Page 1

EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 1

The official publication of the Way-Ahead Process Volume 7, Winter 1999

Air cadet league starts new membership screening process Update on high school credits for cadet training Finding a better way to dress and equip cadets National photo contest winners

Making ‘Cadets’ a household word


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 2

Proud To Be The official publication of the Way-Ahead Process Volume 7 Winter 1999 This publication is produced on behalf of the Canadian Cadet Movement including Cadets, Cadet Instructor Cadre, League members, civilian instructors, parents, sponsors, Regular Force and Reservists, and other interested parties. It is published by the Way-Ahead co-ordination cell under the authority of the strategic team. Proud To Be serves all individuals interested in change and renewal in relation to the Canadian Cadet Movement and the Canadian Forces. Views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect official opinion or policy.

Cadet PO1 Sasha Naime, 26 Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps, Cornwallis, NS, prepares to place a wreath at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Remembrance Day, Nov. 11. She was selected to place the wreath on behalf of cadets from across Canada. Born in the Barbados, Sacha immigrated with her family to Canada and became a Canadian citizen in August 1997. PO1 Naime was also selected ‘Miss Teen Friendship’ in the Miss Teen Canada contest in 1998. (Photo by Sgt Julien Dupuis, photographer to the Governor General of Canada)

ON THE COVER: “Dusk on the seas” is the ‘best overall cadet’ winner in the first national cadet photo contest. PO1 Jason Pesant of Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps 240 Amiral Le Gardeur, of Repentigny, QC, captured this moody moment on film aboard HMCS Toronto somewhere in the Atlantic in 1998. PO1 Pesant will receive the awardwinning CorelDraw9 graphics software, courtesy of Corel Corporation, as his prize, as well as a second prize from BGM Imaging. The contest was held to increase the numbers of quality photographs available for the national public relations program aimed at making Cadets a household word in Canada. The program is an outcome of the Way-Ahead. Turn to page 38 to see other award-winning photographs.

Proud To Be is published four times a year. We welcome submissions of no more than 750 words, as well as photos. We reserve the right to edit all submissions for length and style. For further information, please contact the Editor — Marsha Scott. Internet E-mail: ghscott@netcom.ca Editor, Proud To Be Way-Ahead Process Directorate of Cadets MGen Pearkes Bldg, NDHQ 101 Colonel By Dr. Ottawa, ON K1A 0K2 Toll-free: 1-800-627-0828 Fax: (613) 992-8956 E-Mail: ad612@issc.debbs.ndhq.dnd.ca Visit our Web site at www.vcds.dnd.ca/visioncadets

Copy Deadlines 2

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Art Direction:

Spring 2000 issue — February 4 Summer issue — May 5

Winter

1999

DGPA Creative Services 99CS-0503


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 3

A Future Founded in Renewal

From the Editor

You’re contributing articles — without my asking for them.

I

’m excited. This issue talks a lot about the cadet movement’s image because we’re beginning to get Way-Ahead results in the area of communications. We have a plan to make Cadets better known to Canadians; we’re getting more public affairs training for cadet instructor cadre officers, and we’re going to find out what Canadians really think of Cadets.

But there’s an aspect of image you’ve probably never thought about and it’s more evident than ever in this issue. This issue projects an image of ‘ownership’. You are finally taking ownership of your change and renewal process. How do I know? It’s written all over this newsletter!

You’re sending letters to the editor. You’ve sent me dozens of e-mails since the last issue asking for more information, volunteering for a team, contributing ideas and more. You’re complaining less and offering positive solutions. And I’m hearing from more cadets than ever. This issue’s cadet corner features a 13year-old cadet with her own unique ideas for change. It also carries another cadet’s views on what fellow cadets can do to improve the movement’s image.

It also carries a ‘best practices’ story and an article on lessons learned, both key elements in any change and renewal process. And our speakers’ corner features an article from a unit commanding officer who wants us to be aware of what he perceives as some barriers to change. These are all healthy signs that you’re taking ownership of the Way-Ahead. And what better time to happen than now as we enter the new millennium? By taking ownership, we can all make a difference. And we can look with excitement to creating an even better Canadian Cadet Movement in the year 2000 and beyond! E

This newsletter carries articles from three action teams we haven’t heard from before — the resources, cadet instructor cadre/league training and miscellaneous training action teams.

In this issue... What’s news? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Regional cadet officers share thoughts on change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

High school credits for cadet training . . . . . . . 10

Eye-opener for cadets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

‘Expensive paperweight’ becomes valuable resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Lift-off for another action team . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Helping kids grow up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Lessons learned from Cadets Caring for Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Making ‘Cadets’ a household word . . . . . . . . . . 4

Cadet Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

3

New screening process for air cadet league . . 27

Finding a better way to dress and equip cadets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Speakers’ Corner: Barriers to change . . . . . . . 30

Leadership important to cadet training curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Letters to the editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

‘Desk officers’ to the rescue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Winning photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Resources team ‘off and running’ . . . . . . . . . . 32

E-mail addresses/Winter ’99 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Making

Page 4

‘Cadets’

“So much stuff without style” By Stéphane Ippersiel “So much style without substance… So much stuff without style” – Neil Peart — Grand Designs

T

he second line of this quote from a Rush song sort of sums up my feelings about the Canadian Cadet Movement (CCM). As an organization, Cadets has tons of stuff to offer, but most Canadians (we think) don’t know about Cadets or what this great organization has to offer. The problem here is not the product; it’s the packaging. This is about to change. As a ‘newbie’ to the movement, I have nothing to teach you about what cadets do and the exceptional opportunities that lie within every cadet’s reach. There aren’t a lot of youth groups in Canada that can offer members access to gliding, parachuting, adventure training, sailing, marksmanship, first aid and survival training. And those activities are just the tip of the iceberg. It is baffling that, despite offering so much to help Canada’s youth develop into Canada’s leaders, Cadets, by and large, remains little known as an institution. Why is it that an organization that currently counts over 55,000 youth, 6,000 cadet instructor cadre officers and a national network comprising tens of thousands of dedicated volunteers does not register in the minds of many Canadians?

4

Proud To Be

Volume 7

As the communications manager with directorate of cadets, my mission is to make Cadets better known to Canadians. This will be done methodically with insight and guidance from the members of the Way-Ahead communications action team. Together, we have come up with a communications program that is simple and time-proven. It has three main steps:

cadet movement are familiar with the benefits, culture and traditions of Cadets. It is natural to assume that “if you’re not in it, you won’t get it.” Natural, but misleading. Every organization that has its own codes and hierarchy may be viewed with an equal blend of curiosity, misconception and, in some cases, suspicion by those outside. This is true of organized

• Find out what Canadians know about Cadets • Figure out what we’d like them to know about Cadets • Bridge the gap between

Finding out what Canadians know about Cadets “For the most part, Canadians don’t know about Cadets. Those who do know about cadets think of them as little Rambos or soldiers-in-the-making.” Does this sound familiar? Many in the cadet movement have shared this take on public opinion with me. But is this really what the average Canadian thinks of cadets? It is important to distinguish between fact and one’s own biases when dealing with an outside public. Members of the

Winter

1999

Canadian astronaut Col Chris Hadfield is among well-known cadet alumni. Part of the national communication strategy is drawing Canadians’ attention to Cadets by showing them former cadets who’ve gone on to do good things. (Photo courtesy of the Canadian Space Agency)


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 5

A Future Founded in Renewal

a household word religions, large corporations, ethnic groups, street gangs, police departments, fire-fighters, the military community and youth groups. Even an organization as well known as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is prone to misunderstanding by the general population. It is safe to say that most Canadians have heard of the Mounties; it is also safe to say that most Canadians don’t “get” what being a Mountie is really about.

and prepare a communication strategy to inform Canadians about Cadets. The communication strategy will outline our present situation, indicate where we want to be, and map out the steps we will take to reach our communications objectives. It will be national in scope, but will be flexible enough to be implemented at the regional and local levels.

Bridging the gap What do Canadians really think of cadets? I don’t know. But I’d like to find out and I’m certain, so would many of you. So this past fall, we commissioned public opinion research to find out what Canadians know (or don’t know) about Cadets, and what they feel the program is about. The research gauged the opinions and attitudes Canadians have toward the Cadet program. One facet looked at adult Canadians, the other looked at Canadian youth. Results of the research will be published in the spring issue of Proud To Be.

Finding out what we would like Canadians to know about Cadets This is probably the trickiest part. Following public opinion research, we should understand better what Canadians think about the movement. We might be surprised at the results we get. Here’s where we throw our own perceptions out the window. What we’re really interested in here are what public perceptions are and what Canadians do, or do not know. Then we can start to figure out what our messages should be,

5

This part is all about talking to Canadians, and letting them in on a national treasure they may not know is here. The bulk of the talking will be done where it really matters: at the local level. To do so effectively, we will take a multi-pronged approach that will include the design and implementation of a movement-wide corporate image, including the design and fabrication of quality exhibition and information products. We will create public relations, recruiting and public speakers’ toolboxes, all accessible on-line; galvanize internal communications products; and introduce public affairs training for cadet instructor cadre officers (See story on next page). Creating a corporate image is key. Part of the Canadian Cadet Movement’s image problem has to do with the fact that it is Canadian. By that I mean that we Canadians — quiet, respectful, self-effacing as we are — have a tough time telling others how good we really are. Did I say “good?” More like “great”, really.

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Continued on page 7

To my eyes, Cadets is a national icon on a par with the Mountie, the maple leaf, the beaver, the CN tower and Anne of Green Gables. – Stéphane Ippersiel, communications manager, directorate of cadets.


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 6

Making ‘Cadets’ a household word

Public affairs training in the year 2000 Yes!!!!! Another Way-Ahead result!

I

t’s been a while coming, but it looks like more public affairs training for cadet instructor cadre (CIC) officers is a ‘go’ for the new millennium.

The Way-Ahead communications action team and the communication cell at directorate of cadets — with the help of directorate general public affairs — are working on two aspects of public affairs training for CICs in the new year: • Public affairs training for all CICs who fill public affairs positions at cadet summer training centres (CSTC) • Defence public affairs course training for at least two CICs each year Normally, public affairs functions are carried out at every cadet summer training centre. But most CICs do it as a secondary duty. Some, who are located in regions with a full-time dedicated public affairs officer, receive training. Others receive none. No-one receives nationallevel public affairs training. All that will change in the year 2000.

Capt Ross Brown, a full-time public affairs officer with Atlantic Region, gives public affairs training to cadet instructor cadre officers who do public affairs at the region’s cadet summer training centres.

6

Proud To Be

Volume 7

“Planning is still going on,” says Stéphane Ippersiel, head of the directorate of cadets communication cell. “But our hope is to get dedicated public affairs positions at the summer training centres and conduct formalized training in two phases — a standardized national training phase and a regional phase.”

Winter

1999

Next spring, 27 CICs will meet in Ottawa for the national training phase to be given at the same time as the cadet summer training centre commanding officers’ conference. The ‘public affairs officers in training’ will hear briefings on the Canadian Cadet Movement’s broad communication picture, on national communication themes and messages and on the corporate communication philosophy. In addition to briefings and round-table discussions, joint meetings between the public affairs officers and the CSTC commanding officers are planned. The CICs will receive their regional public affairs training before the summer training centres open. Currently, three regions have full-time public affairs officers: LCdr Gerry Pash, Pacific Region, who is also a member of the communications action team; Maj Carlo DeCiccio, Eastern Region; and Capt Ross Brown, Atlantic Region. These officers offer regional training for CSTC public affairs officers now and it’s been going well and will continue. “We don’t want to interfere with that nuts and bolts training,” says Mr. Ippersiel. “We want to keep that regional spirit in what they do.”


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 7

A Future Founded in Renewal

So much stuff without style… continued from page 5

According to Maj DeCiccio, who has been in his position for four years and has a university degree in communications, the training he offers is based on the Department of National Defence unit public affairs officer course required for the basic public affairs officer qualification. His course lasts two or three days and covers subjects like mass communications, writing press releases, media relations, photography and so on. “The people who come have no public affairs training, so the course is good,” says Maj DeCiccio. “It results in a better public relations program and better visibility for the seven camps in my region.” The problem that needs to be resolved is regional public affairs training for CICs in Central, Prairie and Northern regions, which have no full-time CIC public affairs officers. One option might be bringing them from those regions to regions where training is offered. With regard to the Defence Public Affairs course, the directorate general public affairs has agreed to reserve two slots on each course for cadet instructor cadre officers. The course is normally offered once a year, but a second course may be added in the new year. Plans are to ask regions for nominations of course candidates. E

7

To my eyes, Cadets is a national icon on a par with the Mountie, the maple leaf, the beaver, the CN tower and Anne of Green Gables. The reason Canadians don’t recognize Cadets as a national icon is that we haven’t packaged Cadets well enough. We haven’t given much style to all this stuff that is Cadets. One of the things we plan to do is draw Canadians’ attention to the cadet movement by showing them former cadets who’ve gone on to do good things. These famous cadet alumni will help Canadians understand the benefits of the cadet program, by connecting their familiar faces with an organization that helped them prosper. Among the famous alumni we know of are Brian Tobin, Jim Carrey, Myriam Bédard, Col Chris Hadfield and MGen (ret’d) Lew MacKenzie. Can you help us find more?

I have yet to see a cadet publication by cadets and for cadets. Over the next months, we will look at the possibility of funding and developing a national magazine with content provided entirely by cadets for cadets. The first step in this venture is putting together an editorial board. Cadets interested can e-mail me at af397@issc.debbs.ndhq.dnd.ca. As you can see, this is an ambitious program, one that I hope you will support and encourage. Getting the word out about Cadets is important. The more Canadians know about Cadets, the more they will support Cadets. And that, my friends, is a good thing. E

Galvanizing our internal communications is an important issue. As you read this, we have the CIC Newsletter and Proud To Be as the two national Cadet publications, along with element-specific publications The Helm (Navy League of Canada) and Journal (Army Cadet League of Canada). These are complemented by dozens of regional publications put out by the regional cadet offices and provincial league committees. All of these publications fill a need and should carry on. But what about the cadet?

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Brian Tobin, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, is a former cadet.


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 8

Making ‘Cadets’ a household word

Failing to tell Canadians what we’re about A c a d e t ’s v i e w o f i m a g e By Cadet FSgt Mark Masongsong strive to accomplish goals in cadets, we learn and grow, becoming better citizens and leaders for Canada. A clear understanding of this would no doubt help in the recruitment and fund-raising activities of all cadet services. This is where we are failing. The problem is there is little and often no opportunity for the general public to find out what cadets do. When Canadians see us in parades or at public functions, they witness only our ‘starch and polish’ — a superficial image that we are judged on.

