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Fall F a l l 2011

2011

Princeton Architectural Press www.papress.com

Princeton Architectural Press

Princeton Architectural Press

37 East 7th Street, New York, New York, 10003 www.papress.com

ISBN 978- 1- 61689-0 2 7 -8 / printed in canada

fi ne book s s i n ce

1981


Publisher’s Note In my last “Publisher’s Note,” in our Spring 2011 catalog, I hinted at some big changes ahead. I can now be less coy about this and announce (unless you’re a reader of the publishing business press, in which case you may already know) that Princeton Architectural Press has joined, at the beginning of this year, the McEvoy Group of companies, which includes Spin magazine, the publisher/packager Becker&Mayer, and, most importantly, our friends and colleagues at Chronicle Books, the much-admired San Francisco– based publisher and our North American distributor since 1995, and arguably the biggest single factor in our growth since then. Almost as soon as this deal was made public, some of the publishing trade magazines called to ask why I’d sold the Press: was it the decline of independent bookstores, always champions and showcases of our books, the bankruptcy of Borders, or the rise of e-books? My answer was simple: this is a partnership based not on necessity but on strategic strengths and a shared optimism about the possibilities ahead for both companies. The McEvoy Group believes strongly in the future of the printed book (look no further than the books produced by Chronicle for confirmation of this). As Dave Eggers, founder/publisher of McSweeney’s, recently wrote, these are actually very good times for books: more people read than ever before (including teens), more books are sold now than at any time in the past twenty years, and there are actually more independent bookstores now than there were two years ago. Anybody who declares that the printed book is dead clearly hasn’t looked at the beautiful new offerings in this catalog on pages 15 to 52. The simple truth remains that the printed book is an ecologically finetuned device, made of reusable and sustainable materials (such as recycled paper and soy-based inks), capable of displaying four color information at extremely high resolutions, and which can be made and distributed at very low cost and used with no external power source. All this without even considering the tactile and haptic dimensions of the printed, bound artifact, something which even the sexiest tablet will never come close to duplicating. See, for example, our book on Patty Curtan’s menus and artwork she’s created in letterpress and linoleum block for the celebrated restaurant Chez Panisse (p. 15) over the past forty years, if you’re looking for an example of art- and book-making that can never be simulated electronically. This said, it would be foolish to ignore the opportunities available to the forward-looking in the realm of digital publishing, and this is another area where we look ahead optimistically with the McEvoy Group. Indeed, you’ll find many of our books available in e-reader format at places like amazon. com, and hundreds of titles available for use, particularly by students and professors, at online libraries like ebrary.com and learningtree.com (details on specific titles available on our website at www.papress. com). When I watch my teenage sons leave the house in the morning with their forty-pound backpacks, I know firsthand that a lightweight and easily updated electronic course reader makes a huge amount of sense, and we are committed to making as many of our books available in this way as possible, and on the devices most consistent with our commitment to design and typographic excellence. So it is this dual commitment to the printed book and enthusiasm for the new frontiers opened up by digital publishing that culminated in our agreement with the McEvoy Group. As they were thirty years ago when the Press began, these are exciting times for publishing, full of promise, great ideas, and bright and creative coworkers. So rather than the end of a chapter, I think it is much more appropriate to think of this new partnership as the opening sentence in chapter two, the next thirty years. I’m confident you’ll find the books in this new catalog, whether you buy or download them, as rich food for thought and inspiration as any published in the world today. As always, we greatly welcome your feedback, ideas, and comments. Feel free to email me at lippert@papress.com or leave notes on our website www.papress.com.

Kevin Lippert Publisher New York, March 2011

For complete order Information including individual orders, examination and review copy orders, special orders, terms, freight, shipping and handling, please visit our website: www.papress.com Editorial and General Information Princeton Architectural Press 37 East 7th Street New York, NY 10003 Tel (212) 995-9620 Fax (212) 995-9454 www.papress.com Publicity and Marketing Sales Katharine Myers Tel (212) 995-9620 X 216 katharine@papress.com Russell Fernandez Tel (212) 995-9620 X 212 russell@papress.com To order Princeton Architectural Press titles United States Chronicle Books 680 Second Street San Francisco, CA 94107 Tel (800) 759-0190 Fax (800) 286-9471 order.desk@hbgusa.com www.chroniclebooks.info Canada Raincoast Books 9050 Shaughnessy Street Vancouver, BC V6P 6E5 Tel (604) 448-7100 Fax (604) 270-7161 info@raincoast.com www.raincoast.com Europe United Kingdom/Eire Publishers Group UK 8 the Arena, Mollison Avenue, Enfield, EN3 7NL, UK Tel (020) 8804-0400 Fax (020) 8804-0044 info@pguk.co.uk Benelux, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal, Netherlands Coen Sligting Bookimport Groot Nieuwland 27 1811 ET Alkmaar The Netherlands Tel 31 (72) 5119220 Fax 31 (72) 5117029 sligting@xs4all.nl www.coensligtingbookimport.nl

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All prices and publication dates subject to change without notice. Printed in Canada


Fall 2011 princeton architectural press

15 Menus for Chez Panisse 17 The Toaster Project 19 Graphic Design Thinking 21 Paula Scher MAPS 23 Tom Kundig: Houses 2 25 Geometry of Design Second Edition, Revised and Updated 27 Participate 29 The Business of Design 31 No Nails, No Lumber 33 The Houses of William Wurster 35 Oak 37 The Electric Information Age Book 39 Typography Sketchbooks 41 The Book as Art 43 Old Buildings, New Designs 44 The Nature of Place 45 Toward a New Interior 47 Material Strategies 48 After Taste 49 Pamphlet Architecture 32 50 The Concrete Dragon Hyphen Press

51 Counterpunch 52 Human Space 53 Backlist 66 Index 66 Order information


As we head into the fall of our 30th Anniversary year, we can’t help but feel a little introspective. Looking back at our books in print, it’s encouraging to see how much of our published past we bring with us into the future. We hope the following assortment of recent bestsellers will soon join the ranks of our timeless perennials. Much more than just strong “backlist titles,” the ongoing success of these books reflects their status as dependable sources of knowledge and inspiration for our readers. It’s your appetite for bright ideas and smart design—as well as your enthusiastic word-of-mouth and online recommendations—that makes everything we do possible.


Thinking with Type, second, revised and expanded edition A Critical Guide for Designers, Writers, Editors, & Students Ellen Lupton 978-1-56898-969-3 $24.95 Paperback

Stickwork Patrick Dougherty 978-1-56898-862-7 $50.00 Hardcover 978-1-56898-976-1 $34.95 Paperback

Cartographies of Time Daniel Rosenberg and Anthony Grafton 978-1-56898-763-7 $50.00 Hardcover

Form+Code in Design, Art, and Architecture Casey Reas et al. 978-1-56898-937-2 $24.95 Paperback

In the Wilds Drawings by Nigel Peake Nigel Peake 978-1-56898-952-5 $22.95 Hardcover

Visual Complexity Mapping Patterns of Information Manuel Lima 978-1-56898-936-5 $50.00 Hardcover

Publish Your Photography Book Darius D. Himes and Mary Virginia Swanson 978-1-56898-883-2 $29.95 Paperback

Large Scale Fabricating Sculpture in the 1960s and 1970s Jonathan D. Lippincott 978-1-56898-934-1 $45.00 Hardcover

The Projectionist Kendall Messick and Brooke Anderson 978-1-56898-933-4 $40.00 Hardcover

The Englishman Who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects John Tingey 978-1-56898-872-6 $24.95 Hardcover

Natural Houses The Residential Architecture of Andersson-Wise Arthur Andersson and Chris Wise 978-1-56898-879-5 $40.00 Hardcover

Graphic Design The New Basics Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips 978-1-56898-770-5 $50.00 Hardcover 978-1-56898-702-6 $35.00 Paperback


“And now I sketch for different reasons—sometimes just to draw, sort of for fun, sort of as an exercise, maybe the way knitters knit. Other times, I sketch to work out ideas, or make notes of ideas as they come up—the same way I keep a notebook for writing. The examples here are typographic sketches that are different from what I do in average sketchbooks. They are part of our collaborative process. First we talk, and possibly scribble something. Then Dikko sets type and proofs some things. I cut it up and move it around into a rough pasteup, and he sets that up on the press and proofs. Then we fine-tune, and eventually, finally, voilà!” e st h e r   k . smi t h, from t y po gr a ph y s k etc h b o ok s For more information about this title, see page 39


“Paula Scher’s giant map paintings, despite the fact that they are composed entirely of boundary lines, place-names, and information relevant to the identity of their subjects, do not depict any place. The hum of information overload, the fullness of the overwritten surface of the canvas, and a suggestion of wistful wanderlust bring a hint of thaw, but the icy disjunct between the land in question and its treatment remains absolute— and more informative than any depiction could be.” n e l l mc c li ste r , b om b m aga z i n e For more information about this title, see page 21


7


“Also called ‘radiant thinking,’ mind mapping is a form of mental research that allows designers to quickly explore the scope of a given problem, topic, or subject area. Starting with a central term or idea, the designer quickly plots out associated images and concepts. Mind mapping was developed by Tony Buzan, a popular psychology author, who has promoted his method through publications and workshops. Although Buzan delineated specific rules for mind mapping, such as using a different color for each branch of the diagram, his method is employed more loosely and intuitively by countless designers, writers, and educators.” k r i s s i x e na k i s , from e l le n lu p ton's gr a ph ic de s ign t h i n k i ng, For more information on this title, see page 19


“By inventorying the effects of change in a playful and accessible vein that, though couched in the phototypographical vernacular of the present, is squarely aimed at you and your everyday life, the book manages both to entertain and to initiate a process of cognitive retooling. To this end, it demands of readers a nonlinear approach to reading, based on the very forms of verbal-visual pattern recognition that McLuhan believed essential to survival and success in the second half of the twentieth century.� j e ffr ey t. s c h na pp, from t h e e lectr ic i n for m at ion age b o ok, For more information on this title, see page 37


11


“M. F. K. Fisher made a rare public appearance—one of her last—a conversation in front of a live audience: a post-event supper on the stage to honor and please her. The menu included some of her professed favorite things to eat: oysters and hot sausages. The stage was set with extravagant quantities of roses grown by her friend Ray Redell. As for imagery, I had only to think of the grace and beauty of Mary Frances in her last years, and how some roses produce striking scarlet hips, still stunning after the blooms have gone and winter approaches.” patr ic i a c u rta n, from me n us for c h e z pa n i s s e , For more information on this title, see page 15


[13] New Year’s Eve 1986}

-

one and only time, and the feather was intended to add a sense of extravagance and glamour to the festivities. Mouth-watering drama was supplied by the sight of suckling dining room has an open kitchen, one end of the small dining

early hours of a Sunday morning a smouldering coal in a wood rebuilt to include a large brick hearth in an alcove just inside the

on the back wall of the hearth, spit roasting became part of the from the grill and roasts turning on the spit are exciting elements of the ambiance of the dining room.

26

27

[103] A Marriage Feast for Peggy & Robert} Peggy and Robert have a storybook romance. Both of a certain age with full lives already behind them, they were living in different cities and not looking for anyone. At the urging of mutual friends, they agreed to be introduced, and fell madly in love. They knew very quickly that they would marry and begin a new life together, and they are the envy of their friends for their utter devotion to one another. Branches of rosemary (symbol of fidelity and remembrance) form the heart. I cut and printed two blocks, light and dark green, and added the color to the blossoms and stems by hand with watercolor.

   ;  ;  ;  

155

154

[28] Parsi New Year’s Eve} Niloufer Ichaporia King, author and anthropologist, cooks her fabulous Parsi New Year’s feasts at Chez Panisse every year and this one was the first. Niloufer has a collection of small, footed tin trays from her native Bombay. They are perforated with little holes that form designs of auspicious symbols. The little trays are filled with chalk and their designs are stencilled on the sides of entryways as a traditional welcome to guests. (The fish on the menu are derived from them.) The stencil designs began on the sidewalk outside the restaurant and continued up the front steps to the entrance. There were fragrant garlands of blossoms of tuberose, marigold, and gardenia over every doorway, and an intoxicating aroma of spices and frankincense. I found a handmade paper from India for the menu, and Niloufer’s husband, David King (brilliant mad scientist), volunteered to formulate a dye from fresh tumeric to color it. We set up in my studio and dipped each sheet into a tray of dye and spread them out to dry on every available surface. The color was intense and beautiful, but not fast, it has faded around the edges. The dye was also extremely fragrant. The studio pleasantly smelled of tumeric for months. The title at the top translates as Happy New Year, and it is printed in the auspicious color of red, as is the pomegranate, a symbol of wealth and good fortune.

   ;  ;  ;   

48

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Menus for Chez Panisse The Art and Letterpress of Patricia Curtan Patricia Curtan, with a foreword by Alice Waters Chez Panisse, a small restaurant in Berkeley, California, opened its doors in the summer of 1971. For forty years, the restaurant and its founder, legendary chef Alice Waters, has had a profound influence on food, farming, cooking, and dining around the world. In the beginning, Waters saw the beauty and aesthetic of fine printing as a way to communicate—at the outset of the diners’ experience—the care and attention given to the preparation of their dinner. Berkeley-based artist Patricia Curtan began hand printing menus for the restaurant during its early years, while employed as a cook in the Chez Panisse kitchen. Curtan’s menus, works of art in their own right, capture the unique spirit of the famous restaurant with letterpress and linoleum-block prints on beautiful paper. In Menus for Chez Panisse, Curtan presents four decades of menus— including dinners for special guests such as Julia Child, Hillary Clinton, Mikhail Baryshnikov, and James Beard—with notes about the menus, the artwork, the occasions, and, of course, the food. • The visual world of Chez Panisse will inspire anyone interested in cooking, fine dining, letterpress, or hand-printed art • Includes wonderful anecdotes about famous guests such as Julia Child, James Beard, Wendell Berry, Marion Cunningham, M. F. K. Fisher, John Cage, Mikhail Baryshnikov, and former First Lady Hillary Clinton

Also Available . . .

• Ends with an illustrated look at the author’s printing process. A selection of her linoleum blocks are scattered throughout the book

Shipping August 2011 — 11 × 9.5 in / 28 × 24 cm 184 pp / 250 color Hardcover 978-1-61689-029-2 $40.00 / £25.00 —

Large Scale 978-1-56898-934-1 $45.00

54000

Pulled 978-1-56898-943-3 $35.00

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078

S te e l

S te e l

079

Attempting to smelt iron with a microwave

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The Toaster Project Or a heroic attempt to build a simple electric appliance from scratch Thomas Thwaites * or a heroic attempt to

“Hello, my name is Thomas Thwaites, and I have made a toaster.” So begins The Toaster Project, the author’s nine-month-long journey from his local appliance store to remote mines in the UK to his mother’s backyard, where he creates a crude foundry. Along the way, he learns that an ordinary toaster is made up of 404 separate parts, that the best way to smelt metal at home is by using a method found in a fifteenth-century treatise, and that plastic is almost impossible to make from scratch. In the end, Thwaites’s homemade toaster— a haunting and strangely beautiful object—cost 250 times more than the toaster he bought at the store and involved close to two thousand miles of travel to some of Britain’s remotest locations. The Toaster Project may seem foolish, even insane. Yet, Thwaites’s quixotic tale, told with self-deprecating wit, helps us reflect on the costs and perils of our cheap consumer culture, and in so doing reveals much about the organization of the modern world.

build a simple electric appliance from scratch

Thomas Thwaites

• Thwaites’s toaster construction process is illustrated from beginning (dismantling of a cheap toaster) to end (final homemade toaster that, if not toasts, at least warms a slice of bread) • Includes e-mails he sent to experts in various fields and conversations with the BP press office and Professor Jan Cilliers, the Chair in Mineral Processing at the Royal School of Mines

Also Available . . .

• Explores timely environmental and social issues in a playful and accessible manner

Shipping October 2011 — 5 × 7.5 in / 13 × 19 cm 192 pp / 83 color / 60 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-997-6 $19.95 / £12.99 — 51995

Mingering Mike 978-1-56898-569-5 $24.95

The Englishman Who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects 978-1-56898-872-6 $24.95

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“A problem “A problem well-stated well-stated is half-solved.” is half-solved.” John Dewey John Dewey

How HowtotoDefine DefineProblems Problems Most design Most design projects projects start with starta with problem, a problem, such as such as This chapter This chapter looks at looks techniques at techniques designers designers use to use to improving improving a product, a product, creating creating a logo,aorlogo, illustrating or illustrating an an define define (and question) (and question) the problem the problem in the early in thephases early phases of of idea. Designers idea. Designers and clients and clients alike often alike think oftenabout think about the creative the creative process. process. Methods Methods such as such brainstorming as brainstorming and and problems problems too narrowly too narrowly at the at outset, the outset, limitinglimiting the success the success mind mapping mind mapping help designers help designers generate generate core concepts, core concepts, of the of outcome. the outcome. A clientA who clientclaims who claims to need toaneed new a new while others while others (such as (such interviewing, as interviewing, focus groups, focus groups, and and brochure brochure may domay better do better with a with website, a website, a promotional a promotional brand mapping) brand mapping) seek toseek illuminate to illuminate the problem the problem by asking by asking event, event, or a marketing or a marketing plan. Aplan. designer A designer who thinks who thinks the the what users what want usersorwant whatorhas what been hasdone beenbefore. done before. Many Many client needs client needs a new alogotype new logotype may find may that find a pictorial that a pictorial icon icon of these of techniques these techniques could take couldplace take at place any at phase any phase of a of a or a new or aname new will name work willbetter work better for a global for a global audience. audience. A Aproject.project. Brainstorming Brainstorming is the first is the step firstinstep many in designers’ many designers’ searchsearch for greener for greener packaging packaging may yield maynot yield justnot individual just individual process, process, and it is and theit mother is the mother of many of other many thinking other thinking tools, tools, products products but new butsystems new systems for manufacturing for manufacturing and and so we so putwe it at put the it at beginning. the beginning. distribution. distribution. Why are Why such aretechniques—whether such techniques—whether casualcasual or or At the At beginning the beginning of the of design the design process, process, ideas are ideas arestructured—necessary structured—necessary at all? at Can’t all? aCan’t creative a creative personperson just just cheap cheap and plentiful, and plentiful, pumped pumped out in abundance out in abundance and and sit down sit and down beand creative? be creative? Most thinking Most thinking methods methods involveinvolve tossedtossed aroundaround with abandon. with abandon. Later, this Later, large thispool largeofpool of externalizing externalizing ideas, setting ideas, setting them down them in down a form in athat form can that can ideas isideas narrowed is narrowed down to down those to most thoselikely mostto likely succeed. to succeed. be seen beand seen compared, and compared, sortedsorted and combined, and combined, rankedranked and and It takesIt time takestotime visualize to visualize and test and each testviable each concept. viable concept. shared.shared. Thinking Thinking doesn’tdoesn’t happenhappen just inside just inside the brain. the Itbrain. It Thus, designers Thus, designers often begin often with begina with period a period of playful, of playful, occursoccurs as fleeting as fleeting ideas become ideas become tangible tangible things:things: words,words, open-ended open-ended study. It’ study. s a process It’s a process that includes that includes writingwriting lists lists sketches, sketches, prototypes, prototypes, and proposals. and proposals. More and More more, and more, as wellasaswell sketching as sketching images. images. It involves It involves mapping mapping familiarfamiliar thinking thinking happens happens amongamong groupsgroups working working together together towardtoward territory territory as wellasaswell charting as charting the unknown. the unknown. common common goals. goals.

14

GRAPHIC 14 GRAPHIC DESIGNDESIGN THINKING THINKING

15

Defining the Problem

Key

Wall

Doorbell

Roof Mailbox

Door

Door Knob

Sleeping Human

Home (visual)

Interview with Charlie Rubenstein

Shopping Cart Sleeping Bag

Sign

Charity Logo

Street

Intersection

Homeless (visual) Hand Drawn

Childish Logo

Paired with his body language, Charlie’s comments showed that he was dissatisfied with the current state of homeless services but also recognized their value.

HOME

If we are talking about 3419 as an organization,

Trustworthy

LESS

Home Logo

where do you see it five years from now?

Homeless Logo

in the city. I don’t want to do it from a nonprofit, third

Hotel/Resort

Believe

Real Estate

party level, I want to do it from the inside out.

Main Visual

My biggest problem with Baltimore’s homeless

Effective Logo

services, or whatever you want to call it, is that they don’t

(for teenager)

Sample Logo Home Human

go very deep. There isn’t enough reach. For me, it isn’t that they are doing it wrong, there just needs to be a new

Fashionable Eye Catching

way to do it.

Culture Fresh

associated images and concepts. Mind mapping was developed by Tony Buzan, a popular psychology

On the theory of mind mapping, see Tony Buzan and Barry Buzan, The Mind Map Book: How to Use Radiant Thinking to Maximize Your Brain’s Untapped Potential (New York: Plume, 1996).

Here, Charlie started talking more quickly and with more animation in his tone and body language, indicating his passion for treating homeless people like real people instead of just a number.

Although Buzan delineated specific rules for mind mapping, such as using a different color for each branch of the diagram, his method is employed more

02 Branch out. Create a web of associations around the core phrase or image. If you like, use simple pictures as well as words.

loosely and intuitively by countless designers, writers, and educators. Ferran Mitjans and Oriol Armengou of Toormix, a design firm in Barcelona, call the technique “a cloud of ideas.” Krissi Xenakis

03 Organize. The main branches of your map can represent categories such as synonyms, antonyms, homonyms, related compound words, clichés, stock phrases, and so on. Try using a different color for each branch you develop.

GRAPHIC DESIGN THINKING

its biggest problem is that it’s singular and won’t work for everybody. The biggest problem is that, even institutionally, we are treating people as numbers. We

I want to create a people-based program. Because we are talking about people, and there are

CAN

WANT

ARE

Livestrong Pepsi Refresh online

in-person Product Red

so many different kinds of them. So, what if we tried to

six-month qualitative research study where we actually

Tom’s Shoes

continuous

go out and interview over five hundred homeless people. And not just one time but over a period of time, so we can understand who these people are.

8

GRAPHIC DESIGN THINKING

Brand Matrix. This diagram shows relationships among different social change campaigns. Some are single events, while others take place continuously. Some happen online, others, in person. See more on Brand Matrix, page 42.

Brainstorming. By focusing the campaign on what homeless people have and not what they materially lack, designers chose “can,” “want” and “are” as the voice of the project. See more on Brainstorming, page 16.

THE DESIGN PROCESS

9

Not Like Grandma. Here, traditional quilting patterns have nourished visual imagery that is both graphic and ripe with personal voice. In these reconstructed illustrations, complex patterns nest within simple shapes to re-create a crafted vocabulary. The shape and color palettes were inspired by memories of family quilts made by grandmothers, great aunts, and church quilting circles. Design: Christopher Clark.

How to Start a Visual Diary 01 Define parameters. How regular are the entries? Will you work in a journal or post online? Will there be a theme to your diary or will it roam untamed? Ask yourself questions. Experiment with new media and shelved ideas.

Do it every day.

your routine and make something pretty. Designing something new every day can be as healthy for the creative mind as eating fruits and vegetables is for the body. Drawn-out projects stuffed with endless phases, revisions, and brainstorming sessions can rapidly degrade into over-cooked solutions and aimless theory. Sometimes, a big spoonful of sweet, unrefined creation can

02 Stick to the rules. Big projects tend to dominate your schedule. Free yourself by dedicating a little time each day to making something. Fifteen minutes of unguided creativity could solve a month’s worth of overthinking.

be the perfect remedy for opening up a stubborn mental block. By making beautiful things on a daily basis, you can build a library of small and simple ideas that can blossom into ambitious projects later. Making something gorgeous can be painless and fulfilling. Hydrate your mind with small pleasures reminiscent of the doodles and sketchbook pages that first got you excited about graphic design. Christopher Clark

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event-driven Race for the Cure

are treating people as a genre, as if they are faceless,

understand who each of these people are? Where they

A Month of Type. Making a new typographic work each day for a month is a workout for the eye and mind. Design: Christopher Clark.

