 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite A Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-971-6700 Lorinda J. Price 4444 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite C Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-903-0060 Domenick P. Reina HealthPoint Pediatrics 2506 West Virginia Avenue Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-870-3720 Christopher D. Reiner Pediatric Health Care Alliance 2803 West Saint Isabel Street Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-875-3896 Lynnette N. Ringenberg Hillsborough County Health Department 1105 East Kennedy Boulevard Tampa, FL 33602 Phone: 813-307-8000 Monica Sams 11410 North 56th Street, Suite 102 Tampa, FL 33617 Phone: 813-988-5141 Maurice Hyman Shaw Pediatric Health Care Alliance 4446 East Fletcher Avenue, Suite A Tampa, FL 33613 Phone: 813-971-6700 Earl Arthur Smith 5124 North Armenia Avenue Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-879-5716 Jennifer Cohen Takagishi Tampa General Hospital Pediatric Clinic at Healthpark 5802 North 30th Street Tampa, FL 33610 Phone: 813-236-5114 Ignatius I. Tan Pediatric Health Care Alliance 1850 Crossings Boulevard, Unit 100 Odessa, FL 33556 Phone: 813-475-7100 Christopher L. Tappan Pediatric Health Care Alliance 5454 Lithia Pinecrest Road Lithia, FL 33547 Phone: 813-571-6800 Margarita P. Torres Pediatric Health Care Alliance 2803 West Saint Isabel Street Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-875-3896

Cynthia W. White Pediatric Health Care Alliance 3222 West Azeele Street, Suite A Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-872-8491 PediaTRicS/GeneRal Ann R. Winkler 2855 Fifth Avenue North St. Petersburg, FL 33713 Phone: 727-323-2727 Alyssa Zwarych Internal Medicine and Pediatrics of Tampa Bay 10111 Wilsky Boulevard Tampa Bay, FL 33625 Phone: 813-961-2222 PediaTRicS/HOSPiTal medicine Dipti Patel Amin All Children's Hospital Department of Pediatrics 501 Sixth Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Phone: 727-767-4243 Antoinette C. Spoto-Cannons St. Joseph's Children's Hospital Department of Pediatrics Medical Arts Building, Third Floor 3001 West Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Tampa, FL 33607 Phone: 813-554-8093 PlaSTic SURGeRy Dennis S. Agliano Tampa Bay ENT and Cosmetic Surgery 5105 North Armenia Avenue Tampa, FL 33603 Phone: 813-879-8045 Edward H. Farrior Facial Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery Center 2908 West Azeele Street Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-875-3223 Enrique Jose Fernandez Florida Plastic Surgery 1220 Fifty-Ninth Street West Bradenton, FL 34209 Phone: 941-795-2088 John Robert Leikensohn Plastic Surgery Center 5807 Twenty-First Avenue West Bradenton, FL 34209 Phone: 941-792-4157 Henry Arvil Redmon 707 West Fletcher Avenue Tampa, FL 33612 Phone: 813-264-2676 Robert Dickerson Rehnke 6606 Tenth Avenue North St. Petersburg, FL 33710 Phone: 727-341-0337 Ernesto Ruas 603 South Boulevard Tampa, FL 33606 Phone: 813-259-1550 Karen E. Wells 508 South Habana Avenue, Suite 180 Tampa, FL 33609 Phone: 813-353-8809


All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins:

TAMPA BAY KIDS GET THE BEST OF BOTH

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ll Children’s Hospital joined forces with Johns Hopkins Medicine in April to develop promising new treatments for children’s illnesses and provide world-class care to our region’s children. Parents facing a “worst case scenario” will know that their child’s physician at All Children’s can draw on the expertise of their colleagues at Johns Hopkins who see some of the rarest and most complex illnesses in the world. For example, an eight-year-old boy from Pompano Beach who has adrenoleukodystrophy (a rare disease made famous in the movie “Lorenzo’s Oil”) received a bone marrow transplant at All Children’s Hospital as part of a treatment plan developed by his Johns Hopkins doctors. In addition, All Children’s specialists in pediatric cardiology,

surgery, cancer, transplantation and neonatal intensive care have teamed up to launch new clinical studies that can lead to better therapies and outcomes. Integration of research and education with clinical care has made Johns Hopkins Medicine one of the top healthcare institutions in the world, and that’s what will be happening at All Children’s Hospital. The pediatric experts at Johns Hopkins and All Children’s are also developing a new approach to training pediatricians. “We are using powerful knowledge about the genetics of all human cells to tailor treatment to a child’s individualized needs,” explains Jonathan Ellen, M.D., Vice Dean of Pediatrics for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Physician-in-Chief at All Children’s Hospital.


We’re already able to look at biomarkers on cancer cells to see if a child can receive milder chemotherapy and still be assured of a good outcome, ” says Dr. Ellen. “That’s an example of the personalized approach to medical care that we’ll use in training tomorrow’s pediatricians and scientists. For example, we want to reach the point where a simple blood test can tell a child’s doctor which type of asthma medication will be most effective, or which babies in the neonatal intensive care unit will benefit most from a new treatment? Translational research means using questions from the bedside to the lab bench to develop new treatment approaches—and taking them back to the bedside to give patients access to the latest therapies and cures. The integration of All Children’s Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine means that Florida parents can be confident that All Children’s provides the latest and most advanced treatment options.