Cadet FSgt Masongsong

H

ave you ever taken the time to consider how the public views the cadet movement? Do you realize just how important our public image is to our success? As cadets, we all know what the cadet movement is all about, what we stand for and what our objectives are. Unfortunately, the public is largely ignorant of our aims and achievements. Not only is this unfair to the tens of thousands of people who work diligently to further one of Canada’s finest institutions. It severely handicaps us in reaching our full potential. At the very core of cadets are cadets themselves. All of us were once drawn to cadets with promises of unmatched opportunities and experiences. As we

8

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Business people don’t comprehend the level of leadership training and experience that cadets obtain, so they can’t properly evaluate cadet training on a resume. They are also less eager to sponsor cadet activities when they don’t understand the possible benefits for themselves or their communities.

don’t understand what the movement offers. They picture a life of drill and shouting, all to no end or purpose. If Canadians better understood that Cadets is about proactive, positive leadership through teamwork and close friendships with people from across Canada, our organization would be even more successful than it is now. So what now? As cadets, we are trained to take the initiative, and it’s time we did: • As an organization, we can inform people more effectively of the accomplishments of the cadet movement. • At the squadron/corps level, we can promote more aggressively the cadet movement and its aims to local communities. • Each one of us can find some way to personally spread the word about our life in cadets.

Parents would rather send their children to other organized activities, where they can get some ‘useful’ experiences. Do they realize that cadet training offers young people a chance to travel the world, become trusted instructors at an early age, or earn their pilot’s license — all free of charge?

All of these can help relieve the burden placed on the cadet services of unfair stereotypical images. The army, air and sea cadet services — and we as cadets — deserve no less.

Most importantly, the targets of the cadet movement — young people — don’t get a fair choice in whether they want to join or not, because they simply

– FSgt Masongsong is a cadet with 819 Skyhawk Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in North Delta, BC. E

Winter

1999


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 9

A Future Founded in Renewal

W h a t ’s n e w s ? • There’s a new and easier-to-remember web address for the National Canadian Cadet Web Site. Give it a click at www.cadets.dnd.ca and find information on everything from how to become a cadet to millennium plans and year 2000 scholarships. • Do you think cadets across Canada should share a code of cadet discipline? If so, what do you think should be included in the code? Does your corps/squadron already have a code? Let us know. Fax your ideas, comments or existing code to 1-613-992-8956, c/o DCdts 5-4, or e-mail your ideas by logging on to the new national web site. • Some folks are really looking ahead — ‘way-ahead’!!! If you still want to celebrate this year’s 75th anniversary of the Air Force, you can still take part by contributing to a time capsule that will be locked and exhibited at the Royal Canadian Air Force Memorial Museum in Trenton, Ont. Only four people will have a key. The box will be opened April 1, 2024 on the air force’s 100th anniversary. Contributions are being accepted from individuals, air force associations, army, navy and air force clubs, legions, and cadet corps. The locking ceremony is at 8 Wing Trenton on March 31, 2000. Send your contributions to CWO Boutin or Lt Perreault, 1 Wing Headquarters, Sgt KS Smith Building, CFB Kingston, PO Box 17000 Station Forces, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4.

9

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

• As more units and squadrons get computers through the Way-Ahead, and as we focus on raising the profile of the Canadian Cadet Movement (CCM), why not think of creating a web site to promote your own unit? Just remember — there are rules for creating web sites. Visit the national cadet web site to find out what they are. And discover if there’s a difference between an unofficial and official web site. • The cadet movement is looking for a spokesperson — who exemplifies the values of the movement — to raise its profile. The person should be Canadian, well-recognized by youth and adults alike, appeal to all parts of Canada, be a former cadet or willing to speak on their behalf, be bilingual and have a good reputation. Some names that have been suggested so far are singers Bryan Adams and Celine Dion, actor Michael J. Fox, and astronauts Marc Garneau, Col Chris Hadfield, Julie Payette and Roberta Bondar, and athletes Jacques Villeneuve and Wayne Gretzky. Who do you think should be the cadet spokesperson? E-mail your suggestions to Stéphane Ippersiel or Michele Boriel, communication cell, directorate of cadets, though the national web site. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 10

High school credits for cadet training By Capt Linda Hildebrandt

Attention Cadets!

D

id you know that depending on where you live, you could qualify for high school credits for your cadet training? Some provinces and/or territories recognize cadet training as an external course for which cadets can receive credit to assist them in completing their high school graduation requirements. Unfortunately, this is not true for all areas of Canada. Each province and/or territory has its own Ministry or Department of Education and hence its own interpretation of what type of activities outside the school program might qualify for credit. So depending on where you live in Canada, cadet training may or may not qualify as a high school credit. One of the key activities of the miscellaneous training action team is to help get cadet training recognized as a high school credit across Canada. It’s a challenge.

So, where does your completed cadet training qualify as a high school credit? The following is an overview of the national picture as we understand it now. This summary is based on the best available information at this time and will be updated as more information becomes available.

Alberta

The following areas of Canada offer recognition of cadet training for high school credit:

Manitoba

British Columbia In British Columbia, cadets across the province may apply for high school credit after completing their level four training and/or applicable summer courses. They can apply for additional credits upon completing their level five training and/or applicable summer courses. Credit is available in all high schools for air, sea or army cadet training.

Yukon Due recognition must be given to the Air Cadet League of Canada for its efforts in this area. The air cadet league has pursued this goal for some time and has created an awareness of the value of cadet training as an activity deserving recognition for high school credit. In several parts of Canada, the determined efforts of the air cadet league have subsequently paid off and caused some provincial education ministries/departments to include cadet training as an external activity for which cadets may receive credit. Most notably, recent changes have occurred in British Columbia and Newfoundland.

10

Proud To Be

Volume 7

The Yukon Department of Education grants high school credit for level four and five cadet training which has been completed at the local cadet headquarters.

North West Territories As in British Columbia, high school credits may be received upon completing levels four and five training and/or applicable summer training courses.

In Alberta, the Department of Education will grant work experience credits to cadets who have completed employment as staff cadets. Cadets are also allowed to challenge modules of the career and technology studies program, using their staff cadet work experience.

In Manitoba, cadets may receive one credit after three years in cadets and one summer camp, or two credits after four years and one senior cadet summer camp. Unfortunately, these credits cannot be applied towards achieving graduation. These credits may be accumulated in addition to the number of credits needed to graduate from high school.

Newfoundland and Labrador At present, air cadet training can be used to gain high school credit, similar to the program in British Columbia. In Ontario and Alberta, there are examples of cadets receiving credit for the maximum equivalent of two optional courses. The principal of the school granted these credits. In Ontario, one cadet succeeded in receiving two credits for his cadet experience through a co-operative education program by following the nationally recognized militia ‘co-op’ program adapted to his situation.

Nunavut Canada’s newest territory offers recognition similar to that of the North West Territories.

Winter

1999

In the other provinces, the three provincial leagues are getting together with the aim of achieving recognition of cadet training for high school credit in areas


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 11

A Future Founded in Renewal

where it is still not available. Meetings have been scheduled and the leagues are building a package to present to their respective departments of education. For more complete information on what aspects of cadet training qualify and the application process, cadets are encouraged to contact their corps/squadron commanding officer or high school counsellor for guidance and assistance in applying. The pursuit of gaining widespread recognition of cadet training across Canada is continuing. Potentially, provincial committees made up of members from the navy, army and air cadet leagues would greatly assist in this process. At present, the miscellaneous training team is collecting information to gain a complete national picture of the current situation and setting the groundwork for the formation of such committees. A united effort by all leagues will likely speed the process and gain better

recognition overall of the value of all cadet training — air, army and sea — for high school credit. In the meantime, we need your help. This national overview was based upon the best information at the time, but it’s rather limited for some areas. With so many provinces, educational ministries and departments, collecting accurate information has been a challenge. If you can provide additional information, we would very much appreciate hearing from you. Please contact team leader LCol Robert Langevin at rolang@nb.sympatico.ca and/or myself at ds4@rcispacific.com

This map of Canada denotes areas where high school credit is granted for specific cadet training. (Map by Capt Linda Hildebrandt)

11

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Anyone who has been involved in the cadet program is likely convinced already of the incredible positive value of cadet training for today’s youth. It takes time and a lot of dedication to complete four years of cadet training. Sometimes cadets must give up other activities or part-time jobs to make the most of their involvement in the cadet program. It seems only appropriate that an activity that provides so much opportunity for personal growth and development should receive recognition as an activity qualifying for high school credit. – Capt Hildebrandt is co-leader of the miscellaneous training action team E


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 12

‘Expensive paperweight’ becomes valuable resource By Marsha Scott

S

ince the Way-Ahead began there’s been lots of talk about improving administrative practices and reducing paperwork in cadet units, mostly through computer automation. And the administration and electronic action teams are working hard to put that talk into action. But Capt David Owens, commanding officer of 334 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in Oromocto, NB, knows the challenge goes beyond the Way-Ahead action teams. He understands that everyone plays a role in not only coming up with good ideas, but also sharing best practices as they occur. Since the beginning of the 1998–99 training year, his 75-member squadron has used a computerized database system that’s greatly improved his squadron’s administrative practices. “If you have a really small unit, it might not be as necessary, but if you have more than 50 cadets, the time you spend on manual records is time-consuming,” Capt Owens says. “A computer helps make things timelier.” Before his unit had the system, the computer was just “an expensive paperweight.” We used it for typing letters and memos, says the former Regular Force officer, but we were overlooking its most useful number crunching function. Well, not anymore. The system allows his administration, training and supply officers to share information and maintain electronic records for each cadet and staff member. It’s based on the need to maintain contact information, training records, clothing documents and other printable reports for each cadet.

12

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Winter

1999

Capt David Owens How can it be used? “New Brunswick was planning a training weekend for 400 air cadets,” says the squadron CO. “We knew we could send 19 first-year air cadets from our unit and I wanted to send cadets who had joined first. We told the computer to bring up a list of cadets who had joined, in the order they’d joined, and in two minutes, our list popped out and we had our 19 cadets.” Last year, his administration officer was the main user of the system. Capt Owens added an attendance component over the summer. And this year, as his officers use the system, they’ll determine how it can be improved to make it even easier to use. The computer also helps his supply system work more effectively. “With our data base, we can tell the computer when a cadet quits and it tells us which uniform items are still outstanding,” he says. “Then we can call the cadets, and ask them to bring the items in so we can reissue them. “With the amount of time you have available on training and administration nights, you want to do things as efficiently as you can in a short time,” he says. “The computer makes that possible.”


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 13

A Future Founded in Renewal

So what is this sophisticated system, Capt Owens uses? The bare minimum you need is a 486 computer. It will work on a single desktop computer, or even on a laptop. Capt Owens’ unit received a Pentium this fall, which makes things a bit faster, but last year he used two networked 486 machines. You also need Windows 95 and Microsoft Access 97, which is part of Microsoft Office 97. And that’s it, except for the will to use the system. Because a computer database is only as good as the information entered in it, it must be kept up-to-date to be an important time-saver. Cadet information must be entered when the cadet first joins. “Five minutes in the beginning can save a half hour later,” he says. Is it easy to use? “I just had a new administration officer transfer in from Nova Scotia, who’d never seen it before,” says Capt Owens. “She’s taken to it like a duck to water. It’s a menu driven data-base, so it’s just a matter of pointing and clicking.” So is Capt Owens sharing the word about his innovative practice? You bet! He’s communicated with the electronic action team. He has talked about it when he’s taught at the regional cadet instructor school (Atlantic). He’s shared it with other cadet instructor cadre officers in Nova Scotia, some of who’ve been using it since September. He’s even shared it with the commanding officer of an army cadet unit. “It’s really set up now for air cadet squadrons,” says Capt Owens, whose system has a list of all the air cadet squadrons in the country. But he was able to modify it fairly easy for the army unit.

13

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Capt Owens’ compressed database file is on his Internet home page at: http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/daveo/dbase.html. If anyone wants to try it out, they can, he says. “I don’t have time to personally work out all the details for the army and navy. But anyone familiar with Microsoft Access could probably modify it themselves.” “I realize the system needs further improvements, such as becoming bilingual and adding additional functions,” he says. “However, I felt that even with its warts, it could be a useful tool for other units in the country.” Thanks to Capt Owens for sharing his ‘best practice’. E

Oop s ! We wrongly identified this cadet in our last issue. She is actually Cadet PO1 Amy Simoneau, a member of Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Falkland in Ottawa. Sorry about that Amy!


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 14

Helping kids grow up It’s a good time for Mr. Boudreau to take over his new army cadet league post. “Right now, there’s probably more openness — and fewer hidden agendas — than there has ever been between the Department of National Defence (DND) and the three national offices of the leagues,” he says. “There’s been a significant improvement in the last year in how the three leagues and the directorate of cadets staff work, and the new Director of Cadets Col Rick Hardy has had a lot to do with it. His gesture of opening up his weekly meetings, as well as other events, to league executive directors, for example, is really useful. It would be nice to see the same atmosphere exist at all the regional headquarters.”

Dave Boudreau, new national executive director of the Army Cadet League of Canada. “

C

adets is a program to help kids grow up,” says Dave Boudreau, the new national executive director of the Army Cadet League of Canada. “And that should be the message the Canadian Cadet Movement sends to the Canadian public.”

The new executive director believes, however, that spending even two years in the structured environment offered by Cadets helps young people to grow up and think about other things in life. And that’s why it’s so important, he says, to give a clear message to parents regarding the cadet movement’s aims and objectives.

Mr. Boudreau is pleased that the Way-Ahead has finally formed a partnership action team. He sees opening up lines of communication and clarifying responsibilities as vital to the development of a real partnership. He’s well aware of complaints about DND treading on league territory, and vice versa. But ‘territorialism’ is the last thing on his mind. “The army cadet league spends a lot of time talking about training issues, he says, and while it’s good for the leagues to provide feedback to DND on training problems which are detected, we should let DND handle training matters and the league should focus its efforts on resolving league issues. The same can be said of issues or problems observed by DND. We should be working together in resolving our problems while at the same time, respecting each other’s responsibilities.”

In his new position, Mr. Boudreau is focussed on the future of the cadet movement and the national army cadet league. And as a former army cadet, cadet instructor, 20-year member of the Canadian Forces, detachment commander of 91 sea, army and air cadet units in Toronto and head of the Way-Ahead co-ordination cell, he brings a heap of experience with him.

Public relations and recruiting have been and remain a league responsibility. Now, however, DND is venturing more into those areas with the establishment, for example, of a communications cell within the directorate of cadets. “What’s wrong with two organizations working on the same things,” he asks? “It just complements whatever we can do. Nothing is exclusive.”