Visual Diary There’s only one salvation from the grind of a never-ending project: break

Heart

Mind Mapping. Designers use associative diagrams to quickly organize possible directions for a project. Design: Christina Beard and Supisa Wattanasansanee. See more on Mind Mapping, page 22.

came from and what their names are...I want to do a

04 Subdivide. Each main branch can feed smaller subcategories. Work quickly, using the process to free up your mind. For example, the idea of discovery can take you from the names of inventors and inventions to the physical senses. HOW TO DEFINE PROBLEMS

Sketches: Supisa Wattanasansanee

100

People often need time to get to the bottom line. After forty-five minutes, we were finally able to hear the core of what the client was trying to achieve with the 3419 campaign.

How to Make a Mind Map 01 Focus. Place one element at the center of the page.

author who has promoted his method through publications and workshops.

22

Hand

Humorous (remarkable)

you could read in a lifetime....So, if you have a policy,

Design: Lauren P. Adams

heartless. Like they are just 3419.

subject area. Starting with a central term or idea, the designer quickly plots out

Abstract

Ambiguous (memorable)

Seriousness (touching)

Youth Organization

done. There are more quantitative studies around than

Mind Mapping allows designers to quickly explore the scope of a given problem, topic, or

Human Aspect

Furniture

Hardware Store

Can you give me a specific example of a new way?

Also called “radiant thinking,” mind mapping is a form of mental research that

Seriousness Logo

3419

Well, I want to redesign the way we treat homelessness

Sure. There needs to be more qualitative research Design: Alex Roulette

Colorful

Local (small)

Organization (big)

Interviewing. Designers talk to clients and other stakeholders to learn more about people’s perceived wants and needs. Shown here are highlighted excerpts from a videotaped conversation with Charlie Rubenstein, the chief organizer of the 3419 homeless awareness campaign. See more on Interviewing, page 26.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN THINKING

03 Work in a series. If a certain medium or method excites you, try it again the next day and the next. Make each entry a thoughtful followup to the last. That’s how little things grow into bigger projects. 04 Share your work. Create a blog or Flickr account. Sign up for an exhibition at a coffee shop. Get friends and coworkers to join in on the noodling. Be inspired by the weight of an audience’s gaze. (Of course, you don’t have to show everything you make.)

05 Keep going. The more stuff you make, the more valuable the endeavor becomes. Build up a graphic arsenal. When the really tough problems declare war on your sanity, you will be prepared to defend yourself. 06 Harvest the good stuff. Glance through your journal when it’s time to tackle bigger projects. You may have already found a useful solution or a viable idea.

HOW TO GET IDEAS

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GRAPHIC DESIGN THINKING

HOW TO CREATE FORM

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Design Briefs

Graphic Design Thinking Beyond Brainstorming Ellen Lupton, editor Creativity is more than an inborn talent. It is a hard-earned skill that, like all skills, improves with practice. Graphic Design Thinking explores a variety of techniques—from quick, seat-of-the-pants approaches to more formal research methods—for stimulating fresh thinking and solving design problems. Brainstorming techniques are grouped around the three main phases of the design process: defining problems, getting ideas, and creating form. Visual demonstrations and case studies show the design processes and solutions at work. Featuring best-selling author Ellen Lupton’s hands-on, accessible approach to instructional writing, this most recent addition to the Design Briefs series will help designers create projects that satisfy clients, users, and themselves. • Includes discussions with leading professionals, including Art Chantry, Ivan Chermayeff, Jessica Helfand, Steven Heller, Abott Miller, Christoph Niemann, Paula Scher, and Martin Venezky • Brainstorming is a big topic in business and product design circles, but little has been written on this topic with graphic designers in mind • Smart, compact, reader-friendly, visually inspiring introduction to the graphic design process

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The World 1998 56.5" x 77" acrylic on canvas next spread The World (detail)

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India 2007 98.5" x 91.5" acrylic on canvas right India (detail)

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pr i nc eton a rc h i te ct u r a l pr e s s


Paula Scher MAPS Paula Scher In the early 1990s, celebrated graphic designer Paula Scher (Make It Bigger, 2002) began painting maps of the world as she sees it. The larger her canvases grew, the more expressionistic her geographical visions became. Displaying a powerful command of image and type, Scher brilliantly transformed the surface area of our world. Paintings as tall as twelve feet depict continents, countries, and cities swirling in torrents of information and undulating with colorful layers of hand-painted boundary lines, place-names, and provocative cultural commentary. Collected here for the first time, Paula Scher MAPS presents thirty-nine of Scher’s obsessively detailed, highly personal creations. • Book’s dust jacket unfolds into a map print suitable for framing; many of the maps in this book have sold for thousands of dollars • Includes twenty-one paintings, four installations, and fourteen drawings and prints • Includes maps at all scales ranging in scope from the whole world, to maps of India, the Middle East, and Japan, to Washington, DC, Tokyo, and New York City • Includes a foreword by Simon Winchester (The Map that Changed the World, 2001) and an introductory essay by Paula Scher • Paula Scher’s maps have appeared in other best-selling Princeton titles, including You Are Here and The Map as Art (Katharine Harmon, 2003 and 2009), where one of her paintings graces the cover

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Tom Kundig

Tom Kundig Houses 2

Houses 2 Tom Kundig Our 2006 monograph Tom Kundig: Houses was an instant critical and commercial success. Over the past five years, Seattle-based Kundig has continued his meteoric rise, collecting numerous awards, including the 2008 Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award for Architecture Design. Tom Kundig: Houses 2 features seventeen residential projects, ranging from a fivehundred-square-foot cabin in the woods to a house carved into and built out of solid rock. In his new work, Kundig continues to strike a balance between raw and refined and modern and warm, creating inviting spaces with a strong sense of place. The houses seamlessly incorporate his signature inventive details, rich materials, and stunning sites—from the majestic Northwestern forest to the severe high desert. • Tom Kundig: Houses is one of our most successful monographs, selling more than ten thousand copies • Large format monograph is filled with evocative photographs as well as plans and detail drawings • Features a foreword by architect Juhani Pallasmaa and an essay by Daniel Friedman, Dean of the University of Washington College of Built Environments

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Vanna Venturi House, Robert Venturi, 1962-64 Breaking with the starkness of modern architecture and Meis van der Rhoe’s statement that “Less is more,” Robert Venturi argued the case for eclecticism in architecture by declaring that “Less is a bore.” In the small house he built for his mother he experimented with many of the ideas he would write about later in his influential book, Complexity and Contradiction in Modern Architecture. These ideas included the use of complexity, ambiguity, and contradiction.

MR Chair, Meis van der Rhoe, 1927

Chimney top is to the left of the center line

The house is at first simple and boldly symmetrical in its reflected gable roof line, centered chimney, and dominant square entry. Yet the eye is fascinated with the off-center chimney top, asymmetric window arrangement, and the presence of a rectangular hole that is punched through the center of the structure. The strong diagonals of the roof and right angles of the windows are brought together in harmony with the single artistic stroke of a circular arc.

Square

Square

During the mid 1920s Meis van der Rhoe was influenced by others who were experimenting with the new technology of tubular steel in furniture design. Metal was not a new material in furniture design and iron had been used in mid-nineteenth century furniture for cast iron garden furniture, rocking chairs, and tubular steel for children’s furniture and hospital beds. Metal was cost-effective, readily bent, and easily cleaned. It was rarely used for home interiors because of the aesthetic

sensibilities of Victorian tastes for upholstery with carved and embellished wood, and because of the coolness of the metal to the touch. What was new was the simplicity and geometric style of the way van der Rhoe used the metal. By the early 1920s at the Bauhaus Marcel Breuer had experimented with tubular steel in the design of tables, chairs, desks and storage uinits. In 1925 as the Bauhaus moved from Weimar to Dessau,

Breuer designed a range of furnishings for the new buildings, with the most iconic and lasting design being the ground breaking tubular steel chair, the elegant Wassily chair. Meis was aware of Breuer’s work and also that of Mart Stam who had designed a cantilever chair frame of right angles from straight lengths of gas pipe and elbow connectors. Meis’ chair frame was cantilevered, similar to Stam’s, but instead of right

angles the chair frame used a curve of tensioned tubular steel. This curve created an elastic frame that bent with flexible tension and provided comfort without the addition of an upholstered cushion. The chair was available in leather and canvas which were laced on with ties, and cane upholstery that was woven around the frame. In the armchair version the caning was wrapped around the arms so that the arms of the user did not touch cold metal.

Square

Center Center Line

Proportions of the Vanna Venturi House The proportions of the house, with the exclusion of the chimney top, are 1:2. The main proportions of the house including the roof line and doorway are symmetrical.

Center Of Square Center Of Arm Circle Center Of Frame Circles and Alignments The circle segments above the entrance give some clues as to how the various elements of the house relate to each other. A series of circles, all with the same center point, touch on the architectural elements.

Golden Section Rectangle MR Chair, Front View The MR chair front view fits in a golden section rectangle.

MR Chair, Side View The MR chair side view fits in a square. The center point of the square, center of the arm circle, and center of the frame circle all align on a diagonal.

MR Chair Influences 1850, Peter Cooper, Iron Rocking Chair (left) The sled-style frame is solid cast iron and the design is similar to the MR chair.

1925, Marcel Breuer, Wassily Chair (left) Made from tubular steel with stretched leather upholstery. 1926 Mart Stam’s Chair (right) Rough approximation drawing of the cantilever chair frame made of straight gas pipe and elbow connectors.

1860, Thonet Rocking Chair (right) The frame of is similar to the Iron Rocking Chair and made with bentwood. The MR chair was at one time manufactured by Thonet.

Center of Circles

Bathing at Asnières, Georges-Pierre Seurat, 1883 Georges-Pierre Seurat was classically educated as an artist at one of Europe’s premier fine art academies, L’École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. The academy was the powerful center of fine art education and held a tight monopoly on exhibitions and work selected for exhibition. Admission to the academy provided an entry into the fine art world and likely future prosperity for its students. The academy’s demanding curriculum emphasized study of classi-

cal Greek and Roman art and architecture which included mathematical principles. It is here that Seurat learned about visual organization and proportioning systems including the golden section.

exhibition by the established Paris Salon and prompted Seurat to join other artists in creating the Société des Artistes Indépendants. Later, the painting was exhibited with four hundred others in the Société but due to its massive size was hung in the exhibition beer hall where it met with scant attention, tepid reviews, and criticism for the commonplace subject matter of working men enjoying a swim on a hot summer day.

Bathing at Asnières was Seurat’s first monumental work as a painter, and was completed when he was just 24 years old. The canvas is a massive 79" x 118" (201 cm x 300 cm). The painting was rejected for

Intrigued with color and its application to the canvas, Seurat experimented with a painting technique he had developed of crosshatching, which he termed balayé. This technique involves a flat brush applying paint with larger strokes in the foreground and smaller strokes in the background, thereby increasing the sense of depth and perspective. Later, Seurat would develop another technique, pointilism, for his second and final masterwork, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte.

+

=

+

=

Construction of the Golden Section Dynamic Rectangle The golden section dynamic rectangle consists of four overlapping golden section rectangles. Beginning with a single rectangle it is copied and reflected vertically, and then copied and reflected horizontally. 58

59

Golden Section Dynamic Rectangle The golden section dynamic rectangle placed over the painting shows that the focal point, the seated figure, is placed at the square of the golden section rectangle. The horizon is at the square of the reciprocal golden section rectangle and the diagonals touch the angle of the seated figure’s neck and arms, the back of the figure in the water, and both the reclining figure and seated figures in the background.

Construction of the Golden Section Rectangle

Taliesin Barrel Chair, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1904, 1937 Similar to Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright designed furniture specifically for his buildings. Both architects believed in honoring the architecture with furnishings appropriate for the unique style and harmonizing the interior with the exterior. In the early twentieth century Frank Lloyd Wright was designing and building modern homes in a style that hadn’t been seen before. Flowing horizontal lines, abstracted geometry, and simplicity in

the architecture required furnishings with a similar aesthetic. Many of the furnishings available at that time were ornate and inappropriate for such modern architecture. Influenced by the Arts and Craft movement, the design of the furnishings gave Wright the opportunity to fully acknowledge the architecture with the interior furnishings as well as a venue for increasing his fees and profits through the additional commission of furniture design services.

The original Barrel chair was designed in 1904 and was said to be a favorite of Wright. The original chair had arms that flared up at the ends, a slightly thicker base, and thicker and higher back. In 1937, when Wright was designing, Wingspread, a house for Herbert Johnson of Johnson Wax, he needed chairs for the dining room and he revisited and refined the Barrel chair. The proportions were adjusted, the arms simplified, and the base was tapered resulting in a more streamlined and cohesive design.

The golden section rectangle is a ratio of the Divine Proportion. The Divine Proportion is derived from the division of a line segment into two segments such that the ratio of the whole segment, AB, to the longer part, AC, is the same as the ratio of the longer part, AC, to the shorter part, CB. This gives a ratio of approximately 1.61803 to 1, which can also be expressed 1+√5 .

Many of Wright’s furniture designs involved straight planes with angles, and the Barrel chair stands out because of the curved back and use of the circle. The cushion punches through the seat and can be seen above and below the wood frame. From the side view the seat circle cantilevers beyond the arms, reminiscent of a number of Wright’s buildings. The chair back slats continue from the back support to the base giving an effect of enveloping and shielding the user.

The Divine Proportion: A

C

B

AB = AC AC CB

2

Golden Section Spiral Construction By using the golden section subdivision diagram a golden section spiral can be constructed . Use the length of the sides of the squares of the subdivisions as a radius of a circle . Strike and connect arcs for each square in the diagram .

1937 Refined Barrel Chair The refined barrel chair has a simplified frame and more pleasing proportions. The flared arms have been simplified, back support adjusted to be narrower and less thick, and the base tapered.

90º 45º

45º

30º

B

2 . Draw a diagonal from the midpoint A of one of the sides to an opposite corner B . This diagonal becomes the radius of an arc that extends beyond the square to C . The smaller rectangle and the square become a golden section rectangle .

Diameter of Cushion

Diameter of Cushion

Diameter of Cushion

Golden Section, Square Construction Method 1 . Begin with a square .

1904 Original Barrel Chair The original barrel chair was heavier and less streamlined. The back support was thicker as were the wood slats. The base used an additional wide molding.

The golden section rectangle is unique in that when subdivided its reciprocal is a smaller proportional rectangle and the area remaining after subdivision is a square. Because of the special property of subdividing into a reciprocal rectangle and a square, the golden section rectangle is known as the whirling square rectangle. The proportionally decreasing squares can produce a spiral by using a radius the length of the sides of the square.

A

24

Barrel Chair Proportions The refined barrel chair has pleasing proportions. Both the front view and side view fit in a golden section rectangle. The height of the chair is twice the diameter of the cushion, and the repeated wood slats terminate at the top of the cushion circle.

Golden Section Rectangle

3 . The golden section rectangle can be subdivided . When subdivided the rectangle produces a smaller proportional golden section rectangle which is the reciprocal, and a square area remains after subdivision . This square area can also be called a gnomon .

C

Reciprocal Square

Golden

(Gnomon)

Rectangle

25

Proportional Squares The squares from the golden section subdivision diagram are in golden section proportion to each other .

4 . The process of subdivision can endlessly continue, again and again, producing smaller proportional rectangles and squares .

30º

120º

24

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Design Briefs

Geometry of Design Second Edition, Revised and Updated Studies in Proportion and Composition Kimberly Elam The very first volume in our acclaimed Design Briefs series is now available in a revised and updated second edition. Geometry of Design is a comprehensive overview of the principles of proportion and composition. Using detailed diagrams and vellum overlays, author Kimberly Elam clearly illustrates how naturally occurring systems of measurement create symmetry, order, and visual balance in a broad spectrum of successful modern designs. From Bauhaus posters to Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Chair and the Volkswagen Beetle, Geometry of Design illuminates fundamental design concepts while offering valuable insight into the methodology of history’s great artists, designers, and architects. • Features thirty-six pages of new content, including analysis of paintings by Albert Baertsoen, Francisco Goya, Georges Seurat, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec; furniture designs by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Mies van der Rohe, Michael Thonet, and Frank Lloyd Wright; graphic design by A. M. Cassandre, Otl Aicher, and FHK Henrion; and architecture by Mies, Philip Johnson, and Robert Venturi • Vellum overlays allow readers to layer diagrams of proportions directly over the object being discussed • An essential cornerstone of any designer’s library that has remained a best seller for ten years, with more than fifty thousand copies sold

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(above) Elizabeth Beasley, Lindi Biery, Daniel Cha, J. T. Cobell, Greg Cole, Kirsten Gundry, Chris Hurley, Sara Jabbari, Alena Jaffe, Izzy Jarvis, Carla Johnson, Nadia Kabra, Minhee Kim, Harrison Kuykendall, Matt Lewicki, Sarah Straub, Sol Winer, Cameron Wray. Graphic Design 1, fall 2010. Faculty: Zvezdana Stojmirovic.

Graphic Design 1,

opposite top), Lindi Biery, Izzy Jarvis. Bottom, Alena Jaffe. fall 2010. Zvezdana Stojmirovic.

GoogleType Apply existing tools in new and fresh ways by working with the online platform Google Docs. In this twophased project, MICA students co-created alphabets, working simultaneously on Google Docs documents— text, spreadsheet, or drawing. Once the co-creative stage was completed, each participant downloaded the alphabets and imported them into CS applications as vector-based art. They used the co-created letterforms to design posters promoting a new book on media theory, Program or Be Programmed, by Douglas Rushkoff. In this phase of individual work, students studied composition, color, and hierarchy.

TRY THIS PROJECT

Use Google Docs to co-create an alphabet of lettering with a group of participants, working remotely, yet simultaneously, on the same file. Once your alphabet is completed, use the type to design a poster for a book of your choice. Start by developing three sketches. Consider hierarchy, color, and composition, and balance the co-created lettering with a strong but simple supporting font.

COMMUNITY 35

PROJECT PROJECTS

PARTICIPATE 34

PRACTICUM 39

COMMUNITY PRACTICUM

Fig 12 INTO THE OPEN: POSITIONING PRACTICE, 2009 www.projectprojects.com

(left) Project Projects created the exhibition design and graphics for Into the Open: Positioning Practice in collaboration with the design firm Saylor + Sirola. This exhibition, focusing on socially engaged architectural practices, was a restaging of the U.S. Pavilion for the Venice Architectural Biennale 2008, curated by Aaron Levy and William Menking. Project Projects developed a fresh design and presentation for this New York version. Transforming the exhibition’s gallery space at Parsons The New School for Design into an open forum, they encouraged visitor participation by covering the space with green chalkboard paint.

Fig 13 ART IN GENERAL, 2009 www.projectprojects.com

(below) This print-on-demand book series documents artist projects produced for Art in General’s New Commissions program. The inexpensive production, through the online self-publishing site called createspace.com, made the seventeen-volume series possible and created interesting design limitations.

Fig 14 RE-SHUFFLE, 2006 www.projectprojects.com

(above) Working with twelve graduate students from Bard College’s Center for Curatorial Studies, Project Projects created this catalog and exhibition. ReShuffle: Notions of an Itinerant Museum explores the responses of forty-seven artists and writers to the curators’ prompt regarding the relevance of cultural institutions. A far cry from the traditional passive gallery experience, visitors assemble their own portable exhibition from the provided screen-printed boxes, stacks of cards, and mailing labels.

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Design Briefs

Participate Designing with User-Generated Content Helen Armstrong and Zvezdana Stojmirovic Foreword by Ellen Lupton Creativity is no longer the sole territory of the designer. User-driven design has never been easier for the public to generate and distribute. Users of websites such as Flickr, Threadless, WordPress, YouTube, Etsy, and Lulu approach design with the expectation that they will be able to fill in the content. How will such a fundamental shift toward bottom-up creation affect the design industry? Participate considers historical and contemporary models of creation that provide ideas for harnessing user-generated content through participatory design. The authors discuss how designers can lead the new breed of widely distributed amateur creatives rather than be overrun by them. • Challenges designers to transform audiences into users and completed layouts into open-ended systems • Four chapters—Community, Modularity, Flexibility, and Technology—explore the various approaches to participatory design through critical essays, case studies, exercises, and interviews with leading designers in the field • A companion website for educators will provide tools for bringing participatory projects into the classroom. It will include creative briefs for student projects, handouts, and lectures, as well as relevant texts written by other designers

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Function, Restraint, and Subversion in Typography 978-1-56898-966-2 $45.00

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h u m a n r eso u r Ce s

n eeds coaching

9

t his is where you want all employees

➞➞➞➞➞

8 7 6 5

n o employees should fall here

4

ski l l

3 2

n eeds coaching

➞➞➞➞➞

10

Culture/ s understanding each quadrant

Fi g ure 2

1 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

C u lt u r e

n eeds coaching

10 9

t his is where you want all employees

x

x

x

8

x

7

x

x

x

Finding the r ight Fit How do you select people for your organization? At Granet and Associates, we find the following questions helpful during the interview process.

6 5

n eeds coaching

n o employees should fall here

4

x

Bu sin ess a n d

I’ve said that the staff in the bottom-left quadrant should be let go, but what do you do with the people in the upper left and bottom right? Those who fall in the upper left and who get the culture of your firm could be coached to help them improve their skill set (and move into the top right). The people in the bottom right are highly skilled, but they just don’t fit in that well. People who fall in the bottom–right quadrant are far more difficult to coach, since it’s an incompatibility issue based on personality. I use this tool to help firms evaluate their staff. A lot about the firm’s culture is revealed in where the majority of their staff falls on the chart. The firms whose staff mostly lands in the upper right are typically successful and high performing. Firms whose staff mostly falls in the bottom right tend to be sweat shops. They hire people for their qualifications, not their fit. These firms tend to produce a lot of work efficiently, but since the employees are not very synergistic, they tend to stay by themselves, and the work product tends not to improve as rapidly as employees who work well together. Firms with most of their staff in the top-left quadrant tend to get along well but get very little accomplished. They love working together, but they tend not to be as successful. During economic downturns in our industry, this tool can be particularly helpful in evaluating whom to retain. This is hard because when you’re forced to lay off staff you often are forced to lay off people you really don’t want to lose. This tool helps you evaluate the right people to keep. F i gu r e 3

x

ski l l

3

1.

2

2. How familiar are you with our work?

x Fi g ure 3

1 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

C u lt u r e

3. Do you know anyone who works here?

Culture/s kill chart, second phase: evaluating your staff

4. Why are you leaving your current employment?

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M en t

T im e lin e for Bringing in a

n ew proje Ct

initial Contact for a n ew project (w eek r esearch potential Client

o ne )

prepare Materials for interview

Meet with potential Client (up to three weeks

Marketing One lesson I learned years ago while at Gensler—and one that I cannot emphasize enough—is that you need to market and get your name out there when you’re the busiest. This is a hard concept for people to grasp because they’re fearful that they won’t be able to handle any more work when they’re busy. It seems hard to believe that you should seek new work when you’re in the thick of designing and building your projects. But if you think about the lead time required to bring in new work—usually several months ahead of when you’ll be billing a good portion of the fees and keeping your staff busy—you can quickly understand that if you wait until you “need” the work, it’s too late. The timeline may look something like this (depending on the scope and size of the project): f igu r es 1 a n d 2 It takes a couple of months to be courted by a client, another month to negotiate the contract, and then a couple of months to get through the project’s early stages (concept, schematics) where someone other than the principal and maybe one other person is working on the project. Add that up, and it can be five months before you’re actually working on the project. So it’s important to always be looking for work. For those firms that have built a great reputation and are highly sought after by clients, they may have the luxury of telling a client when they can start work on a project. This gives them the

s end proposal

)

s et up n ext Meeting

n egotiate t erms (u p to four weeks r eview with insurance / a ttorneys

)

d raft n egotiated a greement

s et up k ick-off Meeting (up to four weeks Meet with Client

)

pre-design s ervices

Begin project (up to three weeks project Budgets and planning

)

Begin s chematic d esign

process Can t ake a nywhere from 12-20 w eeks Before You a re a ble t o invoice a Client

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process for attracting, interviewing, and landing a typical project

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I’ve found that some people simply forget that the design business is essentially a service business. Except for the designers who sell products, most of us design something on paper that someone else will ultimately build. We need to remember that the two most important aspects of running a service business are our staff is our number one asset and how we treat people is the most significant part of protecting that asset. Whether it’s how you treat your employees or how your employees treat each other, or how you and your staff treat your clients and how they (clients) treat you, it all sets the tone for your practice. If you surround yourself with people trying to build a career rather than just having a job, you’ll both be mutually served.

