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New Visual Language.


Modernism.


Less is more.

Modernism is an art and design movement, which changed the world. Emerging from the aftermath of World War 1, artists wanted to create a new world free of greed, community inequality and conflict. Modernism isn’t a style but a cluster of ideas with diverse styles. Modernism was a development from modern industrial communities, which became a rapid development and swept through the cities of the world. A year later after World War 1 Bauhaus opened which was the first school to teach modernism. The modern movement changed everything around us for example music, society, architecture and technology. This forced artist’s to think about their surrounding and environment and how they were going to grasp, expose and contribute to the new world.


POST MODE MODER Postmodernism is a movement in the arts and design, which critique’s the departure of modernism. Postmodernist people believe that nothing is original that everything has been stolen and has been done for before for example paintings, music, movies and photography. Postmodernism, wants to achieve idea perfection as well as trying to realize harmony of form and function.


RNISM ERNISM Nothing is original


Pablo Picasso.

Pablo Ruiz y Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain in 1881. Pablo Picasso was a child prodigy. At an early age Picasso’s father encouraged him to draw and Pablo was able to draw before he could speak and walk. His father gave up painting and drawing when Picasso was young, as his son was so advanced, passing on his paintbrushes and art materials to the young Picasso.Thought out Pablo’s like he went thought many phase of his artwork and hiphases will often have religious, mythical and bull fighting images. Also his phase’s often were infused with his emotions.

This painting is the first cubist painting he has ever done and he looked at numerous studies and variations he came up with it and he calls it African cubism because if you look closely at the women’s faces you can see that they are African masks. One of the most important things I like in this painting is that Pablo Picasso used simultaneity to show the women are looking in different directions and you mostly see it in their eyes. The Egyptian’s did this in there hieroglyphics. This painting is to a street called “Avignon Street”, this street refers to Paris but the street is actually in Barcelona. The street is in the red district of the city and the street is filled with prosatutes. This painting shocked the public when they saw it because it destroys the western idea of beauty. The painting is full and flat but on the other hand the picture is plain but it has the freedom to operate like music. Cubism of the most important movement in art but its simply done because it’s just a broken down form into shapes and here is a quote from Pablo Picasso’s about cubism “cubism is the art of dealing primary in form and when a form is realized it is there to live its own life”. His inspiration for is piece of art was Cezanne and Fauvism. Pablo Picasso experienced a revelation while viewing African art at the ethnographic museum at “Palais du Trocadéro”. Picasso’s discovery of African art influenced the style of his painting Les Demoiselles d’Avignon especially in the treatment of the two figures on the right side of the composition.


This form of cubism is called analytical cubism and this sort of cubism uses sharp and sharped edges because the shapes have been simplified that much to become what they are and analytical cubism is built up from right angles and straight lines. 1908/9 to 1912 is referred to as Analytical Cubism. The colour schemes where simplified to the colour scheme look more monochromatic. This monochrome colour scheme was used to make the hard edges of this sketch look smooth and it doesn’t distract the viewers from the primary interest and the structure of itself. There is so much detail and tone because if you look around the women with the mandolin you can see detail all around her. My favourite part about this sketch is the women’s because you can make out her eyes which look like Egyptian hieroglyphics eyes. The also like that Pablo Picasso has made the hair of the look round but at the same time look like a square.

Wilhelm Uhde was a German art collector, dealer, author and critic, an early collector of modernist painting, and a significant figure in the career of Henri Rousseau. He was one of the first collectors of the cubist paintings of Pablo Picasso and George Braque, buying his first Picasso in 1905. Here’s a quote from Pablo Picasso about cubism “when we invented cubism we have no intention of creating cubism”. This is one of the first pieces of cubism where you can actually see the characters face. There is not a lot of detail in Wilhelm Uhde’s face but on the other hand you can see all the parts of his face. My favourite part of this piece is the background because the shapes go in and out of Wilhelm Uhde The colour in the background is smooth especially on the hard edges and the shading in the certain parts of the background looks good because it makes the picture stand out. This piece of cubism is analytical cubism.


Bauhaus.