That message ties in with what Mr. Boudreau sees as an issue facing today’s army cadet league. “We need to come to the realization that Cadets is a youth program and not a program aimed at producing future soldiers,” he says. “Military activities and uniforms may get the attention of young people, but not many who join army cadets at 12 to 13 years of age do so with the aim of becoming infantry soldiers.”

14

He adds that one of the biggest problems between the leagues and DND has been that not enough people know what’s going on, leading to erroneous conclusions that have complicated the relationship.

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Winter

1999


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 15

A Future Founded in Renewal

He says the leagues should strengthen their support role at the local cadet corps level, getting more sponsors and parent committees to support the commanding officers who can then focus their attention on training and supervising the cadets. Mr. Boudreau sees every Way-Ahead action team as a benefit to both partners. And he sees the league being able to contribute to many of the teams. “A lot of our league people used to be cadet instructor cadre officers and may have good ideas for the teams. It’s always a benefit to listen to people with experience.

Military activities and uniforms may get the attention of young people, but few join cadets with the aim of becoming infantry soldiers.

“We have to get away from this tunnel vision,” he continues, “and learn to use — in the best way we can — the resources we have.” A priority for the army cadet league over the next five years, according to the executive director, is finding more local sponsors for army cadet corps. “The army cadet corps have had DND units as sponsors from the beginning,” he says. “Those units still have a very, very

important role to play. Each of our cadet units is affiliated with a Regular or Reserve Force unit and learning their military traditions and values is important.” However, changes in the Canadian Forces mean there’s less flexibility now than there used to be in providing financial and other support to the cadet units. So the army cadet league must focus on finding co-sponsors or parent associations for financial and other support. “Many cadet units have that support now, but not enough of them,” says Mr. Boudreau. “And where it exists, it works a lot better. Probably the best run corps are the ones that have strong community roots, with support from a military unit, as well as from a service club, a municipal organization, and even the local politicians. Cadet corps that use all of these resources are more successful and accomplish their aims.” The league has just finished restructuring. That is a positive step, in Mr. Boudreau’s view. “We have a new structure to work with, a smaller national executive committee to run the day-to-day business and a national council representing every province and territory. That means more direct involvement with the national level. The task ahead is to establish procedures on how best to use this new structure. Strengthening provincial branches is key to building stronger sponsoring committees. According to Mr. Boudreau, the national executive and council will develop a plan to accomplish this. The Army Cadet League of Canada has its work cut out for it, but clearly, it’s a strong partner in the movement that helps kids grow up. E

In 1990, then Maj Boudreau presented the top junior officer award to OCdt Power, Army Cadet Summer Training Centre Argonaut.

15

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 16

Cadet Corner

D

Cadet Cpl Jessica Reynolds

iversity has many faces in the Canadian Cadet Movement. Recognizing diversity can mean listening to the opinions of the most junior, as well as the most senior, cadets. No specific age group has a corner on the market for good change and renewal ideas. We thank 13-year-old Cadet Cpl Jessica Reynolds, 110 Blackhawks Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in Toronto, ON, for reminding us of that. This issue of Proud to Be (PTB) features Cpl Reynolds, who attended her first cadet summer training centre this past summer. PTB: What are you most concerned about changing in the cadet movement?

PTB: Why did you join Cadets? Jessica: I’ve had an interest in military aviation for a long time. I first learned about cadets in an air show magazine at the Canadian National Exhibition a couple of summers ago. I had never heard of cadets before, which seems sort of odd because they’re such a real part of Canadian society. But people seem to know more about girl guides, scouts and hockey than they do about cadets. I was still too young to join and my parents were skeptical anyway — they thought it might detract from my schoolwork. But I persisted and they finally gave in. PTB: Was Cadets what you expected? Jessica: It was better. Cadets is really hard, but if you put the effort into it, you will get a lot out of it. I expected it to be more like school — more classroom stuff and less hands-on stuff. But we are doings things too, and not just watching. Cadets is more interactive than school. PTB: Why do you want to volunteer for the Way-Ahead? Jessica: I want to contribute to change. Even though older cadets have more time in and experience, there are a lot of new, young cadets who think things can be better, or different, and who can make a contribution.

16

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Winter

1999

Jessica: I would like to see more attention paid to retaining cadets. Our squadron recruits a decreasing number of cadets every year. But that doesn’t concern me as much as how that number decreases after the first year. Last year, approximately 31 recruits graduated. This year, 11 left. Now that’s about 40 per cent of the recruits, not to mention four senior non-commissioned members who retired. I have noticed that the WayAhead plan is for a lot of public relations to recruit more cadets and make a good public image. I don’t have a quarrel with that. But I think there are too few things being done to keep cadets. And I’m sure my squadron is not the only one having problems with numbers. It should be dealt with as a national issue. PTB: What do you think would help retain cadets? Jessica: More competitions for new and junior cadets. Most air cadets understand we have a lot of hard work and theory to learn before we can fly. Still, I think the more things we can do in that time, the better. If we had more competitions for junior cadets — even at the regional and provincial levels — it would give us something to work for in the meantime to keep us interested. We should have drill competitions and effective speaking competitions for junior cadets. I know we can’t do what the senior drill team does. But we’d like to do more drill than what we do in the classroom and in an occasional parade. Competition gives us invaluable experience, and success at a later age is more likely. This year, the Trenton Air Cadet Summer Training Centre offered junior cadets the


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:49 AM

Page 17

A Future Founded in Renewal

opportunity to compete for the silent drill team. I tried out and made it to the final cut, but was not selected. Still, I’ll always carry that memory with me because I tried. It gave me self-confidence and a higher respect for myself. That attempt to become a member of that team made me decide that one day, I would attend the senior leaders’ course. Junior competitions benefit every cadet who strives to achieve their own personal short-term and long-term goals. When younger cadets do well, recognition doesn’t spread beyond the junior level. Regional and provincial competitions would give us recognition beyond that. PTB: Is there anything else you’d like to change? Jessica: The fabric for our uniform pants. Starch made the old cotton uniform hard — that’s a desirable effect. But starch doesn’t work for the new pants,

which I think are a cotton/polyester blend. Creases won’t stay sharp. I’d like to go back to the old ones. PTB: What has cadets taught you so far? Jessica: I’ve learned about citizenship — the country, how the government works, the community and community organizations. I’ve learned about leadership too, as a flight commander. It’s hard work being a leader. To get people to listen to you, you have to be fair and understanding. You can’t project an image that you think you’re better than everyone else is. From my experience, it doesn’t work. I found out that if you do, your team drills horribly and won’t listen at all. PTB: As a younger cadet, do you think cadet training is appropriate for today? Jessica: Yes. Even though there are a lot of old traditions, it teaches values that are important today. A decreasing number of people have respect for things like citizenship. But if you’re a cadet, you respect people. Cadets teaches you it’s not good to smoke, do drugs, or alcohol. Those are good messages. If people say our training is not relevant, they haven’t looked at what today’s youth are really like. E

Cadet Reynolds with cadet corps friend Cadet Jannette Yeun before their promotions to corporal

17

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 18

Finding a better way to dress and equip cadets

T

he Department of National Defence is looking for a better way to dress and equip cadets.

“Things haven’t been going too well,” LCdr Peter Kay told action team leaders in October. “We want to build policies where we need them and build a more proactive and strategic process for dressing and equipping cadets. The process has to allow change.”

used to buy nationally funded items. We want to make sure we do the right thing to benefit all cadets, not just specific cadets.” One of the hurdles is securing funding to dress and equip 55,000 cadets. Right now, cadets compete with Regular and Reserve Forces for clothing funds. “The system’s not the greatest, but it’s one we have to work in,” said LCdr Kay. A lot of procurement has devolved from the national level to local levels (for things such as chap stick and ‘bug juice’, for example), but funds haven’t devolved at the same rate. The directorate of cadets has advised Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff VAdm Gary Garnett that the current funding situation is not working and that funds should be set aside in Ottawa specifically for clothing, equipment and maintenance for the cadet movement. The goal is to get away from the current “patchwork process”. “We need to ensure clothing is practical, get away from stocking millions of dollars worth of clothing in warehouses, take costs of maintenance into account, look at health, safety and comfort issues and get input from every regional and command level, including cadets,” said LCdr Kay.

Right now, Cadets competes with Regular and Reserve Forces for clothing funds. Hopefully, that will change. (CF photo by Sgt David Snashall)

LCdr Kay, who works with the directorate of cadets in Ottawa, said the Canadian Forces’ supply system has really changed, but the cadet movement’s supply system hasn’t evolved with it. “We spend all of our time reacting to problems,” he said. He cited one example of a regional headquarters getting so frustrated with the existing ball cap that it went out and bought new hats for its cadets — with operational and maintenance funds. “The funds were taken away from cadet training funds and that’s not the right way of doing business,” said LCdr Kay. He doesn’t blame the region. “They were trying to solve a problem,” he said. “But training money can’t be

18

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Winter

1999

Plans are to create a cadet clothing committee to oversee cadet clothing policy, as well as the acquisition and delivery of clothing and equipment. The committee will include a senior review board (including director of cadets, regional cadet staff and league members) and a working group. The current subject matter experts on clothing would be consulted. The resources action team will work concurrently on some areas of concern. “Nothing is off limits,” said LCdr Kay. “The current cadet uniform could be entirely replaced.” First though, a new policy framework for materiel acquisition and maintenance in the cadet movement will be outlined in detail. Hopes are to develop and implement the new program in three phases between now and 2001. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 19

A Future Founded in Renewal

Leadership important to cadet training curriculum

I

n our last issue, we promised to carry the results of an information-gathering questionnaire sent out by the cadet training action team. Of 936 questionnaires sent out, 632 were answered. The team thanks those who took time to respond. Sixty-eight per cent of the respondents were cadets, 20 per cent were cadet instructor cadre officers, six per cent were civilian instructors and the rest were league representatives, sponsors or parents. Analyzing the responses was a learning experience for action team members who agree they require professional assistance in composing and analyzing follow-up questionnaires. Information gathered in the initial questionnaire will be used as a base line for future elemental and music questionnaires.

Here are the results of some of the more general training questions: • An overwhelming majority (91 per cent) said it is important to continue increasing emphasis on the responsibilities of youth leaders in the cadet-training curriculum. • An overwhelming majority (92 per cent) agreed that cadet programs should incorporate more hands-on training. • A strong majority (79 per cent) agreed or strongly agreed that cadet programs apply to today’s world. • A majority (65 per cent) thought the location of training (local headquarters versus summer camp) is important. • A large majority (86 per cent) would recommend that resources available for training be increased.

• A large majority (78 per cent) agreed it is important to get out of the classroom for cadet training programs. • An overwhelming majority (91 per cent) said we should continue to move some cadets to other regions of the country for summer training. • A large majority (82 per cent) agreed or strongly agreed that the current practice of moving cadets to visit other regions for summer training positively impacts national unity. • A majority DISAGREED (57 per cent) with the idea of a basic two-week training camp being conducted at a local centre, provincial park or other facility in the area instead of at a military establishment or summer training centre.

• A large majority (77 per cent) agreed that ‘outward bound’ or other wilderness/adventure training programs are needed. • A large majority (78 per cent) agreed that the cadet program should incorporate more innovative training methods.

19

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

• 58 per cent of the respondents said their cadet unit has an affiliated unit. • Forty-eight per cent felt their unit could provide them with more support; 30 per cent were uncertain. • A majority (55 per cent) said affiliated unit support for trade training should NOT be restricted to senior cadets only. • A majority (59 per cent) agreed, or strongly agreed, that a national program for validation for every level of the cadet-training program should be implemented. • A majority (66 per cent) disagreed or strongly DISAGREED that promotions should be based solely on regular training. • A strong majority (74 per cent) felt manuals for common type training (such as drill, shooting, leadership, instructional techniques, music and so on) should be consolidated to ensure uniformity of cadet training regardless of the element. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 20

‘Desk officers’ to the rescue By Maj Nanette Huypungco

O

ur September meeting in Ottawa was supposed to be ‘just another meeting with a defined agenda’ for the ‘Super 7s’ cadet training action team. We were to review our spring questionnaire and summer focus group results, as well as discuss and plan a strategic team presentation.

The atmosphere was tense as ‘desk officers’ Lt(N) Tammy Sheppard, Lt(N) Paul Fraser, Capt Eric Montmarquette, Capt John Scott and Capt Frank Carpentier walked into our meeting. They didn’t know what questions we would be asking them, and we didn’t know what answers they’d be giving us.

But on the first morning of our meeting, we found ourselves asking questions we couldn’t answer. The questionnaire we had sent out in March had definitely been a learning experience for all of us. It had answered a lot of our questions, but we were faced with even more questions we didn’t have the answers for.

Our biggest question was whether or not we were duplicating efforts. We were concerned about duplicating work that the desk officers had already finished, or were still in the process of completing. Also, we wanted to be sure that we weren’t overstepping our Way-Ahead boundaries.

Smarter minds than mine foresaw this inevitability. As a result, the sea, army and air ‘desk officers’ from directorate of cadets had been asked to meet with us, face-to-face, to help us get over this stumbling block.

20

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Winter

1999


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 21

A Future Founded in Renewal

We had asked to meet with these desk officers for two main reasons: We wanted to inform them about what we were doing to achieve some of the goals laid out for us at the 1997 conference in Cornwall; and we wanted to ensure that we could collaborate with them to attain these objectives. We wanted to get new ideas and answers, not re-hash old ones. As a group, we reviewed the questions we had asked in our first questionnaire. By doing that, we were able to clarify and amend our goals as a team. We received ideas from each of the elemental desk officers about how to reach our objectives. We also learned how to meld our ideas so we don’t duplicate efforts in trying to achieve parallel goals. The desk officers helped us refocus and fine-tune. After a brief question and answer period, we broke up into groups and worked with specific elemental desk officers. My group met with the air desk officer. We reviewed

the goals we wanted to achieve in a follow-up questionnaire and asked Capt Carpentier a lot of questions. It was a good talk. We were able to discuss what we wanted to do and the options open to us in an open, relaxed and friendly forum. Overall, we felt the meetings were productive. The desk officers gave their support and expertise and offered to help us get what our action team needs to achieve its goals. The meeting did a lot to open up communication channels, giving us all a better understanding of what each other is trying to do. In the end, we found a fair bit of overlap and agreed to work together to minimize this. The desk officers gave us access to their knowledge and know-how, and we were able to air our concerns, ask them questions and exchange ideas because our goals are the same — the betterment of the Canadian Cadet Movement. Future plans are to further develop elemental and music questionnaires, which we hope to send out in January 2000. We will work closely with the desk officers on these. That way, we can respond in a timely way to data we receive. We have learned a lot as an action team and will hopefully learn more to ensure we can give back as much as we receive. We hope to present an update and some conclusions to the strategic team in late spring, 2000. – Maj Huypungco is a co-leader of the cadet training action team. E

21

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 22

Regional cadet officers share thoughts on change

Putting change in context By Cdr Barry Saladana So, what is motivating present change initiatives?