Chapter 4

human resources

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the foundati on of a desi gn proc e ss

t h e fou n dat ion of a design process

f in a n Cia l Ma n age

Many people ask me the difference between marketing and public relations. Marketing is the research and pursuit of work available in the marketplace. Public relations focuses on exposing your firm to as many targeted people as desired. It can be outreach to shelter magazines, bloggers, trend articles, or any other source to introduce the firm to the audience you seek. To be successful at either of these efforts, you need to have a strategy. In marketing it may be how many past and new contacts you’re going to target in a given time frame. In public relations it might be the number of projects you’ll get photographed and published in the same time period.

th e fo u n datio n o f a design pr o c ess

I N T E RV I E W W I T H

Michael Graves

Who inspired you when

Kg : d o you think that the general public thinks that competitions are sort of a

galleries, and a concert hall. i did a scheme for that, but it didn’t get built because a

OF MICHAEL GRAVES AND ASSOCIATES

Keit H gR anet:

you were thinking about being an architect

process in f argo, n orth d akota, for an art center that consisted of a museum,

mg: i think it’s kind of a view of architecture

golf course was built instead. t he art center

as a commodity, something to pick and

was so heavily published everywhere

choose, like a pair of socks. i like a blue

that i got a lot of lectures at various

one. i like a green one. i like a brown one. i

who have done nothing but criticize other

places. i went to speak, i think to the aia

suppose people think it’s more equitable.

architects, and there are architects like

in portland, and afterward the person

Many people don’t have the experience

and building your practice?

philip j ohnson, who have done nothing but

who was the professional adviser for the

of working with architects, and they don’t

mic Hael

support them.

competition said, “What would we have to

know how to do it.

wasn’t by choice, it just happened that

do to get somebody like you to enter the

way because i went to the u niversity of

Kg : early on in building your practice,

f argo competition?” i said, “a sk.” But it

gR ave S: a lot of people. it

meant that we had to put a team together

c incinnati as an undergraduate, which is a cooperative school: we worked for two

necessity to give you the expertise to get

of builder/contractor/developer along with

months and went to school for two months,

more projects of the same type?

worked for two months, went to school for

mg: early on, i was asked to do a lot of

two months. By the time i got to h arvard, i had

i meet people all the time, at various gatherings, who say, “Well, we wanted the kind of building you would do, but we knew we couldn’t afford you. s o we went with

the architect.

j oe s mith, our neighbor, and asked him to

back porches and kitchen renovations.

Kg : So the art center was a design/build

that.” t hey never took the time to call up

What it led to was more kitchen

project?

and ask what we charge. t hey really don’t know.

more experience than anybody else. i

renovations until my students called me

mg: Yes. part of that was my skill in—i will

the cubist kitchen king, and that just kept

take a little credit here—putting together

g ropius, but in r ome. i worked for g eorge

the doors open in the sixties. But i was still

a group of people i knew i could work

Kg : How would you identify the ideal

n elson in n ew York. g eorge was very

losing money.

with, and not try to do this whole building

client?

You have got to do a lot of these small have to bang them out. i didn’t do that.

those friends today. g eorge was a furniture

i spent far too much time on them. But

designer and a graphic artist as well as an

they got published, and ultimately i got

architect. h e never personally marketed his

something else from these little pieces,

things the way we have. t hen you had an architect like philip j ohnson, who had done nothing but

mg: c lients have to be—to a certain

so i

a developer of shopping centers, whom i

because they would win awards. But it took

architects for doing a building that wasn’t

would come to you after the building is

a long, long time, and a lot of money to do

“modern,” as they wanted it to be.

built, and say, “o h my g od, i didn’t know

a fter the portland building, i was included on a number of competitions:

just about money, timing, or design, but all

building (l ouisville, Kentucky 1982), which

of the facets that, he—or we could say ideal clients—should care about.

hope of getting the commission but that it

we won. We hadn’t lost a competition at that point. We’ve lost a lot since then, but

a younger architect. n ot so someone else

after other major stadiums. Kg : d o you consider the portland project a

we were clearly on a roll. h aving to win

Kg : l ast question. How would you like to

competitions to build buildings was not the

be remembered?

best thing in the world for me, i mean, it

mg: i don’t think about that very much. My

that would allow him to work for less, and

turning point?

kept me poor because we were expending

mother once said that the important thing

also so that he could earn the experience

mg: c ertainly. But the only reason it was a

more money to make a better mouse trap

is to put more in than you take out. t hat’s

and perhaps learn something about doing

turning point is because we won. it was not

each time.

about it—make a contribution.

another building type. t here are architects

a competition but a three-stage interview

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gen Sle R

details, dimensions, and the character. n ot

c alifornia, that we won, and the h umana

would help establish credibility for going

S of de Sign companie

particular place, enhance a site or neighborhood, and be a natural partner with the environment.” la Ke|flato

that you were proposing those kinds of

there was one in s an j uan c apistrano,

a stadium for the t exas r angers baseball team, knowing that we didn’t have much

to him with a commission he might lose

S:

“l ake|f lato believes that architecture should respond to its

doors.” h e is present, and he cares about

We submitted to a competition to design

money on himself, he would recommend

Sign companie

“d esign can elevate the human spirit” Kaa de Sign

was thinking about. if somebody came

Forthcoming Titles

Sample vi Sion Statement

very carefully. h e is not somebody who

that. i suppose you don’t start out being

S of nonde

“t o make people happy” di Sne Y

met on the board of the Whitney Museum.

would lose money, but because a younger

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Sample vi Sion Statement

h e is a client who pays attention. h e looks

to know what the younger generation

architect might have a business structure

Business plan

“t o be the most respected brand in the world” ame Rican eXpReSS

myself. i hadn’t built any city halls at that

emery r oth. We

support younger architects all his life. h e was just one of those people who wanted

c ontents of a

“t o preserve and improve human life” meRc K

degree—savvy. i have one very good client, it was a real family. i still have some of

Writing a Business plan When starting to write your business plan, you’ll want to begin with three key elements: a vision statement, mission statement, and your firm’s core values. A vision statement is the highest level of purpose for your business. The vision is a lofty goal that most likely will take your entire career to achieve. Someone once told me that having a vision is like the stars: we’re better off for having them in our lives, but we may never reach them.

look at your work and do something like

did work for a very short time for Walter

generous with me, and he liked me. t here

you’ll need a business plan. Some people believe that a business plan is a magical tool to achieve your goals. It isn’t, but it can be used as a road map to reach those goals. f igu r e 3

“t o create environments of an alternate reality, with compelling emotional force” Jo Hn Saladino “t he ultimate house of luxury now and forever” c Hanel

A mission statement is used to help you achieve your goals. It sets the direction for you to reach your vision, for example, “Our firm should be a place of growing and learning for all our employees.” This means that to achieve your vision you’ll need to support, nurture, and mentor your staff. Another example might be that you want “an inspired environment to work in,” and this

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The Business of Design Balancing Creativity and Profitability

The Busi ness

Keith Granet Foreword by Art Gensler

of

Design

The Business of Design debunks the myth that business sense and creative talent are mutually exclusive and, unlike other lackluster business books, is written and illustrated to captivate a visually thinking audience. For nearly thirty years, consultant Keith Granet has helped design professionals pursue their passion and turn a profit. From billing to branding, client management to marketing and licensing, The Business of Design reveals the tools necessary to create and run a thriving design business in today’s ultra-competitive marketplace.

Balanc i ng creaTi vi Ty anD Profi TaBi li Ty

Keith Granet Foreword by Art Gensler

• Clients: Calvin Klein, Gensler, John Varvatos, Jonathan Adler, Marmol Radziner, Pamela Burton & Company, Pantone, Richard Meier & Partners, and Rob Wellington Quigley, FAIA

PuBl i s he D By

• Six comprehensive chapters: Foundations of a design business, Financial management, Marketing and public relations, Human resources, Project management, and Product development • Includes interviews with architects and designers, including Michael Graves, A. Eugene Kohn, Victoria Hagan, and Richard Meier • Inspired by Granet’s own course on running a successful design practice at UCLA and his experience consulting more than four hundred design firms

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The Wayfinding Handbook 978-1-56898-769-9 $24.95

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No Nails, No Lumber The Bubble Houses of Wallace Neff Jeffrey Head Imagine a house constructed in less than forty-eight hours, without using lumber or nails, that is more resistant to fire, earthquakes, and hurricanes than any traditionally built structure. This may sound like the latest development in prefab housing or green architecture, but the design dates back to 1941 when architect Wallace Neff (1895–1982) developed Airform construction as a solution to the global housing crisis. Best known for his elegant Spanish Colonial–revival estates in Southern California, Neff had a private passion for his dome-shaped “bubble houses” made of reinforced concrete cast in position over an inflatable balloon. No Nails, No Lumber shows the beauty and versatility of Neff ’s design in new and vintage photography, previously unpublished illustrations, and archival material and ephemera. • The first international survey of Neff ’s bubble houses • While only one bubble house remains in America (Pasadena, CA), the design was used for large housing projects in Egypt, Brazil, and West Africa during the 1940s and 1950s • Low-cost, low-impact housing solution is a precursor to environmentally responsible, green architecture • Encourages a reintroduction of Neff ’s Airform technology, especially for use in disaster and impoverished areas

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Shipping November 2011 — 7.2 × 7.9 in / 18.3 × 20.1 cm 176 pp / 100 color / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-61689-024-7 $24.95 / £16.99 — 52495

A-frame 978-1-56898-410-0 $24.95

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19 2 7 a n d 19 31

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Smith House

Berkeley, California

Berkeley, California

Perched on a steep hillside in Berkeley hills with a commanding view to the south and the west of San Francisco Bay, is the Hagar House, a Mediterranean villa built in 1928. The Hagars wanted a house that “could capture the romantic spirit of California” and said that Wurster’s first sketch was “perfect almost to the finest detail.”1 The stark simplicity of the entrance court facade belied the gracious and comfortable scale of the interior spaces. The well-proportioned living room with its vaulted, crisply detailed mahogany ceiling and white plaster walls displayed Wurster’s sense of simple elegance. The immaculate detailing is characteristic of his tendency to pare away all the unessential elements and “let things be expressed

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as they are.”2 Designed concurrently with the Gregory’s farmhouse in Scott’s Valley, this was to be a city house; a full-time residence, although designed with minimal embellishments, it still was clearly referential to Mediterranean architecture in its massing details and material choices. Most of the rooms had direct access to the outdoors and natural light from at least two sides. Despite the often-dark interior of traditional Mediterranean architecture Wurster didn’t compromise the pleasurable qualities of the rooms to suit a formal arrangement for the architecture. Gardens credited to Lockwood deForest had outdoor garden rooms that were an extension of the interior.3

Concurrent with the Gillespie House, this French Regency townhouse was designed for two elderly sisters and built in 1927; it was completed with the addition of a design studio in a front wing in 1931. In the original design, on Wurster’s insistence, the entry, living room, and dining room were painted a light green: “The entrance must have an appeal that draws a warmth to the person coming in.”1 The addition in 1931 at the front of the property enclosed a small formal garden court and also provided an arched passageway that allowed entrance to the original entry at the living room wing. The courtyard plan allowed the living room to open to two private gardens and made this small house seem expansive despite its confined site. Landscaping by the owner and William Wurster with “later advice by Lockwood deForest.”2

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The Houses of William Wurster Frames for Living Caitlin Lempres Brostrom and Richard C. Peters Over the course of a career that spanned forty-five years, William Wilson Wurster (1895–1973) designed hundreds of residences up and down the West Coast. Like Finnish architect Alvar Aalto, with whom Wurster maintained a close professional exchange, Wurster blends modernism with the vernacular. Wurster described these homes as “frames for living”: spaces that could be fully transformed by the occupant to meet their needs and desires, well-designed canvases for homemaking. Authors Caitlin Lempres Brostrom, AIA, and Richard C. Peters, FAIA, draw upon extensive historical research as well as personal relationships with Wurster to tell the story of his career, including both residential and institutional building. The Houses of William Wurster features new and archival footage of thirty-three of the architect’s best-known houses and includes a foreword by Donlyn Lyndon. • Wurster served as Dean of the School of Architecture and Planning at MIT, and is regarded as the founder of the College of Environmental Design at UC Berkeley, currently housed in the Wurster Building • Features never-before-seen artwork from newly digitized archives featuring work by Ezra Stoller, Roger Sturtevant, and Morley Baer, in addition to new photography by Richard Barnes • An early proponent of green building, Wurster believed in practical construction and relied on local building materials whenever possible

Also Available . . .

• Previous book on Wurster, An Everyday Modernism (University of California Press, 1999), is now out of print

Shipping September 2011 — 9 × 11 in / 23 × 28 cm 224 pp / 150 color / 150 b+w Hardcover 978-1-61689-028-5 $50.00 / £32.50 — 55000

The Sea Ranch 978-1-56898-386-8 $65.00

Art Deco San Francisco 978-1-56898-756-9 $55.00

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Oak One Tree, Three Years, Fifty Paintings Stephen Taylor It was an exercise to learn how to see, to understand just one thing in its greatest detail. Stephen Taylor came across the 250-year-old tree while on a walk in Essex, England, six years ago, shortly after the deaths of his mother and close friend—a tragic time that brought him back to painting and then to an obsession with realism and color perception. He painted the same oak scores of times over a period of three years, in extremes of weather and light, at all times of day and night. Oak is nature’s creed of endurance (the tree was standing when Jane Austen was just a baby) and of one man’s promise to find beauty in a painful world. • Oak is both a meditation on nature and a tour de force of artistic technique • Oak collects Taylor’s single-minded pursuit, first made famous in Alain de Botton’s book The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work (Pantheon, 2009)

Shipping October 2011 — 7.75 × 9.25 in / 19.7 × 23.5 cm 112 pp / 125 color Hardcover 978-1-61689-032-2 $29.95 / £19.99 — 52995

Also Available . . . 9 781616 890322

Stickwork (hardcover) 978-1-56898-862-7 $50.00 Stickwork (paperback) 978-1-56898-976-1 $34.95

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Dear Mr. Agel: I am three and one-half years old. You’re right.

150

effective loosening-up can be achieved only by the most sweeping and all-embracing use of the techniques of photography, zincography, the electrotype, etc. The flex-

[name withheld at the parents’ request] Champlain, New York

ibility and elasticity of these techniques bring with them a new reciprocity between economy and beauty. With the development of photo-telegraphy, which enables reproductions and accurate illustrations to be made instan-

the typophoto governs the tempo of the new visual literature… The twentieth century was launched under the aegis of two total concepts of the book. The first is distant from the noisy, news-edged world of inventory books. It was articulated by the symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé in his essay “The Book, A Spiritual Instrument.” It dreamed of the entire universe flowing into a single total book: a book, both material and metaphysical, in time and outside time, that would fulfill and transcend the revolution inaugurated by Johannes Gutenberg. The second brings us closer to the world of electric information age books. It was embraced by early avantgardes such as futurism and dreamed of an exploded, porous book whose every page could become an all-comprehending theater of the present and a staging ground for ever-surprising futures. László Moholy-Nagy is but one early theorist of this Book of the Now: Until recently typeface and typesetting rigidly preserved a technique which, admittedly, guaranteed the purity of the linear effect, but ignored the new dimensions of life. Only quite recently has there been typographic work which uses the contrasts of typographic material […] in an attempt to establish a correspondence with modern life. These efforts have, however, done little to relax the inflexibility that has hitherto existed in typographic practice. An

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the e/a switch The external history of the shaping of The Medium Is the Massage as a publishing event has embedded within it an internal history in which are nested two overlapping questions: the role of Fiore as designer/coauthor and the issue of just how the design and drafting process unfolded. At some point along this inside track, someone flipped the switch that turned message into massage, transforming the professorial one-man act of the author of Understanding Media into a McLuhan/Fiore/Agel triple threat. According to Eric McLuhan, that switch was thrown not by design but by error. Massage was a typo, welcomed in the Joycean manner: “When McLuhan saw the typo he exclaimed, ‘Leave it alone! It’s great and right on target!’ Now there are four possible readings for the last word of the title, all of them accurate:  Message  Mess Age  Massage and  Mass Age.”37 McLuhan’s biographers omit the tale of the typo. W. Terrence Gordon surmises that “by the time [the book] appeared in 1967, McLuhan no doubt recognized that his original saying had become a  cliché  and welcomed the opportunity to throw it back on the compost heap of language  to recycle and revitalize it.”38 Philippe Marchand seems to concur, dating the shift to a May 1966 presentation at the Laurentian management conference where McLuhan led off a salvo of aphorisms with the oracular pronouncement: “No longer will I say that the medium is the message. I’ve changed my thinking. […] From now on, I believe that the medium is the massage.”39 The switch is repeated in a public lecture given at the Kaufmann Art Gallery in New York City on May 7. Whatever the case may be, May 1966 still situates the switch well within the book’s development time line. This would have been

taneously, even philosophical works will presumably use the same means, though on a higher plane, as the present day American magazines. The form of these new typographic works will, of course, be quite different typographically, optically, and synoptically from the linear typography of today.3

The passage is from Moholy-Nagy’s earliest Bauhaus treatise, Painting Photography Film, published in 1925. However visionary, the loosening up that it promotes became the shared undertaking of multiple generations and categories of practitioners. The spectrum was wide: some were professional designers and artists, others journeymen; some worked for illustrated newspapers, publishers, or commercial printing shops, others labored in the laboratories of the avant-garde. There was little agreement on terminology. Typophotography was the neologism Moholy-Nagy coined to denote the flexible, elastic, photo-driven medium of the future. Jan Tschichold opted for the umbrella phrase the new typography (with the understanding that “we see in photography exactly the factor that distinguishes our typography from everything that went before”).4 Commercially minded peers would instead have identified the venture with a new age of advertising, with the making of the modern magazine, or with emerging genres of reportage like the photo

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Unlike mainstream counterparts like Reader’s Digest, they prided themselves on being elite “writers’ magazines,” with the ability to reach out to a “relatively mass audience” (the phrase is Theodore Solotaroff’s from New American Review’s premiere issue). Though they often cross boundary lines within the realm of writing, they remained textcentered. The word advertising is willfully absent from their vocabulary. Pressured by the rise of the alternative and rock press (Rolling Stone, Crawdaddy), the paperback literary magazine briefly veers off in a phototypographical direction around the time of the publication of The Medium of the Message. Some existing reviews like Evergreen alter their format from octavo to glossy quarto, anchoring every issue in erotic photographs. Others, like Ralph Ginzburg’s Avant-Garde (1968–71), designed by Herb Lubalin, ride the high (art) road toward luxury hardcover solutions not unlike those adopted by Horizon back in the 1950s. US: The Paperback Magazine takes the opposite tack. Squarely (if momentarily) embedded in the space between the alternative press and mainstream media, it represents an experimental incursion on the part of Bantam Books into the youth market. Sold issue by issue (not by subscription), it mixes underground comics (R. Crumb, Victor Moscoso, Spain, Peter Bramley), concrete (Richard Kostelanetz) and free verse poetry (Ed Sanders, Jim Morrison, Tom Clark, Ted Berrigan), and a hodge-podge of articles ranging from profiles of the Living Theater, Jack Kerouac, Timothy Leary, and Rex Reed, to personal/political pieces (Nikki Giovanni, Ellen Willis). The tone is mischievous and the prose unfussy (with four-letter words welcome), but the overall editorial standards are solid. The review’s graphic style remains eclectic, paced by visuals cast in a Pop psychedelic mold, low-end photocollages, photocopied title pages, and a high degree of typographical variability. A few pieces are built around

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The Electric Information Age Book McLuhan/Agel/Fiore and the Experimental Paperback Jeffrey T. Schnapp and Adam Michaels Introduction by Steven Heller Afterword by Andrew Blauvelt The Electric Information Age Book explores the nine-year window of mass-market publishing in the sixties and seventies when formerly backstage players—designers, graphic artists, editors—stepped into the spotlight to produce a series of exceptional books. Aimed squarely at the young media-savvy consumers of the “Electronic Information Age,” these small, inexpensive paperbacks aimed to bring the ideas of contemporary thinkers like Marshall McLuhan, R. Buckminster Fuller, Herman Kahn, and Carl Sagan to the masses. Graphic designers such as Quentin Fiore (The Medium is the Massage, 1967) employed a variety of radical techniques—verbalvisual collages and other typographic pyrotechnics— that were as important to the content as the text. The Electric Information Age Book is the first book-length history of this brief yet highly influential publishing phenomenon. • Entertaining lost chapter in pop-culture history written with a light, playful touch • Designed to echo the look and feel of the original paperbacks. Features numerous full-scale reproductions of pages from the original publications • Features an introduction by design writer Steven Heller and an afterword by Andrew Blauvelt, Design Director at the Walker Art Center

Also Available . . .

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Street Value 978-1-56898-897-9 $19.95

Above the Pavement— The Farm! 978-1-56898-935-8 $19.95

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Typography Sketchbooks Edited by Steven Heller and Lita Talarico Typography is an obsession for most designers. It’s at the heart of all visual communication and is one of the purest forms of design, one that can always be improved and refined. Typography Sketchbooks gets into the minds of designers who create typefaces, wordimages and logos through their private sketchbooks. The result of these wide-ranging typographic musings provide fascinating insights into the expressive quality of letters and words. Aimed at all those who use type, whether by hand or on-screen, this pleasing compendium stresses the importance of good typography at a time when reading habits are changing and celebrates a craft that has endured for centuries. • Reveals how more than ninety of the world’s leading designers and typographers continually strive to find new and exciting ways of communicating through letters and words • Includes work by Ivan Chermayeff, Carlos Segura, Milton Glaser, Maira Kalman, Bob Aufuldish, Matthew Carter, Javier Mariscal and Patrick Thomas, Erik Spiekermann, Viktor Nübel, Peter Bilak and Enkeling, and Jean-Baptiste Levée

Shipping October 2011 — 7.3 × 9.6 in / 18.5 × 24.4 cm 368 pp / 600 color & b+w Hardcover 978-1-61689-037-7 $55.00 Rights: North American Only —

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Thinking with Type, second, revised and expanded edition 978-1-56898-969-3 $24.95

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different cutouts of clothing, drawings, and silhouettes that are attached to a field of each woman’s personal writings. When I was considering possible palettes for each book, I turned to MAC Cosmetics, recognized for serving women of all origins. The resulting choices were derived from blush powders, press powders, and eye shadows selected by a MAC consultant and matched to a photo of each woman in her particular outfit.

elga, Jennifer, Willa, Julee, and Rachel is based upon drawings from WHERE I LIVE: Exploring Identity through Bodies and Clothes, an installation I created of life-sized 3-D images of real women that references my childhood reveries with paper dolls, sewing cards, storytelling, and things homemade. With this smaller scale, I invite both personal reflection and imaginative play. Each book has a unique signature on the cover and contains

Judy Byron (American, b. 1947) Helga, Jennifer, Willa, Julee, and Rachel, 2005 Handmade paper, thread, inkjet printing, letterpress, paper cutouts 5.5 x 11 in. each Edition of 35; published by the artist, Washington, D.C.