Dr. Jonathan Ellen, M.D. Vice Dean of Pediatrics for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Physician-in-Chief at All Children’s Hospital

Parent Guide®

21


Dr. Robert Melillo | By Miranda Jenson

doctors LIFE

ADHD AND THE BRAIN

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r. Robert Melillo had already been conducting research on the adult brain when, in 1994, a friend asked him to look into the growing problem of ADHD in children. Melillo knew very little about ADHD, so he began researching the disorder. Within a short time, one of the main things he noticed was the widespread prescribing of Ritalin to treat ADHD. “What really struck me was the increase in use (of Ritalin).” Melillo had learned that, in just five years from 1990 to 1995, there had been a more-than-200 percent jump in usage of the drug. Perplexed by this statistic, he spoke to teachers who confirmed that they were seeing that in the classroom. Then one of his sons started showing signs of ADHD, and Melillo became even more committed to understanding the disorder. He asked others to “point him in the right direction,” to help him find out what to do. But he quickly learned that no one knew. “Basically then, I went to the library and spent the next 10 years learning.” Through his research, he began to think that there were neurological connections among several developmental disorders such as ADD, ADHD, Autism, Tourette's Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Over the course of the next decade, many scientists were attributing the increase in ADHD and these other disorders to genetics. But Melillo and some other researchers he was working with knew that a damaged gene or a genetic mutation could not explain the rapid jump in these disorders, because those changes typically take hundreds or thousands of years. So, Melillo and his co-researchers latched onto the idea of epi-genetics. Epi-genetics looks at the genes that are responsible for creating functional connections in the brain and how environmental factors interact with them and

affect their ability to “come online” and “turn on” when they're supposed to. In other words, there's an electrical communication problem where the two hemispheres of the brain are not connected, and hence, different areas of the brain that need to work together can't. From this knowledge, Melillo went on to develop a special program designed to help children with these neurological disorders. The Brain Balance Achievement Center is a nationwide learning center with more than 54 centers that use Melillo's research and brain-based approach to treating neurobehavioral and learning difficulties.

813-475-6977 Brain Balance of Oldsmar, FL 4022 Tampa Road #6 • Oldsmar, FL 34677 oldsmar@brainbalancecenters.com brainbalancecenters.com

Parent Guide®

25


Founder Bruce Murakami's Story

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s he was driving, Bruce Murakami had a strange premonition. A black plume of smoke twisted above the white rooftops of his subdivision coaxing his attention in its direction. Normally, something like this would have piqued his curiosity for a second or two, and then he would have kept driving. But today, for some reason, he was compelled to investigate. When he found the cause of the smoke, he had no idea that his life would be changed forever. There, in the midst of smoke and flames was his van with his wife and 11-yearold daughter trapped inside. There was nothing he could do. No way save them. They were gone. Bruce later discovered that the crash was caused by a teenage boy named Justin Cabezas. Justin had been street racing along Hillsborough Avenue in Tampa at speeds approaching 90 miles per hour. When Bruce learned of this, all his grief and mourning turned to vengeance. But after months of waiting to go before the judge, something miraculous happened— something that would once again change

Bruce’s life forever. During this waiting period, Bruce started thinking about his own two sons who were very close in age to Justin. “What if they had been Justin?” he asked himself. “How would I feel?” The more these thoughts weighed on him, the more he realized he needed to do something. In order to heal, Bruce knew he had to forgive Justin. And he did. But now, with this young man who made good grades and who was from a good family facing 30 years in prison, Bruce knew something had to change. He asked his attorney to meet Justin, and in an emotionally charged meeting, Justin apologized, and Bruce told him he accepted his apology. On the day of sentencing, Bruce asked the judge for leniency and for Justin to be sentenced to house arrest and 300 community hours serving in a new nonprofit Bruce wanted to create. The nonprofit would use Justin to talk with young drivers about the consequences of poor decisions while driving and hopefully touch teens in a way that adults could not. The judge listened, and Safe Teen Driver was born.


Motor vehicle crashes are the number one killer of teens in Florida and in the United States. More teens die in crashes than the next three leading causes of death-- homicide, suicide and disease--combined!

u o Y d Di o w ? Kn

Teens ages 15 to 19 have the highest crash rate of any group in Florida. Teens represent five percent of Florida’s driving population, but they are involved in more than nine percent of Florida’s vehicle crashes. Source: Florida Teen Safe Driving Coalition

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oday, Bruce and Justin have given presentations at hundreds of high school and community venues. Additionally, other programs have evolved such as Bruce’s Forgive to Live, a healing service he offers to victims of vehicular crimes; Get Real Behind the Wheel, a driving school program in California; CARS, Cops Against Racing on Streets which develops high school car shows for teens; and most recently, TRACK (Teaching Road Awareness & Consequences to Kids), a unique driving program using go-karts, golf carts and DUI goggles. You can read more about the programs in the rest of this section.

Learn more or find out what you can do to support Safe Teen Driver by visiting www.safeteendriver.org. Or, contact Bruce Murakami at Bmurakami@aol.com.


SAFE TEEN DRIVER PROGRAMS By Geodie Baxter Padgett

Safe Teen Driver

School, Church and Community Presentations One of the most powerful programs a teen or adult can ever experience, it brings together victims who've lost their loved ones in a car crash caused by a teen or young driver. The presentations also include the teens who have killed while behind the wheel. These teens have often served time or on a special pass from prison for the day to participate.

Forgive to Live

Healing and Forgiveness Bruce Murakami personally works with families of victims and the parents of the young driver who committed the vehicular crime to bring about forgiveness, peace and hope. You may contact him directly if you need this assistance at Bmurakami@aol.com.