Cdr Barry Saladana, regional cadet officer (Pacific Region)

T

wo factors drove change and renewal in the Department of National Defence (DND) — budget cuts and competition. People at all levels of the department had known for some time that the way in which work was done was often inefficient. But it was not until its operational capability was threatened that the department started to take change seriously. Successive federal budget cuts threatened the department’s ability to conduct ‘business as usual’ and the department knew it had to find a way of providing support services more efficiently to preserve its operational core. These two factors have not seriously impacted the Canadian Cadet Movement. No-one is suggesting that dramatic budget cuts are imminent, or that our competitors (scouts? guides?) are a serious threat.

It is said that the office of the auditor general and senior officers in DND are casting a steely eye on ‘bang for buck’ from cadet dollars. Certainly, those of us working ‘inside’ know that we are not always as efficient as we could be. But no one is suggesting that there is any reason in terms of efficiency to do anything radical. What would be radical? How about reducing cadet summer training centres from 27 to 20 or nine? How about cutting the regional cadet instructor school establishments down to one. Or how about contracting out all flying, sailing and adventure training? What about insisting that over the next few years all cadet instructor cadre officers at the directorate of cadets, or at regional cadet establishments be required to have university degrees, or two-year community college diplomas related to youth development? Would these radical changes produce better ‘bang for bucks’ in terms of our government’s single largest youth program? Who knows? And it is not suggested that any of these changes would be worthwhile or even worth considering. They are mentioned only to demonstrate that change can be minor or major. Securing the willing, active and even the enthusiastic participation of individuals

22

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Winter

1999

within an organization in major change initiatives often boils down to one fundamental, very personal and highly emotional question: What’s in it for me? In the private and public sectors, a frequent answer to this question has been that embracing radical change might save some jobs, even though many would be lost. As a result of change in the ‘90s, DND’s uniformed and civilian workforce declined significantly. People with mortgages, young children and the expectation that they would be with the department for many more years suddenly left the workplace. Change for those working within the cadet movement will be relatively painless by comparison. The high degree of unselfish motivation that the organization is known for can always be counted on, especially when changes don’t cut too close to home. Minor change isn’t much of a threat to jobs, status of individuals, or working conditions, including geographical location at which the work is done. However, if major changes are required, then the rationale for doing things differently will have to be logical, understandable and widely communicated. Also, it is critical that the “what’s in it for me?” question be addressed. If it isn’t, then those expected to determine what the radical changes should be and to plan and implement them will certainly not be positively motivated. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 23

A Future Founded in Renewal

Managing change By LCol Michel Couture

W

hen I first assumed the position of regional cadet officer (RCO) for the Eastern Region, I quickly came to the realization that the concept of change management in an organization like Cadets poses a daunting challenge. The diversity of the people involved and the local traditions of the cadet corps and squadrons are major factors that must be taken into account if we are to be successful in implementing any planned changes. It becomes clear that the management of change is every bit as important as the change itself when we consider the enormous cultural differences between the various partners responsible for the cadet movement at the local and regional levels. Any change whatsoever can quickly lead to misunderstandings or fears within regional headquarters, cadet corps and squadrons, and the volunteer support organizations if the concept and mode of application are poorly understood. An effective and well-co-ordinated information program is essential, therefore, if we are to gain the support of everyone involved.

LCol Michel Couture, regional cadet officer (Eastern Region)

It should be recognized, however, that there is no guarantee that this particular requirement will be met, particularly at short notice, given the structure of the cadet movement and the limited means at our disposal for communicating quickly and directly with the cadet units under our authority.

The development of our members, our objectives, the assessment of risk, the upgrading of our procedures, and our ability to renew ourselves and adapt to a society in constant flux are only some of the factors that must guide changes within our organization.

During the change management process, consideration must also be given to the vital role of leadership in projecting a vision of the future that will make it easier to institute proposed changes. I sincerely believe that our ability to induce the cadet units and volunteer support organizations to accept the introduction

of new procedures is contingent on our ability to promote and develop innovative and effective change at the senior staff level. We must never forget that the majority of people involved in the cadet movement are part-time members who, more often than not, serve as volunteers. It is for this reason that the concept of change management is so important in an organization like ours.

Even more importantly, however, we must continually remind ourselves that we are a public organization charged with training young people and that we therefore have an obligation to keep our programs and work methods up to date in order to remain dynamic and competitive for the benefit of cadets.

Remember the cadet! 23

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

E


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 24

Eye-opener for cadets

T

he two new cadet leaders on the cadet training action team admit their first WayAhead action team leaders’ meeting was an “eye-opener”. Eighteen-year-old Cadet PO1 Christine Pinnok, 25 Crusader Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps in Winnipeg, and 17-year-old Cadet FSgt Rebecca Evans, 330 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron (DT Vipers) in Toronto, were exhilarated as they opened up their minds to broader perspectives. And that’s important to both of them. They want to voice their opinions as cadets, but they also want to learn about the perspectives of others, including cadet instructor corps officers, league representatives and other leaders of the cadet movement. “For the past three years, I’ve heard, ‘We’re the future’”, says PO1 Pinnok. “If we’re going to carry on the torch in the Canadian Cadet Movement, we have to know what’s going on.” “Change is everywhere in the cadet movement,” adds FSgt Evans. “Issues have to be faced with appropriate attitudes, and I’m open to other views. Because of that, I think I can contribute something to the team and have the positive attitude required for the WayAhead process.” Both cadets know they’ll benefit from their Way-Ahead experience. “It’s a good opportunity to see how the cadet movement is run from different points of view and get hands-on experience,” says PO1 Pinnok. “It’s an invaluable way of seeing how the head people deal with problems, how they react and the kinds of issues they see.” PO1 Pinnok, who has been a cadet for six years and is in her first year of university, would like to be a chemist and a cadet instructor officer. As a new member of the cadet training action

24

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Winter

1999

Cadet PO1 Christine Pinnok team, she would like to see cadet and officer views on cadet training come “in line”. “I think it’s important that officers understand what cadets value,” she says. She explains that sometimes courses are cut or changed because the system views the courses as too challenging or aggressive for cadets. But cadets feel they can learn a lot from those courses.


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 25

A Future Founded in Renewal

FSgt Evans, who’s still in high school but wants to attend military college and join ‘the Navy’, elaborates on this issue. “Cadets have the perception that some of our training courses are being ‘watered down’, giving us fewer challenges. For example, on our senior leaders’ course — in all three services — we all had one course we thought was being watered down,” she says. “We thought the instructors thought we couldn’t handle it. Now I realize that may not be the reality, but the reality needs to be communicated to cadets. All we see is losing traditions and challenges. We don’t understand why. But maybe it’s just that the courses are not appropriate to today. Maybe in reality, it’s improving the system.”

“I’ve learned how to deal with people, understand others’ points of view, get people to understand me and to be a leader.” The team spirit in the cadet movement has influenced FSgt Evans most. “There’s a difference between my school friends and my cadet friends,” she says. “When I’m with my cadet friends, people can see right away that we’re a team. We excel, not for the individual, but for the team. We accept each other, no matter what. Social background, stylish clothes don’t matter. As a cadet, I’m judged on only one thing — my personality. And that’s important. It gives me a self-confidence I might never have had.” E

The two cadets have common views on Cadet Harassment and Abuse Prevention training too. They think it should be expanded!!! “A lot of cadets have problems with CHAP training because it’s too inhibiting,” admits Cadet Pinnock. “We were brought up learning certain ways of correcting the behaviour of other cadets; maybe those ways weren’t right, but they were the ways we learned. Now we’re told we have to do things differently because the old ways are unacceptable. I totally agree with that, but CHAP doesn’t go far enough in training us in alternative ways of behaving in various situations.” The new team leaders feel strongly about taking part in the WayAhead because the movement has had a strong influence in their lives. “I’m really appreciative of everything I’ve ever received in cadets — it’s been the greatest opportunity of my life,” admits PO1 Pinnok.

25

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Cadet FSgt Rebecca Evans


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 26

Lift off for another action team by Ron Bell

T

he cadet instructor cadre(CIC)/league training action team is finally organized and off to a great start! The team met in Toronto in late October for initial training and to set out our objectives and work plans for the next two years. Our first step was to reach a common understanding of the issues facing us and to establish our priorities. Future meetings will include team member training in the areas of leadership, team building, group dynamics, and so on. Our team is looking at 11 different key activity areas: • Recognition of the mission, vision and shared values of the Canadian Cadet Movement • Co-ordination of common courses by the directorate of cadets • Timely production of course training standards • Alignment of training to the cadet core program • Refresher training for the cadet instructor cadre (CIC) • Conflict resolution training • Distance-learning for the CIC • Innovative training methods • Major’s qualification program • Validation of the CIC program • Formalized league training Until now, we haven’t been able to look at many of these issues until other action teams moved ahead in their work. But the work of the cadet training action

26

Proud To Be

Volume 7

team and the CIC/civilian instructor policy change action teams has now advanced to the point where CIC training must be addressed to implement changes approved in CIC policy or cadet training. CIC training will also be affected by the work of other teams, such as the recruiting and image components of the communications action team, and the diversity and values team. One of the most important factors for successful change to take place is a consensus that the change has some benefit for all. You, as our first level of consultation, will have a significant role to play in determining the direction and content of changes. Our job will be to get the ideas down on paper, listing the benefits and problems as we initially see them, and then get them to you so you can provide us with your views and ideas. We can’t consult if it’s all one-way. You have a responsibility to direct change as well.

We will periodically report our progress in Proud to Be. If you’d like to reach us, the addresses of my co-leader, Paul Dowling, and myself follow: Ron Bell, 11142 – 24A Ave. Edmonton, AB, T6J 4P4 tel (780) 438-0377 fax (780) 430-0269 cpbell@telusplanet.net Paul Dowling, 749 Waasis Rd., Oromocto, NB, E2V 2N4 work (506) 357-4012 home (506) 446-4297 dowling@nbnet.nb.ca E

Team leader Ron Bell gives new meaning to the term ‘action team’ in this action hero get-up. When he introduced a continuous learning/ renewal effort to 945 people in his own organization 10 years ago, he wore this outfit to a meeting with managers. He says their reaction was “most interesting”. Let’s see how the CIC/league training action team reacts.

Winter

1999


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 27

A Future Founded in Renewal

New screening process for air cadet league by Jean Mignault

T

he Air Cadet League of Canada approved a new membership registration and screening process at its annual general meeting in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, last June. This initiative is being implemented to ensure all league members are appropriately registered and screened according to guidelines established by the Canadian Volunteer Bureau. The league’s provincial committees will ensure the new initiative is carried out. The air cadet league’s process mirrors other such initiatives by leading charitable organizations in Canada. The process consists of the following steps: • New applicants for membership must complete a membership registration information form that is designed to gather information about the applicants’ background and expertise. This form also requests applicants to provide the name of at least three references who are not relatives. • Two members of the local member screening committee will interview the applicant with a view to identifying skills and abilities of the individual and the suitability of the

applicant in working with youth, when applicable, and/or as a potential league member and supporter. • One of the interviewers will complete a reference check with contact names provided by the applicant to ensure complete and honest disclosure in the membership application form and to ensure the individual is suitable to work with youth and/or as a trusted league member. • For members who will be working closely with youth, or who may be acting as treasurers, a Canadian Police Information Centre check and/or a credit check is recommended. In order to protect individual rights, police authorities will only provide reference as to whether or not the individual is suitable for working with youth. • Once the suitability of the individual has been assured or determined, he/she can begin the assigned duties and responsibilities once he/she has been briefed on what the expectations are for the job.

committee, to ensure the individual is performing as expected. The Air Cadet League of Canada has agreed to screen sponsoring committee members, including chairpersons, secretaries, treasurers and any other member. Our goal was to screen all members before Nov. 1. Our approach is designed to ensure the confidentiality of information and the timely completion of the process, while ensuring the protection of youth. Recent Superior Court of Canada judgements against the Boys Club of Canada and private organizations in British Columbia have reiterated the need for all volunteer organizations to screen all members and employees carefully to ensure youth are protected and community standards and expectations are met. The Air Cadet League of Canada is committed to providing an environment that fosters safety and security for all cadets and recognizes its social obligation to screen every member. – Mr. Mignault is the executive director of the Air Cadet League of Canada. E

A trial period is recommended during the initial stages, which is supervised by an experienced member of the sponsoring

“The Air Cadet League of Canada recognizes its social obligation to screen every member.”

27

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 28

Lessons learned from Cadets Caring for Canada By Maj Bruce Covington

B

y the time you read this article, most of you will have taken part in the first annual Cadets Caring for Canada (CCC) on June 12, or at least read about it in the summer issue of Proud to Be. The national event had a successful start. I’d now like to share with you our ‘lessons learned’ because they relate to what we are trying to achieve through the Way-Ahead. We hope that cadet movement members can learn from our challenges and take away something meaningful. The national launch for CCC took place in the Senate of Canada. There, a group of sea, army, air and navy league cadets were asked to stand and be recognized after a brief congratulatory speech by Senate Speaker Gildas Molgat. The cadets also met with Minister of National Defence Art Eggleton and VAdm Gary Garnett, vice-chief of the defence staff. All three dignitaries signed a pledge of support for Cadets Caring for Canada. A CCC working group first met in October of 1998 with members of the Department of National Defence (DND) and the leagues. In fact, CCC is one of the first major joint ventures between DND, the three leagues and the navy league cadet organization. We encountered many challenges in expanding Cadets Caring for Canada, but also learned a lot about each other and built upon each other’s strengths.

CPO2 Tabitha Moulton, coxswain of 153 Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps in Woodstock, ON, was one of thousands of cadets who took part in Cadets Caring for Canada.

28

Proud To Be

Volume 7

One of the first issues we grappled with was that both DND and the leagues (the traditional partners) would share responsibility for developing and implementing the program. League members headed some provincial committees while DND members

Winter

1999

chaired others. Each had different reporting mechanisms, chains of command and approval processes. League and DND personnel worked together on every committee, with DND contributing the military might, and leagues supplying public relations and sponsorship. We soon learned that communication was the key to making this arrangement work. We struggled to create lines of communication that had not existed previously. And the lessons we learned will have practical implications for members of the Way-Ahead partnership and communications action teams. A second issue that became contentious was DND’s ability to pay transportation and administrative costs for league members on the provincial committees. Although directorate of cadets (DCdts) agreed to this at first, things got complicated. Normally, the department’s financial system will not pay costs for civilian partners unless they work for DND. All claims for this year’s event will be honoured; however, we’re still looking for a solution that will allow the CCC process to conform to regulations. League members involved in the Way-Ahead face an identical situation. We also learned some lessons in the area of public relations, which will also apply to the Way-Ahead. The working group’s mandate was to create national-scale public relations — normally a league responsibility. Director of cadets raised the bar recently with the creation of a national DCdts communications cell to collaborate with the leagues in their mandate. Yet another joint venture for the partners!