Frederica Postman (American, b. 1929) Bonnie Stone (American, b. 1939)

Gift of Hank Prensky

Fashion Statements, 2005 Letterpress, mixed media 10 x 6 in. Edition of 60; P’Nye Press, Los Altos, California Gift of the artists

W

hen we create books, we brainstorm the content, design, and format, frequently on the telephone. Freddie writes and prints the text; Bonnie produces images using her original drawings, collages, rubber stamps, and photographs. Freddie suggested a book on fashion because she knew that it was one of Bonnie’s favorite subjects. We were interested in the follies and foibles of the world of fashion. The book includes an essay on clothing and accessories with letterforms, which Freddie collects, and descriptions and illustrations of vintage clothing, accessories, hats, jewelry, and mannequins, all from Bonnie’s collections. The bound book is contained in a handmade purse adorned with a handmade glove and a lady’s calling card.

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he book combines three texts: “This World Is Off Its Rocker When It Comes to Women” is a speech about women’s devastating vulnerability to AIDS in Africa, delivered by Stephen Lewis at the 2005 Summit on Global Issues in Women’s Health. “Fugue” is a poem by Robyn Sarah about women marching—alone or with their children, carrying rugs, pianos, cats, and plants—to “the new country” where “there will be room for everyone.” “Bread and Roses” is a poem by James Oppenheim about the strike led by

women in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1912 when American Woolen Company cut their wages; the management eventually raised their pay, doubled their overtime rate, and promised amnesty for all strikers. One group of women carried a banner proclaiming, “We want bread and roses too,” emphasizing that they are not only laborers—they are also women who want to be loved and given flowers. The two themes that tie these texts together are women and community. My inspiration for the women figures came from a photograph of Sudanese women lining up to collect water. Through the strength and struggles of the women portrayed in each of these texts, along with the images of women finally marching off the last page, the message is clear: things can get better for women if they work together.

Elizabeth McKee (American/Canadian, b. New Guinea, 1948) For Immediate Release, 2007 Speech by Stephen Lewis Poem by Robyn Sarah Poem by James Oppenheim Arches Text Wove paper, wheat paste, collage, walnut ink, giclée print, linen dyed with walnut ink, Davey Board, magnet 10.5 x 13 x 546 in. (open) Edition of 5; published by the artist, Pasadena, Maryland Gift of Paula Botstein, MD

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The Book as Art Artists’ Books from the National Museum of Women in the Arts Krystyna Wasserman with essays by Johanna Drucker and Audrey Niffenegger Our landmark survey of women artists’ books is now available in paperback. The Book as Art presents more than one hundred of the most exquisite limited-edition volumes held by the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC. Treasures of intricate craftsmanship, these books take every conceivable form as they engage a wide variety of subjects from food and family to politics and poetry. Twelve recent acquisitions are included in this new, updated paperback edition. These exquisitely crafted objects are certain to provoke unexpected and surprising conclusions about what constitutes a book. • Features an introduction by the most famous book artist of our time, best-selling author Audrey Niffenegger (The Time Traveler’s Wife) • Collection is international and contemporary in scope, dating from 1983 to the present • Includes books created by major fine artists, such as Meret Oppenheim, May Stevens, Kara Walker, and Renee Stout, and distinguished book artists, such as Susan King, Ruth Laxson, Claire Van Vliet, and Julie Chen • Descriptions of the works are accompanied by colorful illustrations and reflections by their makers, along with essays by leading scholars

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Bar Guru Bar

In a country where architecture can be thousands of

contrasts with its immediate neighbors. Although

years old, the original lower half of Bar Guru Bar is

popularity with the chic crowd developed mostly

KLab Architects

relatively modern. It is located in one of Athens’ old-

due to the music and food found within, Bar Guru

Athens, Greece, 2005

est districts, Psiri. Most of the buildings in this district

Bar’s juxtaposition of new kinetic elements and old

date from the late twentieth century, built during a

architecture reinforces its unique qualities.

time of urban renewal when housing for post-WWII

Unfortunately, Bar Guru Bar was not sustain-

working-class residents was being constructed. The

able despite its sudden fame in the design world.

typical architecture in the district is simple and mun-

The neighborhood, true to its long history, degener-

dane, mostly whitewashed concrete.

ated after the bar’s opening and became a danger-

Psiri experienced a renaissance in anticipation

ous nighttime destination. In 2009, the giant rusted

of the 2004 Olympic Games and became known for

The new rusting steel door

door was shut with hopes to re-open if conditions

avant-garde nightlife. Like most “edgy” urban loca-

clearly contrasts with its

change in the future.

immediate neighbors.

tions, the Psiri district is a mix of ordinary activity and low-level crime. KLab Architects designed Bar Guru Bar to reflect this environment. Critics have described the project as follows: “Located in a rundown area of the city, the bar is intended to resemble a bunker—protecting its contents during the day and opening up at night.”3 KLab architecture stands for “kinetic lab of architecture,” a group of young architects based in Athens. Bar Guru Bar lives up to this moniker: its

Extreme Contrast

most visible feature is a large steel door that moves vertically between the original one-story building and the new one-story addition. The door is the entire facade, including smaller window and door openings. It shrouds the storefront during the day and opens during nighttime hours. The surface is made of rusting steel, purposefully used to indicate a level of meaning beyond its functional duty. In KLab’s words: “The rusting material of the facade is a metaphor for the transformation in a deteriorating phase. The building is also transformational with the kinetic movement of steel plates that open to form windows and doors.”4 The differentiation between new and old is evident in this small building, especially since almost all of the surrounding structures are whitewashed concrete; the new rusting steel door clearly

Old Buildings, New Designs

C oncept diagram

Case Studies

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OldNew_prop.indd 36-37

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Openings in the giant steel door are able to open and close in an array of configurations – in this case, slits and awnings.

left: In this case, slits, awnings, and casements.

Case Studies

OldNew_prop.indd 38-39

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Architecture Briefs

Old Buildings, New Designs Architectural Transformations Charles Bloszies Increasingly, architects are hired to design new work for existing structures. Whether for reasons of preservation, sustainability, or cost-effectiveness, the movement to reuse buildings presents a variety of design challenges and opportunities. Old Buildings, New Designs is an Architecture Brief devoted to working within a given architectural fabric—from the technical issues that arise from aging construction to the controversy generated by the various project stakeholders to the unique aesthetic possibilities created through the juxtaposition of old and new. • Features twenty-one case studies of built work by an international list of renowned architects including Daniel Libeskind, Renzo Piano, Foster + Partners, and Herzog & de Meuron • Accessible text provides the perfect primer for practitioners as well as students of architecture • Timely topic in light of current economic climate and ongoing concern for sustainable architecture • Author Charles Bloszies is both teacher and practitioner with many years of experience in architectural transformations • Includes a foreword by acclaimed architect and preservationist Hugh Hardy

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Architectural Photography the Digital Way 978-1-56898-697-5 $24.95

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The Nature of Place

The Nature of Place

A Search for Authenticity

A Search For Authenticity Avi Friedman

Avi Friedman After visiting twelve unique spots around the world, architect and writer Avi Friedman asked himself what made being there memorable. Whether strolling, dining, looking, or getting lost, certain locales pulled at his memory long after he bid farewell to the natives. A world away, he reflected on the market he stumbled upon in Dalian, China, one bright morning and the community-building effect markets have in neighborhoods around the world. While walking through a collection of life-sized sculptures in the Canadian arctic, he pondered the importance of folk art in connecting to a place. And in Fargo, on a numbingly frigid day, he wondered how climate should influence the way cities are designed. He took his thoughts and wrote them down. The Nature of Place is about Friedman’s intricate and emotional connection to place, and what makes these places “work,” and is perfect for the frequent traveler and the frequent dreamer. • OWL Award nominee (Non-Fiction), one of Canada’s most prestigious literary awards • Friedman is also the author of Narrow Houses (Princeton Architectural Press, 2010)

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From Here to There 978-1-56898-882-5 $17.50

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Toward a New Interior An Anthology of Interior Design Theory Lois Weinthal Interior design, as a relatively young discipline within the academic world of design, has historically been interpreted as an extension of other fine arts. Narratives exist, but they all too often treat interior design as a function of architecture or display rather than experience. An independent interior design theory is virtually nonexistent. Professor Lois Weinthal envisions a future where interior design is treated with parity to architecture and industrial design, a future with a new interior.

Toward a New Interior An Anthology of Interior Design Theory

• Weinthal has carefully curated (and in some cases repurposed) a collection of forty-eight sources that will form the foundation of interior design theory and shape future interior space

Lois Weinthal

• Organized in eight sections that move from micro to macro in scale: from the intimate core of interior experience, the body, to clothing, furnishings, color, mapping, private and public spaces, and synergizing the whole (a city) • Introductory essays by Weinthal illuminate the selected sources, prefacing and directing discussion of the material as it relates to interior design theory • Includes works by Wim Wenders, Le Corbusier, Aaron Betsky, Adolf Loos, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ellen Lupton, Robin Evans, Jeffrey Siegel, Mark Wigley, Beatriz Colomina, Helene Furján, Steven Jacobs, Charlotte Mullin, and Wolfgang Meisenheimer

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Mineral

16

composition

material for in situ castings, or prefabricated bricks and blocks. [Fig. 4] Ceramics are earthen materials that are transformed by heat into stonelike substances. Clay used to make ceramics consists of hydrous aluminum silicate compounds derived from feldspar-rich rocks, as well as mica, calcite, iron oxides, and quartz. The physical properties of ceramics depend on the kind of clay— kaolinite, montmorillonite-smectite, and illite being the three most common types—as well as the firing temperature. Clayware and stoneware have low firing temperatures (900–1300°C), while porcelain and oxidized ceramics are fired at higher temperatures (1300–2100°C). Common types of ceramics used in building construction include bricks, pipes, tiles, and ceramic panels. [Fig. 5]

Rock is the product of the crystallization of liquid magma. We classify the three types of rock based on the process of formation: igneous rock is the “original rock” formed directly from liquid magma; sedimentary rock is made of particles from rocks that have been deposited in layers and solidified by a process called diagenesis; and metamorphic rock consists of the transformation of igneous or sedimentary rocks via intense heat and pressure. The most common types of stone used for building include granite and basalt (igneous), sandstone and limestone (sedimentary), and marble, slate, and gneiss (metamorphic). Loam is an earthen material that consists of equal parts clay, silt, and sand. Clay, which has the finest particles of the three and is the result of decomposed rock, acts as the binder for the other materials. Loam is a relatively weak material and may be strengthened by adding gravel and organic reinforcing materials such as straw. It is also typically tamped or compressed to make rammed earth, or pisé for durability. Loam is typically applied in one of two forms: loose bulk

—Manuel De Landa

Earth and stone were some of the first materials that early hominids used to make shelter and tools. Many ancient myths and religions related earth and stone to human flesh and bone, respectively—minerals of varying consistency were seen as symbolically connected to the body and its duality of suppleness and fortitude. Active engagement with these materials marked the beginning of human prehistory as well as its end: The Stone Age constituted over 99 percent of humanity’s existence, and its transition into the Copper and Bronze ages occurred roughly around the beginning of recorded history. Loam, stone, and ceramics were fundamental to the genesis of civilization, and they gave physical form and order to the first cities. Characterized by their compressive strength, these materials were appropriate for the thick-walled, low-slung structures

captions tk: Fig. 4: 02_MS_Ryoanji[2C].tif Fig. 5: 02_MS_Trajan[2C].tif

Mineral

“Soft tissue (gels and aerosols, muscle and nerve) reigned supreme until 500 million years ago. At that point, some of the conglomerations of fleshy matter-energy that made up life underwent a sudden mineralization, and a new material for constructing living creatures emerged: bone... The human endoskeleton was one of the many products of that ancient mineralization. Yet it is not the only geological infiltration that the human species has undergone. About eight thousand years ago, human populations began mineralizing again when they developed an urban exoskeleton: bricks of sun-dried clay became the building materials for their homes, which in turn surrounded and were surrounded by stone monuments and defensive walls.” [Fig. 2]

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captions tk: Fig. 1: 02_MS_Chokkura_01[1A].tif Fig. 2: 02_MS_Castor[2C].tif Fig. 3: 02_MS_GreatWall[2C].tif

that emerged as successive layers of earth were laid and compacted to make the first load-bearing walls. For millennia, this striated architecture signified weight, presence, and longevity. [Fig. 3] In modern times, the use of the bearing wall has all but disappeared in industrialized nations, and has been replaced by frame construction with applied material skins. The persistence of earthen materials in contemporary building despite this transformation is a testament to their powerful legacy. Currently, stone and brick are applied as suspended or self-supporting surfaces on skeletal frames—a perverse transmutation from their original use. However, both the broad availability of many mineral resources as well as the perseverance of stone and ceramics as architectural membranes suggest an important future of earthen materials in building construction.

history

Earthen materials were critical to the origins of technology. The Stone Age marked the first human epoch and consisted of the development of stone tools and pottery, as well as the construction of early settlements. Megalithic monuments constructed of

chokkura plaza and Shelter

26

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captions tk: 02_MS_Chokkura_07[3C].tif 02_MS_Chokkura_08[2C].tif 02_MS_Chokkura_05[2B].tif 02_MS_Chokkura_06[1B].tif

Mineral

captions tk: 02_MS_Chokkura_03[1A].tif 02_MS_Chokkura_03[1A].tif

Mineral

Tochigi, Japan Kengo Kuma & Associates 2006

When Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo in 1923, he specified Oya stone for a facing material. Located only within a 9.27 mi2 (24 km2) area in Japan’s Tochigi prefecture, Oya stone is a kind of volcanic tuff known for its resistance to fire and erosion, as well as its easy workability. By the time Wright selected the stone for its rich texture, color, and softness, it had already been used in the walls and foundations of Kanto region buildings for centuries. In the construction boom that followed World War II, Oya stone mining reached nine hundred thousand tons annually until concrete became a more popular alternative construction material. Given the opportunity to design a building in Tochigi prefecture on the site of an abandoned rice warehouse built of Oya stone, Kengo Kuma seized the chance to work with the material. The Chokkura Plaza houses a community hall and exhibition gallery, and the new structure is located immediately adjacent to

the existing building. Never one to use material in a conventional way, Kuma decided to make a porous wall with the Oya stone, inspired by its physical porosity. In keeping with his strong aspirations to dematerialize architecture, Kuma detailed the stone wall so that the material appears to float. Alternating courses of chevron-shaped stones barely touch at their apex, suggesting an impossible lightness. In reality, the stones are supported by a ¼ inch (6 mm) thick steel plate—strong enough to hold the stone, yet thin enough to be undetectable from a short distance. However, both materials perform structural work as a composite system: steel supports stone, and stone supports steel. The Chokkura Plaza embodies Kuma’s search for lightness as well as the true expression of materials. In the project, he sought “to oppose the covering up of the entire world with concrete and steel through the use of local materials and collaboration with local craftsmen in the creation of an invisible architecture.”

gantenbein Winery

28

When Bearth & Deplazes Architects hired Gramazio & Kohler to design the facade for an extension to a winery, the researchers at ETH Zürich only had three months until completion of construction. The clients had requested a new structure that would house a fermentation room for grape processing, a cellar for wine barrel storage, and a terrace for wine tastings. Familiar with Gramazio & Kohler’s explorations in robotic fabrication studies, Bearth & Deplazes requested that the designers apply their process to the exterior infill panels of the addition. Using an oversized image of a basket filled with grapes, Gramazio & Kohler created an abstract digital template to superimpose on the building’s 4,300 ft2 (400 m2) facade. They programmed a robot in their laboratory to construct panels out of individually laid bricks, and the brick angles were established based on the brightness of individual pixels within the

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captions tk: 02_MS_Gantenbein_01[1A].tif captions tk: 02_MS_Gantenbein_03[2B].tif 02_MS_Gantenbein_09[2B].tif

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Mineral

Mineral

Fläsch, Switzerland Gramazio & Kohler Architecture and Urbanism with Bearth & Deplazes Architekten, 2006

photograph of grapes. According to the researchers, “similarly to pixels on a computer screen they add up to a distinctive image and thus communicate the identity of the vineyard. In contrast to a twodimensional screen, however, there is a dramatic play between plasticity, depth and color, dependent on the viewer’s position and the angle of the sun.” An automated procedure regulated the application of two-component bonding agent to the bricks, ensuring the panels’ rigidity. During construction, the seventy-two panels were delivered to the site on a truck and lifted into place by crane. The shifting orientations of twenty thousand bricks allow light to penetrate the structure at varying angles and intensities. The brick naturally tempers peak outdoor temperatures via its thermal mass, and clear polycarbonate panels located on the interior block wind and rain penetration.

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Architecture Briefs

Material Strategies Innovative Applications in Architecture Blaine Brownell Blaine Brownell’s best-selling Transmaterial series has introduced designers to hundreds of emergent materials that have the potential to transform our built environment. In our new Architecture Brief, Material Strategies, Brownell shows architects how creative applications of these materials achieve such transformations. Chapters based on fundamental material categories examine historical precedents, current opportunities, and future environmental challenges. Case studies featuring detailed illustrations showcase pioneering buildings from today’s most forward-thinking architectural firms. • An ideal primer on the role of materials in architectural design • Contemporary case studies include buildings by Kengo Kuma and Associates, Herzog & de Meuron, Steven Holl Architects, and Zaha Hadid • The first book to examine both the role material innovation has played in architectural history and its relevance for today’s architects • Moves beyond the conventional methodologies of building-technology courses and the purely technological contexts of professional practice

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Materials for Design 978-1-56898-558-9 $50.00

Transmaterial 2 978-1-56898-722-4 $35.00 Transmaterial 3 978-1-56898-893-1 $40.00

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After Taste Expanded Practice in Interior Design Kent Kleinman, Joanna Merwood-Salisbury, and Lois Weinthal, editors What is taste? This well-curated collection documents new theories and emerging critical practices in the field of interior design. It investigates taste, a concept central to the formation of the discipline in the eighteenth century that was repudiated by architects in the early twentieth century, but which continues to play an important role in interior design today. Essays by historians and critics are complemented by interviews with practitioners on the margins of normative practice and portfolios of the work of contemporary designers. • An important, critical look at an understudied field • Essential reading for interior designers as well as architects • From the annual symposium After Taste, hosted by Parsons The New School of Design • Features portfolios of artist Courtney Smith, photographer James Casebere, and interior and landscape designer Petra Blaisse and interviews with animation filmmakers Timothy and Stephen Quay (Quay Brothers) and space architect Constance Adams • Contributions by Penny Sparke, Kent Kleinman, J. M. Bernstein, Anthony Vidler, Julieanna Preston, Joanna Merwood-Salisbury, Alex Kitnick, Susan Yelavich, and Jorge Otero-Pailos

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Moderne: Fashioning the French Interior 978-1-56898-724-8 $65.00

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Installations by Architects 978-1-56898-850-4 $40.00

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Pamphlet Architecture 32 Resilience James A. Craig and Matt Ozga-Lawn The competition for Pamphlet Architecture 32 centered on the theme of resilience. By addressing the capacity to cope, the ability to bounce back, and the mitigation and management of risk, participants were asked to showcase a fresh understanding of the architectural opportunities found in resilience. The winning entry successfully takes on the topic through an investigation of the ravaged city of Warsaw, Poland. By identifying, interrogating, and ultimately reinforcing both the physical and immaterial conditions of the landscape, the project allows the space to become something new and yet hold on to what it is, truly exhibiting resilience. • Founded in 1977 as an alternative to mainstream architectural publishing, Pamphlet Architecture helped launch the careers of architects from Steven Holl and Lebbeus Woods to Zaha Hadid • The annual competition has attracted hundreds of participants from around the world

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The Concrete Dragon China’s Urban Revolution and What It Means for the World Thomas J. Campanella “Thomas J. Campanella tackles what he calls the greatest building boom in human history: the creation of whole new cities throughout China, where superhighways, theme parks, and engineering projects light up the night sky. Campanella is an able guide to the dusty haze of China’s ever-growing construction sites.” —Dwell

The speed and scale of China’s urban revolution challenge nearly all our expectations about architecture, urbanism, and city planning. Now available in paperback, The Concrete Dragon provides a critical overview of contemporary Chinese urbanization in light of China’s past as well as other earlier episodes of rapid urban development elsewhere in the world— especially that of the United States, a nation that itself once set global records for the speed and scale of its urban ambitions. • China is the most rapidly urbanizing nation in the world, with an urban population likely to reach one billion within a generation • China’s construction industry employs a workforce equal to the population of California • China is now home to some of the world’s tallest skyscrapers, biggest shopping malls, longest bridges, largest airport, most expansive theme parks, largest gated communities, and even the world’s largest skateboard park

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• By 2020 China’s national network of expressways will exceed, in length, the American interstate highway system

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Survival City 978-1-56898-305-9 $25.00

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Hyphen Press

Counterpunch Making Type in the Sixteenth Century, Designing Typefaces Now Fred Smeijers Typography is still dominated by letterforms from the first one hundred years of European printing. What were the processes and attitudes that lie behind these forms? Fred Smeijers is a type designer who learned to design and cut punches: the key instruments with which metal type is made. This book is a work of practical history, with much contemporary relevance. • Lively, pointed drawings and photographs complement an equally fresh text • Takes in the fundamentals of designing and making letters • Lucid line drawings by Smeijers, along with greatly enlarged photographs of punches, reveal them as the sculptures they are

Shipping October 2011 — 5.5 × 8.7 in / 14 × 22 cm 200 pp / xx color Paperback 978-0-9207259-42-8 $45.00 Rights: North and South America only — 54500

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Hyphen Press

Human Space Otto Friedrich Bollnow Translated by Christine Shuttleworth Edited by Joseph Kohlmaier Following its publication in Germany in 1963, Otto Friedrich Bollnow’s Human Space quickly became essential reading within a cross-disciplinary field of subject areas including architecture, anthropology, and philosophy. In this first English translation, Bollnow conceives the human experience of space not merely as a philosophical problem but also as an extension of his research into psychology, human behavior, and the conventional domains of architecture: living in a building, in an apartment, in a house. Human Space is a remarkable investigation of space as we experience it, by a man many consider to be the father of spatial and architectural anthropology. This lush hardcover edition includes an afterword by Joseph Kohlmaier that situates the work in the context of philosophical and architectural discussion. Shipping May 2011 — 4.9 × 8.3 in / 12.5 × 21 cm 320 pp Paperback 978-0-907259-35-0 $35.00 North and South America only — 53500

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From Hieroglyphics to Isotype 978-0-907259-44-2 $50.00

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At ... 978-0-907259-43-5 $35.00

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backlist

54 59 60 61 62 62 64 65 66 72 72 73 74 75 78 79 81 86 86 90 91 91 92 94

Architects & Monographs Young Architects Series Architecture Briefs Buildings Source s in Architecture Campus Guides Classic Reprints Construction & Reference General Architecture Guide Books Landscape Architecture Source Books in Landscape Architecture Urbanism Writings & Theory Conversations with Students Pamphlet Architecture Arts & Photography Book Arts Graphic & Industrial Design Design Briefs Dot Dot Dot Fresh Dialogue Typography Visual & Popular Culture


Architects & Monographs

Back in Print!

