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Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis Opportunistic Architecture Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, David J. Lewis

Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts Chicago Princeton Architectural Press New York


Graham Foundation / Princeton Architectural Press series New Voices in Architecture presents first monographs on emerging designers from around the world

Published by Princeton Architectural Press 37 East Seventh Street New York, New York 10003 For a free catalog of books, call 1.800.722.6657. Visit our website at www.papress.com. © 2008 Princeton Architectural Press All rights reserved Printed and bound in China 11 10 09 08 4 3 2 1 First edition No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher, except in the context of reviews. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent editions. Photo credits: Michael Moran: 13, 25, 27, 28 left, 32 right, 33–34, 35 top right, 46–49, 51 top right, 52–57, 58 bottom left, 63, 76, 78 right, 79, 80 right, 81, 83–87, 131, 133 top, 134, 135 bottom, 158–59, 160–66, 167 top right Rudolph Janu: 29–31, 34 top right Elliott Kaufman: 112 bottom, 114 bottom, 115 bottom Hye-Young Chung: 137 Maya Galbis: 58 top left, 132, 167 bottom dbox: 152 top left, 154 bottom, 157 bottom right LTL would like to thank Hilary Zaic, Maya Galbis, Elizabeth Hodges, Alex Terzich, Beatie Blakemore, Jason Dannenbring, Tamicka Marcy, and Kathryn van Voorhees for their work on this book. Editor: Dorothy Ball Design: LTL with Jan Haux Special thanks to: Nettie Aljian, Sara Bader, Nicola Bednarek, Janet Behning, Becca Casbon, Penny (Yuen Pik) Chu, Russell Fernandez, Pete Fitzpatrick, Wendy Fuller, Clare Jacobson, John King, Nancy Eklund Later, Linda Lee, Laurie Manfra, Katharine Myers, Lauren Nelson Packard, Jennifer Thompson, Arnoud Verhaeghe, Paul Wagner, Joseph Weston, and Deb Wood of Princeton Architectural Press —Kevin C. Lippert, publisher Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Lewis, Paul, 1966– Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis : opportunistic architecture / Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, David J. Lewis. — 1st ed. p. cm. — (New voices in architecture) ISBN-13: 978-1-56898-710-1 (alk. paper) ISBN-10: 1-56898-710-2 (alk. paper) 1. Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis—Themes, motives. 2. Architecture, Modern—21st century. I. Tsurumaki, Marc, 1965– II. Lewis, David J., 1966– III. Title. NA737.L454L47 2007 720.92’2—dc22 2007002186


Contents 6

Introduction

14

Arthouse

24

Bornhuetter Hall

36

Building 82%

44

Dash Dogs

50

Display Devices

52

Fluff Bakery

60

Four Exhibitions

64

Geltner Loft

68

The Great Egyptian Museum

76

Ini Ani Coffee Shop

82

Lozoo Restaurant

88

MSK Lobby Wall

94

Nazareth House

100

New Suburbanism

110

Parallel Lines Collection

112

Parking Sections

118

Park Tower

130

Tides Restaurant

136

Tourbus Hotel

148

Upside House

152

Vegas 888 Spa and Skin

158

Wooster House

160

Xing Restaurant

Tactics for an Opportunistic Architecture 168 170

Catalyzing Constraints Invention Sprawl

172

Paradoxical Pleasures

174

Alchemical Assemblies

176

Over Drawing

178

Project Credits

184

Timeline

190

Staff

192

Acknowledgments


Bornhuetter Hall Wooster, Ohio

Campus plan and existing residence halls

Ideal hall size, 25–30 students

E pin xis e g ting ro ve

The generative brief for Bornhuetter Hall, a new 47,500-square-foot residence hall with 185 beds, was partially derived through this research. Sited on the northern edge of a liberalarts campus, Bornhuetter Hall encourages social interaction by transforming the conventions of the double-loaded corridor and enriches student experience by providing a balance between private spaces for study and public gathering areas for communal life and discussion. The spatial diagram for the building is the product of resolving conflicting pressures. The college requested a single building not to exceed four floors. Therefore, each floor needed to hold forty-six students, yet according to the research, the ideal hall unit should be limited to twenty-five to thirty students. To solve this dilemma, the building was split into two parts, connected by an exterior courtyard. The existing site features—a parking lot and a pine grove—determined the different lengths of each portion of the building. By extending the brick and glass skins of the building around the courtyard, the two residence halls appear to be a single building. Within each wing, the hallways flare at their ends and embrace lounges, a kitchenette, and more intimate sitting areas. A collective outdoor courtyard is created by this split, and this exterior room functions as the public center of the building. It is an unusual space, simultaneously at the heart of the building and at the ends of each wing, containing both social and private spaces. It provides a sequence of entry into the building and a passage from the campus to the park beyond.