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:50 AM

Page 29

A Future Founded in Renewal

Since we were all brand new at this, we had lots of growing pains as we tried to define what would work, who should do what and so on. We created new communication networks as we went along to include all of the stakeholders — directorate general public affairs, DCdts, provincial committee chairs, national and provincial league executive directors, and more. Results of this new communications/public relations initiative were somewhat mixed since CCC was the ‘guinea pig’ for making the new system work. However, the lessons we learned had immediate benefits for the national launch the following week of the Cadet Harassment and Abuse Prevention program. The ‘communications toolbox’ created for CCC is now the model for all DCdts public relations initiatives. We are certain that the hiccups we experienced with CCC will be ironed out by the year 2000 when we launch CCC as a millennium project! The final working group issue that has implications for the Way-Ahead is the involvement of navy league cadets — an organization that is separate from sea cadets, although both are sponsored by the Navy

League of Canada. Because their participation in CCC activities in Atlantic Canada met with such success, our mandate was to continue their participation at the national level. However, there were sticky issues about providing DND funds to a separate organization, even if it was for a joint project. In the end, the decision was made to encourage navy league cadet participation at their own expense. Once again CCC broke new territory, just as members of the Way-Ahead struggle to do every day. The similarities between our CCC experience and the Way-Ahead experience underscores the necessity of keeping communication lines open and really listening to each others’ challenges and problems. As the cadet movement takes on more partnered ventures in the future, we need to share ‘lessons learned’. Together we can make things better and ensure that future initiatives will benefit from the mutual understanding of all participants. – Maj Covington is a member of the Cadets Caring for Canada working group. E

Support of cadet environmental and citizenship initiatives was evident last June when Defence Minister Art Eggleton signed a pledge of support for Cadets Caring for Canada.

29

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:51 AM

Page 30

Speakers’ Corner

Barriers to change? By Capt Paul Bourque wider — ushering our program into the 21st century with a relevant and interesting training plan, and releasing the Canadian government’s ‘best-kept secret’ to the public. If we are to continue as a government program, we must let go of some traditional thinking to regain the interest of today’s young people. In case nobody has noticed, kids do not think the same way we did in the seventies (or earlier for some of us).

Capt Bourque

M

any barriers face the Way-Ahead as it attempts to initiate positive change in the Canadian Cadet Movement (CCM). A barrier can be any obstacle created to resist change. It can be manifested in many ways, including communications, fiscal challenges, general attitudes of the group, bureaucratic or corporate structure. Innately, we resist change because we honestly believe we are doing the best job possible and do not want to be told that it can be done better. In addition, change tends to suggest that what we are doing is wrong and needs fixing, negating all of the positives that have come from the past. The Way-Ahead should not suggest that to anyone, because the cadet movement is responsible for a lot of success. Many Canadian youth would have never realized their true potential without our intervention, and those of us who have been in this system for a number of years can attest to those successes. In my opinion, what Way-Ahead strives to do is open those doors to success a little

30

Proud To Be

Volume 7

So, what barriers do we face? We have heard a lot about communication and the need to share ideas. This is true and the introduction of this newsletter is proof that the system is attempting to overcome the communication barrier. Also, we will start to communicate via Internet, increasing our capability to talk to each other. These are positive steps. Before I discuss other barriers, I’d like to talk about the importance of focus in overcoming obstacles. For the past year, we have all heard about the hard work of the co-ordination cell and the various teams assembled to revitalize the cadet program. As admirable as these efforts are, are we ‘putting the cart before the horse’? Are these teams aware of the direction the CCM wants to take in the 21st century? At present, all three elements share the common corporate objectives of citizenship, leadership, physical fitness and stimulating interest in the Canadian

Winter

1999

Forces. Is this what we want to keep, or should these be expanded? Have we been successful in meeting our present objectives? In my opinion, we must answer some fundamental questions about our program before we can begin to address issues related to training, cadet instructor cadre officers and so on. Each one of you should ask yourself, “Are we truly stimulating interest in the Canadian Forces if our kids are being exposed to only one-third of the environment? Because our traditions will not allow us to break the ranks of our elements, our cadets are deprived of experiencing the other two-thirds of what cadets and the armed forces have to offer.

The next barriers are attitude and corporate structure. In our present structure, the cadet movement is governed by tradition. All three elements operate independently and compete locally for recruits, sponsorship and facilities. Nationally, the elements jockey for government funding for their training programs and summer training centres. In fact, each element has established such a bureaucracy that it absorbs a significant amount of funding from the coal-face of our program — the cadets. If this bureaucracy (or politics) is not controlled, it could smother the cadet program altogether. This reminds me of an article I read regarding the advance of United States


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:51 AM

Page 31

A Future Founded in Renewal

Armed Forces military doctrine. In American military history, the armed services (army, navy, air force and marines) operated independently — even in time of war. That independence is believed to be one of the factors that lessened American capabilities in the Second World War, Korea and Vietnam. The doctrine existed in the United States until the introduction of the air-land battle doctrine in the 1980s. The introduction of this new doctrine was dependent on breaking down the traditional barriers existing between the armed services. Combat teams were formed and when the services were blended together for combat, operational gaps that had existed before were filled. The first ‘test under fire’ for this new doctrine was Desert Storm, when land, air and sea combined to make one effective fighting force. In the same way, we must continue to break down the barriers created by separating ourselves by elements. We must become the Canadian Cadet Movement. Today’s youth don’t want one-third of the experience. They want it all! They want to sail, fly AND sleep in snowdrifts and the only thing stopping them is our traditions. The bottom line is that with a combined cadet movement, cadets would be exposed to more, would have better training and they could be trained cheaper. We would no longer need three bureaucracies and three separate training systems. And with the combination of a lot of small units to form one big unit, there would be less administration. We can finally stop competing among ourselves and focus our attention on what is really important — the kids.

31

Is the cadet instructor cadre army, air force and navy? No. It is CIC officers appointed by Her Majesty to administer her Canadian Cadet Movement — not the Canadian Armed Forces. Believe me, I’ve done my bit for the army and this is not the same. Our branch of service to the nation and the Queen is not the same as the armed forces, but that does not make it any less admirable. We have every reason to be proud of being CIC officers and of the service and dedication we bring to our nation. I believe we should be recognized as a distinct branch of the Canadian Forces, with our own uniform, commission and training. Though I am presently of the land element of the CIC, the last time I jumped on a tank was

the day I retired from the regiment. That’s not my job anymore. I am now a CIC officer and proud to say so. In my opinion, solidarity and pride in ourselves as a collective is the key to our future. As a whole, we are much more than the sum of our parts. And that is what our kids deserve: the most that we can be. Isn’t that what we are asking of them? I am sure my ideas will not be accepted easily by the traditional out there, but I hope they at least stimulate thought and discussion. If we simply place bandaids on the ‘same old, same old’, our dream will simply fade in the wind. – Capt Bourque is commanding officer of 3006 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps in Dieppe, NB. E

The writer feels we must continue to break down the barriers created by separating ourselves by elements and become the Canadian Cadet Movement. “Today’s youth don’t want onethird of the experience. They want it all!,” he says. (CF photo by Sgt David Snashall)

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:51 AM

Page 32

Resources team ‘off and running’ By Bill Paisley In Toronto, we were thoroughly updated on the Way-Ahead process and then led through an effective team-building exercise. We also made some real headway in our primary task.

Bill Paisley

D

on’t let the title of this article put you off. We’re off and running all right, but not with your resources! Members of the cadet movement, who may have been concerned about the scarcity of information regarding our team’s activities, will be pleased to learn that we’re finally up and running as fast as we can to catch up with the rest of the Way-Ahead pack. Oct 16 and 17 were the dates of our first meeting. After arriving in Toronto, the group — comprising Cleve Beeler, Claude Duquette, Julie Garand, Fernand Gervais, Colin Haveroen, Chris DeMerchant, and myself — got down to some serious business under the expert guidance of Leo Kelly, our Way-Ahead co-ordination cell facilitator. Unfortunately several of our team members were unable to join in the fun and satisfaction achieved by those who made it to Toronto. Those absent were greatly missed but not forgotten as we have plenty of challenges for all. Remaining team members are: Richard Choquette, Lisette Desgagne, Jean Paul Dupius, Ellis Landale, Fred Maniak, Lawrence Pelletier, R. Phenix and Kris Von Apedoom.

32

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Our team’s concern is to look carefully at all the materiel resources necessary for the Canadian Cadet Movement to function effectively and efficiently. Materiel resources are all those pencils, paper, clothing, equipment and so on that enable the movement to fulfill its mandate. Everyone present was excited and enthusiastic about the “no holds barred” and “no sacred cows” approach adopted by the Way-Ahead. During the day-and-a-half session, we established and clarified our objectives. We will recommend to the strategic team that one of our tasks be transferred to another team and that another be added to our list. There were also some slight changes to the wording of our key activities: • Explore and investigate the use of outside agencies for cadet and cadet instructor cadre training. • Investigate present fund-raising policy/ practices at all levels to determine if a national/provincial/local plan is required. • Explore the devolution of resource management to the lowest possible level. • Change materiel scales of issue to reflect training. • Investigate the effectiveness of the materiel management distribution system in support of the cadet movement

Winter

1999

Having clarified our tasks, we produced a fairly comprehensive draft action planning worksheet. Our annotation of ‘draft’ was deliberate because we fully expect it will require change in the future. In fact it may never become more than a draft as our team is dedicated to change. Most of the worksheet items were assigned to ‘lead team members“ responsible for developing target dates and milestones by the end of October. Lead team members are developing a plan to complete assigned tasks. Since most tasks will require a great deal of work, lead team members will require the assistance of other team members and inputs from a variety of sources within and outside the cadet movement. This is where the dozens of volunteers, who completed our resources action team questionnaire almost a year ago, come into play. Naturally we sincerely apologize to you for taking so long to get things moving , but be assured our intent now is to move as quickly as is possible towards the goal of making the cadet movement even better than it is today. We will need your help and will be soliciting your inputs at various times over the next 12 months Our team will meet again Jan 15 and 16 of the new year. Anyone who has not completed our questionnaire, but who is interested in helping us complete our tasks, or has questions related to our tasks, should contact either myself at 613-384-2116 or by e-mail at wpaisley@netcom.ca, or Maj Claude Duquette at 800-817-2761 ext. 7042, or by e-mail clauduc@odyssee.net. – Mr. Paisley is co-leader of the resources action team. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:51 AM

Page 33

A Future Founded in Renewal

S h e ’s n o t w a c k y, b u t s h e ’s W A C O !

C

apt Rusty Templeman is the new WACO in Prairie region, but in defence of Capt Templeman, we should explain. She’s really the new Way-Ahead coordinator (WACO), replacing Lt(N) Tracey Roath. She joins WACOs in the other five regions who serve as gobetweens with Way-Ahead action teams and regional staffs. They are also the regional Youth Initiative Program and Millennium representatives.

She loves the military and loves cadets. “I want the program to be there when my kids turn 12,” she says. Right now, they’re a little young for cadets. Her three-year-old daughter wants to be a ballerina, or a pilot. Her fiveyear-old twin boys also want to be pilots like their mom. Their wishes are not surprising. Capt Templeman says the air force is “bred in the bones”. Her father is retired from the air force.

Capt Templeman is a cadet instructor cadre officer with 176 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in Winnipeg and has been a CIC since 1989. Before that, she was enrolled in the Regular Force. She spent six years as an air cadet in Ottawa, Prince Edward Island and Winnipeg.

Capt Templeman would like to see more activities — besides ‘camp’ — for cadets in the summers. And she thinks change is good. “The hardest message to get across to people during change is that we don’t think everything is broken,” she says. “We’re just out to change the

things that need changing, not to change the things that are working.” E

Capt Rusty Templeman, new WACO for Prairie Region. Phone at (204)833-2500, ext. 6975; fax at (204)833-2583; e-mail at rust13@yahoo.com.

Changing of the guard T h e w a y ahead

T

he Way Ahead co-ordination cell has a new administrative clerk.

MCpl Jean Benoit, a reservist with the Governor General’s Foot Guards in Ottawa, replaces former administrative officer Capt Mark David. Capt David has galloped off to join the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

33

MCpl Benoit is a graduate of Carleton University, where she majored in French and history. She’s been a Reserve Force member and a resident of Ottawa since 1992. Although she’d never heard of the Way-Ahead until she arrived on the scene, she’s a pro when it comes to change — changing of the guard on Parliament Hill, that is. E

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

When the Way-Ahead strategic team meets again February 26 and 27, the meeting will include a performance measurement exercise to measure the progress of Way-Ahead action teams.


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:51 AM

Page 34

Letters to the editor

Constructive Criticism I am writing in response to an article regarding image that was featured in the last edition of Proud to Be. While waiting to depart Edmonton International Airport this past summer, I could not help but notice a large number of people in uniform walking about the airport. Where they were going, or where they were coming from, does not matter; the fact is they were in uniform. Having said this I must tell you that I was dismayed with some — not all — of the cadets. Not only was their dress and deportment in need of correction, but they also required instruction in military bearing. My attention was drawn to the turnout of a number of senior cadets. Some of these staff sergeants, flight warrant officers and chief petty officers had their jackets and/or ties undone, were not wearing their headdress, or were wearing multiple earrings. One of the female cadets displayed an abundance of unauthorized hair accoutrements. All of these infractions are in conflict with current military dress regulations. The cadets’ lack of military bearing was evident: instead of using the chairs provided, cadets lounged on the floor, hindering the movement of other passengers. During boarding procedures, I approached the Chock Officer to express my disgust with the actions of those in his charge. He did not have any reply. It is my opinion that the Chock Officer must set and enforce the ground rules for conduct in the airport.

