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ARTRAGEOUS

UNIQUE ARTISTS ON THE RISE

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CONTENTS 04 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Artrageous! 06

MILLÉSIME CANNES The charming French jewelry brand keeps you pretty at the wrist.

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BITTER SWEET Photography by Jemima Marriott.

16 ORIT BEN-SHITRIT The Brooklyn based artist explores the balance of power. 20

ARMED WITH VINDICE Up-and-coming genre-mixing musician Mei Ohara discusses her new album release and fills us in on what the electric violin, '90s-video game soundtracks and meteorites have in common.

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IN STABILITY Photography by Packard Stevens.

36 POINT OF VIEW/NYFW TillyandWilliam. Alessia Prekop. Laura Siegel.

Photo by KATYA TSYGANOVA

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FLORA AND FAUNA Photography by Lindsay Adler.

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BLOOD, SWEAT AND NEGATIVES Professional photographer and fighter Shawn Tamaribuchi welcomes us into the world of female fighters.

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HOW TO ROCK IN BOSTON 101 An inside guide to Beantowns hottest spots and an exclusive interview with trendign D.J. A.I.

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DILLUMINATTI Photography by Rebecca Litchfield.

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ARTRAGEOUS Badass Ball. Jonny Burt. B Gunner. Allison Long Hardy Lucie Jelfs Jared Konopitski Barbara Smith

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MUSE Photography by Kate Strucka.

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MOSAIC PLAYGROUND Photography by Ausra Osipaviciute.


IN THIS ISSUE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Hayley Maybury INTERACTIVE MEDIA DESIGNER Lucy Nersesian FASHION EDITOR & COPY EDITOR Jessica Young MUSIC EDITOR Danielle Sipple GRAPHIC DESIGNER Margaret Walsh CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Jamall Oluokun MARKETING DIRECTOR Shomari Miller WEB DEVELOPER Jason DePeaux

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lee Hershey Maria Kucinski Alyssa Davis Jessica Young Alisha Madkins Jessica Young Danielle Sipple CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Lindsay Adler Jemima Marriott Packart Stevens Rebecca Litchfield Kate Strucka Ausra Osipaviciute

ON THE COVER Photographed by LINDSAY ADLER Styling LSC @ 4SEASON STYLE MANAGEMENT Makeup & Hair by GRISELLE ROSARIO Nails by ANGEL WILLIAMS Wardrobe NARA PAZ Styling Assistant by DEX ROBINSON Necklace by STYLISTS OWN Earrings by HOIST + LEE Cuff by KAREN LONDON Ring by LARIUCCI Shoes by RUTHIE DAVIS

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FROM THE EDITOR ARTRAGEOUS

Whether it’s fashion, art, music, or anything in the creative realm, the Papercut team and our dedicated contributors strive to make sure we are always introducing you to something new and fresh each time you visit our site or flip through our pages. We want to make sure that we are the first place you go when it comes to any and all things emerging. We are constantly thinking of new ways to improve our content, our media platforms and growing our relationships with other cool websites, startups and organizations. Recently, we launched a campaign with the amazing website TurningArt ( http://www.turningart.com/) . We thought it was time to take our art game to the next level and introduce our readers to some insanely talented artists and their amazing art work. We put together an open call for submissions and with the help of the turning art team chose our favorite Artists to share with you in this issue. This month we are thrilled to have the incredible Bostonbased designer Nara Paz (http://www.narapaz.com/) back in the issue and gracing our cover! It’s almost been three years since we launched our first issue with Nara as our featured designer and we are happy to welcome her back! As always, there’s a great music feature as well as a New York Fashion Week breakdown from our Fashion Editor Jessica Young on a few up-and-coming designers to keep an eye on.. It’s a well-balanced issue to welcome in Spring and leave you feeling inspired!

xx Hayley

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MILLÉSIME CANNES 1983 THE CHARMING FRENCH JEWELRY BRAND KEEPS YOU PRETTY AT THE WRIST. Written by LEE HERSHEY

From the Côte d’Azur, comes a jewelry collection suggesting fun and femininity in the form of charms. Founded by Guillaume Bachelet, Millésime Cannes 1983 jewelry expresses whimsical Cannes, and one can imagine wearing them with careless class as they head out to the beach to soak up the sun like a character from a Fitzgerald novel. Charm bracelets are nothing new. They’re even as old as prehistoric times with evidence of shells worn as adornment from at least 75,000 years ago. Used to denote family origin, religious and political convictions, or simply to express one’s individuality and preferences, or to mark occasions in one’s life, charm bracelets have always decorated people’s wrists, coming and going with the trends of time. Bachelet chose the company’s name to signify the year he was born (1983) and the city he comes from (Cannes).

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“It’s a tribute to my city, which inspired the brand,” he explains. “Cannes,” as Bachelet describes, “is a very cosmopolitan city, with a beautiful coast. Our charms need to be classy, charming and different. Millésime, which is French for refinement and elegance, refers to the way one would describe champagne’s vintage.” “I started Millésime,” Bachelet says, “because I felt there was a need for customizable jewelry. I’ve worked with three jewelry brands before and our customers and shops were always asking for more customizable products.” Thomas Bonnieux, a graphic designer featured in the July 2011 Art Issue, has recently joined Millésime, and spoke of the challenges moving from graphic art to jewelry design. He works closely with Bachelet to follow the latest trends, manage the brand’s look and design the packaging and catalogues. He creates the ambience, the concept and


colors for the jewelry, rather than designing the actual product. Working with jewelry is an exciting challenge for Bonnieux, “I didn’t know the brand and the designer before,” but it was a desire for a new experience that pushed Bonnieux to join the company. Bonnieux, whose personal work recalls ’80s Pop Art, admits it is sometimes a challenge to move towards simpler designs. The pieces are subtle and delicate allowing people to choose how they would like to mix and match. Bonnieux says, “We propose different bases for each model, and people can choose one from our Pop collection or a more classic look with Black or White.” Millésime started in early 2012 selling in stores in France and Italy, and is available internationally through their e-shop on Laboratoire de Mode. Eventually, the brand would like to sell worldwide, both in stores and online. It was featured in several French magazines and blogs, but has not made its runway debut yet. “But,” Bachelet says, “We plan to participate in some events in the next Cannes Cinema Festival in May 2013.” The charms are varied, unusual and also familiar. With a little of this and a little of that, they are inspired by Bachelet’s travels, experiences and current fashion. Some popular choices are: lady bugs, doves, and charms with gothic, Christian, Catholic and Celtic origins. Of course, there is the Eiffel Tower, stars and a Fleur de Lys. There are numerals encircled in silver for clients to create their favorite numbers. A smiley face with a heart and a star for eyes reminds one of the early nineties when they were emblazoned everywhere. Snowflakes, bows and tigers can dangle off the wrist of the wearer either solo or surrounded by other pretty, tinkling charms. All the charms are made from silver and vermeil -a combination of sterling silver, gold and other precious

metals. The bracelets are made with different materials: wood, crystal and precious beads. Some bracelets feature tassels and feathers, as well as other adornments. “We have our concept,” Bachelet says, “And now we will offer infinity of combinations for our clients.” “Millésime’s client,” Bachelet adds, “is a woman tired of being influenced by other people. She wants to choose what she will wear and how. That’s why we created the brand. Every woman can have her Millésime.”