Archigram Peter Cook 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 148 pp / 144 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-194-9 $34.95 / £21.95

Atlas of Novel Tectonics Jesse Reiser and Nanako Umemoto 5 × 7.5 in / 13 × 19 cm 288 pp / 25 col / 200 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-554-1 $29.95 / £15.99

Adalberto Libera Francesco Garofalo and Luca Veresani 6 × 9.5 in / 15 × 24 cm 208 pp / 300 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-344-8 $24.95 / £17.95

Anchoring Steven Holl 8.5 × 8.5 in / 22 × 22 cm 172 pp / 205 b+w Hardcover 978-1-87827-151-8 $40.00 / £28.00

Animate Form Greg Lynn 6.6 × 8.8 in / 17 × 22 cm 204 pp / 1472 col / 135 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-083-6 $40.00 / £28.00

An Architecture of the Ozarks The Works of Marlon Blackwell Marlon Blackwell 9.8 × 8.5 in / 25 × 22 cm 192 pp / 284 col / 51 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-488-9 $40.00 / £28.00

AT-INdex Winka Dubbeldam 7.8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 224 pp / 250 col Paperback 978-1-56898-535-0 $40.00 / £28.00

also available on ebrary.com

Art Deco San Francisco The Architecture of Timothy Pflueger Therese Poletti and Tom Paiva 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 256 pp / 210 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-756-9 $55.00 / £35.00

The Big Idea Scott Johnson 6 × 8 in / 15 × 20 cm 120 pp / 75 b+w Paperback 978-1-890449-38-4 $35.00 / £20.00

Bing Thom Works Bing Thom Architects 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 208 pp / 100 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-959-4 $65.00 / £37.50

A Balcony Press book

World except Canada

Bioreboot The Architecture of R&Sie(n) Giovanni Corbellini et al. 9.5 × 6.5 in / 24 × 17 cm 224 pp / 132 col / 105 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-869-6 $40.00 / £25.00 NA, Canada, Australia & Philippines only

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Charles Rose, Architect Charles B. Rose 8.6 × 9.6 in / 22 × 24 cm 176 pp / 265 col / 40 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-537-4 $40.00 / £28.00

Condemned Building Douglas Darden 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 160 pp / 208 b+w Paperback 978-0-910413-63-3 $45.00 / £30.00

Dean/Wolf Architects Constructive Continum Kathryn Dean 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 224 pp / 303 col Paperback 978-1-56898-829-0 $40.00 / £25.00

Devil’s Workshop 25 Years of Jersey Devil Architecture Susan Piedmont-Palladino and Mark Alden Branch 8 × 10.8 in / 20 × 27 cm 144 pp / 120 col / 45 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-113-0 $29.95 / £21.95

Eero Saarinen An Architecture of Multiplicity Antonio Roman 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 240 pp / 180 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-340-0 $60.00 / £45.00

Erwin Hauer Continua Architectural Screens and Walls Erwin Hauer 10.3 × 10.8 in / 26 × 27 cm 108 pp / 155 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-727-9 $34.95 / £23.50

Expanded Practice Höweler + Yoon Architecture / MY Studio J. Meejin Yoon and Eric Höweler 7.5 × 9.3 in / 19 × 23 cm 208 pp / 300 col / 45 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-866-5 $40.00 / £25.00

Explorations The Architecture of John Ronan John Ronan 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 192 pp / 350 col / 80 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-876-4 $40.00 / £28.00

FOBA / Buildings Katsu Umebayashi et al. 6.8 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 224 pp / 300 col / 66 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-527-5 $40.00 / £28.00

Fougeron Architecture Opposition/Composition Anne Fougeron 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 192 pp / 240 col / 30 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-990-7 $40.00 / £28.00

Frank Furness The Complete Works, Revised Edition George E. Thomas et al. 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 392 pp / 13 col / 655 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-094-2 $45.00 / £30.00

NA, SA, Asia, Germany, Austria & Switzerland

Flesh Architectural Probes Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio 8.3 × 10.8 in / 21 × 27 cm 256 pp / 68 col / 300 b+w Paperback 978-1-878271-37-2 $39.95 / £28.00

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Ghost Building an Architectural Vision Brian MacKay-Lyons 6.3 × 9 in / 16 × 23 cm 192 pp / 224 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-736-1 $35.00 / £23.00

Grand Hotels of the Jazz Age The Architecture of Schultze & Weaver Marianne Lamonaca 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 256 pp / 100 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-555-8 $60.00 / £35.00

Gyroscopic Horizons Prototypical Buildings and Other Works Neil M. Denari 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 224 pp / 250 col / 150 b+w Paperback 978-1-87827-113-6 $40.00

House Black Swan Theory Steven Holl 8.5 × 8.5 in / 22 × 22 cm 176 pp / 176 col / 10 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-587-9 $40.00 / £25.00

NA only

Intertwining Steven Holl 8.5 × 8.5 in / 22 × 22 cm 176 pp / 16 col / 270 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-061-4 $40.00 / £28.00

James Carpenter Environmental Refractions Sandro Marpillero 8.7 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 176 pp / 200 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-608-1 $55.00

Jones, Partners: Architecture El Segundo Jones, Partners: Architecture 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 400 pp / 270 col / 305 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-700-2 $60.00 / £38.00

Julie Snow Architects Julie Snow and Janet Abrams 6.8 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 144 pp / 100 col / 40 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-487-2 $40.00 / £28.00

Leven Betts Pattern Recognition David Leven and Stella Betts 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 192 pp / 205 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-782-8 $40.00 / £25.00

Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis Opportunistic Architecture Paul Lewis et al. 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 192 pp / 130 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-710-1 $40.00 / £25.00

Also available on ebrary.com

NA only

Kesling Modern Structures Popularizing Modern Living in Southern California 1934-1962 Patrick Pascal 11 × 8 in / 28 × 20 cm 96 pp / 80 b+w Paperback 978-1-890449-13-1 $24.95 / £17.95

Kuth/Ranieri Architects Byron Kuth et al. 7.5 × 9.5 in / 19 × 24 cm 192 pp / 220 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-865-8 $40.00 / £28.00

A Balcony Press book

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Made to Measure The Architecture of Leers Weinzapfel Associates Andrea Leers et al. 9 × 11 in / 23 × 28 cm 176 pp / 213 col / 18 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-957-0 $65.00 / £45.00

Maine Cottages Fred L. Savage and the Architecture of Mount Desert John M. Bryan 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 304 pp / 250 col / 75 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-317-2 $50.00 / £35.00

Marina City Bertrand Goldberg’s Urban Vision Igor Marjanovic and Katerina Rüedi Ray 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 176 pp / 105 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-863-4 $35.00 / £25.00

Marmol Radziner + Associates Between Architecture and Construction Leo Marmol and Ron Radziner 8.5 × 9.5 in / 22 × 24 cm 176 pp / 235 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-744-6 $40.00 / £25.00

Mary Colter Architect of the Southwest Arnold Berke 10 × 8 in / 25 × 20 cm 320 pp / 80 col / 120 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-345-5 $35.00 / £21.99

Material Immaterial The New Work of Kengo Kuma Botond Bognar 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 224 pp / 460 col / 85 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-779-8 $40.00 / £25.00

Mehrdad Yazdani Joseph Giovannini 9.5 × 11.5 in / 24 × 29 cm 144 pp / 225 col Paperback 978-1-890449-29-2 $29.95 / £19.99

Miller|Hull Architects of the Pacific Northwest Sheri Olson 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 244 pp / 200 col / 150 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-231-1 $40.00 / £24.00

The Miller|Hull Partnership Public Works The Miller|Hull Partnership 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 256 pp / 200 col / 25 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-754-5 $50.00 / £30.00

Natural Houses The Residential Architecture of Andersson-Wise Arthur Andersson and Chris Wise 8 × 10.3 in / 20 × 26 cm 176 pp / 225 col / 25 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-879-5 $40.00 / £25.00

Norwegian Wood The Thoughtful Architecture of Wenche Selmer Elisabeth Tostrup 9.5 × 11 in / 24 × 28 cm 208 pp / 150 col / 96 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-593-0 $45.00 / £26.00

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A Balcony Press book

O’Donnell + Tuomey Selected Works Sheila O’Donnell and John Tuomey 9.8 × 8.5 in / 25 × 22 cm 192 pp / 200 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-601-2 $40.00 / £23.00

World English only

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Back in Print!

OneFiveFour Lebbeus Woods 7 × 10.5 in / 18 × 27 cm 136 pp / 100 b+w Paperback 978-0-910413-80-0 $24.95 / £16.99

Paul Rudolph: The Florida Houses Christopher Domin and Joseph King 10 × 8 in / 25 × 20 cm 248 pp / 150 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-551-0 $40.00 / £25.00

Paul Rudolph The Late Work Roberto de Alba 10 × 8 in / 25 × 20 cm 224 pp / 250 col / 150 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-401-8 $40.00 / £30.00

Plain Modern The Architecture of Brian MacKay-Lyons Malcolm Quantrill 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 224 pp / 200 col / 80 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-477-3 $40.00 / £30.00

Proceed and Be Bold Rural Studio After Samuel Mockbee Andrea Oppenheimer Dean and Timothy Hursley 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 176 pp / 130 col / Paperback 978-1-56898-500-8 $30.00 / £19.99

Provisional Emerging Modes of Architectural Practice USA Elite Kedan et al. 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 288 pp / 355 col / 65 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-878-8 $40.00 / £25.00

Also available on ebrary.com

Also available on ebrary.com

Responsive Architecture Moody Nolan Recent Work Morris Newman 9 × 10 in / 23 × 25 cm 120 pp / 140 col Paperback 978-1-890449-46-9 $29.95 / £16.99

Reveal Studio Gang Architects Jeanne Gang 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 256 pp / 300 col Paperback 978-1-56898-993-8 $45.00 / £30.00

Parallax Steven Holl 5.8 × 7.6 in / 15 × 19 cm 384 pp / 110 col / 290 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-261-8 $45.00 NA only

Peter Rose Houses Peter Rose 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 160 pp / 200 col / 50 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-821-4 $40.00 / £28.00

Radical Reconstruction Lebbeus Woods 12 × 9 in / 30 × 23 cm 168 pp / 109 col / 103 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-286-1 $39.95 / £24.95

Rick Joy Desert Works Rick Joy 9.8 × 8.5 in / 25 × 22 cm 176 pp / 180 col / 30 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-336-3 $40.00 / £30.00

A Balcony Press book

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Rogers Marvel Architects Rogers Marvel Architects, p llc 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 192 pp / 200 col Paperback 978-1-56898-999-0 $40.00 / £28.00

Rural Studio Samuel Mockbee and an Architecture of Decency Andrea Oppenheimer Dean and Timothy Hursley 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 192 pp / 132 col / 12 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-292-2 $30.00 / £21.00

The Storm and the Fall Lebbeus Woods 9.6 × 7.3 in / 24 × 18 cm 176 pp / 8 col / 134 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-421-6 $50.00 / £35.00

Weiss/Manfredi Surface/Subsurface Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi 11 × 9 in / 28 × 23 cm 208 pp / 300 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-733-0 $60.00 / £35.00

Think/Make Della Valle Bernheimer Andrew Bernheimer and Jared  Della Valle 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 192 pp / 245 col Paperback 978-1-56898-781-1 $40.00 / £25.00

Tom Kundig Houses Dung Ngo 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 176 pp / 150 col / 25 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-605-0 $40.00 / £23.00

True Life Steven Harris Architects Steven Harris 9.5 × 11.8 in / 24 × 30 cm 256 pp / 246 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-971-6 $50.00 / £32.00

VJAA Vincent James Associates Architects Vincent James and Jennifer Yoos 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 208 pp / 175 col / 125 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-588-6 $40.00 / £23.00

Young Architects Series

William L. Pereira James Steele 10 × 12 in / 25 × 30 cm 256 pp / 20 col / 260 b+w Hardcover 978-1-890449-20-9 $59.95 / £40.00 A Balcony Press book

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Yankee Modern The Houses of Estes/Twombly William Morgan 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 168 pp / 150 col / 20 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-817-7 $40.00 / £25.00

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Young Architects 8 Instability Architectural League of New York 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 176 pp / 350 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-637-1 $24.95 / £15.00

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59


Young Architects 9 Proof The Architectural League of New York 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 176 pp / 350 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-743-9 $24.95 / £15.00

Young Architects 10 Resonance The Architectural League of New York 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 176 pp / 350 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-809-2 $24.95 / £14.99

Young Architects 11 Foresight The Architectural League of New York 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 176 pp / 350 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-887-0 $24.95 / £16.99

Young Architects 12 ReSource The Architectural League of New York 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 176 pp / 350 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-998-3 $24.95 / £16.99

Architects Draw Sue Ferguson Gussow 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 176 pp / 200 col / 40 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-740-8 $24.95 / £15.00

Architectural Photography the Digital Way Gerry Kopelow 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 144 pp / 150 col Paperback 978-1-56898-697-5 $24.95 / £14.99

Building Envelopes An Integrated Approach Jenny Lovell 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 144 pp / 175 col Paperback 978-1-56898-818-4 $24.95 / £16.99

Ethics for Architects 50 Dilemmas of Professional Practice Thomas Fisher 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 152 pp Paperback 978-1-56898-946-4 $24.95 / £14.99

Model Making Megan Werner 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 160 pp / 200 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-870-2 $24.95 / £16.99

Philosophy for Architects Branko Mitrovic 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 192 pp / 15 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-994-5 $24.95 / £16.99

Architecture Briefs

Digital Fabrications Architectural and Material Techniques Lisa Iwamoto 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 144 pp / 175 col Paperback 978-1-56898-790-3 $24.95 / £14.99

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Buildings

Albert Frey Houses 1 + 2 Jennifer Golub 9.5 × 6.5 in / 24 × 17 cm 84 pp / 53 col / 22 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-190-1 $20.00 / £14.95

Austin Val Verde A Montecito Masterpiece Berge Aran 8.8 × 12 in / 22 × 30 cm 144 pp / 61 col / 5 b+w Hardcover 978-1-890449-39-1 $50.00 / £30.00 A Balcony Press book

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House Architecture as Portraiture Jack Quinan 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 248 pp / 130 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-419-3 $34.95 / £25.00

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater Ezra Stoller 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 96 pp / 80 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-203-8 $19.95 / £14.95

Guggenheim New York | Guggenheim Bilbao Ezra Stoller and Jeff Goldberg 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 80 pp / 34 col / 30 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-193-2 $14.95 / £10.95

The Chrysler Building Creating a New York Icon, Day by Day David Stravitz 9.6 × 12 in / 24 × 30 cm 192 pp / 170 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-354-7 $45.00 / £30.00

Iron Erecting the Walt Disney Concert Hall Gil Garcetti 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 144 pp / 80 b+w Paperback 978-1-890449-28-5 $29.95 / £19.99 A Balcony Press book

Loblolly House Elements of a New Architecture KieranTimberlake Associates 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 176 pp / 125 col / 46 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-747-7 $40.00 / £25.00

Luis Barragan’s Gardens of El Pedregal Keith Eggener 7.5 × 11 in / 19 × 28 cm 176 pp / 25 col / 115 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-267-0 $40.00 / £28.00

Manhattan Skyscrapers Third Edition Eric P. Nash 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 240 pp / 150 col / 175 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-967-9 $50.00 / £32.00

Mies Van der Rohe’s Krefeld Villas Kent Kleinman and Leslie Van  Duzer 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 144 pp / 40 col / 60 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-503-9 $35.00 / £25.00 Also available on ebrary.com

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Richard Neutra’s Miller House Stephen Leet 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 192 pp / 120 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-274-8 $40.00 / £28.00

Terragni’s Danteum Building Studies 2 Thomas L. Schumacher 5.5 × 8.5 in / 14 × 22 cm 168 pp / 12 col / 117 b+w Paperback 978-1-87827-182-2 $24.95 / £17.99

The Wittgenstein House Bernhard Leitner 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 160 pp / 30 col / 90 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-251-9 $45.00 / £30.00

Bernard Tschumi/ Zenith De Rouen Source Books in Architecture 3 Todd Gannon and Jeffrey Kipnis 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 176 pp / 101 col / 102 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-382-0 $29.95 / £19.99

Steven Holl Architects/ Simmons Hall Source Books in Architecture 5 Todd Gannon and Michael Demson 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 160 pp / 110 col / 75 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-464-3 $29.95 / £19.99

Zaha Hadid/BMW Central Building Source Books in Architecture 7 Todd Gannon 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 160 pp / 200 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-536-7 $29.95 / £17.00

Cranbrook The Campus Guide Kathryn Eckert 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 208 pp / 120 col Paperback 978-1-56898-257-1 $24.95 / £17.95

Dartmouth College The Campus Guide Scott Meacham 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 256 pp / 225 col Paperback 978-1-56898-348-6 $24.95 / £15.00

Source Books in Architecture

Campus Guides

Eisenman Architects/ The University of Phoenix Stadium for the Arizona Cardinals Source Books in Architecture 8 Todd Gannon 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 160 pp / 200 col / 50 b+w Paperback / 978-1-56898-720-0 $29.95 / £17.00 62

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Duke University The Campus Guide John M. Bryan 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 168 pp / 120 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-228-1 $24.95 / £17.95

Harvard University The Campus Guide Douglas Shand-Tucci 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 360 pp / 130 col Paperback 978-1-56898-280-9 $24.95 / £17.95

Northwestern University The Campus Guide Jay Pridmore 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 192 pp / 200 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-755-2 $24.95 / £14.99

Rice University The Campus Guide Stephen Fox 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 208 pp / 120 col Paperback 978-1-56898-246-5 $24.95 / £17.95

Smith College The Campus Guide Margaret Birney Vickery and Bilyana Dimitrova 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 160 pp / 100 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-591-6 $24.95 / £15.00

Stanford University, revised edition The Campus Guide David J. Neuman et al. 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 200 pp / 120 col / 30 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-538-1 $29.95 / £19.99

University of California, Berkeley The Campus Guide Harvey Helfand 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 368 pp / 130 col Paperback 978-1-56898-293-9 $24.95 / £17.95

University of California, San Diego Dirk Sutro et al. 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 224 pp / 125 col Paperback 978-1-56898-860-3 $29.95 / £19.99

University of Cincinnati The Campus Guide Paul Bennett 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 224 pp / 130 col Paperback 978-1-56898-232-8 $24.95 / £17.95

University of Pennsylvania The Campus Guide George  E. Thomas 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 216 pp / 170 col Paperback 978-1-56898-315-8 $24.95 / £17.95

University of Texas at Austin Lawrence W. Speck and Richard L. Cleary 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 224 pp / 125 col / 15 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-854-2 $29.95 / £20.00

University of Toronto The Campus Guide Larry Wayne Richards 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 256 pp / 175 col / 18 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-719-4 $29.95 / £17.99

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University of Washington The Campus Guide Norman Johnston 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 168 pp / 120 col Paperback 978-1-56898-247-2 $24.95 / £17.95

Vassar College The Campus Guide Karen Van Lengen and Lisa Reilly 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 176 pp / 130 col Paperback 978-1-56898-349-3 $24.95 / £17.95

West Point U.S. Military Academy The Campus Guide Rod Miller 6.3 × 10 in / 16 × 25 cm 160 pp / 130 col Paperback 978-1-56898-294-6 $24.95 / £17.95

The Antiquities of Athens Measured and Delineated by James Stuart and Nicholas Revett, Painters and Architects James Stuart and Nicholas Revett 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 496 pp / 400 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-723-1 $125.00 / £70.00

Edifices de Rome Moderne Paul Letarouilly 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 368 pp / 354 b+w Hardcover 978-0-910413-00-8 $85.00 / £60.00

L’Architecture Claude-Nicolas Ledoux 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 328 pp / 300 b+w Hardcover 978-0-910413-03-9 $85.00 / £60.00

Pencil Points Reader A Journal for the Drafting Room, 1920-1943 Jan Cigliano and George E. Hartman 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 680 pp / 400 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-352-3 $85.00 / £60.00

Plan of Chicago Daniel H. Burnham and Edward H. Bennett 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 268 pp / 48 col / 94 b+w Hardcover 978-1-87827-141-9 $85.00 / £60.00

Sammlung Architektonischer Entwürfe Karl Friedrich Schinkel 11 × 8.5 in / 28 × 22 cm 268 pp / 207 b+w Hardcover 978-0-910413-56-5 $85.00 / £60.00

Classic Reprints

Park and Recreation Structures Albert Good 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 624 pp / 400 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-171-0 $85.00 / £60.00

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Construction & Reference

The Vatican and Saint Peter’s Basilica of Rome Paul Letarouilly 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 320 pp / 24 col / 243 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-875-7 $125.00 / £80.00

The Codewriting Workbook Creating Computational Architecture in AutoLISP Robert J. Krawczyk 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 416 pp / 274 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-792-7 $50.00 / £30.00

Detail in Process Christine Killory and René Davids 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 208 pp / 300 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-718-7 $65.00 / £40.00

Materials for Design Victoria Ballard Bell and Patrick Rand 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 272 pp / 275 col / 250 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-558-9 $50.00

Details in Contemporary Architecture Christine Killory and René Davids 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 208 pp / 200 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-576-3 $65.00 / £40.00

Engineered Transparency The Technical, Visual, and Spatial Effects of Glass Michael Bell and Jeannie Kim 8.5 × 10.8 in / 22 × 27 cm 272 pp / 300 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-798-9 $65.00 / £40.00

Integrated Design in Contemporary Architecture Kiel Moe 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 208 pp / 200 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-745-3 $65.00 / £40.00

Prefab Prototypes Site-specific Design for Offsite Construction Mark Anderson and Peter Anderson 9.6 × 11.9 in / 24 × 30 cm 264 pp / 100 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-560-2 $60.00 / £35.00

Remarkable Structures Engineering Today’s Innovative Buildings Sutherland Lyall 9.3 × 11.8 in / 23 × 30 cm 240 pp / 150 col / 150 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-330-1 $75.00

Transmaterial A Catalog of Materials that Redefine our Physical Environment Blaine Brownell 6.8 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 224 pp / 800 col Paperback 978-1-56898-563-3 $35.00 / £25.00

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NA only

Transmaterial 2 A Catalog of Materials that Redefine our Physical Environment Blaine Brownell 6.8 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 240 pp / 400 col Paperback 978-1-56898-722-4 $35.00 / £25.00 Backlist

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General Architecture

A-frame Chad Randl 7.2 × 7.9 in / 18 × 20 cm 208 pp / 150 col / 75 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-410-0 $24.95 / £15.99

After the Crash Architecture in Post-Bubble Japan Thomas Daniell 6 × 8.5 in / 15 × 22 cm 192 pp / 100 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-776-7 $24.95 / £14.99

Andrea Cochran Landscapes Mary Myers 10 × 8.5 in / 25 × 22 cm 192 pp / 175 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-812-2 $50.00 / £30.00

The Architectural Detail Edward R. Ford 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 336 pp / 285 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-978-5 $40.00 / £28.00

Architectural Lighting Designing with Light and Space Hervé Descottes and Cecilia E. Ramos 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 144 pp / 177 col Paperback 978-1-56898-938-9 $24.95 / £16.99

The Architecture of Modern Italy The Challenge of Tradition, 1750-1900, Vol. 1 Terry Kirk 6.4 × 9 in / 16 × 23 cm 280 pp / 119 b+w / Hardcover 978-1-56898-420-9 $35.00 / £25.00

The Baltimore Rowhouse Mary Ellen Hayward and Charles Belfoure 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 304 pp / 135 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-283-0 $24.95 / £12.95

Bamboo Fences Isao Yoshikawa and Osamu Suzuki 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 160 pp / 250 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-834-4 $40.00 / £23.50

Transmaterial 3 A Catalog of Materials that Redefine our Physical Environment Blaine Brownell 6.8 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 252 pp / 400 col Paperback 978-1-56898-893-1 $40.00 / £25.00

Alvar Aalto Houses Jari Jetsonen and Sirkkaliisa Jetsonen 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 224 pp / 279 col / 37 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-982-2 $50.00 / £35.00 World rights excluding Swedish and Finnish language rights

The Architecture of Diplomacy Building America’s Embassies, Revised Second Edition Jane C. Loeffler 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 424 pp / 190 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-984-6 $24.95 / £16.99 66

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Bunker Archeology Paul Virilio 6.5 × 10.5 in / 17 × 27 cm 216 pp / 124 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-015-7 $40.00 / £28.00

The Cape Cod Cottage William Morgan 8.5 × 8.5 in / 22 × 22 cm 108 pp / 75 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-575-6 $24.95 / £14.00

Contemporary Curtain Wall Architecture Scott Murray 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 264 pp / 275 col / 150 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-797-2 $75.00 / £45.00

Crafting a Modern World The Designs of Antonin and Noémi Raymond Kurt G. F. Helfrich and William Whitaker 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 352 pp / 100 col / 340 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-583-1 $75.00 / £42.00

Designing Paradise The Allure of the Hawaiian Resort Don Hibbard 10 × 8 in / 25 × 20 cm 216 pp / 170 col / 84 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-574-9 $50.00 / £30.00