34

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Winter

1999

If this is acceptable behaviour for senior cadets, and the Chock Officer is allowing the behaviour to continue, what message is being sent to the junior cadets? This is a matter of leadership, and anyone who holds any rank MUST ‘lead by example.“ Only when you employ this basic ethos will you begin improving your public image. That is the intent of this letter: not to put down the cadet movement, but rather provide some constructive criticism, in an effort to help you understand that the good image of the Canadian Cadet Movement depends on more than public relations. It is sometimes difficult for members of the civilian population to distinguish between a Regular Force, Reserve Force or Cadets member — all they see is someone in uniform. Proper dress and deportment is a matter of personal pride, but when that pride is lacking each member is affected. Every member in every branch has a responsibility to project a positive image. I am a serving Regular Force member. During my 20 years of service I have excellent memories of supporting cadets in the capacity of cadet liaison for two air cadet corps, two naval cadet corps, and as the camp quartermaster at the Banff National Army Cadet Camp. I believe in a vibrant cadet movement as it assists in building people of character. – Sgt R. D. Lundy, CFB Borden, ON


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:51 AM

Page 35

A Future Founded in Renewal

Impressed I read your recent issue of Proud to Be and was quite impressed by the high quality of your magazine. As an air cadet from 1965 (#6 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron Jim Whitecross), I was very pleased to see that cadets are fully engaged in the change process. I am currently in Toronto on the advanced military studies course for captain (navy) and colonel-level officers. Both Capt(N) Harrison and myself were cadets in our previous life, with his background being sea cadets. Good luck and I look forward to seeing your publication around in the future. – Yours aye, Capt(N) R. R. Town

Bravo Zulu I just happened across the internet version of your excellent publication Proud to Be. ‘Bravo Zulu’ on such a fine job. How could I acquire five hard copies, as well as be added to the future distribution? I would like to show this publication throughout the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps as an example of what can be done!

Deadlines I received the summer 1999 issue of Proud to Be today and I note that the deadline date for copy for the fall issue is also today (26 July). I hope that my late receipt of your excellent journal is not indicative of the distribution by Canada Communications Group. Keep up the good work. – LCol (ret’d) Brian Darling Regional Coordinator West Island Region Air Cadet League of Canada P.S.: As a league member, I don’t hear much about the Way-Ahead from the Quebec provincial committee. Editor’s note: Because of the turn-around time for the newsletter, the publication usually comes out very close to the deadline for the following issue. For this reason, we always publish the deadline dates for two issues in advance on our inside front cover.

– LCdr Joseph M. Land Sr., U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps Chiefland, Florida

Recycle Me! When you’re done reading me, pass me along to someone else. Thanks!

35

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:51 AM

Page 36

Get them while they’re hot! Action Team E-Mail addresses/Winter 99

B

eing in the change business keeps us flexible when it comes to changing leaders and e-mail addresses. Here’s the newest list of both, hot off the press. Discard your former list and use this updated one for easy reference if you wish to communicate directly with any of the action team leaders. Action team leaders with no e-mail address may be reached through the Way-Ahead coordination cell (see inside front cover for numbers).

Electronic

Cadet training

Miscellaneous training

Maj Steve Deschamps (CIC — Air) schamps@direct.ca

Capt Linda Allison (CIC — Air) lallison@cadets.net

Capt Linda Hildebrandt (CIC — Army) ds4@rcispacific.com

Cdt MWO Ghislain Thibault (Cadet — Land) thibo68@hotmail.com

Cadet FSgt Rebecca Evans (Cadet — Air) revans@wwonline.com

LCol Robert Langevin (CIC — Air) rolang@nb.sympatico.ca

Maj Michael Zeitoun (CIC — Army) mzeitoun@cadets.net

Lt(N) Peter Ferst (CIC — Navy) pferst@ferstcom.com

Resources

Administration

Maj Nanette Huypungco (CIC — Air) nanette@mb.sympatico.ca

LCdr Brent Newsome (CIC — Sea) brent.newsome@prior.ca

Cadet PO1 Christine Pinnock (Cadet — Sea) tinie@hotmail.com

Communications

Bill Paisley (League — Air) wpaisley@netcom.ca Maj Claude Duquette (CIC — Army) clauduc@odyssee.net

Structure (establishments)

LCol Tom McGrath (CIC — Army) tmcgrath@nfld.com

WO Chantal Richard (Cadet — Army) No e-mail

Maj Roman Ciecwierz (CIC — Air) rciecwierz@aol.com

Elsie Edwards (League — Navy) eedwardswex@mb.imag.net

LCol Bill Smith (CIC — Air) w.m.smith@sympatico.ca

Capt Steve Dubreuil (CF — Land) sdubray@ibm.net

Cadet Instructor Cadre/Civilian Instructor policy change

Maj Paul Westcott (CIC — Army) paulw@nfld.com

Values and diversity

LCol Francois Bertrand (CIC — Army) qgrec@videotron.ca

Group e-mail address Wayahead7@nfld.com

Capt John Torneby (CIC — Air) johntorneby@connect.ab.ca

Cadet Instructor Cadre/League training

Capt Michael Blackwell (CIC — Army) m.blackwell@sympatico.ca

36

Proud To Be

Volume 7

Maj Kenneth Fells kfells@nwes.ednet.ns.ca Maj Lance Koschzeck (CIC — Army) lancek@hypertech.yk.ca

Ron Bell (League — Army) cpbell@telusplanet.net

Lt(N) Pierre Lefebvre (CIC — Navy) lefebvre@rocler.qc.ca

Paul Dowling (CIC — Air) dowling@nbnet.nb.ca

Capt Alison MacRae-Miller (CIC — Air) alisonmm@home.com E

Winter

1999


EM2543 DND Cadets Epub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:51 AM

Page 37

A Future Founded in Renewal

Winning photos By Stéphane Ippersiel

W

hat a pool of talent we have in the cadet movement! Whether it’s through personal initiative, individual performance or pure creativity, cadets and their supporters prove every day they’re great. The first national cadet photo contest, which wrapped up Oct 1, bears witness to the creativity and enthusiasm of cadet movement members. We are happy to announce that this first-evernational cadet photo contest was an unqualified success. The contest, sponsored by directorate cadets, the leagues and corporate/private sector companies, was open to all photographers within the cadet movement. The challenge was taken up by more than 60 enthusiastic shutterbugs who submitted a total of 154 images. A panel of judges representing the sponsors evaluated these images on their technical attributes, their artistic qualities, and their pertinence to Cadets.

Winners were selected in each of the following categories: “Life at the unit”, “Life at a cadet summer training centre” and ‘open’, with each of these categories being divided into three headings for cadets, non-cadet members of the movement and professionals. Corel

37

Corporation, BGM Imaging, Ilford Imaging Canada, Kodak Corporation, DayMen Photo Marketing, the Navy League of Canada, the Army Cadet League of Canada, and the Air Cadet League of Canada were generous in providing prizes. The images selected freeze in time a special moment in ‘the life of a cadet’. Some show the camaraderie that flourishes in Cadets; some show the individual cadet’s struggle to meet a specific challenge. The top two entries (by Cadet PO1 Jason Pesant in the ‘best overall — cadet’ category and by Capt Rick Butson in the ‘best overall — Canadian Cadet Movement’ category) immortalize two separate moments in time that have a lot in common. Both show an individual taking a pause to soak up the vastness of the environment in which they will be working for the next couple of hours. The themes of personal challenge in the face of transition (things that cadets are remarkably well prepared for) struck a chord with the judges.

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Other winning images present youth in situations that can only occur in Cadets. MWO Jacky Wong’s photo during a parachute jump is a unique perspective on an activity that is reserved for a select few cadets, as is MWO Jeremy Nason’ group shot on top of Yotto Peak. OCdt Emmanuelle Brière’s glider and powered flight images from St-Jean,QC, show a youth activity that is almost exclusive to Cadets. Other photographs told a story that went beyond the content of the image itself, such as OCdt Paramjit Singh’s black and white photo of a trumpeter practising alone in a classroom, or Capt Chantal Thompson’s photo of someone crossing a rope over a lake. Very moving stuff. On the next two pages, we carry the winning entries in the 1999 national cadet photo contest. They can also be seen at the photo contest image gallery at www.cadetscanada.org; from there follow the links.Check the spring issue for details of our Year 2000 photo contest. Continued on page 38


National Cadet

Photo Contest Winners Photo par le C/adjum Jeremy Nason

Photo par le C/sgt s Jason Binns

Photo par le C/pm 1 Geneviève Chartier

Escadron des cadets de l’Aviation 513, Coquitlam (C.-B.) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (Cadet) Prix de la Ligue des cadets de l’air du Canada

Corps des cadets de la Marine 210 Amiral Le Gardeur, Repentigny (Qc) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (Cadet) Prix de la Ligue navale du Canada

Corps des cadets de l'Armée 2951 CFS Leitrim, Kanata (Ont.) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (Cadet) Prix de la Ligue des cadets de l'Armée du Canada

Photo by Cadet FSgt Jason Binns

Photo by Cadet CPO1 Genevieve Chartier

Photo by Cadet MWO Jeremy Nason

513 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron, Coquitlam, BC Honourable mention — life at CSTC (Cadet) Air Cadet League of Canada award

210 Amiral Le Gardeur Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps, Repentigny, QC Honourable mention — life at CSTC (Cadet) Navy League of Canada award

2951 CFS Leitrim Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Kanata, ON Honourable mention — life at CSTC (Cadet) Army Cadet League of Canada award

Photo par le C/adjum Jacky Wong

Meilleur – ensemble MCC

Corps des cadets de l'Armée 105, Streetsville (Ont.) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (Cadet)

Photo by Cadet MWO Jacky Wong

Best overall (CCM)

105 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Streetsville, ON Honourable mention — life at CSTC (Cadet)

Photo par le capt Rick Butson

Photo par le capt Chantal Thompson

Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2814, Hamilton (Ont.) Meilleur – Vie au CIEC (Mouvement des cadets du Canada)

Corps des cadets de l'Armée 2773 (Royal 22e Régiment), Québec (Qc) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (MCC)

Photo by Capt Chantal Thompson 2773 (Royal 22 nd Regiment) Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Quebec City, QC Honourable mention — Life at CSTC (CCM)

Photo by Capt Rick Butson 2814 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Hamilton, ON Best life at CSTC (Canadian Cadet Movement)

Photo par le slt Emmanuelle Brière Escadron des cadets de l’Aviation 96 Alouette, Montréal (Qc) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (MCC)

Photo by SLt Emmanuelle Brière 96 Alouette Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron, Montreal, QC Honourable mention — Life at CSTC (CCM)

Photo par le lcdr Valérie Lafond Quartier général, région de l'Est, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu (Qc) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (MCC)

Photo par le C/m 1 Jason Pesant Corps des cadets de la Marine 240 Amiral Le Gardeur, Repentigny (Qc) Gagnant – meilleur (cadets)

Photo by P01 Jason Pesant Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps 240 Amiral Le Gardeur, Repentigny, QC Winner — Best overall cadets

Photo by LCdr Valerie Lafond Headquarters, Eastern Region, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, QC Honourable mention — life at CSTC (CCM)

Photo par l'élof Paramjit Singh Escadron des cadets de l'Aviation 801, Montréal (Qc) Gagnant – Vie à l'unité (MCC)

Photo by OCdt Paramjit Singh 801 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron, Montreal, QC Winner — Life at the Unit (CCM)

Les gagnants du concours

national de photos pour Cadets Art Direction: DGPA Creative Services 99CS-0503 / Direction artisique : DGAP Services créatifs 99CS-0503


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 1

d’être

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Volume 7, Hiver 1999

Nouveau processus de sélection de la Ligue des cadets de l’Air Mise à jour des crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets Trouver une meilleure façon d’habiller et d’équiper les cadets Les gagnants du concours de photos pour cadets

Prendre familier le terme « Cadets »


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 2

Fiers d’être La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir Volume 7 Hiver 1999

Le C/m 1 Sasha Naime, du Corps des cadets de la Marine 26, à Cornwallis (N.-É.), s’apprête à déposer une couronne de fleurs au Monument commémoratif de guerre du Canada le 11 novembre. Elle a été choisie pour représenter les cadets du Canada lors de la cérémonie du Jour du Souvenir à Ottawa. Née à la Barbade, Sacha a immigré au Canada avec sa famille et est devenue citoyenne canadienne en août 1997. Elle a été nommée ‘Miss Teen Friendship’ dans le cadre du concours Miss Teen Canada de 1998. (Photo par le sgt Julien Dupuis, photographe du Gouverneur général)

SUR LA COUVERTURE : « Le crépuscule en mer » a remporté le premier prix du premier concours annuel de photo à l’intention des cadets. Le C/m 1 Jason Pesant du Corps des cadets de la Marine 240 Amiral Le Gardeur, à Repentigny (Qc), a capturé ce moment maussade sur pellicule à bord du NCSM Toronto dans l’Atlantique, en 1998. Le m 1 Pesant recevra le logiciel graphique CorelDraw9, une gracieuseté de Corel Corporation ainsi qu‘un autre prix de BGM Imaging. Le concours a été lancé afin d’accroître le nombre de photos de qualité pour aider le programme national de relations publiques à faire du terme « Cadets » un nom familier au Canada. Le programme est un aboutissement de Choix d’avenir. Voyez d’autres photos gagnantes en page 38.

Dates de tombée des prochains numéros Printemps 2000 – 4 février

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Fiers d’être est publié quatre fois par année. Nous acceptons les textes de 750 mots ou moins, de même que les photographies. Nous nous réservons le droit de modifier la longueur et le style des textes. Pour plus d’information, communiquez avec la rédactrice en chef – Marsha Scott. Courriel Internet : ghscott@netcom.ca Fiers d’être processus Choix d’avenir Direction des cadets Édifice Mgén Pearkes, QGDN 101, Promenade Colonel By Ottawa, ON K1A 0K2 Téléphonez sans frais : 1-800-627-0828 Téléc : (613) 992-8956 Courrier électronique : ad612@issc.debbs.ndhq.dnd.ca Visitez notre site Internet à : www.vcds.dnd.ca/visioncadets Direction artistique : DGAP Services créatifs 99CS-0503

Été 2000 – 5 mai

2

Cette publication est produite au nom du Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC) incluant les cadets, les officiers du CIC, les membres des Ligues des cadets, les instructeurs civils, les parents, les répondants, les membres de la Force régulière et les réservistes ainsi que tous les autres membres intéressés. Elle est produite par la cellule de coordination du processus Choix d’avenir, sous l’autorité de l’équipe stratégique. Fiers d’être est un outil pour les personnes intéressées au changement et au renouveau au sein du Mouvement des cadets du Canada et des Forces canadiennes. Les points de vue présentés ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions officielles et les politiques.

Hiver

1999


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 3

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Le mot de la rédaction Vous avez envoyé des articles sans qu’on vous les demande.

Q

uel bulletin enthousiasmant! Dans ce numéro, il est beaucoup question de l’image du Mouvement des cadets, parce que Choix d’avenir commence à donner des résultats dans le domaine des communications : nous avons un plan pour mieux faire connaître les cadets au Canada, les officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets recevront plus d’instruction dans le domaine des affaires publiques, et nous apprendrons enfin ce que les Canadiens pensent vraiment des cadets. Il y a cependant un aspect de l’image des cadets auquel vous n’avez probablement jamais pensé et qui est plus évident que jamais. Ce numéro du bulletin véhicule une image d’« appropriation ». Vous êtes enfin en train de vous approprier le processus de changement et de renouveau. Comment puis-je le savoir? Facile : il suffit de parcourir le bulletin!

des ressources, de l’instruction du CIC et des ligues et des questions diverses d’instruction.