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BITTER SWEET

Photography by JEMIMA MARRIOTT Stylist by HANNAH BETH FINCHAM Makeup by ASHLEIGH DORMER USING MAC PRO Model KATE PARNELL @ storm Photographer's Assistant JOSEY WEATHERLEY Flower head piece & bunny ears by HANNAH BETH FINCHAM @ hannahbethfincham.com

OPPOSITE Flower head piece by HANNAH BETH FINCHAM

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THIS PAGE Flower head piece by HANNAH BETH FINCHAM OPPOSITE Bunny ears by HANNAH BETH FINCHAM

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OPPOSITE Flower head piece by HANNAH BETH FINCHAM THIS PAGE Bunny ears by HANNAH BETH FINCHAM

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THIS SPREAD Bunny ears by HANNAH BETH FINCHAM

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ORIT BEN-SHITRIT

THE BROOKLYN-BASED ARTIST EXPLORES THE BALANCE OF POWER. Written by MARIA KUCINSKI

With power, control, and the inner psyche at the center of her work, Orit Ben-Shitrit explores the dynamics of the relationships that make up our world. Ben-Shitrit's most recent projects Vive le Capital, 2010-2012 and Men Die and They are Not Happy, 2010 are short video works that incorporate dance and movement. The sets are stark and the lighting is ominous, allowing for the characters to reveal themselves to the viewer in their purest forms. These characters are flawed - broken down from years of oppression and violence, whether physical or emotional - yet they are still somewhat hopeful. It is Ben-Shitrit's harsh and critical yet eloquent and poignant interpretation of our world that sets her apart as an artist. Of Israeli and Moroccan descent, Ben-Shitrit was educated in New York City and is now based in Brooklyn. Growing up in Israel, she became aware of the constant oppression in the form of violence and the way it bore down in all forms - physical, verbal and psychological. Violence, she believes, is an essential and cyclical part of humanity. Given this mentality, her work stems from personal experience and builds to something greater addressing issues of dominance and control through dance, language and repetition. By incorporating dance into her work, Ben-Shitrit introduces an outside opinion, a muse of sorts that expresses certain emotions through movement. It is what 16

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cannot be told through verbal language. In Vive le Capital, the investment banker Pascal has lost everything and is explaining himself to the authorities. The dancers in this piece tell a parallel subtext to Pascal, transgressively revealing movement by movement, what he masks with convenience. Their Butoh-like white bodies and blackpainted hands express anger, mistrust, guilt and denial. Pascal is at once demonized and humanized. Ben-Shitrit carefully considers language in her work. For Men Die and They are Not Happy, she created a language called Urdek based on German and the Moroccan Berber dialect to express political and religious sentiments. The viewer is exposed to the power of language as a tool to control, to manipulate, to enslave. Finally, repetition is a major motif within Ben-Shitrit’s work. With it, she addresses character and narrative plot. Between the three scenes of Men Die and They Are Not Happy, there is a “Dance of Violence” in which a man is battling in a room against an invisible - external or internal - force. This scene, in its three occurrences and with its slight changes in each iteration, expresses a sentiment of futility. The man struggles against this force but cannot win - time and again. There is, however, something to be said with his will to fight. He has not given up, he has the will to contend with this force. There is hope. Ben-Shitrit explores universal themes and philosophical tropes surrounding power and control within a contemporary yet timeless frame. Within this setting, it is Ben-Shitrit’s investigation into character that through the feelings of fear and anxiety evoked in her work she exposes beauty and a renewed faith in humanity.

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ARMED WITH VINDICE

UP-AND-COMING GENRE-MIXING MUSICIAN MEI OHARA DISCUSSES HER NEW ALBUM RELEASE AND FILLS US IN ON WHAT THE ELECTRIC VIOLIN, ‘90S-VIDEO-GAME SOUNDTRACKS AND METEORITES HAVE IN COMMON. Written by ALYSSA DAVIS Photography by CJ BRYAN of invisible girl studio Hair and Makeup by ASHLEIGH TAYLOR Model by MEI OHARA Jewelry by SKILER LOVE Apparel by MONICA KITCHEN DESIGNS

I step out of North Station on a Saturday night and make my way through a crowd of sports-obsessed fans only a few feet away from TD Garden. As I turn onto Portland Ave while texting my videographer CJ, “Might be a few minutes late…,” I then look up to see McGann’s Pub in view and breathe a sigh of relief. I’m lucky enough to score a oneon-one interview with electric violinist Mei Ohara who’s in town after returning from a show in Los Angeles days before. I walk in to see CJ already chatting with Mei and her boyfriend in a corner booth as crew members organize the set for the annual Rompetition, a competition put on by Unregular Radio where each participating band plays for roughly fifteen minutes. Boston-based singer and songwriter Mei Ohara is a petite girl no taller than 5’4” who rocks long multicolored strands of pink, blue and purple on one side of her hair and her natural brunette on the other. Like her hair, her music is a juxtaposition of contrasting themes, dark and innocent, which later becomes the concept behind our accompanying photoshoot. “I like the mix of industrial elements with romantic touches,” she says when I ask her about her personal style, “I was originally going to use the concept for my album cover, you know, make up one side of my face dark and edgy like a few of my tracks and the other more romantic and innocent to identify with the rest.” I jot down this info in a corner on my notepad. Not even five minutes with the girl and she is already thinking outside of the box Papercut-style, I muse to myself. To complete the vision, her gemstone covered bangs and funky eye makeup solidifies her eccentric look for the night. She’s anxious for her show and to discuss her newly released album Antimatter EP, a blend of electro-rock with a spin of classical and “whatever else comes along”. “I’m not in it for the prizes,” Mei says, “I played at this event last year and really enjoyed the crowd.” Glancing around the pub, I see various band members hanging out, getting their instruments ready and fans trickling in to score a decent spot at the bar before the show starts in an hour. Tonight Mei plans to play a couple songs from her new album in addition to a dubstep violin track “Galaxies”. “It’s my main crowd pleaser because I really shred on the violin,” she reveals. Intrigued to find out the details on how this genremixing musician got her start – it’s not everyday you hear shred and violin in the same sentence – I started taking notes from our conversation before it was time for Mei to hit the stage and rock what I highly doubt will be her only fifteen minutes of fame. AD: YOU HAVE A PRETTY IMPRESSIVE AND DIVERSE SOUND. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCES? WHEN DID YOU START GENRE MIXING? MO: Thank-you! I think my biggest influences are a toss up between video-game soundtracks and the classical music I've played over the years. Part of my genre mixing began because I liked playing classical music, but on average preferred listening to things more electronic. Before

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pursuing my solo career I did a little bit of semi-classical writing. I couldn't reproduce true classical music, so once I started writing I was unintentionally mish-mashing genres. Now I embrace what comes most naturally to me. AD: HOW DID YOU GET STARTED PLAYING THE ELECTRIC VIOLIN? MO: I began studying classical violin when I was six and finished up my Bachelor’s degree in classical music last spring. I got my first electric violin while still in high school, not expecting to do much more than fool around on it. The following year, I started playing with my friend’s band and soon enough I was hooked. AD: DO YOU COME FROM A MUSICAL FAMILY? MO: My father is a scientist but once upon a time worked as a piano tuner. Both my mother and sister studied piano as I did, but I switched after a few years to the violin because I felt the sound was more human and organic. While I don't have a family of professional musicians, they all understand the art of creating music and support my decision to pursue it. AD: TAKE ME THROUGH THE TRACKS ON YOUR FIRST ALBUM. DO YOU SEE AN ONGOING THEME OR DOES IT VARY? MO: It opens up with a personal industrial-style track “Antimatter Man” that uses electric violin and vocals. The second track “Touch Upon Request” is my first single and a song of sexual frustration. It’s catchy and the easiest to identify with. I usually write in a more poetic style but this track is raw and the writing just flowed. There aren’t a whole lot of lyrics but the point of the song is the feeling of frustration while screaming, “I need a connection!” The third track “Scattered” is about questioning the game of life, people trying to pretend to be mature and pretending to understand love and experiences. The fourth and the fifth tracks are about regaining self identity. I went through a relationship that destroyed my sense of who I was. I channeled the urgency of wanting to just live my life, be self aware and make my own decisions. Five tracks down, she pauses and I have to ask, “What about the last track “Never Beam Again?” Her face lights up and she laughs, “I’m a huge space nerd, I’m really into astronomy! The meteorite that recently came into the atmosphere was so exciting. It’s totally my thing. Since all of the other tracks are personal and human, I wanted to write a song about a vaster topic. 'Never Beam Again' is a depressing track that tells the story of a star that’s burning out. It describes how it reflects off the remains of the rest of the universe. Sometimes when I write a song, it seems to write itself, and this one really came out of me purely and naturally.” AD: SOUNDS LIKE IT CAN BE EASY TO GET LOST IN THE MUSIC. MO: Usually when I first complete a new song, it feels like something I needed to hear, so I get really caught up in it. Also, in live shows there will be those moments when a certain feeling in my heart fights to the surface because of a specific song. AD: THE PAST YEAR YOU’VE PLAYED IN BOSTON AND CALIFORNIA, ANY PLANS TO HIT UP ANY OTHER CITIES? MO: The show that I recently played was in Santa Monica, which is one of the parts of LA that I personally like. It was the same night of the Grammys but I was impressed with the crowd. The venue Trip also seemed to be very accepting of bands from out of town and I met a 22