Figure/Ground A Design Conversation Scott Johnson and Bill Fain 8.5 × 9.5 in / 22 × 24 cm 240 pp / 220 col Hardcover 978-1-890449-23-0 $65.00 / £42.00

Fragments of Utopia Collage Reflections of Heroic Modernism David Wild 8.3 × 11 in / 21 × 28 cm 112 pp / 120 b+w Paperback 978-0-907259-10-7 $40.00 / NA+SA only

Frank Lloyd Wright The Romantic Spirit Carol Bishop 6 × 8 in / 15 × 20 cm 144 pp / 64 col Hardcover 978-1-890449-30-8 $35.00 / £24.00

Building (in) the Future Recasting Labor in Architecture Phillip Bernstein and Peggy Deamer 6 × 8.5 in / 15 × 22 cm 216 pp / 85 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-806-1 $29.95 / £19.99

Tall Building Imagining the Skyscraper Scott Johnson 8 × 14 in / 20 × 36 cm 280 pp Hardcover 978-1-890449-47-6 $34.95 / £22.00

Colonial Revival Maine Kevin Murphy 8.3 × 10 in / 21 × 25 cm 192 pp / 60 col / 90 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-449-0 $39.95 / £28.00

Earth Architecture Ronald Rael 8.5 × 9 in / 22 × 23 cm 208 pp / 222 col / 96 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-945-7 $24.95 / £16.99

A Balcony Press book

A Balcony Press book

A Balcony Press book

A Hyphen Press book

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Full Irish New Architecture in Ireland Sarah A. Lappin 7.8 × 8.5 in / 20 × 22 cm 240 pp / 250 col / 50 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-868-9 $45.00 / £30.00

Gateway Visions for an Urban National Park Alexander Brash et al. 11 × 9.5 in / 28 × 24 cm 224 pp / 349 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-955-6 $60.00 / £40.00

The Green House New Directions in Sustainable Architecture Alanna Stang and Christopher Hawthorne 8.5 × 9 in / 22 × 23 cm 196 pp / 200 col / 100 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-950-1 $24.95 / £16.99

Guastavino Vaulting The Art of Structural Tile John Ochsendorf and Michael Freeman 8.3 × 11 in / 21 × 28 cm 256 pp / 174 col / 161 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-741-5 $60.00 / £37.50

Heavenly Vaults From Romanesque to Gothic in European Architecture David Stephenson 11 × 11.5 in / 28 × 29 cm 192 pp / 125 col / 15 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-840-5 $65.00 / £40.00

Hill-Stead The Country Place of Theodate Pope Riddle James F. O’Gorman et al. 8.3 × 10 in / 21 × 25 cm 192 pp / 63 col / 98 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-759-0 $45.00 / £30.00

Hotel as Home The Art of Living on the Road Gary Chang 8.5 × 7 in / 22 × 18 cm 248 pp / 300 col / 40 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-603-6 $29.95 / £17.00

A House for My Mother Architects Build for their Families Beth Dunlop 8.5 × 9.5 in / 22 × 24 cm 192 pp / 150 col Paperback 978-1-56898-173-4 $34.95 / £24.95

House in the Landscape Siting Your Home Naturally Jeremiah Eck 8.5 × 9 in / 22 × 23 cm 208 pp / 248 col / 59 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-823-8 $40.00 / £28.00

How to Photograph Buildings and Interiors Third Updated and Expanded Edition Gerry Kopelow 8.4 × 11 in / 21 × 28 cm 284 pp / 104 col / 230 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-323-3 $35.00 / £24.95

Human Space Otto Friedrich Bollnow 8.3 × 10.8 in / 21 × 27 cm 300 pp Paperback 978-0-907259-35-0 $50.00 / NA+SA only

From Autos to Architecture Fordism and Architectural Aesthetics in the Twentieth Century David Gartman 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 400 pp / 80 b+w / Hardcover 978-1-56898-813-9 $60.00 / £38.00 Also available on ebrary.com

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NA+SA, Europe

A Hyphen Press book

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Installations by Architects Experiments in Building and Design Sarah Bonnemaison and Ronit Eisenbach 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 192 pp / 170 col / 45 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-850-4 $40.00 / £25.00

Interactive Architecture Michael Fox and Miles Kemp 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 256 pp / 350 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-836-8 $50.00 / £30.00

Italian Architecture of the 16th Century Colin Rowe and Leon Satkowski 6.4 × 9 in / 16 × 23 cm 352 pp / 186 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-331-8 $35.00 / £24.95

Le Corbusier and the Maisons Jaoul Caroline Maniaque Benton 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 176 pp / 122 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-800-9 $40.00 / £25.00

LEED Materials A Resource Guide to Green Building Ari Meisel and Steven Winter 6.8 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 224 pp / 500 col Paperback 978-1-56898-885-6 $40.00 / £28.00

Leisurama Now The Beach House for Everyone Paul Sahre 7.3 × 9.8 in / 18 × 25 cm 208 pp / 270 col / 20 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-709-5 $40.00 / £25.00

The L!brary Book Design Collaborations in the Public Schools Anooradha Iyer Siddiqi 6.6 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 176 pp / 175 col Paperback 978-1-56898-832-0 $30.00 / £18.99

Matter in the Floating World Conversations with Leading Japanese Architects and Designers Blaine Brownell 7 × 9.5 in / 18 × 24 cm 256 pp / 425 col Paperback 978-1-56898-996-9 $40.00 / £25.00

Miami Modern Metropolis Paradise and Paradox in Midcentury Architecture and Planning / Allan T. Shulman and Diane W. Camber 9.5 × 12 in / 24 × 30 cm 414 pp / Hardcover 978-1-890449-51-3 $85.00 / £55.00

Minka My Farmhouse in Japan John Roderick 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp / 45 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-731-6 $24.95 / £14.99

Modern North Architecture on the Frozen Edge Julie Decker et al. 8.5 × 9 in / 22 × 23 cm 240 pp / 315 col / 135 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-899-3 $45.00 / £30.00

More Mobile Portable Architecture for Today Jennifer Siegal 9 × 6 in / 23 × 15 cm 144 pp / 220 col Paperback 978-1-56898-758-3 $24.95 / £14.99

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Narrow Houses New Directions in Efficient Design Avi Friedman 7.5 × 11.3 in / 19 × 29 cm 240 pp / 280 col / 50 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-873-3 $45.00 / £25.00

The New Modern House Will Jones 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 176 pp / 300 col Paperback 978-1-56898-524-4 $40.00

Photographing Architecture and Interiors Updated and Expanded Julius Shulman 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 180 pp / 4 col / 200 b+w Hardcover 978-1-890449-07-0 $39.95 / £28.00

Quonset Hut Metal Living for a Modern Age Chris Chiei and Julie Decker 7.2 × 8.3 in / 18 × 21 cm 192 pp / 80 col / 110 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-519-0 $24.95 / £15.99

Revolution of Forms, updated edition Cuba’s Forgotten Art Schools John Loomis 7.5 × 11 in / 19 × 28 cm 232 pp / 44 col / 134 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-988-4 $29.95 / £20.00

Revolving Architecture A History of Buildings that Rotate, Swivel, and Pivot Chad Randl 7.2 × 8.3 in / 18 × 21 cm 208 pp / 100 col / 70 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-681-4 $35.00 / £25.00

The Sea Ranch Donlyn Lyndon and Jim Alinder 11 × 11 in / 28 × 28 cm 304 pp / 200 col / 170 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-386-8 $65.00 / £44.00

Small Scale Creative Solutions for Better City Living Keith Moskow and Robert Linn 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 224 pp / 400 col Paperback 978-1-56898-975-4 $34.95 / £20.00

Solid States Concrete in Transition Michael Bell and Craig Buckley 8.5 × 10.8 in / 22 × 27 cm 272 pp / 500 col / 175 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-895-5 $65.00 / £45.00

NA only

Next Wave New Australian Architecture Davina Jackson 7.8 × 8.5 in / 20 × 22 cm 256 pp / 185 col / 80 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-735-4 $50.00

Pamela Burton Landscapes Pamela Burton 10 × 8.5 in / 25 × 22 cm 192 pp / 275 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-965-5 $50.00 / £32.00

NA only

A Balcony Press book

Sacred Spaces Historic Houses of Worship in the City of Angels Robert Berger 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 176 pp / 100 col Hardcover 978-1-890449-21-6 $59.95 / £40.00 A Balcony Press book

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Source Book of American Architecture 500 Notable Buildings from the 10th Century to the Present G. E. Kidder Smith 6.5 × 9.5 in / 17 × 24 cm 688 pp / 557 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-254-0 $29.95 / £21.95

Southern Comfort The Garden District of New Orleans, Revised and Updated Edition S. Frederick Starr 9.8 × 9.8 in / 25 × 25 cm 276 pp / 90 col / 75 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-546-6 $24.95 / £16.99

Steps to Water The Ancient Stepwells of India Morna Livingston 9.6 × 12 in / 24 × 30 cm 240 pp / 140 col / 92 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-324-0 $50.00 / £35.00

Thermally Active Surfaces in Architecture Kiel Moe 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 240 pp / 250 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-880-1 $55.00 / £38.00

Tilting House Launching, Slide Hauling, Potato Trenching, and other Tales from a Newfoundland Fishing Village Robert Mellin 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 256 pp / 150 col / 90 b+w Paperback / 978-1-56898-807-8 $24.95 / £14.99

To Each His Home Inspired Interiors as Unique as their Owners Bilyana Dimitrova 9 × 9.3 in / 23 × 23 cm 176 pp / 112 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-796-5 $45.00 / £28.00

Wandering the Garden of Technology and Passion John Marx Architect Pierluigi Serraino and Chris  I. Yessios 10 × 10.5 in / 25 × 27 cm 176 pp / 250 col / Hardcover 978-1-890449-56-8 $45.00 / £30.00

Weekend Utopia Modern Living in the Hamptons Alastair Gordon 9.6 × 12 in / 24 × 30 cm 172 pp / 75 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-272-4 $45.00 / £30.00

Workbook The Official Catalog for Workshopping: An American Model for Architectural Practice Emily Abruzzo 6.5 × 8.8 in / 17 × 22 cm 128 pp / 80 col / 15 b+w Paperback 978-1-61689-017-9 $20.00 / £12.99

A Balcony Press book

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Swiss Made New Architecture from Switzerland Steven Spier and Martin Tschanz 7.8 × 8.5 in / 20 × 22 cm 256 pp / 250 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-425-4 $45.00 NA only

Usonia, New York Building a Community with Frank Lloyd Wright Roland Reisley and John Timpane 9 × 9 in / 23 × 23 cm 192 pp / 67 col / 130 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-245-8 $40.00 / £28.00

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71


Guide Books

The Havana Guide Modern Architecture 1925-1965 Eduardo Rodriguez 5.5 × 9 in / 14 × 23 cm 288 pp / 16 col / 270 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-210-6 $29.95 / £17.95

The Le Corbusier Guide 3rd edition Deborah Gans 5.5 × 9 in / 14 × 23 cm 288 pp / 286 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-539-8 $24.95 / £14.99

The National Park Architecture Sourcebook Harvey H. Kaiser 6 × 9.5 in / 15 × 24 cm 608 pp / 500 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-742-2 $40.00 / £25.00

When Brazil Was Modern A Guide to Architecture 1928-1960 Lauro Cavalcanti 5.9 × 6.8 in / 15 × 17 cm 468 pp / 184 col / 200 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-341-7 $34.95 / £24.00

Wright Sites Updated and Revised, 3rd Edition Arlene Sanderson 5.5 × 9 in / 14 × 23 cm 144 pp / 90 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-275-5 $17.95 / £10.95

Courtyard Housing in Los Angeles Stefanos Polyzoides et al. 8.5 × 9.5 in / 22 × 24 cm 232 pp / 403 b+w Paperback 978-0-910413-53-4 $35.00 / £22.50

Descanso An Urban Oasis Revealed Warren Marr et al. 14 × 9 in / 36 × 23 cm 96 pp / 80 col Hardcover 978-1-890449-37-7 $42.95 / £25.00

Green Roof — A Case Study Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates’ Design For the Headquarters of the American Society of Landscape Architects Christian Werthmann 8.5 × 9 in / 22 × 23 cm 160 pp / 130 col / Hardcover 978-1-56898-685-2 $45.00 / £26.00

Cruising LA Architectural Styles in 5 Easy Drives Troy Fuss 6 × 11 in / 15 × 28 cm 96 pp / 80 col Paperback 978-1-890449-42-1 $14.95 / £9.95 A Balcony Press book

Louisville Guide Gregory A. Luhan et al. 4.5 × 8.5 in / 11 × 22 cm 480 pp / 325 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-451-3 $19.95 / £13.99 Also available on ebrary.com

Landscape Architecture

A Balcony Press book

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Large Parks Julia Czerniak and George Hargreaves 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp / 50 col / 100 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-624-1 $34.95 / £23.50

The Modern Garden Jane Brown 10 × 8.8 in / 25 × 22 cm 224 pp / 120 col / 130 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-238-0 $45.00

Recovering Landscape Essays in Contemporary Landscape Theory James Corner 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 288 pp / 120 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-179-6 $24.95 / £17.95

Richard Haag Bloedel Reserve and Gas Works Park, Landscape Views 1 William S. Saunders 6.5 × 8.5 in / 17 × 22 cm 80 pp / 52 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-117-8 $14.95 / £9.95

Natural Architecture Alessandro Rocca 9.4 × 6.4 in / 24 × 16 cm 216 pp / 250 col Paperback 978-1-56898-721-7 $39.95 / £25.00

NA only

Reclaiming the American West Alan Berger 11 × 9.5 in / 28 × 24 cm 224 pp / 179 col / 29 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-362-2 $45.00 / £35.00

Shallow Water Dictionary A Grounding in Estuary English, 2nd edition John R. Stilgoe 4.6 × 6.5 in / 12 × 17 cm 72 pp / 5 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-408-7 $14.95 / £10.95 Also available on ebrary.com

Also available on ebrary.com

Source Books in Landscape Architecture

Grant Jones / Jones & Jones ILARIS: The Puget Sound Plan Source Books in Landscape Architecture 4 Jane Amidon 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 144 pp / 120 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-604-3 $29.95 / £18.00 w w w.pa pr e s s.c om

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Paolo Bürgi Landscape Architect Discovering the (Swiss) Horizon: Mountain, Lake, and Forest Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto et al. 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 144 pp / 100 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-851-1 $29.95 / £18.99

Tom Leader Studio Three Projects Jason Kentner 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 144 pp / 120 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-891-7 $29.95 / £19.99

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73


Urbanism

Beyond the Edge New York’s New Waterfront Raymond W. Gastil 8.3 × 10.8 in / 21 × 27 cm 208 pp / 70 col / 70 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-327-1 $30.00 / £21.95

World English except France and Belgium

Above the Pavement— the Farm! Architecture & Agriculture at PF1 Amale Andraos and Dan Wood 4.5 × 7 in / 11 × 18 cm 192 pp / 20 col / 150 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-935-8 $19.95 / £12.99

Bird’s Eye Views Historic Lithographs of North American Cities John W. Reps 14.5 × 12.5 in / 37 × 32 cm 116 pp / 120 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-146-8 $70.00 / £50.00

Block by Block Jane Jacobs and the Future of New York Timothy Mennel et al. 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 64 pp / 12 col / 10 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-771-2 $17.95 / £10.99

City Building Nine Planning Principles for the Twenty-First Century John Lund Kriken et al. 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 304 pp / 200 col / 100 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-881-8 $40.00 / £25.00

The Concrete Dragon China’s Urban Revolution and What it Means for the World Thomas J. Campanella 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 336 pp / 85 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-968-6 $24.95

Coney Island The Parachute Pavilion Competition Zoë Ryan and Jonathan Cohen-Litant 8 × 9.5 in / 20 × 24 cm 176 pp / 132 col / 14 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-623-4 $29.95 / £18.00

Drosscape Wasting Land in Urban America Alan Berger and Lars Lerup 7 × 11 in / 18 × 28 cm 256 pp / 165 col Paperback 978-1-56898-713-2 $27.50 / £16.00

Fast-Forward Urbanism Rethinking Architecture’s Engagement with the City Dana Cuff and Roger Sherman 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp / 204 col / 27 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-977-8 $34.95 / £22.50

The Landscape Urbanism Reader Charles Waldheim 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 288 pp / 200 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-439-1 $34.95 / £19.99

Above Paris The Aerial Survey of Roger Henrard Jean-Louis Cohen 11.4 × 6.3 in / 29 × 16 cm 320 pp / 320 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-613-5 $50.00 / £30.00

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Also available on ebrary.com

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The Liberal Monument Urban Design and the Late Modern Project Alexander D’Hooghe 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 112 pp / 30 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-824-5 $29.95 / £19.99

The Suburbanization of New York Is the World’s Greatest City Becoming Just Another Town? Jerilou Hammett and Kingsley Hammett 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 192 pp / 20 b+w / Paperback 978-1-56898-678-4 $24.95 / £15.00

The Next American Metropolis Ecology, Community, and the American Dream Peter Calthorpe 8.5 × 10 in / 22 × 25 cm 176 pp / 60 col / 120 b+w Paperback 978-1-87827-168-6 $35.00 / £19.95

Sprawltown Looking for the City on Its Edges Richard Ingersoll 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 176 pp / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-566-4 $19.95 / £10.99

Suburban Transformations Paul Lukez 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 192 pp / 200 col / 100 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-683-8 $40.00 / £25.00

Urbanisms Working with Doubt Steven Holl 8.5 × 8.5 in / 22 × 22 cm 288 pp / 200 2-color and 50 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-679-1 $55.00 / £35.00

Street Value Shopping, Planning, and Politics at Fulton Mall Rosten Woo et al. 4.5 × 7 in / 11 × 18 cm 208 pp / 35 col / 165 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-897-9 $19.95 / £12.99

World English only

Also available on ebrary.com

X-Urbanism Architecture and the American City Mario Gandelsonas 9.8 × 9.8 in / 25 × 25 cm 200 pp / 40 col / 140 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-151-2 $37.50 / £26.00

Writings & Theory

Architectural Regionalism Collected Writings on Place, Identity, Modernity, and Tradition Vincent B. Canizaro 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 496 pp / 80 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-616-6 $39.95 / £22.99 w w w.pa pr e s s.c om

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Architecture and Film Mark Lamster 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp / 80 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-207-6 $24.95 / £17.95 Also available on ebrary.com

Architecture and the Sciences Exchanging Metaphors Antoine Picon and Alessandra Ponte 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 360 pp / 120 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-365-3 $27.50 / £15.95

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75


Architecture From the Outside In Selected Essays by Robert Gutman Robert Gutman et al. 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 344 pp Paperback 978-1-56898-896-2 $40.00 / £28.00

Architecture of the Off-Modern Svetlana Boym 5.5 × 8.5 in / 14 × 22 cm 80 pp / 20 col / 22 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-778-1 $24.95 / £14.99

Biopolitics and the Emergence of Modern Architecture Sven-Olov Wallenstein 5.5 × 8.5 in / 14 × 22 cm 96 pp / 20 col / 60 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-785-9 $24.95 / £14.99

Capital Dilemma Germany’s Search for a New Architecture of Democracy Michael  Z. Wise 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 244 pp / 65 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-134-5 $25.00 / £18.95

Dimension 306090 12 Emily Abruzzo and Jonathan D. Solomon 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 192 pp / 100 col / 75 b+w Paperback 978-0-615-18202-5 $24.95 / £14.99

Artificial Light A Narrative Inquiry into the Nature of Abstraction, Immediacy, and other Architectural Fictions Keith Mitnick 6 × 8.3 in / 15 × 21 cm 144 pp / 33 col / Paperback 978-1-56898-749-1 $24.95 / £15.00

Architecture Oriented Otherwise David Leatherbarrow 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 304 pp / 80 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-811-5 $39.95 / £23.50 Also available on ebrary.com

Design Ecologies Essays on the Nature of Design Lisa Tilder and Beth Blostein 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp / 72 col / 64 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-783-5 $35.00 / £22.50

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Constructing a New Agenda for Architecture Architectural Theory 1993‒2009 A. Krista Sykes and K. Michael Hays 6.1 × 9.3 in / 16 × 23 cm 516 pp Paperback 978-1-56898-859-7 $45.00 / £30.00

Donogoo-Tonka or the Miracles of Science A Cinematographic Tale Jules Romains 5.5 × 8.5 in / 14 × 22 cm 136 pp / 20 col / 20 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-780-4 $24.95 / £14.99

Eco-Tec The Architecture of the In-Between Amerigo Marras 5.8 × 8.4 in / 15 × 21 cm 142 pp / 40 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-159-8 $15.95 / £11.95

The Ethical Architect The Dilemma of Contemporary Practice Tom Spector 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp Paperback 978-1-56898-285-4 $25.00 / £17.95

Also available on ebrary.com

Also available on ebrary.com

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Fabricating Architecture Selected Readings in Digital Design and Manufacturing Robert Corser 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 224 pp / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-889-4 $29.95 / £19.99

50 Years of Recuperation of the Situationist International McKenzie Wark 5.5 × 8.5 in / 14 × 22 cm 80 pp / 26 col / 18 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-789-7 $24.95 / £14.99

Five Houses, Ten Details Edward R. Ford 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp / 20 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-826-9 $40.00 / £25.00

Geography of Home Writings on Where We Live Akiko Busch 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 164 pp Paperback 978-1-56898-429-2 $19.95 / £11.99

A History of Architectural Theory From Vitruvius to the Present Hanno-Walter Kruft 6.1 × 9.3 in / 16 × 23 cm 800 pp / 207 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-010-2 $45.00 / £28.00

Le Corbusier, Homme de Lettres M. Christine Boyer 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 720 pp / 46 col / 170 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-980-8 $45.00 / £30.00

Network Practices New Strategies in Architecture and Design Anthony Burke and Therese Tierney 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 224 pp / 24 col / 100 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-701-9 $29.95 / £18.00

Postmodern Urbanism Revised Edition Nan Ellin 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 368 pp / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-135-2 $29.95 / £16.99

Shanghai Reflections Architecture, Urbanism, and the Search for an Alternative Modernity Mario Gandelsonas 6.8 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 208 pp / 130 col / 40 b+w Vinyl binding 978-1-56898-326-4 $24.95 / £14.95

Studio and Cube On The Relationship Between Where Art is Made and Where Art is Displayed Brian O’Doherty 5.5 × 8.5 in / 14 × 22 cm 80 pp / 43 col Hardcover 978-1-883584-44-3 $24.95 / £15.00

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On Vision and Colors by Arthur Schopenhauer and Color Sphere by Philipp Otto Runge Georg Stahl 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 168 pp / 12 col / 10 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-791-0 $24.95 / £16.99 w w w.pa pr e s s.c om

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Form Follows Finance Skyscrapers and Skylines in New York and Chicago Carol Willis 5.8 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 224 pp / 170 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-044-7 $29.95 / £18.00

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77


Subnature Architecture’s Other Environments David Gissen 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 224 pp / 80 col / 65 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-777-4 $35.00 / £22.50

Survival City Adventures Among the Ruins of Atomic America Tom Vanderbilt 6.1 × 9.3 in / 16 × 23 cm 224 pp / 80 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-305-9 $25.00 / £17.95

Sustain and Develop 306090 13 Joshua Bolchover and Jonathan D. Solomon 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 308 pp / 100 col / 75 b+w Paperback 978-0-692-00088-5 $30.00 / £18.99

Theorizing a New Agenda for Architecture An Anthology of Architectural Theory 1965‒1995 Kate Nesbitt 6.1 × 9.3 in / 16 × 23 cm 608 pp / 28 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-054-6 $45.00 / £28.00

A Conversation with Frei Otto Juan María Songel 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 96 pp / 22 2-color col Paperback 978-1-56898-884-9 $19.95 / £12.99

Conversations with Mies van der Rohe Moisés Puente 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 96 pp / 31 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-753-8 $19.95 / £11.99