Vous avez écrit à la rédaction. Vous avez envoyé à la rédaction des dizaines de messages électroniques depuis la parution du dernier numéro pour demander des renseignements, offrir vos services à une équipe d’intervention, faire des suggestions, etc. Vous vous plaignez moins et vous avez des solutions précises à offrir. Nous n’avons jamais autant eu de vos nouvelles. Le Coin des cadets de ce numéro est consacré à un cadet de 13 ans qui a des vues très personnelles sur le changement. On y parle aussi des idées d’un autre jeune sur ce que les cadets peuvent faire pour améliorer l’image du Mouvement.

Vous y trouverez aussi des articles sur deux éléments clés de tout processus de changement et de renouveau : les « meilleures pratiques » et les « leçons retenues ». À vous la parole, enfin, présente un article d’un commandant d’unité qui désire nous sensibiliser à un certain nombre d’obstacles au changement. Il s’agit là de bons signes d’appropriation de Choix d’avenir. Que pourrait-il nous arriver de mieux à l’aube du nouveau millénaire? En nous appropriant Choix d’avenir, nous pourrons innover ensemble et envisager avec enthousiasme de créer un Mouvement cadets qui soit encore meilleur en 2000 et au-delà. E

Le bulletin présente des articles de trois équipes d’intervention dont nous n’avions pas encore entendu parler : les équipes d’intervention responsables

Dans ce numéro Prendre familier le terme « Cadets » . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Quoi de neuf? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

3

Des officiers régionaux des cadets partagent leurs vues sur le changement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Une expérience révélatrice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Un « presse-papiers coûteux » transformé en outil précieux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Nouveau processus de sélection de la Ligue des cadets de l’Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Aider les jeunes à s’épanouir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Leçons tirées de Cadets du Canada à l’œuvre . . . 28

Le coin des cadets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

À vous la parole : Obstacles au changement . . . . 30

Trouver une meilleure façon d’habiller et d’équiper les cadets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

L’équipe responsable des ressources : « c’est parti »! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Importance du leadership dans le programme d’instruction des cadets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Échos du milieu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

« Officiers responsables » à la rescousse . . . . . . . 20

Les photos gagnantes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Décollage d’une autre équipe d’intervention . . . 26

Adresses de courriel/hiver 1999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 4

Prendre familier « Ta n t d e c h o s e s , s a n s s t y l e » par Stéphane Ippersiel « Tant de style, sans substance… Tant de choses, sans style. » – Neil Peart – Grand Designs

L

a seconde ligne de cet extrait d’une chanson de Rush résume en quelque sorte mes sentiments au sujet du Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC). En tant qu’organisation, les cadets ont des masses de choses à offrir; pourtant, la majorité des Canadiens (croyonsnous) ne savent pas grand chose des cadets, ni de ce que cette formidable organisation a à offrir. Le problème dans ce cas n’est pas le produit; c’est l’emballage. Les choses sont sur le point de changer.

En ma qualité de « novice » dans le Mouvement, je n’ai rien à vous montrer au sujet de ce que font les cadets et des possibilités exceptionnelles qui s’offrent à chacun d’eux. Il n’y a pas beaucoup de groupes de jeunes au Canada qui permettent à leurs membres de s’initier au vol à voile, au parachutisme, à la formation par l’aventure, à la voile, au tir, au secourisme et à l’instruction de survie. Et ces activités ne sont que la pointe de l’iceberg. Il est déconcertant de voir que le MCC demeure en gros méconnu même s’il offre tant de possibilités pour aider de jeunes Canadiens à devenir les meneurs de demain. Comment se fait-il qu’une organisation qui compte actuellement plus de 55 000 jeunes, 6000 officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets et un réseau national de plusieurs dizaines

4

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

de milliers de bénévoles dévoués ne frappe-t-elle pas davantage l’esprit des Canadiens?

ont le même point de vue que moi sur l’opinion publique. Mais est-ce vraiment là ce que pense le Canadien moyen?

À titre de responsable des communications au sein de la Direction des cadets, j’ai la mission de faire mieux connaître les cadets aux Canadiens. J’ai l’intention de m’attaquer à cette tâche avec méthode et en m’appuyant sur les idées et les conseils des membres de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications de Choix d’avenir. Ensemble, nous avons énoncé un programme de communication qui est simple et dont l’efficacité est reconnue. Le programme comporte trois principales étapes :

Il est important de départager la réalité et ses propres idées quand il s’agit d’opinion publique. Les membres du MCC connaissent bien les avantages, la culture et les traditions des cadets. Il est normal de dire : « si vous n’en faites pas partie, vous ne pouvez pas comprendre ». Normal, mais trompeur. Chaque organisation qui a une hiérarchie et des codes propres peut être vue de l’extérieur avec un mélange égal de curiosité, de préjugés et, dans certains cas, de suspicion.

• Déterminer ce que les Canadiens savent des cadets • Définir ce que nous souhaiterions que les Canadiens sachent au sujet des cadets • Combler le fossé.

Déterminer ce que les Canadiens savent des cadets « La majorité des Canadiens ne connaissent pas les cadets. Ceux qui en ont entendu parler les imaginent comme des petits Rambo ou comme des soldats en puissance. » Cela vous rappelle-t-il quelque chose? Nombreux sont ceux au sein du MCC qui

Hiver

1999

L’astronaute canadien, le col Chris Hadfield, est un ancien cadet bien connu. (Photo : gracieuseté de l’Agence spatiale canadienne)


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 5

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

r le terme

« Cadets »

Cela est vrai des religions, des grandes entreprises, des groupes ethniques, des bandes, des services de police, des pompiers, du milieu militaire et des groupes de jeunes. Même une organisation aussi bien connue que la Gendarmerie royale du Canada peut être mal comprise de la population. On ne risque pas beaucoup de se tromper en disant que la plupart des Canadiens ont entendu parler de la police montée; on ne risque pas beaucoup non plus de se tromper en disant que la plupart des Canadiens ne comprennent pas vraiment ce que signifie l’appartenance à la police montée. Quelle idée les Canadiens se font-ils au juste des cadets? Je l’ignore, mais j’aimerais le savoir et j’ai la conviction qu’il en va de même pour beaucoup d’entre vous. L’automne dernier, nous avons donc fait faire un sondage d’opinion pour découvrir au juste ce que les Canadiens savent (ou ne savent pas) au sujet des Cadets et ce qu’ils comprennent du programme. Le sondage a porté sur l’opinion et l’attitude des Canadiens à l’égard du programme des Cadets. Il s’adressait d’une part à des Canadiens d’âge adulte et d’autre part à des jeunes Canadiens. Les résultats seront publiés dans l’édition du printemps de Fiers d’être.

Définir ce que nous souhaiterions que les Canadiens sachent au sujet des cadets Cet élément est probablement le plus délicat. Le sondage d’opinion devrait nous aider à nous faire une meilleure idée de ce que les Canadiens pensent du Mouvement. Nous serons peut-être surpris des résultats. C’est à ce moment-là

5

que nous devrons nous défaire de nos points de vue. En effet, c’est le point de vue du public qui nous intéresse vraiment ici et ce que les Canadiens savent ou ne savent pas des cadets. Quand nous disposerons de ces renseignements, nous pourrons commencer à penser à la forme de nos messages et à définir une stratégie de communication pour informer les Canadiens. La stratégie de communication consistera à décrire notre situation actuelle, à indiquer nos objectifs de communication et à énoncer les mesures que nous prendrons pour les atteindre. La stratégie aura une portée nationale, mais elle sera suffisamment souple pour être mise en œuvre au niveau régional et local.

« À mes yeux, les cadets sont un symbole national au même titre que

Combler le fossé Dans cette étape, nous allons nous adresser aux Canadiens et les mettre au courant d’un trésor national dont ils ignorent peut-être l’existence. Le gros de l’effort d’information se fera là où cela importe le plus : au niveau local. Pour y parvenir, nous retiendrons une approche à plusieurs volets qui comportera notamment la définition et la diffusion d’une image de marque du MCC ainsi que la conception et la production de matériel d’exposition et d’information de qualité. Nous produirons des trousses de relations publiques, de recrutement et de conférence accessibles en direct, stimulerons les communications internes et offrirons aux officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets une instruction aux affaires publiques (voir à ce sujet l’article à la page suivante).

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Suite à la page 7

la police montée, la feuille d’érable, le castor, la tour du CN et Anne of Green Gables ». Stéphane Ippersiel, responsable des Stéphane Ippersiel,

– –

communications, responsable des Direction des cadets. communications, Direction des cadets.


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 6

Prendre familier le terme « Cadets »

L’ i n s t r u c t i o n a u x a f f a i r e s publiques en 2000 Un résultat de Choix d’avenir! Oui, oui!

C

ela a pris du temps, mais il semble que les officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) vont recevoir une meilleure instruction aux affaires publiques dès 2000.

L’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications de Choix d’avenir et la cellule des communications de la

Direction des cadets – avec l’aide de la Division des affaires publiques – travaillent actuellement à deux aspects de l’instruction aux affaires publiques des officiers du CIC pour l’an prochain : • l’instruction aux affaires publiques de tous les membres du CIC qui occupent des postes dans le domaine des affaires publiques dans un Centre d’instruction d’été des cadets (CIEC); • des cours d’affaires publiques de la Défense pour au moins deux officiers du CIC chaque année. Normalement, chaque CIEC s’acquitte des fonctions relatives aux affaires publiques. Pour la plupart des officiers du CIC, toutefois, il s’agit là d’une tâche secondaire. Certains officiers – ceux qui se trouvent dans des régions disposant d’un officier des affaires publiques à plein temps – reçoivent une instruction. D’autres n’en reçoivent pas. Aucun ne suit d’instruction aux affaires publiques de niveau national. Tout cela va changer à compter de 2000.

Le capt Ross Brown, officier des affaires publiques à plein temps de la région de l’Atlantique, assure l’instruction aux affaires publiques des officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets qui s’occupent d’affaires publiques dans les centres d’instruction d’été des cadets de la région.

6

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

« Le travail de planification se poursuit », déclare Stéphane Ippersiel, chef de la cellule des communications de la Direction des cadets. « Nous espérons néanmoins obtenir des postes spécialisés dans les affaires publiques dans les centres d’instruction d’été et offrir l’instruction

Hiver

1999

en deux phases : une phase d’instruction nationale uniforme et une phase d’instruction régionale. » Le printemps prochain, 27 officiers du CIC se réuniront à Ottawa pour la phase d’instruction nationale, qui coïncidera avec la conférence des commandants de CIEC. Les officiers des affaires publiques à l’instruction assisteront à des exposés sur la situation générale des communications dans le Mouvement des cadets du Canada, les thèmes et les messages nationaux de communication et les principes de communication du Mouvement. Outre des exposés et des tables rondes, des réunions auxquelles participeront les officiers des affaires publiques et les commandants des CIEC sont prévues. Les officiers du CIC suivront l’instruction régionale aux affaires publiques avant l’ouverture des centres d’instruction d’été. À l’heure actuelle, trois régions ont des officiers des affaires publiques à plein temps. Ces officiers sont le capc Gerry Pash, de la région du Pacifique, qui est aussi membre de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications, le maj Carlo DeCiccio, de la région de l’Est et le capt Ross Brown, de la région de l’Atlantique. Tous trois assurent déjà l’instruction régionale des officiers des affaires publiques des CIEC et ils continueront de le faire. « Nous ne voulons pas nous mêler de l’instruction à ce niveau », affirme M. Ippersiel. « Nous voulons que leurs activités conservent un caractère régional. »


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 7

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Tant de choses,… suite de la page 5

Selon le maj DeCiccio, en poste depuis quatre ans et titulaire d’un diplôme universitaire en communications, l’instruction qu’il offre s’appuie sur le cours de qualification de base d’officiers des affaires publiques d’unité du ministère de la Défense. Le cours dure deux ou trois jours et il porte sur des sujets comme les communications de masse, la rédaction de communiqués, les relations avec les médias et la photographie. « Les personnes qui viennent n’ont jamais reçu d’instruction dans le domaine des affaires publiques; le cours est donc profitable, ajoute le maj DeCiccio. Le cours a permis d’améliorer le programme des relations publiques et de donner une plus grande visibilité aux sept camps de ma région. » Il reste à régler le problème de l’instruction régionale aux affaires publiques des officiers du CIC des régions du Centre, des Prairies et du Nord, qui n’ont pas d’officiers des affaires publiques du CIC à plein temps. La solution consistera peut-être à inviter ces officiers à suivre l’instruction dans les régions où elle se donne. En ce qui concerne le cours d’affaires publiques du MDN, la Division des affaires publiques a convenu de réserver deux places à chaque cours à des officiers du CIC. Le cours est normalement donné une fois par an, mais il se peut qu’un second cours soit ajouté l’an prochain. On envisage de demander aux régions de proposer des stagiaires au cours. E

Créer une image de marque est la clé. Le problème d’image du MCC tient en partie au fait que le Mouvement est canadien. Par cela je veux dire qu’en tant que Canadiens, nous sommes discrets, respectueux et effacés et que nous avons du mal à dire aux autres que nous sommes bons. Ai-je dit « bons »? J’aurais plutôt dû dire « formidables ». À mes yeux, les cadets sont un symbole national au même titre que la police montée, la feuille d’érable, le castor, la tour du CN et Anne of Green Gables. C’est uniquement parce que nous avons mal présenté le Mouvement que les Canadiens n’en ont pas fait un symbole national. Nous avons manqué de style pour parler des cadets. L’une des choses que nous envisageons faire est d’attirer l’attention des Canadiens sur le MCC en leur présentant d’anciens cadets qui ont accompli des choses. Ces cadets célèbres aideront les Canadiens à comprendre les avantages du programme des cadets en établissant un rapport entre des visages connus et une organisation qui les a aidés à réussir. Parmi les anciens cadets figurent Brian Tobin, Jim Carrey, Myriam Bédard, le col Chris Hadfield et le mgén (retraité) Lew MacKenzie. Pouvezvous nous aider à en trouver d’autres?

le Journal (Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée du Canada). À ces publications s’ajoutent des dizaines de publications régionales émanant des bureaux régionaux de cadets et des comités des ligues provinciales. Toutes ces publications répondent à des besoins et devraient être maintenues. Mais qu’en est-il des cadets? Je n’ai pas encore vu de publication s’adressant à des cadets qui soit faite par des cadets. Dans les mois qui viennent, nous étudierons la possibilité de financer et de produire un bulletin national à l’intention des cadets écrit par des cadets. La première étape de cette entreprise consistera à former un comité de rédaction. Les cadets intéressés peuvent m’écrire à l’adresse af397@issc.debb.ndhq.dnd.ca. Comme vous pouvez le voir, il s’agit là d’un programme ambitieux. J’espère que vous y adhérerez et l’appuierez. Il est important de faire connaître les cadets. Mieux les Canadiens les connaîtront, plus ils les appuieront. Et cela, mes amis, est une bonne chose. E

La stimulation des communications internes revêt aussi une grande importance. Au moment où vous lisez ces lignes, nous pouvons compter sur deux publications nationales relatives aux Cadets – le Bulletin national du CIC et Fiers d’être – et deux publications propres à un élément – À la barre (Ligue navale du Canada) et

Le premier ministre de Terre-Neuve et du Labrador est un ancien cadet.