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Seattle-based band who was doing a little west coast tour too. Last October, I played in the California desert for a conference called Interfusion Music Summit. I was on a stage outside. It was over 100 F and in the distance you could see the desert mountains, probably one of the craziest shows thus far. I've also played in NYC and DC and may return to one or both this year. I want to play Philly, Austin and really any city that will have me! I studied violin for a few months in London and want so badly to go back and play there. I also feel a blood obligation to play in Japan (my mom is from Tokyo). AD: WHAT CAN PEOPLE EXPECT FROM YOUR LIVE SHOW? MO: It's just me on stage, and I switch between singing and keyboards to shredding on my violin. I like to change it up. Sometimes I will dress up and head bang my hats and feather hair pieces off my head. Speaking of feathers, I think Vindice, my electric violin, is quite the eye candy. AD: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING TO SEE IN THE AUDIENCE WHILE YOU ARE ON STAGE? MO: When anyone starts really moving I feel like I'm not alone on stage. One time someone at a show in a bar started doing the robot, which made me feel like I was at least doing something right! I also love seeing the reactions when I break out the violin. AD: WHO WOULD YOU WANT TO DO A DUET WITH? MO: In a dream world, I want so much to be able to work with Dave Gahan or Martin Gore of Depeche Mode. Both have amazing voices, and are inspirational to me as an electronic artist. I want to work with Matt Bellamy from Muse too, since he was my idol as a young tween and has a lot to do with me exploring non-classical music. AD: HAVE YOU WRITTEN SONGS FOR OTHER MUSICIANS? MO: I have not but I think it would be awesome to try it out. I would love to write for a male vocalist sometime. AD: ARE YOU COMPARED TO OTHER MAINSTREAM ARTISTS? WHO? MO: The main comparisons I receive generally include Bjork, Portishead and Imogen Heap. No complaints here! AD: DO YOU HAVE ANY STYLE ICONS? MO: I am really into underground and alternative fashion. I enjoy seeing the things that pin-up/burlesque model Mosh wears in her shoots. I also think Danish musician Oh Land has great style! Before Mei hits the stage, I have to ask, “Anything exciting planned for the upcoming year?” With a mysterious side smile and smirk, she says, “I have a lot of things up in the air right now. There may be a music video for my last track in the works, which is exciting for me since I’m very into visual things. I also have a few bar and club performances that may happen in March, or may be a little later. I am planning on playing violin (both classical and electric) with other artists, and am considering doing some gigs with live drums sometime in the future. So far with my career, I am approaching my music as though it’s something I had to do for me and not something I was too ambitious with. Now that I am finding my niche in the music world, I feel it's time to let myself dream big. The best way to know what is coming up is to check out my website: meiohara. com or my facebook: facebook.com/mei.ohara.music. 23


IN STABILITY Photography by PACKARD STEVENS Stylist by RUSANA RAHMAN Hair by JOHN BILES Makeup by VIOLA BEA Model JENA GOLDSACK @ models1 Photographer's Assistant KIRSTY SAPSFORD

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THIS PAGE Skirt by JAYNE PIERSON Knotted Ring by LINNE MCLARTY OPPOSITE Black Lace Dress by STYLISTS OWN Leather Corset by LIZ BLACK Bangle by LINNIE MCLARTY

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THIS PAGE Jacket by EVMORFIA Jeans by STYLISTS OWN Ring by LINNIE MCLARTY OPPOSITE Leather Jacket by HAIZHEN WANG

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THIS PAGE Jacket by JAMES HOCK Skirt by LIZ BLACK Bangle and Ring by LINNIE MCLARTY OPPOSITE Ceramic Neckpiece by JAYNE PIERSON

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OPPOSITE Gabardine Jacket and pencil skirt by LIZ BLACK THIS PAGE Wool and Leather Coat by LIZ BLACK

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THIS PAGE Black Gaberdine Jacket by LIZ BLACK OPPOSITE Jacket and Skirt by EVMORFIA

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POINT OF VIEW/NYFW THREE NEW DESIGNERS BRING CREATIVITY BACK INTO FOCUS. Written by JESSICA YOUNG

Critics of New York Fashion Week complain that it’s too commercial, too contemporary and too crowded of a calendar. While I can agree that it’s a rather relentless rigmarole of back-to-back shows for twelve hours a day that stretch out past the conventional 7-day week, there’s good reason for it to be so action packed, and it’s not a reason to feel sordid about. With the crucial combination of creative innovation and business savviness coupled with a penchant for extreme efficiency, New York City is fertile ground for any scrappy fashion label with enough perseverance to make it. In a grand tradition of being the bastion of the land of opportunity, NYC leads in support, infrastructure and spirit to nurture and grow emerging designers independent of big fashion houses. So, there’s lots of shows. And sure it seems that every label under the sun is staging an event. However, the commercial reputation that precedes NYFW can, in fact, be challenged if one is willing to step past the tradeshow scene of Lincoln Center to venture into the industrial spaces of Chelsea and downtown Manhattan where under-the-radar designers present their latest collections with distinct creative vision. The atmosphere is rife with energy and innovation while reeking of the blood and sweat of hard work to birth something unique and worthwhile into the world. It’s not the parties, the celebrities or the glamorama surrounding famous fashion folk that catapults NYFW into sartorial stardom. It’s the niche labels with small-time means and big-time passions bursting the seams of the city that deserve a champagne toast. Three up-and-coming designers, two of which showed for the first time this Fall 2013 season, exemplify the sort of highly curated point of view that piques the imagination while keeping fashion fresh and exciting. And no, they’re not showing American sportswear.

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TILLYandWILLIAM Designer(s): Jessica Lapidos and Thomas Barranca Season: First Show Highlight: A mid-runway-show breakout interpretative dance depicting unisexuality of their designs between male and female models. Signature: Unconventional shapes made of highstretch fabric that inspires versatility and experimentation. Inspiration: Mirroring the name, TILLY and WILLIAM, at the crux of the brand lays two characters, Tilly and William. Taking different roles in the creative process, these two characters inspire duality that results in inherently genderless designs. The idea of transformation begins with the re-imagination of traditional garment construction where each garment is engineered to fit multiple points on the same form. Noting the mutable nature of an individual’s mood or the changing needs of a traveler on a journey, each reversible piece is made to be worn inside-out, upside-down and between sexes for a truly fluid experience. The collection lending itself to such utility in both function and aesthetic preference also is a sustainable solution to fast fashion. The transformational aspects of each piece creates a myriad of possibilities in wear lessening the desire to constantly burn through cheap and trendy garments.