Get Real Behind the Wheel California Driving Program

Run by Ken Ucci in Tracy, CA, this teen driving course and program was started by Bruce Murakami and incorporates the key elements of Safe Teen Driver.

C.A.R.S. -- Cops Against Racing on Streets

A unique program started by Bruce and the Tampa Police Department, it taught kids about safe driving through special high school car shows.

TRACK

Free Driving Program for Teens and Their Parents Safe Teen Driver's newest and most exciting program offers parents and young drivers a day of free driving instruction. But the program goes well beyond what a typical driver's education class does. It lets the teens practice situations using professional go-karts as well as golf carts while wearing DUI glasses and more. Plus, the parents get the opportunity to work and learn what they can do. After all, it's really a partnership between parent and child. And it's all free thanks to the generous support from the Tampa Law Firm of Winters & Yonker.


Parent Guide's

Top Family Rides of 2012

Cars to fit your budget and your style!

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eady to upgrade, go green or expand your vehicle for your growing family? Well, Parent Guide has the inside track to the top cars for families for 2012. Here, in our special pull-out guide, we'll give you what you need to know about each vehicle, plus talk about those little extras that take a car from good to great for a family.

SEDANS & COUPES

Toyota Camry

It's been the best-selling car car for 13 out of the past 14 years, but Toyota ups their game for 2012 with a new style for this mid-size favorite and more technological enhancements including options for downloading mobile applications and data services via touch screen or voice command. Why we like it It's roomy enough for the whole family while still retaining a good fuel efficiency (21-25 mpg city; 30-35 mpg highway). Plus, it has a history of being very reliable.

Hyundai Elantra

Safety-conscious parents will love the Elantra because it comes complete with six airbags, 4-wheel ABS and an intelligent Vehicle Stability Management System. Why we like it Although called a compact car, it's stylish and has more space for the family than several competitors such as the Corolla, the Civic and the Maxima. Great gas mileage (29 mpg city; 40 mpg highway).

VW Beetle

The re-released Beetle has always retained some of the groovy looks of its 1960s-1970's counterpart, but this redesigned version for 2012 really bumps up the cool factor and makes for a great second car. Why we like it It looks a little more retro and offers owners either a Diesel engine or one of two gas engines. And for those retro-carloving moms who desire modern conveniences, there's an optional navigation system available. Peace, man.

Dodge Charger SRT-8

Hard to believe we'd include the iconic Charger in our list of top family vehicles, but Dodge must have heard all the dads lament having to give up their favorite sports cars for a family vehicle. Now, they can have the best of both worlds. Why we like it It has four doors! So, mom and the kids can pile in and feel comfy while dad enjoys his new muscle car. Great bucket seats and up to a 470-hp, 6.4 liter V-8 engine. Now, that's some power.

Fiat 500

Fiat’s first entry into the American market in years, this European-styled compact has four seats and great gas mileage (27-30 mpg city; 34-38 mpg highway). Why we like it While the Fiat 500 might be a tight squeeze for the whole family, it’s a great option for budget-conscious moms and dads in need of a second car. It’s also an affordable option for the teen or college-age driver in need of wheels. And despite it’s affordable price, you can’t help but love the Italian-styled interior and numerous personalization options.


MINIVANS

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES (SUV'S)

Honda Odyssey

Ford Explorer

Minivans are the quintessential vehicle for the family, offering lots of room and features designed to make toting the whole gang anywhere as easy and comfortable as possible. And the Honda Odyssey is no exception. Why we like it The second row of seats adjusts to fit up to three child safety seats. Lots of storage areas and even a flip-up ring for a trash bag. (A mom must have designed this one.)

Toyota Sienna

Another minivan designed with family in mind, the Sienna won't disappoint when it comes to a comfortable ride and good handling. Why we like it The dual sliding doors make for great convenience, but take convenience one step further and consider opting for sliding door jam protection, which Toyota offers. Ample space and a versatile second row. For boating and camping families, ask about the tow package option.

Nissan Quest

Garage sale moms will love that the seats fold down easily, providing lots of space to tote big items. And both mom and dad will appreciate that Nissan offers a blind spot warning system for added safety. Why we like it Those fold-down seats are perfect for the family, and mom and dad have the option of either leather or cloth upholstery. The Quest also has a lower step-in height, making it easier for little ones (and many big ones) to climb in.

The Explorer comes with standard front-wheel drive and space for up to seven passengers (think kids and their friends and their stuff). For the outdoorsy types, it also offers a user-friendly terrain management system. Why we like it The Explorer has decent gas mileage for an SUV, getting 17-20 mpg in the city and 23-28 mpg on the highway. It comes with several key safety features such as roll and curve stability, six airbags and Ford's “MyKey,� which lets mom and dad control their teen's driving speed and reminds their teen to buckle up.

Dodge Durango

With the Dodge Durango, moms and dads can choose from a V-6 or a V-8 engine and enjoy towing capability up to 7,400 lbs in addition to a very comfortable ride. So, get the camper ready to go. Why we like it The Durango offers three rows that can seat up to seven or the option of captain's seats for the second row. It comes with a 5-year/100,000-mile powertrain limited warranty.

Jeep Grand Cherokee

Parents have a choice of engines with the Jeep Grand Cherokee, including a V-6 290-hp, a V-8 360-hp and a V-8 470-hp. The 2012 Grand Cherokee is roomy and comfortable for kids or adults and looks more like a crossover, but still offers excellent off-road capabilities for nature-loving families. Why we like it Jeep cut the Grand Cherokee's price by $3000 with the 2012 model. That makes it an SUV worth checking into. It's also got several good safety features designed to avoid accidents (very important when carrying precious cargo) such as a forward collision warning, blind spot monitoring and rear cross path detection.


SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES (SUV’S)

Mini Countryman

Hard to believe those cute, little, two-door MINI Coopers now have a big, four-door, all-wheel-drive crossover cousin that works for a family, but they do. And of course, the newest Cooper still retains many of the unique design features of the cool little Mini. Why we like it Great gas mileage for a crossover or SUV (25-27 mpg city; 3035 mpg highway). Includes a “center rail” running from front to back that is highly customizable. Families can add or remove additional cup holders, storage boxes and armrests.

Volkswagon Tiguan

If the kids and parents can get past trying to pronounce the name (there are several versions online―we're not sure either), the family might just find that VW's entry into the crossover market is a great option. Why we like it Another crossover with good gas mileage. The intelligent Crash Response System optimizes safety if a collision occurs by unlocking doors, turning off power to fuel pump and turning on the hazard lights. It also has a tire pressure monitoring system. Then there's the Bluetooth® and touchscreen technology in the interior.

Subaru Outback

Good gas mileage for a crossover (18-23 mpg city; 25-29 mpg highway), plus spacious backseat and lots of room for storage or toting. Why we like it Moms and dads of outdoorsy families will love the Outback’s standard all-wheel drive, making trekking on most terrain easy. But even better is the optional all-weather package, complete with heated seats, heated side mirrors and a windshield wiper de-icer. Now that’s cool!

Volvo XC90

This roomy seven-seater SUV from Volvo has options for front-wheel or all-wheel drive and includes a standard moonroof (the kids will love that) and leather seats (mom and dad will be smiling). Why we like it Volvo sets the bar high when it comes to safety features-something every family cares about. The XC90 is no exception with available blind spot warning and roll stability systems, integrated child booster cushions, a side-impact protection system and a DSTC anti-skid system. There’s also antilock breaks with break assist (a system that adds additional brake pressure in emergency braking situations).


HYBRID/ELECTRIC

Chevy Volt

Chevrolet's four-door electric vehicle (yes, you plug it in) allows drivers to drive with either electricity or a combination of electricity and gas. Car seats four, so the whole family can come along. Why we like it Getting 95 mpg in the city and 90 on the highway is nothing to sneeze at. Plus, the gas-only engine gets approximately 37 mpg as well. Oh, and charging costs are estimated at only $1.50 a day (less than your morning Starbucks).

Nissan LEAF

Running purely on electricity (the Web site boasts it's 100 percent electric with zero tailpipe), the Nissan LEAF is another good green option for families. Why we like it Although it's a compact hatchback, there's enough room for five. The LEAF is great on gas mileage (106 city; 92 highway), and fuel costs are low. Plus, it features an intelligent navigation system, decent acceleration and a five-star crash rating.

Lexus CT200h

A hybrid hatchback with the sleek Lexus look offers lots of technological upgrades as well as excellent fuel efficiency (43 mpg city; 40 mpg highway). Why we like it It has the sleek look that Lexus is famous for, but is big on safety with eight (yes we said “eight�) airbags. Plus, there's a seat feature designed to lessen the possibility of whiplash in the event of a rear-end collision, and there's an optional backup camera that can display images on the navigational system or in a section of the rearview mirror. Sources: MotorTrend.com, Edmunds.com, Cars.com, Honda. com, Ford.com, Toyota.com, Nissan.com, Hyundai.com, Mini.com, VW.com, Lexus.com, Cherolet.com, Jeep

Cars to fit your budget and your style!


“Capturing what’s Real” To arrange your photo session contact Shannon Livingston at 727-784-5522 or visit us at www.shannonlivingston.com

Parent Guide®

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a dad’s LIFE

Working Without a Net

J

ust like Frankie Avalon, these days, when it comes to protecting my kids from harm, I feel that I’m working without Annette. Get it? Annette? As in a safety net? Never mind! This article is about safety. But let me come clean right off the bat and tell you that I have two boys, and Evel Knievel has nothing on either of them, so this article will be more about what not do regarding safety issues. Let me start off by encouraging you not to let your kids use dad’s boxer shorts or large trash bags as parachutes when jumping off the bunk bed onto the newly waxed hardwood floors. We had very little success managing the safety aspect with that particular maneuver in our house. Trying to harness and ride the German shepherd also met with pretty poor results. Have you seen those signs that they have at some work sites where they say something like 125 days and no accidents? Well, if we had one of those in our house, it couldn’t track days or even hours to give us any sense of accomplishment. It would have to read something like 23 minutes and no ER visits.

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It’s not that we aren’t trying. We gave both of our boys skating lessons, so that they could get exercise, have fun and participate safely at the local roller rink. My eldest son broke his leg about 10 minutes after the sixth and final lesson during his very first free skating period. One good thing is that the ER doctors now call and tell us if they are going to have to be out of town to let us know who will be covering for them. And they regularly thank us for all of the X-rays (both boys actually glow in the dark which is a pretty nifty safety feature in and of itself ). When the boys' grandparents bought them a dartboard last year, we knew that it was only a matter of time before one of them had darts poking out of his hair like a permanent hair ribbon. We were actually pleasantly surprised when the dart was instead buried in a left buttocks cheek. The variety of injuries and injury-producing activities does keep the ongoing cycle interesting.