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Walter Gropius

Walter Gropius was the first founder of Bauhaus school in Weimar in 1919. Before he was the founder of Bauhaus school he was a German architect and was wildly regarded as one of the pioneering masters of modern architecture. Walter Gropius wanted to become an architect like his father and his uncle before him; Walter couldn’t draw and was dependent on collaborators and partnerinterpreters throughout his career. Walter career was interrupted by the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Called up immediately as a reservist, Gropius served as a sergeant major at the Western front during the war years, and was wounded and almost killed. Gropius’s career advanced in the post-war period. Henry van de Velde, the master of the Grand-Ducal Saxon School of Arts and Crafts in Weimar was asked to step down in 1915 due to his Belgian nationality. His recommendation for Gropius to succeed him led eventually to Gropius’s appointment as master of the school in 1919. It was this academy which Gropius transformed into the world famous Bauhaus.

The Deutscher Werkbund Movement

The Deutscher Werkbund was a German association of artists, architects, designers, and industrialists. The Werkbund was to become an important event in the development of modern architecture and industrial design, particularly in the later creation of the Bauhaus school of design. Its initial purpose was to establish a partnership of product manufacturers with design professionals to improve the competitiveness of German companies in global markets. World War I interrupted the Werkbund’s activity, but after the war it reasserted itself with a significant exhibition in Stuttgart in 1927. The Werkbund also participated in the Paris exhibition of industrial arts and building held in 1930. The Werkbund’s displays were organized by Gropius, along with László Moholy-Nagy, Marcel Breuer, and Herbert Bayer.


Johannes Itten.

Johannes Itten was a Swiss expressionist painter, designer, teacher, writer and theorist associated with the Bauhaus school. Together with German-American painter Lyonel Feininger and German sculptor Gerhard Marcks, under the direction of German architect Walter Gropius, Itten was part of the core of the Weimar Bauhaus. Johannes Itten was one of the main pedagogical forces behind the Bauhaus and taught a foundation course in craft through the study of colour and form. From 1919 to 1922, Itten taught at the Bauhaus, developing the innovative “preliminary course, which was to teach students the basics of material characteristics, composition, and colour.

Laszlo Moholy-Nagy.

Laszlo Moholy-Nagy was a Hungarian painter and photographer as well as professor in the Bauhaus school. He was highly influenced by constructivism and a strong advocate of the integration of technology and industry into the arts.In 1923 Laszlo Moholy-Nagy replaced Johannes Itten as the instructor of the foundation course at Bauhaus. Throughout his career he became proficient and innovative in the fields of photography, typography, painting, sculpture, industrial design and printmaking.He experimented with the photographic process of exposing light sensitive paper with objects overlain on top of it, called photogram.

Josef Albers.

Josef Albers was a German-born American artist and educator whose work, both in Europe and in the United States, formed the basis of some of the most influential and far-reaching art education programs of the 20th century.He studied art in Berlin, Essen, and Munich, before enrolling as a student in the basic course of Johannes Itten at the prestigious Weimar Bauhaus in 1920. Although Josef Albers studied painting, it was as a maker of stained glass that he joined the faculty of the Bauhaus in 1922, approaching his chosen medium as a component of architecture and as a stand-alone art form.In 1925 Josef Albers was promoted to Professor, the year the Bauhaus moved to Dessau. At this time, he married Anni Albers who was also a student there.

Herbert Bayer.

Herbert Bayer was an Austrian and American graphic designer, painter, photographer, sculptor, art director, environmental and interior designer, and architect, who was widely recognized as the last living member of the Bauhaus and was instrumental in the development of the Atlantic Richfield Company’s corporate art collection until his death in 1985. After Herbert Bayer had studied for four years at the Bauhaus under such teachers as Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee and László Moholy-Nagy, Gropius appointed Bayer director of printing and advertising.In the spirit of reductive minimalism, Bayer developed a crisp visual style and adopted use of all-lowercase, sans serif typefaces for most Bauhaus publications. Bauhaus moved to Dessau. At this time, he married Anni Albers who was also a student there.


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Umberto Boccioni.

Umberto Boccioni was an influential Italian painter and sculptor. He helped shape the revolutionary aesthetic of the Futurism movement as one of its principal figures. Despite his short life, his approach to the dynamism of form and the deconstruction of solid mass guided artists long after his death. His works are held by many public art museums, and in 1988 the Museum of Modern Art in New York organized a major retrospective of 100 pieces.