Photography by PETER ROESSLER

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Photography by LLOYD CRAWFORD 39


ALESSIA PREKOP Designer: Alessia Prekop Season: First Show Highlight: Unforgiving power in silhouette and attitude. Signature: Angular lines and sharp tailoring. Inspiration: Personally admitting that she finds inspiration in sadness and the melancholy moments in life, her aesthetic certainly can be described as fortuitously dark. However, the catharsis she ultimately experiences in the process of creating her collection is exuded in the end result. Prekop’s architectural designs may be dark but they are also commanding and self assured. Made for the woman with self confidence and acute self-awareness, a strong personality is required for looks that may be intimidating and imposing for weaker dispositions. Natural geometry and dimensional flourishes adds an authoritative hardness in the sculptural integrity of her overcoats and shifts. Relishing the greatness in transcendence, Prekop’s collection is fiercely committed to the woman who knows what she wants and where she’s going.

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Photography by DAN LECCA 41


LAURA SIEGEL Designer: Laura Siegel Season: Fifth Show Highlight: Modern application of ancient garment-making techniques and ethnic decorative arts. Signature: Urban-nomadic, layerable pieces. Inspiration: Polar bears, grizzly bears and basic animal survival are not usual inspirations found in womenswear design. Based on the theme of adaptation, Laura Siegel’s Fall/Winter 2013 collection proves this concept on several levels. While referencing nature and the idea of the grizzly bear adapting and evolving into the polar bear, Siegel pulls her color choices like midnight-forest from the bear’s environment and burgundy-blood from fish hunting, a survival activity. Also, exploring the idea that clothing is a basic human need, Siegel always designs with one concept in mind -- how clothing is a home for the body. Fusing both the animalistic and human need for shelter and protection, Siegel drapes and layers garments in soft jersey, baby alpaca and washed silks for a cocoon-like effect with global inspirations. Another aspect of adaptation is Siegel’s penchant for moving ancient garment-making techniques and ethnic details forward into contemporary design. Utilizing block printing, embroidery, knitwear, bandhani, hand-dye work and beading in collaboration with artisans in Asia and Latin America, Siegel realizes a collection that feels both culturally traditional and natural yet modern and cosmopolitan.

Photography by ANTHONY-JAMES

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Photography by MARK LUEBBERS FOR RUNWAY PASSPORT 43


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FLORA AND FAUNA Photography by LINDSAY ADLER Stylist by LSC @ 4season style management Stylist Assistant by DEX ROBINSON Hair and Makeup by GRISELLE ROSARIO Nails by ANGEL WILLIAMS Wardrobe by NARA PAZ

OPPOSITE Cuff by MARIA BLACK Bracelet by LULU FROST Ring by KENNETH JAY LANE Shoes by CESARE PACIOTTI

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THIS PAGE Necklace by LULU FROST Earrings by HOIST + LEE Bracelets by VENESSA ARIZAGA OPPOSITE Necklace by STYLISTS OWN Earrings by HOIST + LEE Cuff by KAREN LONDON Ring by LARIUCCI Shoes by RUTHIE DAVIS

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OPPOSITE Ring by CHRIS HABANA Necklace by SABRINA DEHOFF Bracelets by VENESSA ARIZAGA Shoes by CESARE PACIOTTI THIS PAGE Necklace by CAPWEL & CO. Necklace by NOIR Bracelet & Ring by JULIET & COMPANY Shoes by JOURDAN SHOES

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THIS PAGE Necklace by CAPWELL & CO. Bracelet by LARUICCI Bracelet by SABRINA DEHOFF Bracelet by VANESSA ARIZAGA Ring by SABRINA DEHOFF OPPOSITE Shirt by MARISSA WEBB Necklace by JOOMI LIM Bracelet by NICOLE ROMANO Bracelet by JULIET & COMPANY Bracelet by SOBRAL

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BLOOD, SWEAT AND NEGATIVES

PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER AND FIGHTER SHAWN TAMARIBUCHI WELCOMES US INTO THE WORLD OF FEMALE FIGHTERS. Written by DANIELLE SIPPLE Shawn Tamaribuchi knows the subjects of her photographs very intimately. Considering the fact that she bonded with them like family, this professional photographer has punched, choked, spit and dripped sweat with almost everyone she’s photographed, even before her finger clicked her shutter button. As a professional photographer who developed a very successful second career as a professionally trained MMA fighter, Shawn held her place at the helm of both ships for many years. Representing different facets of her personality, these two elements, photography and fighting, corresponded to the manifestation of her contemplative side, ultimately blossoming into the Female Fighter Project -- a photographic portfolio of female fighters. When it comes to the rarity of this kind of documentation, Shawn discovered that it takes a fighter to capture a fighter. Photography ran through the veins of Shawn’s family from when she was very young, starting with her grandfather who was both a medical doctor and a camera enthusiast. His camera collection was quite extensive and, luckily enough for Shawn, some of his cameras were passed along to her. Vintage cameras, including hasselblads, would become an obsessive hobby for this soon-to-be camera nerd. Even before making such a geeky technical connection to photography, she remembers growing up with her mother having a camera glued to her hand. This kind of constant documentation planted a seed into Shawn’s creative side, waiting years to sprout into her finalized personal love of photography. With photography, and creativity as a whole, holding a prominent force in Shawn’s rendering as a youth, her natural inclination was not to pursue the subjective nature of the arts but to study the objective path of science. Entering into a liberal arts college, she started a course of study that pushed her towards pre-med, favoring her natural inclination towards the methodology of mechanics. Quickly she realized, that despite her love for science, her current course of study was not for her and with precisionlike decision making she switched to the arts. Undecided as to which particular medium fancied her best, Shawn tested the waters in both painting and photography. This proved well suited but once she was forced to choose one medium over the other during a year studying abroad, she fell into suit with her passion for photography. Diving into the inner workings of photography, Shawn funneled her scientific mind into discovering the art of photo processing in the dark room. Shawn chose a very specific kind of photography that in today’s world would become obsolete in the eyes of aspiring photographers: film photography. Choosing to work solely in film, she developed skills that would allow her to process her own prints equipped with a specific mindset that created a 52

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meditative space in the process itself. Driven by speed and endless energy thus far, she was forced to slow down as an artist, concentrate on the steps needed and relish the entire transformation from click to print. Shawn eventually found a way to make photography a bread-and-butter element in her life, but at the sacrifice of the passion for the art. When her commercial job as a photographer lost all its vigor, she needed a life change. She wasn’t about to drop photography out of her life completely, but the intense focus it had taken, mixed with the soul-less monotony, was enough to drive Shawn to something completely different. Drawing upon her past involvement in competitive sports and her desire to find a renewed connection with a community outside of herself and her art, Shawn started training in various types of mixed-martial-arts fighting techniques. Rationalizing the sudden life change with health benefits and self-defense skills, Shawn began her professional fighting career. Training with the ferocity of a true fighter at heart, Shawn realized that her career was just beginning. In order to foster its growth, she would have to take it outside of her Bay Area community and into the international fighting world. Once all the final details were sorted, she embarked on a yearlong journey of training in South America, Thailand and Japan. In each city she trained with other female fighters and coaches in various styles, perfecting her own personal skill set while building a larger community around herself, and recognizing the power of this exceptionally rare group of female MMA fighters as a whole. Packing her camera as her journey toured from one country to the next, Shawn documented her travels, not as a professional photographer but as an artist capturing her memories. Some of the first fighters she photographed were ones she trained with while in Tokyo. All of her photographs were unstaged, using natural lighting and captured on film. After carrying multiple rolls of film around the world, unfortunately through X-ray machines and various other disruptive travel processes, Shawn ended her yearlong training journey to continue her training in the Bay Area. Armed with a load of experiences living on film, she began to process the rolls from her trip and realized that she was onto something. The simple act of engaging her artistic side while she pursued her fighting career spurred an unexpected connection to the fighting community, a relationship she’d lost along the way. She had a purpose, documenting her fellow fighters, which renewed her conviction that she was a part of the community that welcomed her so fervently. For the next few years, Shawn continued documenting her rare but extensively diverse community of female