A Dad’s Safety Story I By Kurt Goerke Our most recent mishap occurred when my eldest son jumped off of a floating swimming dock at a lake into 20 feet of water. He, of course, landed on the single chain that served to anchor the dock to the large chunk of cement at the bottom causing his leg to look like the Creature from the Black Lagoon took a swipe at him. In conclusion, with regard to children and safety (and with especially boys), we have learned that the most important safety feature we can implement is really good insurance. We determined this after testing a number of measures including motorcycle helmets worn 24 hours a day and bubble wrap sweat suits and pajamas--both of which met with a limited degree of success. The next-best-thing you can do is to try to keep a sense of humor and have your own heart checked frequently by an understanding doctor. Also, as I often say, if they’re not bleeding, I’m finishing the sports section. I’ve got to go now, my youngest son just sustained a wicked paper cut from the first draft of this story that I printed out for him to read. Kurt Goerke is a father of two, an almost bearable husband, master of Cocoa the dog, professional writer and a Regional Director with the American Lung Association of Florida.

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Genesiselementary.com

Genesis School- NPR Campus 6609 River Road, New Port Richey, FL 34652 727-845-1111

Genesis School- Trinity Campus 8100 Mitchell Ranch Rd. New Port Richey, Fl 34655 727-372-9333

Longleaf Learning Center 3035 Alachua Pl., New Port Richey, FL 34655 727-375-2664

For additional information, please contact one of the following Genesis School locations.

Genesis Preparatory School 7710 Osteen Rd., New Port Richey, FL 34653 727-846-8407

By Shannon Kelley Pattee

G

enesis School was founded in 1977 and was operating as a preschool on River Ranch Road in New Port Richey, FL. In 1981, Dr. Melissa Nurrenbrock purchased the school and immediately began a growing plan that added one grade a year until the school offered a curriculum through grade five. By 1988, she was ready to open a second location on Mitchell Ranch Road in Trinity, and by following the same plan, once again grew the school from preschool through fifth grade. As the 1990’s rolled around, Dr. Nurrenbrock was approached by a group of Genesis parents to form an independent middle and high school in New Port Richey. The new sister school, which is governed by a Board of Trustees, was created and called the Genesis Preparatory School for children grades six through twelve. In 2003, Dr. Nurrenbrock purchased the Longleaf Learning Center in New Port Richey, and added another preschool that accommodates children from ages 2 to 4 years old. The Genesis Schools are accredited by the Florida Council of Independent Schools (FCIS) and by the Florida Kindergarten Council (FKC). In 2009, they were named Business of the Year by the West Pasco Chamber of Commerce, along with Dr. Nurrenbrock being named one of the Successful Women in Business in Tampa Bay 2011.

Club and serve on the Credentials Committee of the Board of Morton Plant North Bay Hospital. She’s also involved with Cindy’s Pets, an organization dedicated to helping seniors feed their pets, which was created in memory of her sister. (She is a pet lover extraordinaire!) The Genesis School’s mission is to instill in each student a lifelong love of learning while providing a strong foundation for further education in a safe environment. Their curriculum offers a traditional program emphasizing basic skills and the development of good work habits and character. It is focused on math, science, history, geography, with a strong emphasis on reading and language arts. It also includes art, music, Spanish, physical education, library, computer and the TECHNOKIDS curriculum. According to Dr. Nurrenbrock, with small class sizes, strong academic focus, individual attention and a close partnership between children, parents and teachers, the Genesis students regularly perform at least two years above their grade level on standardized tests. They have also consistently won awards in local and regional competitions. Their graduates have proven to excel at private and public schools alike. And because of its success, another unique characteristic of the Genesis school is that it has educated several generations from same families. In fact, some of their former students even come back to teach for them.

According to Dr. Nurrenbrock, her priorities in life are family, community and the children whose lives they touch daily. But she also notes that being inquisitive and seeking the truth is the impression that she hopes to always leave on her students. As busy as she is, Dr. Nurrenbrock still manages to be a member of the New Port Richey Rotary

ating

l on celebr o o h c S is s tion! a the Gene c to u s n d o e ti la n i s Congratu s f u l ye a r

s 35 succe


BLUEBERRY FRECKLES PHOTOGRAPHY

.....coming soon

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Melissa Nurrenbrock Founder of The Genesis School


MONTESSORI ACADEMIES For additional information on Montessori Academies or Montessori Preparatory School please contact: Montessori Preparatory School 11302 N. 53rd St., Temple Terrace, FL 33617 813-899-2345 Pre-K – 5th grade (Main Office)

Montessori Academy of Tampa Bay 1901 W. Waters Ave., Tampa, FL 33604 813-933-4782 12 months – 6th grade Montessori Academy of New Tampa 4001 Skipper Rd., Tampa, FL 33613 813-979-4926 12 months – Pre-K

Montessori Academy of Temple Terrace 5804 Gibson Ave., Montessori Preparatory School of Ocala Temple Terrace, FL 33617 2967 N.E. Silver Springs Blvd., 813-985-7829 Ocala, FL 34470 12 months – Pre-K 352-351-3140 12 months – 5th grade