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Conversations with Students

ZoomScape Architecture in Motion and Media Mitchell Schwarzer 6.1 × 9.3 in / 16 × 23 cm 312 pp / 30 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-441-4 $29.95 / £19.99

Ian McHarg Dwelling in Nature Lynn Margulis et al. 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 112 pp Paperback 978-1-56898-620-3 $19.95 / £12.00

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Le Corbusier Talks with Students Le Corbusier 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 96 pp Paperback 978-1-56898-196-3 $14.95 / £10.95

Louis I. Kahn Conversations with Students Louis Kahn 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 112 pp / 12 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-149-9 $19.95 / £12.95

Paul Rand Conversations with Students Michael Kroeger 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 96 pp / 30 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-725-5 $19.95 / £12.99

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Peter Smithson Conversations with Students Catherine Spellman and Karl Unglaub 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 96 pp / 37 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-461-2 $17.95 / £12.99

Rem Koolhaas Conversations with Students Rem Koolhaas 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 80 pp / 33 b+w Paperback 978-1-885232-02-1 $19.95 / £13.99

Santiago Calatrava The MIT Lectures Santiago Calatrava et al. 5.5 × 8 in / 14 × 20 cm 112 pp / 35 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-325-7 $17.95 / £12.99

Pamphlet Architecture 1-10 Steven Holl et al. 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 480 pp / 700 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-126-0 $45.00 / £28.00

Pamphlet Architecture 5 Alphabetical City Steven Holl 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 72 pp / 176 b+w Paperback 978-0-910413-16-9 $16.95 / £9.99

Pamphlet Architecture 9 Rural and Urban House Types Steven Holl 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 60 pp / 107 b+w Paperback 978-0-910413-15-2 $12.95 / £9.95

Pamphlet Architecture 11-20 Steven Holl 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 604 pp / 466 b+w Hardcover 978-1-61689-016-2 $45.00 / £30.00

Pamphlet Architecture 12 Building Machines Robert McCarter 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 64 pp / 106 b+w Paperback 978-0-910413-40-4 $16.95 / £9.99

Pamphlet Architecture 13 Edge of a City Steven Holl 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 64 pp / 70 b+w Paperback 978-1-87827-156-3 $14.95 / £9.95

Pamphlet Architecture

Pamphlet Architecture 11 Hybrid Buildings Joseph Fenton 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 48 pp / 97 b+w Paperback 978-0-910413-14-5 $12.95 / £9.95

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Pamphlet Architecture 15 War and Architecture Lebbeus Woods 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 40 pp / 35 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-011-9 $16.95 / £9.99

Pamphlet Architecture 16 Architecture as a Translation of Music Elizabeth Martin 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-012-6 $16.95 / £12.95

Pamphlet Architecture 17 Small Buildings Mike Cadwell 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 64 pp / 110 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-055-3 $12.95 / £9.95

Pamphlet Architecture 20 Seven Partly Underground Rooms... Mary-Ann Ray 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 110 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-103-1 $16.95 / £9.99

Pamphlet Architecture 21 Situation Normal Paul Lewis et al. 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 150 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-154-3 $16.95 / £9.99

Pamphlet Architecture 22 Other Plans University of Chicago Studies Michael Sorkin Studio 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 96 pp / 44 col / 36 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-309-7 $14.95 / £10.95

Pamphlet Architecture 23 Move: Sites of Trauma Johanna Saleh Dickson 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 90 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-400-1 $14.95 / £10.95

Pamphlet Architecture 24 Some Among Them Are Killers: Unmanaged Landscapes for Non-U.S. Military and Government Users David Ross 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 95 b+w / Paperback 978-1-56898-389-9 $14.95 / £10.95

Pamphlet Architecture 25 Gravity James Cathcart et al. 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 108 pp / 95 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-434-6 $16.95 / £10.95

Pamphlet Architecture 26 Thirteen Projects for the Sheridan Expressway Jonathan D. Solomon 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 75 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-454-4 $14.95 / £10.95

Pamphlet Architecture 27 Tooling Benjamin Aranda et al. 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 70 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-547-3 $19.95 / £11.99

Pamphlet Architecture 28 Augmented Landscapes Smout Allen 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 100 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-625-8 $19.95 / £11.99

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Pamphlet Architecture 29 Ambiguous Spaces Nannette Jackowski and Ricardo de Ostos 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp / 100 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-795-8 $16.95 / £9.99

Pamphlet Architecture 30 Coupling Strategies for Infrastructural Opportunism InfraNet Lab / Lateral Office 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 80 pp Paperback 978-1-56898-985-3 $17.95 / £12.99

Pamphlet Architecture 31 New Haiti Villages Steven Holl et al. 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 48 pp / 16 col / 31 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-981-5 $19.95 / £12.99

Animal Logic Richard Barnes et al. 12 × 11 in / 30 × 28 cm 144 pp / 100 col / 20 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-861-0 $65.00 / £40.00

Around the World The Grand Tour in Photo Albums Barbara Levine and Kirsten Jensen 12 × 9 in / 30 × 23 cm 208 pp / 200 col / 100 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-708-8 $55.00 / £32.00

Artpark 1974‒1984 Sandra Q. Firmin 11.5 × 9.3 in / 29 × 23 cm 256 pp / 304 col / 38 b+w Hardcover 978-1-61689-019-3 $45.00 / £30.00

BEE Rose-Lynn Fisher 7.8 × 9.3 in / 20 × 23 cm 128 pp / 60 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-944-0 $29.95 / £19.99

Bethlehem Steel Andrew Garn 8.5 × 8.5 in / 22 × 22 cm 120 pp / 90 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-197-0 $21.95 / £15.95

Big Up Ben Watts 7 × 8.3 in / 18 × 21 cm 192 pp / 300 col Paperback 978-1-56898-452-0 $35.00 / £25.00

Arts & Photography

At... Writing, mainly about art, from the London Review of Books Peter Campbell 4.9 × 8.3 in / 12 × 21 cm 400 pp / 12 col / Paperback 978-0-907259-43-5 $35.00 / £25.00 / NA+SA only A Hyphen Press book

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81


Bird Watching Paula McCartney et al. 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 120 pp / 40 col / 5 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-855-9 $50.00 / £30.00

Blackstock’s Collections The Drawings of an Artistic Savant Gregory L. Blackstock 5.5 × 9.5 in / 14 × 24 cm 144 pp / 140 col Paperback 978-1-56898-579-4 $21.95 / £12.95

Brodsky and Utkin The Complete Works Lois Nesbitt 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 128 pp / 99 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-399-8 $45.00 / £30.00

Brothels of Nevada Candid Views of America’s Legal Sex Industry Timothy Hursley 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 192 pp / 166 col Paperback 978-1-56898-418-6 $24.95 / £16.99

By Hand The Use of Craft in Contemporary Art Shu Hung and Joseph Magliaro 7.5 × 9.5 in / 19 × 24 cm 176 pp / 240 col Paperback 978-1-56898-942-6 $24.95 / £16.99

Creative Time: The Book Anne Pasternak and Ruth Peltason 7.9 × 11 in / 20 × 28 cm 288 pp / 275 col / 25 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-804-7 $50.00 / £30.00

Dance in Cuba Gil Garcetti 12 × 13 in / 30 × 33 cm 144 pp / 80 b+w Hardcover 978-1-890449-34-6 $65.00 / £38.00

Drawing from Life The Journal As Art Jennifer New 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 192 pp / 200 col / 5 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-445-2 $29.95 / £16.99

The Eiffel Tower Lucien Hervé 5.5 × 9 in / 14 × 23 cm 96 pp / 45 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-372-1 $19.95 / £14.95

Forest of Pipes The Walt Disney Concert Hall Organ Jennifer Zobelein and Grant Mudford 8 × 8 in / 20 × 20 cm 80 pp / 100 col / Paperback 978-1-890449-43-8 $24.95 / £15.00

From Hieroglyphics to Isotype A Visual Autobiography Otto Neurath 9.4 × 6.7 in / 24 × 17 cm / many col Hardcover 978-0-907259-44-2 $50.00 / NA+SA only

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Frozen Music Gil Garcetti 16 × 14 in / 41 × 36 cm 96 pp / 45 b+w Hardcover 978-1-890449-27-8 $125.00 / £80.00 A Balcony Press book

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Ghostly Ruins America’s Forgotten Architecture Harry Skrdla 7.5 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 208 pp / 250 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-615-9 $29.95 / £17.00

Holidays on Display William L. Bird, Jr. 7.8 × 8.8 in / 20 × 22 cm 160 pp / 150 col / 75 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-695-1 $24.95 / £14.99

I Am My Family Photographic Memories and Fictions Rafael Goldchain 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 168 pp / 138 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-738-5 $40.00 / £25.00

Ilf and Petrov’s American Road Trip The 1935 Travelogue of Two Soviet Writers Ilya Ilf et al. 6.5 × 8.5 in / 17 × 22 cm 176 pp / 150 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-600-5 $24.95 / £15.00

Impressions of New York Prints from the New-York Historical Society Marilyn Symmes 11 × 9 in / 28 × 23 cm 304 pp / 32 col / 107 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-492-6 $50.00 / £35.00

Inside the Painter’s Studio Joe Fig 7 × 9.5 in / 18 × 24 cm 240 pp / 200 col Paperback 978-1-56898-852-8 $35.00 / £22.50

Italian Cities and Landscapes An Architect’s Sketchbook William H. Fain, Jr. 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 264 pp / 246 col Paperback 978-1-890449-32-2 $27.00 / £18.00

Kosmos A Portrait of the Russian Space Age Adam Bartos 11 × 9.8 in / 28 × 25 cm 176 pp / 94 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-308-0 $40.00 / £28.00

A Balcony Press book

Landscape Stories Jem Southam 12.5 × 11.5 in / 32 × 29 cm 156 pp / 90 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-517-6 $75.00 / £50.00

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LaPorte, Indiana Jason Bitner 6.8 × 8.5 in / 17 × 22 cm 192 pp / 200 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-530-5 $19.95 / £10.99

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Large Scale Fabricating Sculpture in the 1960s and 1970s Jonathan D. Lippincott 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 256 pp / 160 col / 220 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-934-1 $45.00 / £30.00

LA’s Early Moderns Art, Architecture, Photography Victoria Dailey et al. 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 136 pp / 75 col / 75 b+w Paperback 978-1-890449-16-2 $34.95 / £25.00 A Balcony Press book

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83


Lickshot A Photo Scrapbook Ben Watts 9 × 11 in / 23 × 28 cm 208 pp / 180 col / 20 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-838-2 $50.00 / £32.00

Life on the Lower East Side Photographs by Rebecca Lepkoff, 1937–1950 Rebecca Lepkoff et al. 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 192 pp / 170 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-939-6 $29.95 / £19.99

Lists / To-dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts, and Other Artists’ Enumerations from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art Liza Kirwin 7 × 10 in / 18 × 25 cm 208 pp / 115 col / 25 b+w Paperback / 978-1-56898-888-7 $24.95 / £16.99

Lost Border The Landscape of the Iron Curtain Brian Rose 10 × 10 in / 25 × 25 cm 144 pp / 87 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-493-3 $40.00 / £28.00

Lucy + Jorge Orta Food, Water, Life Lucy + Jorge Orta 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 192 pp / 300 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-991-4 $40.00 / £28.00

Mingering Mike The Amazing Career of An Imaginary Soul Superstar Dori Hadar 9 × 9.5 in / 23 × 24 cm 192 pp / 136 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-569-5 $24.95 / £14.99

Mysteries of the Rectangle Essays on Painting Siri Hustvedt 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 204 pp / 50 col Paperback 978-1-56898-618-0 $24.95 / £16.95 World English only

The Mythic City Photographs of New York by Samuel H. Gottscho, 1925-1940 Donald Albrecht 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 224 pp / 175 b+w Paperback 978-1-61689-015-5 $29.95 / £20.00

New York Changing Revisiting Berenice Abbott’s New York Douglas Levere and Bonnie Yochelson 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 192 pp / 170 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-473-5 $40.00 / £28.00

Newtown Creek A Photographic Survey of New York’s Industrial Waterway Anthony Hamboussi 9.6 × 6.5 in / 24 × 17 cm 432 pp / 237 col / 4 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-858-0 $55.00 / £35.00

Now Is Then Snapshots from the Maresca Collection Marvin Heiferman 7.8 × 9.3 in / 20 × 23 cm 192 pp / 200 col / 50 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-748-4 $29.95 / £16.99

Nell Brooker Mayhew Paintings on Paper Alissa Anderson 8.3 × 8.3 in / 21 × 21 cm 80 pp / 50 col Paperback 978-1-890449-35-3 $24.95 / £14.99 A Balcony Press book

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Obsessive Consumption What Did You Buy Today? Kate Bingaman-Burt 6 × 8 in / 15 × 20 cm 208 pp / 550 col Paperback 978-1-56898-890-0 $19.95 / £12.99

Once Upon a Time Illustrations from Fairytales, Fables, Primer, Pop-Ups, and other Children’s Books. Amy Weinstein 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 256 pp / 192 col / 325 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-564-0 $35.00 / £19.99

Paris Women & Bicycles Gil Garcetti 9 × 11 in / 23 × 28 cm 128 pp / 100 col Paperback 978-1-890449-52-0 $45.00 / £30.00

Paris Changing Revisiting Eugene Atget’s Paris Christopher Rauschenberg 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 192 pp / 172 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-680-7 $40.00 / £25.00

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Pedro E. Guerrero A Photographer’s Journey Pedro E. Guerrero 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 224 pp / 60 col / 137 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-590-9 $55.00 / £35.00

Publish Your Photography Book Darius D. Himes and Mary Virginia Swanson 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 224 pp / 25 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-883-2 $29.95 / £18.99

Real Photo Postcards Unbelievable Images from the Collection of Harvey Tulcensky Laetitia Wolff 7.1 × 9.3 in / 18 × 23 cm 192 pp / 180 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-556-5 $19.95 / £10.99

Sites of Impact Meteorite Craters Around the World Stan Gaz 10.3 × 13 in / 26 × 33 cm 144 pp / 85 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-815-3 $60.00 / £35.00

Snapshot Chronicles Inventing The American Photo Album Barbara Levine et al. 10 × 10 in / 25 × 25 cm 192 pp / 576 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-557-2 $40.00 / £25.00

Stickwork Patrick Dougherty 7 × 9.5 in / 18 × 24 cm 208 pp / 230 col / 20 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-862-7 $50.00 / £32.00

Thrown Rope Peter Hutchinson 7.5 × 9.8 in / 19 × 25 cm 144 pp / 100 col Paperback 978-1-56898-561-9 $29.95 / £19.99

Urban Surprises A Guide to Public Art in Los Angeles Gloria Gerace 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 112 pp / 20 col / 40 b+w Paperback 978-1-890449-14-8 $14.95 / £11.95 A Balcony Press book

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Visions of Heaven The Dome in European Architecture David Stephenson and Victoria Hammond 11 × 11.5 in / 28 × 29 cm 192 pp / 125 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-549-7 $60.00 / £35.00

Water is Key A Better Future for Africa Gil Garcetti 12 × 13 in / 30 × 33 cm 112 pp / 80 b+w Hardcover 978-1-890449-45-2 $65.00 / £40.00 A Balcony Press book

A Year of Mornings 3191 Miles Apart Maria Alexandra Vettese and Stephanie Congdon Barnes 6 × 8 in / 15 × 20 cm 208 pp / 450 col Paperback 978-1-56898-784-2 $21.95 / £12.99

Book Arts

Art Deco Bookbindings The Work of Pierre Legrain and Rose Adler Yves Peyré and H. George Fletcher 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 120 pp / 60 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-462-9 $35.00 / £25.00

By Its Cover Modern American Book Cover Design Ned Drew and Paul Sternberger 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 192 pp / 200 col Paperback 978-1-56898-497-1 $29.95 / £19.99

Classic Book Jackets The Design Legacy of George Salter Thomas Hansen 8.3 × 9.8 in / 21 × 25 cm 200 pp / 224 col Paperback 978-1-56898-491-9 $35.00 / £25.00

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Graphic & Industrial Design

Designing Books Practice and Theory Jost Hochuli and Robin Kinross 6.7 × 8.9 in / 17 × 23 cm 168 pp Paperback 978-0-907259-23-7 $30.00 / NA+SA only A Hyphen Press book

The ABC’s of Triangle Square Circle The Bauhaus and Design Theory Ellen Lupton and J. Abbott Miller 8.3 × 10.8 in / 21 × 27 cm 64 pp / 105 b+w / Paperback 978-1-87827-142-6 $24.95

Bent Ply The Art of Plywood Furniture Dung Ngo and Eric Pfeiffer 7.3 × 10 in / 18 × 25 cm 160 pp / 125 col / 16 b+w Plywood with rounded corners and taped spine 978-1-56898-405-6 $49.95 / £35.00

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Cuba Style Graphics from the Golden Age of Design Steven Heller and Vicki Gold Levi 8 × 8.8 in / 20 × 22 cm 168 pp / 250 col Paperback 978-1-56898-360-8 $24.95 / £14.99

Curious Boym Design Works Constantin Boym 6.4 × 8.5 in / 16 × 22 cm 224 pp / 290 col / 15 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-353-0 $40.00 / £28.00

Daniel Eatock Imprint Daniel Eatock 8.3 × 11.7 in / 21 × 30 cm 224 pp / 700 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-788-0 $60.00 / £30.00

Design for Victory World War II Posters on the American Home Front William L. Bird, Jr. and Harry R. Rubenstein 8.8 × 8 in / 22 × 20 cm 120 pp / 170 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-140-6 $24.95 / £14.99

Design Studies Theory and Research in Graphic Design Audrey Bennett 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 464 pp / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-586-2 $40.00 / £25.00

Design Studies Theory and Research in Graphic Design Audrey Bennett Hardcover 978-1-56898-597-8 $65.00 / £35.00

Dish International Design for the Home Julie Muller Stahl 7.3 × 9.8 in / 18 × 25 cm 200 pp / 316 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-476-6 $34.95 / £25.00

Exploring Materials Creative Design for Everyday Objects Inna Alesina and Ellen Lupton 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 208 pp / 425 col Paperback 978-1-56898-768-2 $35.00 / £20.00

Extreme Textiles Designing for High Performance Matilda McQuaid 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 224 pp / 200 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-507-7 $45.00

Function, Restraint, and Subversion in Typography J. Namdev Hardisty 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 256 pp / 390 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-966-2 $45.00 / £30.00

George Tsypin Opera Factory Building in the Black Void George Tsypin et al. 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 224 pp / 350 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-532-9 $75.00 / £40.00

Graphic Design The New Basics Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips 8 × 9 in / 20 × 23 cm 248 pp / 400 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-770-5 $50.00 / £26.00

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Graphic Design The New Basics Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips Paperback 978-1-56898-702-6 $35.00 / £20.00

It Is Beautiful… then Gone Martin Venezky 7 × 9.5 in / 18 × 24 cm 192 pp / 1392 col / 35 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-729-3 $29.95 / £16.99

The Handy Book of Artistic Printing / A Collection of Letterpress Examples with Specimens of Type, Ornament, Corner Fills, Borders, Twisters, Wrinklers, and other Freaks of Fancy / Doug Clouse and Angela Voulangas 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 224 pp / 185 col / 12 b+w Paperback / 978-1-56898-705-7 $40.00 / £23.50

How to Be a Graphic Designer without Losing Your Soul, new edition Adrian Shaughnessy 7.5 × 9 in / 19 × 23 cm 176 pp / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-983-9 $24.95

Kitchen Centric Mick De Giulio et al. 11 × 11 in / 28 × 28 cm 256 pp / 250 col Hardcover 978-1-890449-54-4 $65.00 / £40.00

Letters from the Avant-Garde Modern Graphic Design Ellen Lupton and Elaine Lustig Cohen 10.7 × 8.2 in / 27 × 21 cm 128 pp / 120 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-052-2 $24.95 / £17.95

Make It Bigger Paula Scher 9.3 × 6.5 in / 23 × 17 cm 272 pp / 300 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-332-5 $45.00 / £32.00

Moderne Fashioning the French Interior Sarah Schleuning 9 × 12 in / 23 × 30 cm 304 pp / 272 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-724-8 $65.00 / £40.00

Over and Over A Catalog of Hand-Drawn Patterns Mike Perry 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 256 pp / 250 col Paperback 978-1-56898-757-6 $35.00 / £20.00

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Mixing Messages Graphic Design in Contemporary Culture Ellen Lupton 8.3 × 10.8 in / 21 × 27 cm 176 pp / 300 col / 64 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-099-7 $35.00 / £23.00

Models and Constructs Margin Notes to a Design Culture Norman Potter 6.7 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 312 pp / 190 b+w Hardcover 978-0-907259-04-6 $40.00 / NA+SA only

Inside Design Now The National Design Triennial Ellen Lupton et al. 8.5 × 11 in / 22 × 28 cm 208 pp / 400 col Paperback 978-1-56898-395-0 $29.95 NA+SA, Africa, Asia only

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Pulled A Catalog of Screen Printing Mike Perry 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 256 pp / 256 col Paperback 978-1-56898-943-3 $35.00 / £22.50

Screen Essays on Graphic Design, New Media, and Visual Culture Jessica Helfand 5.3 × 8 in / 13 × 20 cm 200 pp / 65 col / 120 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-310-3 $19.95 / £13.95

Seventy-nine Short Essays on Design Michael Bierut 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 272 pp Hardcover 978-1-56898-699-9 $24.95 / £15.00

NA+UK only

There’s Nothing Funny About Design David Barringer 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp / 160 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-828-3 $24.95 / £14.99

Tools of the Imagination Drawing Tools and Technologies from the Eighteenth Century to the Present Susan Piedmont-Palladino 7.8 × 9.3 in / 20 × 23 cm 128 pp / 115 col / 15 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-599-2 $29.95 / £17.00

Twentieth-Century Pattern Design Lesley Jackson 9 × 11 in / 23 × 28 cm 224 pp / 360 col Paperback 978-1-56898-712-5 $35.00

Visual Complexity Mapping Patterns of Information Manuel Lima 8.5 × 10.5 in / 22 × 27 cm 272 pp / 250 col / 65 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-936-5 $50.00 / £35.00

Visual Function An Introduction to Information Design Paul Mijksenaar 6.8 × 8.3 in / 17 × 21 cm 56 pp / 22 col / 88 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-118-5 $14.95 / NA+SA only

Robert Brownjohn Sex and Typography Emily King 7.5 × 9 in / 19 × 23 cm 240 pp / 200 col / 55 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-550-3 $45.00 NA only

Skin Surface, Substance, and Design Ellen Lupton et al. 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 240 pp / 250 col Paperback 978-1-56898-711-8 $27.50 / £16.00

The Transformer Principles of Making Isotype Charts Marie Neurath and Robin Kinross 8.3 × 10.8 in / 21 × 27 cm 80 pp / Paperback 978-0-907259-40-4 $25.00 / NA+SA only

Soak Wash Rinse Spin Tolleson Design 7 × 9.5 in / 18 × 24 cm 320 pp / 800 col Paperback 978-1-56898-198-7 $45.00 / £30.00

NA only

A Hyphen Press book

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Design Briefs

Volume Writings on Graphic Design, Music, Art, and Culture Kenneth FitzGerald and Rudy VanderLans 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 256 pp / 9 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-964-8 $24.95 / £14.99

What is a Designer Things, Places, Messages Norman Potter 5 × 8.3 in / 13 × 21 cm 184 pp Paperback 978-0-907259-16-9 $20.00 / NA+SA only

D.I.Y. Design It Yourself Ellen Lupton 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 196 pp / 250 col Paperback 978-1-56898-552-7 $24.95 / £12.99

A Hyphen Press book

Elements of Design Rowena Reed Kostellow and the Structure of Visual Relationships Gail Greet Hannah and Designed by Tucker Viemeister and Seth Kornfeld 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 160 pp / 150 col / Paperback 978-1-56898-329-5 $24.95 / £12.99

Form+Code in Design, Art, and Architecture Casey Reas et al. 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 176 pp / 120 col / 80 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-937-2 $24.95 / £14.99