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fighters. Tailoring her training to a smaller routine, mixed with teaching classes, Shawn had time to collect rolls of film that depict female fighters in all different areas of the community. Whether they were in competition, training or post-match, these fighters turned towards Shawn’s camera and gave a piece of their inner selves for the photo -- an essence that’s only seen by another fighter. After time, this Bay Area-based photographer began to realize that her love of documenting her community had not extended past that in thought, for there was no “next step” in her objective thinking. She collected the images, but now she had to decide what to do with them. Upon her return home from her yearlong training adventure, Shawn turned away from commercial photography for an income and instead refocused on web production and development. When she was faced with the decision of how to handle her large body of work, consisting of years worth of photography, she chose the easiest way to showcase them to the public: she created a website. Finally having a resting home, nestled safely on the Internet, the Female Fighter Project had a space to flourish into the amazing photographic portfolio that it is today. Ironically once formated in this manner, the Female Fighter Project was now available to the masses, outside of Shawn’s artistic safety net, and ready to welcome the world to the femalefighter community for all the beauty it is. Once out in the world, the project slipped into the hands of people who wanted to spread the images further than Shawn could ever imagine. Two different gallery curators approached her with two very different shows, a group show and then a very large solo show. Shocked but jumping at the idea of finalizing a project that never had an imagined end date, she began the daunting process of narrowing down the portfolio to the few choice images that she wanted to display to the art community. Once that selection happened, the next step naturally was a decidedly technical and time consuming one. For when it comes to film photography, precision is a painstaking process. Shawn cleaned up all the negatives, pixel by pixel, for dust particles and distorted sections from her travels, and then began the next step of printing out large format prints of each photograph. The end result would be worth the time, but as a film photographer Shawn was forced to slow down her drive to hurry the whole procedure. If at any point, she lost sight of her goal and raced through a step, her entire print would be ruined and she would have to start over. Writer’s note: During the interview, Shawn was still in the process of printing out all her photographs. Each print can take up to a few hours. Shawn has completed the group show and is preparing herself for her solo show early this summer. No two art shows are alike but if her group show was a test run for her solo show, then the it will definitely exceed her audience’s expectations. Each image is raw and uncompromising in its visual capture of the subject, yet because Shawn connects so personally with each fighter it forces the viewer to embrace the sweat, tears and punches behind the image. Without even trying, Shawn gives her reconnection -- her new purpose -- with the female fighter community to the viewer and allows them to feel the camaraderie that forms in the unlikeliest of places. When a fighter punches, spits upon and chokes another fighter, it’s often forgotten that they are friends, comrades and partners in the trade. The Female Fighter Project was never set out to be but happened as circumstance by one fighter who fought

to keep her love of photography alive. Shawn reshaped her world by looking through her lens and seeing herself in a new way, defined by the faces she surrounded herself by. Shawn is every female fighter she’s documented along the way, just as all of them are a little bit of her. The camera has a funny way of capturing that, of seeing the unseen, and allowing it to be experienced by all. This is basic definition of The Female Fighter Project. Her photography: http://www.liarphoto.com/ Her solo show: Saturday, July 5th, 2013 “Female Fighter Project Show” Photobooth SF 1193 Valencia St San Francisco, CA 94110 (415) 824-1248 Want to own a piece of Shawn’s art? Buy a print: www.liarphoto.com/prints/ Buy a roll of film, get a postcard: www.liarphoto.com/ about/buy-me-a-roll-of-film-get-a-postcard/

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HOW TO ROCK IN BOSTON 101

AN INSIDE GUIDE TO BEANTOWN'S HOTTEST SPOTS AND AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH TRENDING DJ A.I. Written by ALISHA MADKINS

It’s Saturday night and you’ve spent the whole day running errands, but now the entourage is ready to step out for cocktails. Question is, where? If you are looking for the sickest clubs/bars in Boston, Flavor Media Group is the promotion contact. They offer a diverse selection of entertainment that specialize in delivering the freshest ambiance with an array of music. Jeremy Martin, Chief Brand Officer and engineer graduate from Boston University, understands the culture of today’s nightlife. People look forward to their weekends and Flavor is sure to deliver a good time. “You can guarantee Flavor will keep you coming back for more. We have an annual Cinco De Mayo booze cruise each year with 100 people. There's so much epicness on one boat it's almost too much,” states Martin. Flavor’s always planning ahead to keep Boston in the mix, plus they’ve hosted some of the hottest DJ’s such as Alesso, Hardwell, Porter Robinson, Eric Prydz, Huge Euge, Nervo and Nicky Romero. With a lineup like this, how can one not get amped for a night filled with overblown electronic excitement? While Flavor does promote mainstream artists, they have their own local in-house Deejay A.I. (Artificial Instruments), who spins at the sickest spots. In this Q&A, he breaks down how the industry has changed, but his true identity is sticking with the original basics. Alias: Deejay A.I. (Artificial Instruments) Age: 24 Residence: Boston, MA College: Suffolk University

AM: HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN THE INDUSTRY? AI: Growing up I was always into music and had a diverse group of friends whom shared the same passion. I was into everything--it didn’t matter if it was hip-hop, house or rock. When I got to college I started experimenting with beat matching while mixing with my close friend and mentor DJ Cosh’N. Everything just grew from there. AM: WHERE DID YOUR SPIN NAME ORIGINATE? AI: As a kid, I would ride in the car with my father while listening to old mixtapes I made of Benassi, Arrmin and Tiesto. My dad (whom is quite traditional) would complain the instruments sounded so artificial. This memory stuck, and I thought it would be cool to incorporate my past with the future. AM: WHAT KIND OF EQUIPMENT DO YOU USE? AI: I pretty much use everything, but prefer Technic 1200 turntables and a DJM 900 mixer with Serato. AM: WHAT KIND OF EQUIPMENT DID YOU START OFF WITH? AI: I started off with CDJ 800’s, a Numark and learned to mix solely using CD's and my ears--which I admit was not easy. However, this restricts me from heavily relying on software, and trusting my ear more. Ultimately, it allows me to produce great blends quickly and proficiently without worrying about my waveforms. I feel a lot of today’s DJ’s skip learning to mix (using only their ears) and jump right to waveforms; thus forfeiting the most fundamental skill of DJing. AM: DID YOU INVEST INTO YOUR EQUIPMENT THEN UPGRADE, OR

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DID YOU START AT THE TOP? AI: I still have my first pair of Gemini turntables. Look, equipment is expensive and as most college kids know money is scarce when you are taking classes full-time. I had to save for my equipment over the years to finally afford the rig I wanted. AM: DID YOU TEACH YOURSELF OR HAVE A MENTOR? AI: My mentor was a close friend named Josh North a.k.a. DJ Cosh’N. He taught me everything from beat matching, mixing techniques, to mixtape production and microphone skills. If it wasn't for his guidance, I would not be in the scene. AM: WHAT GAVE YOU THE INITIAL DRIVE FOR THIS INDUSTRY? AI: Overall, boredom. I was tired of going to local Boston bars and nightclubs listening to the same tracks I heard on the radio all day. I really wanted to switch things up and introduce the city to some new music. AM: WHAT WAS THE FIRST EVENT YOU EVER PLAYED OR PUT ON? AI: It was at a Suffolk University house party in Boston. There’s nothing like lugging equipment and CD binders down the street at 3 A.M. after the cops just broke up the party. Besides, who had money for a cab back then?! Definitely not me. AM: WHAT'S THE BEST EVENT YOU'VE PLAYED AT OR PUT ON? AI: I would say last year’s New Year’s Eve. My promotion company, Flavor Media, threw a party with over a 1,000 people in which I DJ’ed along with ‘5 and a Dime’ and a favorite producer/DJ of mine, ‘Aylen’. We had an absolute blast and it was definitely a night that I will never forget. AM: WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST RECORD YOU BOUGHT? AI: That's easy, Dr. Dre 2001! AM: OUT OF ALL THE TUNES YOU HAVE, WHICH ONE NEVER FAILS? AI: Right now I am getting the best reactions from Hardwell’s “Spaceman” or Ingrosso & Alesso’s “Calling”, but you can never go wrong with a little Fatman Scoop “Be Faithful!” AM: WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE TUNE OF ALL TIME? AI: That’s gotta be AZ and DJ Premier “The Come Up.” AM: SO, HOW IS THE SCENE IN YOUR EYES AT THE MOMENT? AI: The scene is exploding and I love it. It’s great to see the culture of electronic music finally take hold in the US. I love to witness all the energy and excitement at the shows. It brought an entire new liveliness to Boston nightclubs. For the first time in a long time, I see people not afraid to dance, smile, scream and raise their hands as the track builds; then dance like madmen when the drop hits. It has given me an entire new love for the city that I’m from. Not to mention, I love the fact we have Pete Tong’s new Evolution Radio Station exclusive to our city, not too bad. Haha. AM: WHAT’S YOUR REAL NAME IF YOU USE AN ALIAS? AI: My real name is Alexander Pelletier. AM: WHERE DO YOU LIVE? AI: I live in East Cambridge, a.k.a. “The Bridge.” 57