Sonia Johnson Owner

By Shannon Kelley Pattee

I

n 1970, Mrs. Sonia A. Johnson opened her first Montessori school in the Carrollwood area of Tampa. At that time, the school accommodated toddlers through kindergartenage children. However, the need for higher Montessori grade levels became apparent as the Montessori children tended to be above level compared to their peers. The decision to add grades first through sixth was made. Mrs. Johnson now owns five successful Montessori academies and preparatory schools in the Tampa Bay and Ocala areas. Montessori Academies are highly recognized in the community and serve as Montessori Certified Teacher Training and internship sites. They are affiliated with Montessori Institute of America, National Center for Montessori Education and American Montessori Society. Mrs. Johnson is passionate about Montessori education and about making a difference in the lives of so many children and their families. Her strong motivation stems from wanting her own children to have a Montessori education, along with her grandchildren and, “God willing,” her great-grandchildren. The Montessori Academies Mission Statement is to provide an environment to meet the individual needs of young children guided by teachers trained in the Montessori philosophy. This philosophy acknowledges that education must be a help to each individual child, so that he or she may develop to his or her highest potential. Students learn through hands-on activities in sequencing at their own pace. Each classroom contains a full set of basic, intermediate

and advanced level Montessori materials. The curriculum includes an early reading program based on phonics, handson mathematics, science, social studies, practical life and character development, music and movement, art and foreign languages. They also offer after school enrichment activities and extended hours The Montessori Academies have been in business for more than 40 years with the same owner. Mrs. Johnson believes that a Montessori education should be affordable for all to take advantage of. Another unique quality is that they were the first Montessori schools in the area to provide education for toddlers who are still in diapers, and often, many of those enrolled toddlers are reading by the age of three. At the Montessori Academies, the children are encouraged to utilize their critical thinking skills to become independent thinkers and better problem solvers. The use of interdisciplinary studies is also being utilized to incorporate a particular subject matter into many different areas of learning.

WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT TAMPA BAY’S BEST SCHOOLS? CHECK OUT PARENT GUIDE’S EDUCATION ISSUE

COMING IN EARLY 2012!


When your child took their first breath... they took yours away.

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MONTESSORI ACADEMIES We provide an environment that encourages active learning through methods that stimulate the child.

Toddlers thru 6th Grade Early Reading Program Hands-on Math Activities Fun Science Spanish Language / Cultural Immersion Drama Cooking Chinese Arts & Crafts Music & Movement

Serving the Tampa Bay area since 1970! Convenient Hours 7:00am – 6:00pm

Affordable Tuition Temple Terrace 899-2345, 985-7829

New Tampa 979-4926

Tampa 933-4782


Featuring Manners I Dr. Susan Bartell

a teachable MOMENT™

Manners Count during the holiday SeaSon and all year round

T

he excitement of the holiday season can bring out the best in kids, but it often brings out their worst. Nagging, whining and a lack of “please” and “thank you” are not uncommon during this festive, but frenetic time of year. It can be easy to let these behaviors slide without reprimand or punishment, because you want your child to enjoy the holidays. You also may not want to embarrass them at holiday gatherings by pointing out behavior flaws. However, in truth, this is an excellent opportunity to teach your child about manners. If you emphasize appropriate behavior during the holidays, he will begin to realize that it is important all the time. The key is to teach with patience rather than anger, and use strategies that help him achieve success rather than highlighting failure. These four techniques will help your child develop manners you can be proud of: 1. Quit while you’re ahead. Tired, cranky kids are more likely to be rude and impolite. If you finish shopping or leave a party before reaching this point, you will be able to praise your child for great manners at the end of the activity. Praise reinforces good behavior and motivates your child to want to continue it in the future. 2. Pre-teach manners. Before heading out to a gathering or holiday activity remind your child how you expect her to behave. Emphasize that you want to hear “please” and “thank you; “ that she should look at people when they talk to her and respond to questions; and generally behave in a way that will make you proud. Subtle reminders may be necessary. For example, before leaving a party you could whisper a reminder to your child to thank the host.

3. Don’t plead or punish. When your child doesn’t behave politely, respond firmly but not in anger. You don’t want your child to remember this holiday as one when he was embarrassed or punished. Resist the urge to yell in public, threaten or mete out serious consequences. On the other hand, imploring him to behave, but issuing no consequences— or empty ones—will not change his behavior. If necessary, take him aside and quietly remind him of your expectations. Explain that if he continues to be impolite, there will be a consequence. Explain the consequence and, if necessary, follow through with it. You may not be happy to take your child home from a party, hold a gift for a couple of days or send him to bed early, but the long-term impact will be worth it. Your child will develop manners, self-control and respectful behavior. This will be your favorite holiday gift! 4. Review and reward. After every holiday activity, compliment your child for positive behaviors. For example: • “I loved how you held the door open for people in the stores.” • “You played so patiently with your baby cousin.” • “Thank you for helping set the table tonight—it saved me time.” • “You said ‘thank you’ to grandma for the gift without being reminded.” • “I noticed that even though you didn’t love the gift, you made your uncle feel like you did”

Dr. Susan Bartell is America’s #1 Family Psychologist. Her latest book is The Top 50 Questions Kids Ask. You can learn more about her at www.drsusanbartell.com

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2012 COVER SEARCH

Capture that Special Moment ...

Submit your photo for a chance to be chosen for the Cover of Parent Guide速 or Tampa Bay Baby 速 or maybe used in our editorial pages throughout 2012!

WIN Great Prizes for your family and Give Back to your favorite non profit! For details log on parentguide.com


Dr. Kim John Payne | By Georgianne Riley-Price

doctors LIFE

The undeclared war on childhood The Kaiser FoundaTion researched and deTermined ThaT The average 8 To 18- yearold spends seven and a halF hours in FronT oF a screen.