Plan diagram

24

Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis

ing t ist lo Ex king r pa

This project for the College of Wooster began in 2001 with an extensive feasibility study of the residential campus plan that culminated in recommendations for substantial changes in the density and configuration of several student halls. Contrary to the prevailing trend at residential colleges toward apartment-style living, extensive discussions with students, residential-life staff, and the college’s administration led to the unanticipated conclusion that a double-loaded corridor typology actually encourages the greatest degree of socialization and the most positive student experiences. Urban where the apartment type is suburban, the spatial format of the corridor building facilitates exchange among students and provides opportunities for diverse levels of interaction. At a time when students arrive on campus with an increasing array of insulating personal technologies—iPods, computers, Game Boys—this seemingly outmoded housing type offers a social mixing chamber for the cultivation of a collective collegial identity. The success of the double-loaded corridor as a catalyst for college social life is predicated on several important conditions: 1) the scale of the hall unit—the total number of rooms served by a single corridor—should be neither too small nor too large, as this results either in isolation or institutional anonymity, 2) the corridor should be wide enough to function as an ad-hoc social space and connect to or incorporate other collective spaces, and 3) the corridor should be integrated with the main circulation paths through the building.


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Bornhuetter Hall

27


The hall is sited at the northern edge of the campus adjacent to a park with ballfields. The courtyard both provides the major collective space for the building and forms a link between the campus and the landscape beyond. One can move through the building to the park—from outside to outside—without passing through a door.

The building is conceived as two copper-clad boxes wrapped by two veneers of brick. The brick skins unify the building, while the details at the corners, windows, and joints of the building explicate the interplay between the brick surfaces and the copper volume.

28

Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis


Wood-clad study nooks cantilever, like box seats, into the theatrical space of the courtyard, producing a dynamic entrance to the building and establishing private study areas in a collective setting. The daily activity of coming and going from the residence hall becomes a public event.


The courtyard is sheathed in a screen of channel glass oriented to allow for a dynamic and changing relation to the exterior. From the exterior of the building, these glass columns produce a constantly shifting degree of transparency. The angled position of the glass columns allows direct views between the courtyard and the entry walkway, while obscuring the views to and from automobiles on the adjacent streets. The glass screen animates the variations of sunlight and shadows during the day and provides a veil of privacy at night.

31


LTL’s design capitalizes on the opportunities and paradoxes of conventional systems of construction. The brick facades are treated as independent planes sheathing internal volumes clad in copper—an approach that reflects the veneer nature of the cavity wall construction. The layering and interplay between the brick skins and the copper volume is most evident at the ends of the building. Copper awnings, installed on the public, campus sides of the building to provide shading and depth, are treated as extensions of the interior volume through the openings of the brick skin. At the front, the formal limestone frame at the entry is extended down to form a side entry and a seat, playfully linking the monumental and the prosaic.

Pre-cast concrete plank proved a cost-effective and rapid means to construct the floors. It also provided an opportunity to alleviate the potential blandness of the stacked corridors by introducing a gap between the planks cantilevered from the bearing walls of the rooms over the corridor. The resulting slot houses recessed hallway lighting, introducing vertical articulation into an otherwise flat ceiling. Carpet was continued up the wall of the hallways to encourage social loitering. Located on the ground floor, a larger multipurpose room, wrapped in bamboo, connects directly to the park.

32

Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis


Bornhuetter Hall

33


Overlooking the interior courtyard, the study nooks are sized for individual or small-group study. In this way, the coming together of two or three students is also the moment of contact with the larger community of the residence hall. From within the perch of the study nooks, students can see the activity in adjacent nooks, the comings and goings in the courtyard below, and the campus and street activity beyond the channel-glass screen. The study nooks’ proximity to hall traffic and lounge activity means that students can both withdraw and engage in the community at the same time.

34

Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis

The communal lounges allow for contrasting views of the park and campus. On one side, an expansive glass wall opens to a serene park landscape of pines and grass while the study nooks provide more selective, active vantage points toward the courtyard and campus.

Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis: Opportunistic Architecture  

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