AM: WHAT’S THE FUNNIEST THING THAT HAPPENED AT AN EVENT? AI: It’s probably witnessing “daggering” -- a form of dance that incorporates sexual and frantic movements originating from Jamaica -- for the first time. Or, when my buddy broke his nose on the way to my gig but proceeded to stay the entire night even though his face was getting more swollen and black-and-blue as the night went on. That's a real friend right there. AM: WHO ARE YOUR MUSICAL INSPIRATIONS? AI: Oh, there are so many: Benny Benassi, Arrmin Van Burren, David Guetta, Fedde Le Grand, Mark Knight, Kaskade, DJ AM, DJ Premiere and A-Trak. AM: WHAT DO YOU DO OUTSIDE OF THE DANCE MUSIC SCENE? AI: I work as a head Tech Analyst for Bullhorn Inc. AM: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO UP AND COMING DJS? AI: Practice, practice, practice... and don't listen to critics. AM: WHEN YOU PLAY IS IT A PRE-PLANNED SET? AI: I played one one time and it was awful. I need the ability to respond to a crowd and you can’t do that when your set is pre-planned. I’ll admit, I do have some guidelines I follow, but they are all mental and never written down. AM: TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF. WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO OUTSIDE MUSIC? AI: I like to DJ! But I also love snowboarding, lacrosse, soccer, football and pretty much every sport. I love the beach more than anything; it must be my Puerto Rican blood. Oh, I’m also an avid gamer and science geek. AM: WHAT MAKES YOU TICK CREATIVELY? AI: A lot affects me creatively: my mood, what’s playing in my car, other DJ's sets or how pissed off I am at my dog. Honestly, pretty much everything affects my sets. But what I love about music is the ability it has to change your state of mind no matter what is going on in your life. The fact that music influences my life on such an emotional level and vice versa is what makes me such a versatile DJ. AM: DO YOU GARNER INSPIRATION FROM SOMETHING IN PARTICULAR? AI: Inspiration comes from experience. I need to witness shows, watch crowd reactions, talk to other music lovers and spend countless hours in front of my computer watching videos and downloading random tracks. This helps me connect with my audience on a more personal level rather than just playing shows and hoping tracks work. It’s great to give the crowd a curve ball once in awhile, but I do this for the people. Truth is, I’m not having a good time unless you are. AM: DO YOU HAVE A CREATIVE PROCESS? AI: Practice, practice, practice. I try to do the best I can, while letting my tracks and tables do all the work. AM: IS THEIR ANYTHING FROM YOUR DJ PERSONALITY THAT’S PART OF YOUR SHOWMANSHIP? AI: It’s gotta be my energy, I'm kind of known for it. Haha. I'm always jumping or dancing on the mic. Not to mention, I like to spray champagne and bring randoms up

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to party with me. I'm all about people, friends, and love. Without them I'm just some dude playing music. AM: WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO EAT? AI: Anything as long as I can throw some Sriracha on it. AM: WHAT DO YOU LISTEN TO DURING DOWN TIME? AI: Everything. I love Nancy Ajram, her voice is so beautiful. The album currently playing in my car is Juelz Santana’s God Willin’. It all just depends on my mood. AM: FUN FACT ABOUT YOURSELF? AI: I was adopted as a kid and am very thankful for my parents and the opportunities they’ve provided. If it wasn't for them, I wouldn't be where I am today. AM: LASTLY, WHEN AND WHAT CLUBS DO YOU SPIN AT? AI: I spin all the time on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Plus, I’m at all the main Boston clubs: Prime, Royale, Rumor, Venu, Gypsy Bar, Wonderbar, Market, Greatest Bar, Naga and Hurricanes. Put it this way, if you are in Boston and they have a DJ booth, chances are I’ve spun there. So, what are you waiting for? Ladies, grab a tight dress. And fellas, hail a taxi for a chaotic night on the town. Because let’s face it, when you are rolling with Boston’s hottest promotion group Flavor Media and number one DJ A.I., you are in for a sinful night with unforgettable memories. To find out more, check out: flavormediagroup.com.


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DILLUMINATTI Photography by REBECCA LITCHFIELD @ rebeccalitchfield.com Stylist by HELEN WAUGH @ helenwaughstylist.co.uk Hair and Makeup by REBECCA RYTHER @ rebeccaryther.co.uk Model LARA PROFILE @ profile-models.com Retoucher GO ADDICTED RETOUCHING @ goaddicted.com

OPPOSITE Barbaraalan by BLOODY GRAY LONG BLACK TAIL DRESS

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THIS SPREAD Long Origami Dress by MILLIE BETITO Rose Hair Accessory by STYLISTS OWN

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THIS PAGE Bloody Gray Long Flair Skirt by JAMES HOCK Organic Silk Satin Racer Folded Peplum by LYDIA FREEBORN Reclaimed Leather Lasercut Cuffs by LYDIA FREEBORN Reclaimed Leather Lasercut Bodice by LYDIA FREEBORN OPPOSITE Crown by REGAL ROSE Catsuit, Ring, Necklace by STYLISTS OWN

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THIS SPREAD Bloody Gray Long Black Dress with Feathers by JAMES HOCK

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OPPOSITE Black Dress by GARY WILSON THIS PAGE Reclaimed Silk Hand Dyed Veil by LYDIA FREEBORN Organic Georgette Dip Dyed Lasercut Dress by LYDIA FREEBORN

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THIS SPREAD Origami Dress by MILLIE BETITO

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Rageous FOR THIS MONTH’S ART FEATURE, WE TEAMED UP WITH TURNINGART.COM TO SHINE A LIGHT ON THE WORK OF 7 UNIQUE RISING ARTISTS FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE.

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BADASS BALL Badass Ball is an artist from Malaysia who uses acrylic, ink and aerosol paint to create work featuring the cartoon character of the same name. With inspiration from skateboard culture, cartoons, anime and hentai, Badass Ball explores themes of pop culture, sex, politics, death, war and religion.

NEIGHBORHOOD: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

PEANUT BUTTER OR JELLY? Jelly!

FAVORITE CARTOON CHARACTER? If I really have to choose, it would be Bugs Bunny and Oggy.

PANCAKES OR WAFFLES? I love both. Do I really need to choose?

FAVORITE ART CLICHÉ? It’s probably the one made famous by Picasso, "Good artists copy, great artists steal.” FINISH THIS SENTENCE: If I could clone myself I would...do BAD things! WHAT’S YOUR MOST RECENT WEIRDEST DREAM? I was bitten by a spider. Then the other day when I woke up, I became Spider Man. IF YOUR ART HAD A SLOGAN, WHAT WOULD IT BE? Take it easy and smile.