H

ow often as a parent have you thought to yourself, “I'm exhausted. I can't keep up this pace?” Whether you work full time every day and then come home to a family on the go with multiple needs, or whether you're a stay-at-home parent who's “on” all of the time caring for the children, for modern family, there just doesn't seem to be any breathing room. And while every member of the family is paying the price, the children are truly being robbed of their childhood, says Dr. Kim John Payne author of Simplicity Parenting. According to Payne, today's moms and dads are in the front lines of “a parenting arms race” that's competitive and that pushes parents to constantly strive for more. More sports, more ballet classes, faster technology and better this and that. It's nonstop. Yet, this mindset of more is not producing happier, healthier, calmer and more well adjusted kids. Instead, we have a society of children who are “plugged in” to some gaming or technological device around the clock and are being diagnosed in droves with attention related disorders. What's the solution? Payne believes happiness can be found simply by slowing down and looking at four different areas: Decluttering: Whether it's toys, clothes, aromatic cleaners and air fresheners anything that adds unnecessary stimulation and takes up space, consider letting it go. Too much stuff overwhelms children, and too many toys

can cheat them of the opportunity to be creative and cooperative in their play. Predictability and Rhythms: The key here is striving for balance in a way that helps children know what to expect at home. The predictability and rhythms may be conveyed through the morals and ethics that permeate the family or family traditions and rituals. But they're important because they give the children a sense of security. Scheduling: It sounds counterintuitive, but allow your children the gift of boredom. Why? Because out of that boredom springs creativity. So, let your child have real downtime where he has to figure out what to do. Chances are, you'll be surprised at the outcome. Filtering Out Adult World: This is harder than it seems, because the adult world lives in and around children constantly, at school and at home. Payne believes that children are heavily exposed to the adult world through adult conversation, media, computers, smart phones, etc. Plus, they're regularly exposed to solutions that promote violence. According to Payne, when you remove these influences, discipline issues become much easier.

Learn more about Dr. Kim John Payne and Simplicity Parenting at www.simplicityparenting.com.

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Four Young Brothers Stay Together....Forever! T

ammy and Chris Dunne always knew they wanted to adopt. Tammy was born and raised in New York. She was reared by her mother, but due to her mother’s unmet mental health issues, Tammy and her siblings eventually entered foster care. Tammy was 11 years old at that time and remained in care until she “aged out” at 18. Tammy recalls that some homes were better than others, and the experiences shaped her into the person she is today. She was one of the success stories; she did well in school, participated on her swim team and eventually went on to attend college. Tammy can relate only too well to the struggles of children in foster care, as she has walked in their shoes. She understands how lonely and disruptive it can be given the frequent changes in schools, friends and homes. In 2003, Tammy married her husband, Chris, who shares her same passion for adoption, as he was adopted as a child himself. Together, they have two older daughters of their own, but vowed one day to give a child in foster care a second chance at a loving home. The Dunne’s started taking the necessary steps toward adoption, with the first one being attending a free orientation with Eckerd Community Alternatives, a nonprofit agency that oversees the local foster care system. As they were pursuing adoption, they discovered the portrait and stories of foster children on the Heart Gallery...and they fell in love! On National Adoption Day in Pinellas County, the Dunne’s lived up to that promise, adopting not

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just one child from foster care – but four! They first saw the faces of this sibling group of four, who range in age from 8 to 14, on the Heart Gallery of Pinellas and Pasco – and they knew that brothers John (age 8), Aaron (age 10), Trisden (age 12), and Galyn (age 14) belonged in their home with their family. If not for the Dunne family, these rambunctious young boys faced a possible future growing up apart in different foster or adoptive homes. And although the road has been rough at times, Tammy and her husband remain committed to raising the brothers together and are adoption advocates who have formed their own network of support of other adoptive families. And they know that you don’t have to be perfect to be the perfect parents for children in foster care – you just have to be committed! November Is National Adoption Month – A Time To Celebrate Forever Families November is National Adoption Month, a month set aside each year to raise awareness about the adoption of children and youth from foster care. The first major effort to promote awareness of the need for adoptive families for children in foster care occurred in Massachusetts in 1976, when Governor Michael Dukakis announced the first-ever Adoption Week. The idea grew in popularity and spread nationwide. In 1984, President Reagan proclaimed the first National Adoption Week, and in 1995, the week was expanded to the entire month of November under the

parentguide.com

leadership of President Clinton. Every November, a Presidential Proclamation launches activities and celebrations to help build awareness of adoption throughout the nation. Thousands of community organizations arrange and host programs, events, and activities to share positive adoption stories, challenge the myths, and draw attention to the thousands of children in foster care who are waiting for permanent families. The celebration usually also includes National Adoption Day with courthouses throughout the nation participating and hundreds of adoptions being finalized simultaneously on that day. How Big Is The Need? In the United States, about 450,000 children and teens live in foster care and over 107,000 are waiting for permanent adoptive families, while in Florida nearly 20,000 live in temporary foster care and about 800 are currently available for adoption. Locally on any given day, there are about 800 children and teens residing in foster care; of those, more than 100 need forever homes. And about half of all these are African American children and teens. Adoption by the Numbers You Don’t Have To Be Perfect To Adopt You don’t have to be perfect to be the perfect parent for a child in foster care. Foster children don’t need perfection; they need the commitment and love a forever family can provide. I believe there are families out there for every child living in foster care – we just need to find them. Families who understand their strengths


In the United States: •

About 450,000 children and teens live in foster care

About 107,000 foster children and teens are currently available for adoption In Florida