Graphic Design Theory Readings from the Field Helen Armstrong 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 152 pp / 41 col / 32 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-772-9 $24.95 / £14.99

Grid Systems Principles of Organizing Type Kimberly Elam 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 120 pp / 45 col / 200 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-465-0 $24.95 / £12.99

Indie Publishing How to Design and Produce Your Own Book Ellen Lupton 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 176 pp / 270 col Paperback 978-1-56898-760-6 $24.95 / £12.99

Lettering and Type Creating Letters and Designing Typefaces Bruce Willen et al. 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 144 pp / 515 col Paperback 978-1-56898-765-1 $24.95 / £14.99

Thinking with Type, second, revised and expanded edition A Critical Guide for Designers, Writers, Editors, & Students Ellen Lupton 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 224 pp / 100 col Paperback 978-1-56898-969-3 $24.95 / £14.99

Typographic Systems Kimberly Elam 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 160 pp / 55 col / 400 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-687-6 $24.95 / £12.99

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Visual Grammar Christian Leborg 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 96 pp / 200 2-color col Paperback 978-1-56898-581-7 $21.95 / £12.99 Also available on ebrary.com World English only

The Wayfinding Handbook Information Design for Public Places David Gibson 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 152 pp / 265 col / 5 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-769-9 $24.95 / £14.99

Web Typography Viviana Cordova 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 192 pp / 72 col / 145 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-995-2 $24.95 / £16.99

Dot Dot Dot 13 Stuart Bailey and Peter Bilak 6.5 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 104 pp / 14 col / 90 b+w Paperback 978-90-77620-07-6 $16.95

Dot Dot Dot 16 Stuart Bailey 6.5 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 104 pp / 14 col / 90 b+w Paperback 978-0-9794654-1-3 $16.95

Dot Dot Dot 17 Stuart Bailey 6.5 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 104 pp Paperback 978-0-9794654-2-0 $16.95

NA+SA, South Africa & Asia only

NA+SA, South Africa & Asia only

NA+SA, South Africa & Asia only

Dot Dot Dot

Fresh Dialogue

Dot Dot Dot 19 Stuart Bailey 6.5 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 144 pp / 25 col / 245 b+w Paperback 978-0-9794654-4-4 $16.95

Dot Dot Dot 20 Stuart Bailey 6.5 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 144 pp / 25 col / 245 b+w Paperback 978-0-9794654-5-1 $16.95

NA+SA, South Africa & Asia only

NA+SA, South Africa & Asia only

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Fresh Dialogue 6 Friendly Fire AIGA New York Chapter and James Victore 6.5 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 112 pp / 200 col Paperback 978-1-56898-582-4 $16.95 / £12.95

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91


Fresh Dialogue 7 Making Magazines AIGA New York Chapter and James Truman 6.5 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 128 pp / 100 col Paperback 978-1-56898-698-2 $16.95 / £9.99

Fresh Dialogue 8 Designing Audiences AIGA New York Chapter and Ze Frank 6.5 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 128 pp / 130 col Paperback 978-1-56898-751-4 $16.95 / £9.99

Fresh Dialogue 9 In/Visible: Graphic Data Revealed AIGA New York Chapter 6.5 × 9 in / 17 × 23 cm 128 pp / 130 col Paperback 978-1-56898-816-0 $16.95 / £9.99

Active Literature Jan Tschichold and New Typography Christopher Burke 8.3 × 10.9 in / 21 × 28 cm 336 pp / 700 col Hardcover 978-0-907259-32-9 $75.00 / NA+SA only

Anthony Froshaug Typography & Texts Documents of a Life: Vol 1 and Vol 2 Robin Kinross 6.7 × 9.5 in / 17 × 24 cm 528 pp / 360 b+w / Paperback 978-0-907259-09-1 $75.00 / NA+SA only

A Hyphen Press book

A Hyphen Press book

Dimensional Typography J. Abbott Miller 5.5 × 8.5 in / 14 × 22 cm 64 pp / 30 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-089-8 $19.95 / £13.95

Fraktur Mon Amour Judith Schalansky 4.9 × 7.9 in / 12 × 20 cm 648 pp / 300 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-801-6 $45.00 / £30.00

Typography

Detail in Typography Jost Hochuli 4.9 × 8.3 in / 13 × 21 cm 72 pp / 75 b+w Paperback 978-0-907259-34-3 $25.00 / NA+SA only A Hyphen Press book

World English except Germany, Austria,

A View of Early Typography Up to about 1600 Harry Carter 5.5 × 8.8 in / 14 × 22 cm 208 pp / 84 b+w Paperback 978-0-907259-21-3 $35.00 / NA+SA only A Hyphen Press book

Hand Job A Catalog of Type Mike Perry 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 256 pp / 500 col Paperback 978-1-56898-626-5 $35.00 / £20.00

Switzerland & Japan

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Karel Martens Counterprint Karel Martens et al. 8.3 × 11.8 in / 21 × 30 cm 40 pp Paperback 978-0-907259-25-1 $35.00 / NA+SA only

Letter by Letter An Alphabetical Miscellany Laurent Pflughaupt 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 160 pp / 139 1-color / 230 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-737-8 $24.95 / £15.00

A Hyphen Press book

Printed Matter / Drukwerk Jaap van Triest et al. 6.7 × 23 in / 17 × 58 cm 208 pp / many col Paperback 978-0-907259-41-1 $60.00 / NA+SA only

The Stroke Theory of Writing Gerrit Noordzij 5 × 8.3 in / 13 × 21 cm 96 pp / Paperback 978-0-907259-30-5 $25.00 / NA+SA only

A Hyphen Press book

A Hyphen Press book

Modern Typography An Essay in Critical History, 2nd Ed Robin Kinross 5 × 8.3 in / 13 × 21 cm 224 pp / 64 b+w Paperback 978-0-907259-18-3 $27.50 / NA+SA only

Paul Renner The Art of Typography Christopher Burke 6.5 × 9.5 in / 17 × 24 cm 224 pp / 20 col / 110 b+w Paperback 978-0-907259-12-1 $35.00

A Hyphen Press book

A Hyphen Press book

Type Now A Manifesto Fred Smeijers 5.7 × 8.7 in / 14 × 22 cm 144 pp / 16 col Paperback 978-0-907259-24-4 $27.50 / NA+SA only

Type Spaces In-house Norms in the Typography of Aldus Manutius Peter Burnhill 6.7 × 9.4 in / 17 × 24 cm 144 pp / 150 b+w Paperback 978-0-907259-19-0 $35.00 / NA+SA only

A Hyphen Press book

NA+SA, Africa, Asia only

A Hyphen Press book

Typeface Classic Typography for Contemporary Design Tamye Riggs 10.3 × 9 in / 26 × 23 cm 256 pp / 400 col Paperback 978-1-56898-810-8 $45.00

Modern typography in Britain Graphic Design, Politics, and Society, Typography papers 8 Stuart Hall and Paul Stiff 8.5 × 11.7 in / 22 × 30 cm 160 pp / Paperback 978-0-907259-39-8 $50.00 / NA+SA only

Unjustified Texts Perspectives on Typography Robin Kinross 5 × 8.3 in / 13 × 21 cm 384 pp / 50 b+w Paperback 978-0-907259-17-6 $30.00 / NA+SA only

Typography Papers 6 The Classical Traditon in Letters Nicolete Gray et al. 8.5 × 11.7 in / 22 × 30 cm 128 pp Paperback 978-0-907259-29-9 $40.00 / NA+SA only

A Hyphen Press book

A Hyphen Press book

A Hyphen Press book

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Visual & Popular Culture

America’s Doll House The Miniature World of Faith Bradford William L. Bird, Jr. 7.5 × 9 in / 19 × 23 cm 128 pp / 51 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-974-7 $24.95 / £14.99

At a Crossroads Between a Rock and My Parents’ Place Kate T. Williamson 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 144 pp / 144 col Paperback 978-1-56898-714-9 $19.95 / £11.99

The Best of LCD The Art and Writing of WFMU Dave the Spazz 7.6 × 10 in / 19 × 25 cm 256 pp / 150 col / 300 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-715-6 $29.95 / £16.99

Breaking News How the Associated Press Has Covered War, Peace, and Everything Else Associated Press 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 432 pp / 40 col / 140 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-689-0 $35.00 / £20.00

Cartographies of Time Daniel Rosenberg and Anthony Grafton 8.5 × 10.5 in / 22 × 27 cm 272 pp / 268 col / 40 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-763-7 $50.00 / £30.00

Catalog The Illustrated History of Mail Order Shopping Robin Cherry 7 × 9 in / 18 × 23 cm 272 pp / 375 col / 125 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-739-2 $35.00 / £22.00

Cocinando! Fifty Years of Latin Album Cover Art Pablo Yglesias 7.5 × 7.5 in / 19 × 19 cm 240 pp / 177 col / 7 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-460-5 $19.95 / £13.99

D.I.Y. Kids Ellen Lupton and Julia Lupton 7 × 8.5 in / 18 × 22 cm 144 pp / 400 col Paperback 978-1-56898-707-1 $14.95 / £9.95

Empire Nozone IX Nicholas Blechman 7 × 10 in / 18 × 25 cm 168 pp / 235 col Paperback 978-1-56898-457-5 $19.95 / £14.99

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Also available on ebrary.com

The Englishman Who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects John Tingey 6 × 9 in / 15 × 23 cm 176 pp / 130 col / 16 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-872-6 $24.95 / £14.99

Five Flights Up and Other New York Apartment Stories Toni Schlesinger 6.1 × 9 in / 16 × 23 cm 320 pp / 130 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-585-5 $24.95 / £14.00

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Forecast Nozone X Nicholas Blechman 7 × 10 in / 18 × 25 cm 168 pp / 170 2-color col Paperback 978-1-56898-793-4 $24.95 / £14.99

From Here to There A Curious Collection from the Hand Drawn Map Association Kris Harzinski 5 × 7.5 in / 13 × 19 cm 224 pp / 80 col / 62 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-882-5 $17.50 / £9.99

The Games We Played The Golden Age of Board and Table Games Margaret Hofer 10.3 × 10.5 in / 26 × 27 cm 160 pp / 160 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-397-4 $24.95 / £17.95

The Guerilla Art Kit Keri Smith 5 × 7 in / 13 × 18 cm 144 pp / 70 col / 10 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-688-3 $19.95 / £11.99

Handmade Nation The Rise of DIY, Art, Craft, and Design Faythe Levine and Cortney Heimerl 7.5 × 9.5 in / 19 × 24 cm 176 pp / 225 col Paperback 978-1-56898-787-3 $24.95 / £14.99

Hello World A Life in Ham Radio Danny Gregory and Paul Sahre 6.8 × 9.3 in / 17 × 23 cm 256 pp / 500 col Paperback 978-1-56898-281-6 $24.95 / £22.50

Hong Kong Comics A History of Manhua Wendy  Siuyi Wong 9 × 9.8 in / 23 × 25 cm 204 pp / 1000 col Paperback 978-1-56898-269-4 $25.00 / £17.99

In the Wilds Drawings by Nigel Peake Nigel Peake 6 × 8 in / 15 × 20 cm 136 pp / 80 col / 18 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-952-5 $22.95 / £14.99

Iowa State Fair Country Comes to Town Thomas Leslie 7 × 9.5 in / 18 × 24 cm 144 pp / 125 col / 60 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-568-8 $19.95 / £12.00

The Map as Art Contemporary Artists Explore Cartography Katharine Harmon and Gayle Clemans 10 × 9 in / 25 × 23 cm 256 pp / 360 col Hardcover 978-1-56898-762-0 $45.00 / £28.00

The Map as Art Contemporary Artists Explore Cartography Katharine Harmon and Gayle Clemans Paperback 978-1-56898-972-3 $29.95

Paint by Number The How-to Craze that Swept the Nation William L. Bird, Jr. 8 × 8.8 in / 20 × 22 cm 144 pp / 185 col / 15 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-282-3 $18.95 / £12.95

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Pinhole Cameras A DIY Guide Keeney Chris 5.5 × 8.5 in / 14 × 22 cm 144 pp / 35 col / 175 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-989-1 $18.95 / £10.99

The Projectionist Kendall Messick and Brooke Anderson 8 × 10 in / 20 × 25 cm 160 pp / 175 col / 25 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-933-4 $40.00 / £25.00

Reinventing the Wheel Jessica Helfand 7.5 × 9.5 in / 19 × 24 cm 160 pp / 100 col / 20 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-596-1 $18.95 / £12.99

Speck A Curious Collection of Uncommon Things Peter Buchanan-Smith 7.7 × 8.5 in / 19 × 22 cm 224 pp / 200 col / 50 b+w Hardcover 978-1-56898-297-7 $25.00 / £17.95

Strips, Toons, and Bluesies Essays in Comics and Culture D. B. Dowd and Todd Hignite 7.5 × 11 in / 19 × 28 cm 112 pp / 85 col Paperback 978-1-56898-621-0 $21.95 / £12.99

Taking Things Seriously 75 Objects with Unexpected Significance Joshua Glenn and Carol Hayes 5.5 × 7 in / 14 × 18 cm 176 pp / 85 col Paperback 978-1-56898-690-6 $17.50 / £9.99

Times Square Style Graphics from the Great White Way Vicki Gold Levi and Steven Heller 8 × 8.8 in / 20 × 22 cm 144 pp / 225 col / 25 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-490-2 $20.00 / £14.99

A Year in Japan Kate T. Williamson 6 × 8 in / 15 × 20 cm 192 pp / 350 col Paperback 978-1-56898-540-4 $19.95 / £10.99

You Are Here Personal Geographies and Other Maps of the Imagination Katharine Harmon 7 × 10 in / 18 × 25 cm 192 pp / 122 col / 50 b+w Paperback 978-1-56898-430-8 $24.95 / £14.99

Asleep in the Afternoon E. C. Large 5 × 7.5 in / 13 × 19 cm 416 pp Hardcover 978-0-907259-37-4 $35.00 / NA+SA only

God’s Amateur The Writing of E. C. Large Stuart Bailey and Robin Kinross 6.7 × 9.5 in / 17 × 24 cm 128 pp / 50 b+w Paperback 978-0-907259-38-1 $20.00 / NA+SA only

Sugar in the Air E. C. Large 5 × 7.5 in / 13 × 19 cm 448 pp Hardcover 978-0-907259-36-7 $35.00 / NA+SA only

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A Hyphen Press book

A Hyphen Press book

A Hyphen Press book

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Publisher’s Note In my last “Publisher’s Note,” in our Spring 2011 catalog, I hinted at some big changes ahead. I can now be less coy about this and announce (unless you’re a reader of the publishing business press, in which case you may already know) that Princeton Architectural Press has joined, at the beginning of this year, the McEvoy Group of companies, which includes Spin magazine, the publisher/packager Becker&Mayer, and, most importantly, our friends and colleagues at Chronicle Books, the much-admired San Francisco– based publisher and our North American distributor since 1995, and arguably the biggest single factor in our growth since then. Almost as soon as this deal was made public, some of the publishing trade magazines called to ask why I’d sold the Press: was it the decline of independent bookstores, always champions and showcases of our books, the bankruptcy of Borders, or the rise of e-books? My answer was simple: this is a partnership based not on necessity but on strategic strengths and a shared optimism about the possibilities ahead for both companies. The McEvoy Group believes strongly in the future of the printed book (look no further than the books produced by Chronicle for confirmation of this). As Dave Eggers, founder/publisher of McSweeney’s, recently wrote, these are actually very good times for books: more people read than ever before (including teens), more books are sold now than at any time in the past twenty years, and there are actually more independent bookstores now than there were two years ago. Anybody who declares that the printed book is dead clearly hasn’t looked at the beautiful new offerings in this catalog on pages 15 to 52. The simple truth remains that the printed book is an ecologically finetuned device, made of reusable and sustainable materials (such as recycled paper and soy-based inks), capable of displaying four color information at extremely high resolutions, and which can be made and distributed at very low cost and used with no external power source. All this without even considering the tactile and haptic dimensions of the printed, bound artifact, something which even the sexiest tablet will never come close to duplicating. See, for example, our book on Patty Curtan’s menus and artwork she’s created in letterpress and linoleum block for the celebrated restaurant Chez Panisse (p. 15) over the past forty years, if you’re looking for an example of art- and book-making that can never be simulated electronically. This said, it would be foolish to ignore the opportunities available to the forward-looking in the realm of digital publishing, and this is another area where we look ahead optimistically with the McEvoy Group. Indeed, you’ll find many of our books available in e-reader format at places like amazon. com, and hundreds of titles available for use, particularly by students and professors, at online libraries like ebrary.com and learningtree.com (details on specific titles available on our website at www.papress. com). When I watch my teenage sons leave the house in the morning with their forty-pound backpacks, I know firsthand that a lightweight and easily updated electronic course reader makes a huge amount of sense, and we are committed to making as many of our books available in this way as possible, and on the devices most consistent with our commitment to design and typographic excellence. So it is this dual commitment to the printed book and enthusiasm for the new frontiers opened up by digital publishing that culminated in our agreement with the McEvoy Group. As they were thirty years ago when the Press began, these are exciting times for publishing, full of promise, great ideas, and bright and creative coworkers. So rather than the end of a chapter, I think it is much more appropriate to think of this new partnership as the opening sentence in chapter two, the next thirty years. I’m confident you’ll find the books in this new catalog, whether you buy or download them, as rich food for thought and inspiration as any published in the world today. As always, we greatly welcome your feedback, ideas, and comments. Feel free to email me at lippert@papress.com or leave notes on our website www.papress.com.

Kevin Lippert Publisher New York, March 2011

For complete order Information including individual orders, examination and review copy orders, special orders, terms, freight, shipping and handling, please visit our website: www.papress.com Editorial and General Information Princeton Architectural Press 37 East 7th Street New York, NY 10003 Tel (212) 995-9620 Fax (212) 995-9454 www.papress.com Publicity and Marketing Sales Katharine Myers Tel (212) 995-9620 X 216 katharine@papress.com Russell Fernandez Tel (212) 995-9620 X 212 russell@papress.com To order Princeton Architectural Press titles United States Chronicle Books 680 Second Street San Francisco, CA 94107 Tel (800) 759-0190 Fax (800) 286-9471 order.desk@hbgusa.com www.chroniclebooks.info Canada Raincoast Books 9050 Shaughnessy Street Vancouver, BC V6P 6E5 Tel (604) 448-7100 Fax (604) 270-7161 info@raincoast.com www.raincoast.com Europe United Kingdom/Eire Publishers Group UK 8 the Arena, Mollison Avenue, Enfield, EN3 7NL, UK Tel (020) 8804-0400 Fax (020) 8804-0044 info@pguk.co.uk Benelux, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal, Netherlands Coen Sligting Bookimport Groot Nieuwland 27 1811 ET Alkmaar The Netherlands Tel 31 (72) 5119220 Fax 31 (72) 5117029 sligting@xs4all.nl www.coensligtingbookimport.nl

France Interart 1 rue de l’est 75020 Paris Tel 01 (43) 49 36 60 Fax 01 (43) 49 41 22 info@interart.fr www.interart.fr Scandinavia (including Iceland) KT McNeish, Export Sales Agent McNeish Publishing Services 3 New Coastguard Cottages Toot Rock, Pett Level East Sussex, TN35 4EW, UK Mobile: 44 (7712) 18 40 30 kt@globescribe.demon.co.ukSouth Africa Real Books 137 Smit Street Braamfontein 2001 Johannesburg South Africa Tel (27) 11-403-3700 Fax (27)11-837-0645 realbook@global.co.za Asia (excluding Japan) Michelle Curreri/Sonja Merz 3 Eagle Lane Beverly, MA 01915 Phone: (978) 921-8020 Fax: (978) 921-7577 michelle@curreriworldsvs.net Sonja@sonjamerz.com Japan Tessa Ingersoll Tel (415) 537-4205 Fax (415) 537-4450 Tessa_ingersoll@chroniclebooks. com Australia Books@Manic PO Box 8 Carlton North VIC 3054 Australia Tel (61) 3-9383-4466 Fax (61) 3-9383-4477 manicex@manic.com.au Latin America, Caribbean and Bermuda Jerry C. Carrillo J.C.C. Enterprises, Inc. P.O. Box 6146 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502 Tel (505) 986-8458 Fax (505) 438-0206 jerry@jc-carrillo.com Eastern Europe and Bahrain, Israel, UAE , Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey Anna Martini Hachette Book Group Tel 49 (221) 923 27 70 Fax 49 (221) 923 27 71 a.martini@t-online.de

Pakistan and the other Middle East Countries Jennifer Espaillat Hachette Book Group 237 Park Avenue, #15-168b New York, NY 10017 Tel (212) 364-1515 Fax (212) 364-0933 jennifer.espaillat@hbgusa.com For all other Territories Katharine Myers Princeton Architectural Press 37 East 7th Street New York, NY 10003 Tel (212) 995-9620 X 216 Fax (212) 995-9454 katharine@papress.com sales representatives USA Northern California Christa Grenawalt Tel (415) 537-4315 Fax (415) 537-4470 christa_grenawalt@ chroniclebooks.com Southern California, AZ, NM, key accounts TX Dave Ehrlich dave_ehrlich@chroniclebooks.com Tel (323) 346-7498 Fax (323) 798-5468 Pacific Northwest and Southwest AK, WA, OR, UT Courtney Payne Tel (206) 409-8556 Fax (206) 723-3956 courtney_payne@chronicle books. com ID, MT, Northern Wyoming David Diehl Tel (206) 328-0295 Fax (206) 328-0295 david_diehl@mindspring.com CO, Southern Wyoming Jock Hayward Tel (415) 383-3883 Fax (415) 383-3883 handhayward@earthlink.net Midwest IA, IL, IN, KS, KY, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI Abraham Associates: Stu Abraham, Steve Horwitz, Roy Schonfeld, John Mesjak, Juliet tterson Tel (800) 701-2489 Fax (952) 927-8089 info@abrahamassociates.com New York Metro NJ, and Select DC and PA Accounts Hachette Book Group Tel (800) 759-0190 Fax (800) 331-1664 tradeNY@chroniclebooks.com

New England CT, NH, MA, ME, RI, VT Nanci McCrackin Tel (603) 924-8766 Fax (603) 924-0096 mcbooks@aol.com Mid-Atlantic DC, DE, MD, PA, WV Chesapeake and Hudson Tel (800) 231-4469 Fax (800) 307-5163 janine@cheshud.com Southeast AL, AR, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, VA Southern Territory Associates Tel (806) 799-9997 Fax (806) 799-9777 Sta77@suddenlink.net Partner Booksellers have made a special commitment to stocking and selling our titles. The current Partner Booksellers are: AA Bookshop London, UK www.aabookshop.net Builders Booksource Berkeley, CA www.buildersbooksource.com Canadian Centre for Architecture Montreal, Canada www.cca.qc.ca Dexter Sinister New York, NY info@dextersinister.org Hennessey & Ingalls Santa Monica, CA www.hennesseyingalls.com Inform Interiors Vancouver, Canada www.informinteriors.com Joseph Fox Bookshop Philadelphia, PA www.foxbookshop.com/ Peter Miller Books Seattle, WA www.petermiller.com Potterton Books New York, NY www.pottertonbooks.co.uk Powell’s Books, Inc. Portland, OR www.powells.com Spoonbill & Sugartown Booksellers Brooklyn, NY www.spoonbillbooks.com St. Mark’s Bookshop New York, NY www.stmarksbookshop.com Swipe Books on Design Toronto, Canada www.swipe.com University Books Seattle, WA www.bookstore.washington.edu William Stout Books San Francisco, CA www.stoutbooks.com

All prices and publication dates subject to change without notice. Printed in Canada


Fall F a l l 2011

2011

Princeton Architectural Press www.papress.com

Princeton Architectural Press

Princeton Architectural Press

37 East 7th Street, New York, New York, 10003 www.papress.com

ISBN 978- 1- 61689-0 2 7 -8 / printed in canada

fi ne book s s i n ce

1981


Fall 2011 Catalog