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GUITAR OR TURNTABLES? Guitar, because I play the guitar. WHAT’S THE WORST MOVIE YOU WATCHED THIS YEAR? Well, I don't really have one off the top of my head. WHAT’S AN ART TECHNIQUE YOU WISH YOU COULD DO? Sculpture. I need to do that! CAN VIDEO GAMES BE ART? It involves sketching, composing, drawing and coloring too. I can't think of any reason to say no. IF YOU WERE DOWN TO YOUR LAST DOLLAR, WHAT WOULD YOU SPEND IT ON? Getting more dollars at Reno or Las Vegas!


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JONNY BURT Jonny Burt is an artist and fashion designer from London, UK. A passionate reaction to the dehumanizing effects of 21st century life, his work often features young children as a method to suggest who the true victims are. The sketchy, surrealistic style of his figures, as well as their child-like appearances, reflect our society’s own regressive and dependent condition in a media-saturated, commodified culture. Jonny has this to say about his work: “In an age dominated by reality shows, it seems that the line is blurring rapidly between fame and infamy: Just how far will people go to be famous in the next ten years? Where are the limits to the exploitation of human beings?”

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NEIGHBORHOOD: London FAVORITE CARTOON CHARACTER? Tom or Jerry FAVORITE ART CLICHÉ? Tortured artist. FINISH THIS SENTENCE: If I could clone myself I would...have no reason to exist. WHAT’S YOUR MOST RECENT WEIRDEST DREAM? Chris Brown stabbed me because I married Rihanna. IF YOUR ART HAD A SLOGAN, WHAT WOULD IT BE? Innocence is dead. IPAD OR IPAD MINI? Neither. The iPad is already pointless if you own an iPhone. Apple is just taking the piss with the iPad Mini. PEANUT BUTTER OR JELLY? Both together. I’m controversial. WHAT’S THE WORST MOVIE YOU WATCHED THIS YEAR? Chernobyl Diaries WHAT’S AN ART TECHNIQUE YOU WISH YOU COULD DO? Digital manipulation CAN VIDEO GAMES BE ART? In their own right, I suppose they are within the broader sense of a moving-image medium. Art has no limits. The character design in that new “Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance” game actually looks stunning; it has the visual inventiveness and sophistication of a movie. IF YOU WERE DOWN TO YOUR LAST DOLLAR, WHAT WOULD YOU SPEND IT ON? Scratch cards

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B GUNNER Gavin Bunner's whimsical yet edgy work could be described as your older-brother-meets-the-children’slibrary-section. His "hatercolors", as he likes to call his watercolors, have a touch of kitsch and a dash of clever that draws in everyone's eye. When asked to describe himself, Bunner simply googled the word "yourself."

NEIGHBORHOOD: Highland Park in Los Angeles FAVORITE CARTOON CHARACTER? Scrappy Do, I like his “never say die” attitude. FAVORITE ART CLICHÉ? Nudes. Art is like a party, it's always better when someone’s naked. FINISH THIS SENTENCE: If I could clone myself I would...not do it because eventually my clone will turn against me and we will naturally have to determine which of us is the better Gavin. There can be only one. IF YOUR ART HAD A SLOGAN, WHAT WOULD IT BE? Now with ten percent more fart jokes! IPAD OR IPAD MINI? Desktop PC. iPads are too needy. You have to hold it to use it, you have to carry it around and take it out with you. iPads are like a puppy. I prefer the PC stoically sitting on my desk, quietly humming with a calm joyousness that it's master is home. PCs are like a cat, and I'm a cat guy. IPHONE OR ANDROID? Motorola Razr. It’s simply the best phone ever. I don't know why they ever stopped making it. It’s probably part of some conspiracy. I'm waiting for some poorly researched documentary to come out about it. PEANUT BUTTER OR JELLY? Peanut butter. It contains all the dietary nutrients you

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need to survive and it's cheap. As a poor artist, I consume a lot of peanut butter. PANCAKES OR WAFFLES? Waffles, because the waffle clique was way cooler than the pancake clique in my 9th grade Spanish class. GUITAR OR TURNTABLES? Both as long as they’re playing “Freebird.” WHAT’S THE WORST MOVIE YOU WATCHED THIS YEAR? It's been a couple of years ago now, but MacGruber was the shittest thing ever. WHAT’S AN ART TECHNIQUE YOU WISH YOU COULD DO? Something sculptural. Making a really nice casting of something would be cool. CAN VIDEO GAMES BE ART? Oh, yeah. If film was the great new artform of the 20th century, then video games will be the great new artform of the 21st century. No other media platform has a more direct interaction with it's audience than video games, and as such, it will be the medium to use to connect and interact with the largest audience possible. The medium's greatest strength is that the audience already knows to interact directly with it, where as in painting and film the audience’s reaction is to simply observe the piece. How the game designer chooses to exploit these interactions, and what the audience will in turn get from them, is what will be the art. IF YOU WERE DOWN TO YOUR LAST DOLLAR, WHAT WOULD YOU SPEND IT ON? A McChicken Sandwich. Go dollar menu!

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ALLISON LONG HARDY Allison Long Hardy is interested in how people communicate: effectively and ineffectively. An artist, adjunct professor and gallery professional located in Woodbridge, VA, her artwork examines the certain moments when communication or lack of communication occur and interpreting those moments through mark. My work is a mix of intuitive and deliberate mark-making paired with the spontaneity that occurs when these marks overlap. Hardy’s work begins to take life when the marks that emerge on her page overlap and meld with the marks below and on top creating a new type of mark. Hardy has taught in various educational institutions including Northern Virginia Community College, Towson University and Maryland Institute College of Art. Prior to moving to the Northern Virginia area, Hardy served as the Coordinator of College Exhibitions at the Corcoran College of Art + Design where she mounted over sixty exhibitions every year. NEIGHBORHOOD: Woodbridge, VA FAVORITE CARTOON CHARACTER? Marvin the Martian FAVORITE ART CLICHÉ? I always cringe when my students describe something as "artsy.” FINISH THIS SENTENCE: If I could clone myself I would.... make more art! WHAT’S YOUR MOST RECENT WEIRDEST DREAM? Well I'm currently pregnant, so I've had a lot of crazy ones recently. The most recent one involved me coming home and my basset hound greeting me with a fully cooked meal. Then him and I proceeded to dine together at our kitchen table while having deep, intellectual conversations. IF YOUR ART HAD A SLOGAN, WHAT WOULD IT BE? "It's not that you don't have a life, it's that art is your life." One of my friends in undergrad used to say that all the time and it has always stuck with me. WHAT’S THE WORST MOVIE YOU WATCHED THIS YEAR? Beasts of the Southern Wild, I just couldn't get into it! WHAT’S AN ART TECHNIQUE YOU WISH YOU COULD DO? Welding CAN VIDEO GAMES BE ART? No IF YOU WERE DOWN TO YOUR LAST DOLLAR, WHAT WOULD YOU SPEND IT ON? Chocolate

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LUCIE JELFS Formally untrained, Lucie Jeffs works mostly in watercolors to create flat, surreal and caricature-like portraits. Her works have ties to art history but also explore contemporary themes. NEIGHBORHOOD: Hackney, East London FAVORITE CARTOON CHARACTER? Bambi FAVORITE ART CLICHÉ? I don't have one. FINISH THIS SENTENCE: "If I could clone myself I would...freak everyone out. WHAT’S YOUR MOST RECENT WEIRDEST DREAM? I dreamt a few days ago that I had a new job mending bicycles. IF YOUR ART HAD A SLOGAN, WHAT WOULD IT BE? I create or get bored. PANCAKES OR WAFFLES? Savoury pancakes or potato waffles. GUITAR OR TURNTABLES? Generally turntables, as I love electronic music. However, I do love my Turner guitar because it’s wonderfully bright sounding. WHAT’S THE WORST MOVIE YOU WATCHED THIS YEAR? I watched Skyfall last night at my parent's house and nodded off halfway through so I am sure it isn’t that engaging! WHAT’S AN ART TECHNIQUE YOU WISH YOU COULD DO? Topiary CAN VIDEO GAMES BE ART? I guess they already are, aren't they? Someone created them. IF YOU WERE DOWN TO YOUR LAST DOLLAR, WHAT WOULD YOU SPEND IT ON? It sounds wet, but it’d have to be a tin of cat food for my beautiful black cat Stussy.