About 19,800 children and teens live in foster care

About 800 foster children and teens are currently available for adoption

In Florida’s Pinellas and Pasco Counties (Circuit 6):

and limitations, and aren’t afraid to advocate on behalf of themselves. Who can be consistent yet flexible; strong yet nurturing. Who have the patience, commitment, and unconditional love to give foster children and teens, so they can adjust, grow and thrive in a safe, stable permanent home. Don’t Expect Perfection As foster children will tell you, they aren’t perfect either. Many have been in foster care for years, experiencing multiple placements and multiple disappointments. They know the foster home or group care facility where they live is just “temporary”; not where they belong. They live each day in limbo, and the pervasive word they use to describe themselves is “lonely”. They are children who have been exposed to more traumas, loss and rejection than most of us will ever know – and they have reacted in the best way they could in that moment. Don’t judge them by the words written on some study in a file. They aren’t a totality of their meltdowns, incidents and dark moments. They are children who have been physically and emotionally hurt – but they can (and will) heal. Take the time to get to know them. Dig beneath the hard outer

About 800 children and teens live in foster care

About 100 foster children and teens are currently available for adoption

surface, peel back the layers and you’ll find a promising young man or young woman. What Does The Term “Special Needs” Mean? “Special needs” is a federal, legal definition that applies to most children in foster care. It means the child qualifies for an adoption subsidy, but it does not necessarily mean the child has a disability. In Florida, any of the following criteria qualifies a child for special needs assistance: • Age 8 or older • Member of a sibling group being placed for adoption together • African American or racially mixed • Significant emotional ties with foster parents or a relative caregiver • Mental, physical or emotional handicap Who Are Our Children In Need Of Forever Families? Children come into foster care through no fault of their own. Some enter care because they were abused, neglected or abandoned or because their parents weren’t able to care or cope with their medical needs or disabilities. They come from varied backgrounds, circumstances, races and ethnicities. While some have specific medical, physical or emotional issues that

require special care, many do not. When children in foster care are available for adoption, this means the legal rights of their biological parents have been terminated and new adoptive families must be found. • African American Children – At any given time, about half of children in foster children awaiting adoption are African American. Adopting a child of African American descent provides unique opportunities for families to help preserve and celebrate the child’s heritage. Targeted recruitment efforts are currently underway to partner with churches and other faith-based organizations to help find African American children adoptive homes. These initiatives include our brand new “Churches as Champions for Children” initiative and One Church, One Child of Florida. • Teenagers - Teenagers in care need parents too. Think back to your own teenage years and remember how badly you needed love and guidance as you navigated the transition to adulthood. As an adoptive parent to a teen, you’ll provide them with a strong family foundation and give them the security and confidence to make solid life decisions that lead to a successful future. And remember, when you adopt

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a teenager from foster care, tuition is free to any Florida state university, college or vocational school. • Children with Disabilities or Medical Conditions Some of the children who wait the longest to find forever families are children with special disabilities or medical conditions. We are looking for families who will embrace this challenge and experience the unique rewards of adopting a child with special needs. Some of our best prospects are those who have successfully parented children with similar disabilities, as well as those who work in the medical field. • Sibling Groups - In the past, brothers and sisters separated from their birth parents due to abuse or neglect were often adopted into different homes. This was partially because younger siblings found homes more readily, leaving older siblings in temporary foster care. As the lead agency for the local foster care system, Eckerd Community Alternatives believes strongly in keeping siblings together and is committed to finding adoptive homes, whenever possible, for large sibling groups. For more information about fostering or adopting please call Eckerd’s Recruitment Line (866) 233-0790. To see the faces and stories of local foster children available for adoption please visit heartgallerykids.org. Local Adoption Facts • You don’t have to be perfect to be a perfect parent for a child in foster care – you just have to be committed. There are families out there for every child living in foster care – we just need to find them. Families who understand their

strengths and limitations, and aren’t afraid to advocate on behalf of themselves. Who can be consistent yet flexible, strong yet nurturing and who have the patience, commitment, and unconditional love to give. • Children come into foster care through no fault of their own. Some enter care because they were abused, neglected or abandoned or because their parents weren’t able to care or cope with their medical needs or disabilities. They come from varied backgrounds, circumstances, races and ethnicities. While some have specific medical, physical or emotional issues that require special care, many do not. When children in foster care are available for adoption, this means the legal rights of their biological parents have been terminated and new permanent, adoptive families must be found. • Eckerd Community Alternatives is the communitybased child welfare lead agency in Pinellas and Pasco counties and is responsible for the safety, well-being and permanency of more than 3,100 children and teens each day. Eckerd Community Alternatives is a program of Eckerd, a national nonprofit that has given much-needed second chances to more than 100,000 abused, neglected and at-risk children since 1968. • Eckerd Community Alternatives celebrates record breaking numbers of adoptions, and last year more than 273 children and teens were adopted from foster care, exceeding the statewide goal set by the Florida Department of Children and Families! • For more information about adopting children from foster care call Eckerd’s Recruitment Line at (866) 2330790 or visit www.heartgallerykids.org. • Children available for adoption include teenagers, siblings groups or children with medical conditions and about half of the children and teens awaiting adoption are African American. • If families aren’t found for these kids, they run the risk of aging out of foster care when they turn 18, and each year, about 100 youth age out of foster care in Pinellas and Pasco counties. This means no place to go during the holidays, no one to walk them down the aisle, no one to help them raise their own children and pass down family traditions.



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