Umberto Boccioni was an influential Italian painter and sculpto . He helped shape the The city rises 1910 Umberto Boccioni painted this piece of art. The story behind this painting is the city is rising because you can see there are factories in the background and the city is under heavy construction. If you look at the centre you can see labours and horse dragging giant cables and the reason why they are using horses is because at this time in history they only had horseman technology. Here’s a quote from the Umberto Boccioni “I am sick of all the walls and places I want the new the expressive formidable�. The colour in this painting is really bright and vivid but they look like they are the colour for rage because on the many colours you see is red and red is a powerful colour and normally known for being in painting of war and rage. The short may cause this but expressive brush strokes because it makes the painting feel like it has movement. The composition of this painting is like a vortex because the paint and the figures flow together giving it like a 4D effect which is giving the painting of a feel that it is moving along with the brush strokes. What makes this a Futurist piece of work is the expressive and bright colours used in the painting also the way the brush strokes have been used. Also the history behind it because of the way people were treated and how people concerned the problems they had.


Carlo Carrà.

Carlo Carrà was an Italian painter, a leading figure of the Futurist movement that flourished in Italy during the beginning of the 20th century. In addition to his many paintings, he wrote a number of books concerning art. He taught for many years in the city of Milan.

This piece of art is has history behind it. in 1904 there was a protest against the government called Italy and it was a peaceful protest until the soldiers shot an anarchist for no reason and this painting is showing the respect for the anarchist for standing up for what he believed in but on the other hand it shows the angry of the his followers and that the soldiers got away with their crime. There is a lot of angry and aggressive symbols in this painting for example the colour in this painting shows all signs of rage and angry because Carlo Carrà used a lot of red in this painting and red is the colour of angry, rage and power. You can also see the people waving sticks and flags which also shows signs of aggression and that the people are intent of attacking to police because they want to take revenge. The figures in this painting are interlocking but are trying to show the physical movement of the sticks and flags. Here’s a quote from Carlo Carrà “the art of the past is great nonsense based on moral, religious and political symbols. Only does futurist art does true art imagery.


Creative Review. Creative review is one of the biggest graphic design magazines in the world. It involves contemporary advertising, design, illustration, new media, photography, and typography. It launched in the 1980’s and hasn’t stopped. Cover art typically features typography, photography, graphics and illustration. Rarely do covers feature the actual artists and every cover is different.

This is properly my favourite creative review magazine, it has a mixture of postmodernism and modernism together, this is the first and only piece of work I’ve seen where these two different art movements. The strange form that’s moves form 2D to 3D looks like postmodernism but the fact that everything curve and line are the same size makes it modernism.


Inspiration. Here are some of the main magazines that gave inspiration in my ideas.


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NVL. New Visual Language.

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Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

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Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

Amazing Design New up coming Desighers

25 Woodford ave Winton Salford

New Visual Language.

Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

Amazing Design New up coming Desighers

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New Visual Language.

Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

Amazing Design New up coming Desighers

25 Woodford ave Winton Salford

New Visual Language.

NVL.

Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

Amazing Design New up coming Desighers

25 Woodford ave Winton Salford

NVL.

Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

Amazing Design New up coming Desighers

New Visual Language.

25 Woodford ave Winton Salford

Sunday 4th May 2014 Issue 1

New up coming Desighers

Amazing Design by Obey

New Visual Language.

New Visual Language.

NVL.

Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

Amazing Design New up coming Desighers

Issue 1

New Visual Language. Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

New Visual Language.

New Visual Language.

Amazing Design New up coming Desighers

25 Woodford ave Winton Salford

Sunday 4th May 2014 All ages

Amazing Design New up coming Desighers

25 Woodford ave Winton Salford

New Visual Language.


Sunday 4th May 2014 Issue 1

New up coming Desighers

Amazing Design by Obey

New Visual Language.

New Visual Language.

This is my final cover design, this cover has gone through many changes, from colour, placement and type but this is exactly what I wanted and I love the modernist design it has to it. I wanted to show less is more in my magazine design and I have accomplished that through this cover.


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New Visual Language. This is my final logo for my magazine I tried many ways to my this fit into the style of my magazine and I’ve final got it.



New Visual Language Research