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JARED KONOPITSKI With the hope that the viewer will daydream and laugh a little, Jared Konopitski creates bizarre, fantastical scenes in acrylic and cel vinyl. He has exhibited throughout the US, Canada, South America and Europe. He’s also been featured in publications such as Juxtapoz Magazine and Time Magazine among others. Most recently, he was a featured artist in the Snow White and the Huntsman art show curated by Universal Pictures.

NEIGHBORHOOD: I am currently living in Sacramento, California. I spend most of my days traveling back and forth from Sac Town to San Francisco. FAVORITE CARTOON CHARACTER? Christopher Walken

WHAT’S THE WORST MOVIE YOU WATCHED THIS YEAR? Hmm, the Double D Avenger. It is not a porn like it sounds; however, it is just..horrible...

FAVORITE ART CLICHÉ? “Starving artist.” I mean, you can buy non-toxic paint which can be edible. Just eat your paintings, is all I am trying to say. “Starving artist” is so last year.

WHAT’S AN ART TECHNIQUE YOU WISH YOU COULD DO? I would love to get better at airbrushing. I would like to truly make my paintings glow. That is something I am currently working on. So, stay tuned...

FINISH THIS SENTENCE: If I could clone myself I would...hmmm, this could get kinky. I don't know if I should answer this.

CAN VIDEO GAMES BE ART? Definitely! Just check out Edmund McMillen or the game "Limbo.” Amazing stuff!

WHAT’S YOUR MOST RECENT WEIRDEST DREAM? Well, I had a dream where I was in charge of installing a Port-O-Potty on the dark side of the moon because Earth realized the moon has no plumbing.

IF YOU WERE DOWN TO YOUR LAST DOLLAR, WHAT WOULD YOU SPEND IT ON? Bacon

IF YOUR ART HAD A SLOGAN, WHAT WOULD IT BE? "Screw art and just make cool stuff!" IPAD OR IPAD MINI? I don't know. IPHONE OR ANDROID? People who use iPhones walk around as androids, if that answer counts. PEANUT BUTTER OR JELLY? Either one is hilarious to rub all over your cat. PANCAKES OR WAFFLES? Man, that is like asking to choose your favorite child. Can't I have both?

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GUITAR OR TURNTABLES? I like it when they mix the guitar all up on the turntables to make that groovy sound.

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BARBARA SMITH Having studied at Goldsmith’s College in London, UK, French and Irish artist Barbara Smith is part of an alumni group which includes Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Lucian Freud and Vivienne Westwood to name a few. While in college she trained at Estudio Mariscal in Barcelona, Spain with multidisciplinary artist, designer and Oscar-winning film director Javier Mariscal. Barbara explores a wide range of mediums, from painting and drawing to etching on plexiglass, amongst other disciplines. She includes references to art history, music, comics and popular culture. Death and mortality are also recurring themes in Smith’s works.

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NEIGHBORHOOD: I'm currently living in Camaret Sur Mer, Brittany, France, right on the very edge of Europe. The scenery is breathtaking and the beaches are amazing. FAVORITE CARTOON CHARACTER? I like superheroes in general; however, I don't have a favourite character. FAVORITE ART CLICHÉ? "KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON" WHAT’S YOUR MOST RECENT WEIRDEST DREAM? A white-winged horse flying past my bedroom window in slow motion. It was weird and wonderful. IF YOUR ART HAD A SLOGAN, WHAT WOULD IT BE? At the moment, "WITH HOPE WE'LL CARRY ON.” PEANUT BUTTER OR JELLY? Jam PANCAKES OR WAFFLES? Brittany is the land of pancakes. Hot, buttery pancakes with sugar and freshly squeezed lemon... GUITAR OR TURNTABLES? Guitars. My boyfriend is a composer and there are guitars in nearly every room of the house. WHAT’S THE WORST MOVIE YOU WATCHED THIS YEAR? Taken 2 WHAT’S AN ART TECHNIQUE YOU WISH YOU COULD DO? Right now it's screen printing. CAN VIDEO GAMES BE ART? Of course, what isn't art today? IF YOU WERE DOWN TO YOUR LAST DOLLAR, WHAT WOULD YOU SPEND IT ON? Maybe a scratch card?

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MUSE

Photography by KATE STRUCKA @ strucka.com Stylist by PSZCZORMANI @ pszczormani.blogspot.com Hair by LUKE SIENKO @ fb.com/luke.hairstylist Makeup by ALEKSANDRA BYRA Model MARTYNA @ ecmanagement

OPPOSITE Top by MARITA BOBKO Belt by GLITTER Skirt by FANFARONADA Tights by CONTE Ring and Bag by GLITTER

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THIS SPREAD Bag by GLITTER Shawl by GLITTER Necklace by LOLITA ACCESSORIES Tights by CONTE

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THIS PAGE Shirt by RIVER ISLAND Collar by GLITTER Bag by GLITTER OPPOSITE Skirt by FANFARONADA Tights by CONTE Earrings by GLITTER

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THIS PAGE Top by MARITA BOBKO Belt by GLITTER Skirt by FANFARONADA Ring by GLITTER OPPOSITE Dress by MARITA BOBKO Collar by GLITTER

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THIS SPREAD Collar by GLITTER T-Shirt by ROBERT KUPISZ Skirt by FANFARONADA Tights by CONTE Gloves by VINTAGE

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THIS SPREAD Top by MARITA BOBKO Belt by GLITTER Skirt by FANFARONADA Ring by GLITTER

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THIS SPREAD Skirt by RIVER ISLAND Head Accessories by EXPOSE AKECSORIA Gloves and Ring by GLITTER Tights by CONTE

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MOSAIC PLAYGROUND Photography by AUSRA OSIPAVICIUTE @ aography.com Stylist by LINA BERNOTAITYTE Makeup by GIEDRE JAROCKAITE Models ELENA @ ruta models & VIKTORIJA @ pmst Clothing ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE, LINA BERNOTAITYTE, FREAK FACTORY

OPPOSITE Leggings by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE T-Shirts by LINA BERNOTAITYTE

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THIS SPREAD Coat on left by FREAK FACTORY Leggings by LINA BERNOTAITYTE Coat on right, Dress, & Body by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE

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THIS PAGE Coat on the left by FREAK FACTORY Sweaters & Leggings by LINA BERNOTAITYTE Coat on the right by VINTAGE

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THIS PAGE Coat on the left by FREAK FACTORY Coat on the right & Dress by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE OPPOSITE Coats by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE Leggings by LINA BERNOTAITYTE

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THIS SPREAD Sweater by LINA BERNOTAITYTE Leggings & Headphones by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE

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THIS SPREAD Leggings & 'Earphones' by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE T-Shirts by LINA BERNOTAITYTE

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OPPOSITE Blouse & Leggings by LINA BERNOTAITYTE Headphones by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE THIS PAGE Dress by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE Leggings by LINA BERNOTAITYTE

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THIS SPREAD Coats by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE

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THIS SPREAD Body by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE Leggings & Sweaters by LINA BERNOTAITYTE

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OPPOSITE Dress by ALINA VAITKEVICIUTE

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