7

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 8

Prendre familier le terme « Cadets »

Dire aux Canadiens qui nous sommes Point de vue d’un cadet sur la question de l’image par le C/sgt s Mark Masongsong nous devenons de meilleurs citoyens et des meneurs. En faisant clairement comprendre cela à la population, nous aurions certes plus de succès dans nos activités de recrutement et nos campagnes de financement. Pourtant, nous n’y arrivons pas. Le problème est que le grand public n’a pas souvent l’occasion de voir ce que les cadets font. Quand les Canadiens nous voient participer à des défilés ou à des cérémonies publiques, ils ne voit que notre côté « empesé et rutilant » et ils nous jugent sur une image bien superficielle.

Le C/sgt s Masongsong

A

vez-vous déjà pris le temps de vous demander comment les Canadiens voient le Mouvement des cadets? Êtesvous conscients de l’importance de notre image pour notre réussite?

En tant que cadets, nous savons tous en quoi consiste le Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC), quelles idées nous défendons et quels objectifs nous poursuivons. Malheureusement, la majeure partie des Canadiens ne connaissent pas nos buts et nos réalisations. En plus d’être injuste pour les dizaines de milliers de personnes qui ont à cœur de servir l’une des plus belles institutions du Canada, cela nous empêche de réaliser pleinement notre potentiel. Le MCC repose sur les cadets eux-mêmes. Nous avons tous un jour été attirés par le Mouvement parce qu’il nous offrait des possibilités sans égales. En nous efforçant d’atteindre des buts au sein du MCC, nous apprenons, nous nous développons et

8

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Les personnes des milieux d’affaires n’ont pas une bonne idée de la formation au commandement et de l’expérience dont bénéficient les cadets; ils ne peuvent donc pas évaluer correctement la formation d’un cadet en se fiant à un curriculum vitae. Ils seront par ailleurs moins portés à commanditer des activités du Mouvement s’ils n’en voient pas les avantages éventuels pour eux-mêmes ou pour leur collectivité.

au Mouvement parce qu’elles ignorent ce que celui-ci a à leur offrir. Elles s’imaginent une vie de drill et d’ordres, sans but ni objet. Si les Canadiens savaient que le Mouvement est une affaire de leadership proactif et positif, de travail en équipe et d’amitiés entre des gens de tous les coins du pays, le Mouvement connaîtrait encore plus de succès. Que faire? En tant que cadets, on nous montre à faire preuve d’initiative. Le temps est donc venu d’agir. • En tant que mouvement, nous devrions mieux informer la population des réalisations du MCC. • Au niveau des escadrons et des corps, nous devrions faire une promotion plus dynamique du Mouvement et de ses objectifs auprès des collectivités locales. • Chacun de nous devrait trouver des façons de faire connaître la vie des cadets.

Les parents préféreraient souvent envoyer leurs enfants participer à des activités organisées qui débouchent sur des expériences « utiles ». Comprennent-ils que l’instruction des cadets offre à des jeunes la chance de parcourir le monde, de devenir des instructeurs de confiance dès leur jeune âge ou d’obtenir une licence de pilote – et ce, gratuitement?

Ces mesures peuvent toutes contribuer à dissiper des stéréotypes injustes qui portent préjudice au Mouvement des cadets. Les services des Cadets de l’Armée, de l’Air et de la Marine et les cadets euxmêmes ne méritent pas moins.

Par-dessus tout, les personnes auxquelles le MCC s’adresse – les jeunes – ne sont pas en mesure de faire un choix judicieux quand vient le moment d’adhérer ou non

– Le C/sgt s Masongsong appartient à l’Escadron de Cadets de l’Aviation 819 (Skyhawk), à North Delta (C.-B.). E

Hiver

1999


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 9

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Quoi de neuf? • L’adresse du site Web national des Cadets du Canada a changé et elle est plus facile à retenir. Cliquez sur www.cadets.dnd.ca, et vous pourrez trouver des renseignements sur tout ce qui concerne le monde des cadets, de la façon de s’enrôler aux plans du millénaire en passant par les bourses de l’an 2000. • Croyez-vous que les cadets du Canada devraient avoir un même code de discipline? Dans l’affirmative, que devrait-on inclure dans le code à votre avis? Votre corps/escadron a-t-il déjà un code? Faitesnous le savoir. Communiquez-nous vos idées, vos commentaires ou votre code de discipline par fax, au (613) 992-8956, à l’attention du D Cad 5-4, ou faites-nous part de vos idées par courriel, sur le nouveau site Web national. • Certains voient les choses longtemps à l’avance – très longtemps, même! Si vous souhaitez participer aux célébrations de commémoration du 75e anniversaire de la Force aérienne, vous pouvez encore contribuer à la capsule-mémorial qui sera exposée au Musée commémoratif de l’Aviation royale du Canada, à Trenton (Ont.). Quatre personnes seulement en auront la clé. Le coffret sera ouvert le 1er avril 2024, le jour du 100e anniversaire de la Force aérienne. Des particuliers, des associations de la Force aérienne, des clubs de l’Armée de terre, de la Marine et de l’Aviation, des légions et des corps de cadets peuvent faire des contributions. La cérémonie de verrouillage se tiendra le 31 mars 2000, à la 8e Escadre Trenton. Envoyez vos contributions à l’adjuc Boutin ou au lt Perreault, QG 1re Escadre, Bâtiment Sgt K.S. Smith, BFC Kingston, Boîte postale 17000, Succursale Forces, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4. • Comme un nombre croissant d’unités ou d’escadrons obtiennent des ordinateurs grâce à Choix d’avenir et puisque nous

9

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

nous efforçons à rehausser l’image du Mouvement des cadets, pourquoi n’envisageriez-vous pas de créer un site Web pour promouvoir votre unité? N’oubliez pas toutefois que des règles s’appliquent à la création de sites Web. En consultant le site Web national des cadets, vous pourrez obtenir des renseignements à ce sujet et découvrir la différence qu’il y a entre un site non officiel et un site officiel. • Le Mouvement des cadets est à la recherche d’un porte-parole à l’image de ses valeurs. La personne devrait être de nationalité canadienne, être bien connue des jeunes et des adultes, être appréciée dans toutes les régions du Canada, être un ancien cadet ou être prêt à parler au nom des cadets, être bilingue et avoir une bonne réputation. Parmi les noms qui ont été suggérés jusqu’ici figurent ceux des chanteurs Bryan Adams et Céline Dion, du comédien Michael J. Fox, des astronautes Marc Garneau, du col Chris Hadfield, Julie Payette et Roberta Bondar, et des athlètes Jacques Villeneuve et Wayne Gretzky. À votre avis, qui devrait être le porte-parole des cadets? Envoyez vos suggestions par courriel à Stéphane Ippersiel ou à Michèle Boriel de la cellule des communications de la Direction des cadets, en passant par le site Web national. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 10

Crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets par le capt Linda Hildebrandt

Attention cadets!

S

aviez-vous que l’instruction des cadets peut dans certains endroits être créditée au secondaire?

Un certain nombre de provinces et de territoires reconnaissent l’instruction des cadets comme un cours externe que les cadets peuvent se faire créditer en vue de l’obtention de leur diplôme d’études secondaires. Malheureusement, cela n’est pas le cas partout au Canada. Chaque province et territoire a son propre ministère de l’Éducation et, de ce fait, sa propre interprétation des activités parascolaires susceptibles d’être créditées. Compte tenu de votre lieu de résidence au Canada, l’instruction des cadets peut donc vous valoir ou non des crédits d’études secondaires. L’une des principales activités de l’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction (questions diverses) consiste à faire en sorte que l’instruction des cadets soit créditée partout au Canada, au niveau secondaire. Le défi est de taille. Les efforts déployés dans ce domaine par la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air du Canada méritent d’être soulignés. La Ligue des Cadets de l’Air poursuit cet objectif depuis un certain temps déjà; elle a sensibilisé les autorités à la valeur de l’instruction des cadets et à l’opportunité d’y voir une activité qui mérite d’être créditée dans les écoles secondaires. Dans plusieurs parties du pays, les efforts de la Ligue ont donné de bons résultats, et certains ministères provinciaux de l’Éducation ont ajouté l’instruction des cadets à la liste des activités externes qui peuvent être créditées. Soulignons en particulier les changements qui viennent d’être effectués en ce sens en Colombie-Britannique et à Terre-Neuve.

10

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Où peut-on donc obtenir des crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets? La situation actuelle est résumée ci-dessous. Cet aperçu s’appuie sur les meilleurs renseignements disponibles et il sera mis à jour à mesure que nous obtiendrons d’autres renseignements. Les régions du Canada où l’instruction des cadets peut être créditée au secondaire sont les suivantes :

Colombie-Britannique Les cadets de la Colombie-Britannique peuvent demander des crédits d’études secondaires après avoir terminé l’instruction de niveau quatre et/ou certains cours d’été. Ils peuvent demander des crédits additionnels après avoir terminé l’instruction de niveau cinq et/ou certains cours d’été. Des crédits sont accordés dans toutes les écoles secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets de l’Air, de la Marine et de l’Armée.

Yukon Le ministère de l’Éducation du Yukon accorde des crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets de niveau quatre et de niveau cinq qui a été suivie au centre local.

Territoires du Nord-Ouest Comme en Colombie-Britannique, les cadets peuvent obtenir des crédits d’études secondaires après avoir terminé leur instruction de niveau quatre et cinq et/ou certains cours d’été.

Nunavut Le plus récent territoire du Canada reconnaît la même instruction que les Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

Hiver

1999

Alberta Le ministère de l’Éducation de l’Alberta accorde des crédits d’expérience de travail aux cadets qui ont été employés comme cadets-cadres. Les cadets peuvent aussi s’inscrire à des modules du programme de formation professionnelle et technique en mettant à profit leur expérience de travail comme cadet-cadre.

Manitoba Au Manitoba, les cadets peuvent obtenir un crédit après avoir fait trois ans dans le Mouvement et un camp d’été, ou deux crédits après avoir fait quatre ans dans le Mouvement et un camp d’été de cadets supérieurs. Malheureusement, ces crédits ne peuvent pas être appliqués à l’obtention du diplôme. Ils s’ajoutent seulement au nombre de crédits requis pour obtenir un diplôme d’études secondaires.

Terre-Neuve et Labrador À l’heure actuelle, l’instruction des cadets de l’Air peut servir à obtenir des crédits d’études secondaires; le programme est semblable à celui de la ColombieBritannique. En Ontario et en Alberta, des cadets ont reçu des crédits équivalant au maximum à deux cours facultatifs. Ces crédits ont été accordés par le directeur de l’école. En Ontario, un cadet a réussi à obtenir deux crédits pour son expérience de cadet dans le cadre d’un programme d’enseignement coopératif, en suivant une version adaptée à sa situation du programme coopératif de la Milice qui est reconnu à la grandeur du pays. Dans les autres provinces, les trois ligues provinciales vont unir leurs efforts afin de faire reconnaître l’instruction des cadets dans des domaines où elle ne l’est pas encore. Des réunions sont


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 11

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

prévues, et les ligues sont en train de préparer un dossier qui sera présenté aux ministères de l’Éducation respectifs. Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements sur les aspects de l’instruction des cadets qui sont admissibles à des crédits et sur la façon d’obtenir des crédits, les cadets devraient communiquer avec le commandant de leur corps/escadron ou le conseiller de leur école. Les efforts déployés pour faire reconnaître l’instruction des cadets partout au Canada se poursuivent. La création de comités provinciaux formés de membres des ligues de cadets des trois éléments aiderait sans doute beaucoup les choses. L’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction recueille actuellement des renseignements qui lui permettront de tracer un portrait de la situation nationale et de jeter les bases de la création de tels comités. En unissant leurs efforts, les ligues contribueraient à accélérer les choses et à mieux faire reconnaître la valeur générale de l’instruction des cadets de l’Air, de

l’Armée et de la Marine en vue d’obtenir des crédits d’études secondaires. Entre-temps, nous avons besoin de votre aide. Ce résumé de la situation nationale a été établi en fonction des meilleurs renseignements dont nous disposions, mais il est plutôt limité dans certaines régions. Avec tant de provinces et de ministères de l’Éducation, recueillir des renseignements précis n’a pas été facile. Si vous êtes en mesure de nous fournir d’autres renseignements, nous apprécierions beaucoup avoir de vos nouvelles. Vous êtes prié de communiquer avec le chef de l’équipe d’intervention, le lcol Robert Langevin, à l’adresse rolang@nb.sympatico.ca, ou avec l’auteur, à l’adresse ds4@rcispacific.com.

Cette carte du Canada indique les régions où des crédits d’études secondaires sont accordés pour certains aspects de l’instruction des cadets. (Carte établie par le capt Linda Hildebrandt)

11

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Quiconque a été associé au programme des Cadets sera vraisemblablement convaincu de la grande valeur de l’instruction des cadets pour les jeunes d’aujourd’hui. Suivre les quatre années d’instruction des cadets demande du temps et beaucoup de volonté. Certains cadets doivent renoncer à d’autres activités ou à des emplois à temps partiel pour profiter au maximum de leur participation au programme. Il paraît juste qu’une activité offrant tant de possibilités d’épanouissement personnel soit reconnue et créditée au niveau secondaire. – Le capt Hildebrandt est co-chef de l’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction (questions diverses). E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 12

Un « presse-papiers coûteux » transformé en outil précieux par Marsha Scott Depuis que Choix d’avenir a été lancé, on a souvent parlé d’améliorer les pratiques administratives et de réduire la paperasserie dans les unités de cadets, surtout grâce à l’informatique. Les équipes d’intervention responsable des pratiques administratives et des systèmes d’information électronique ont travaillé ferme à concrétiser ces intentions. Le capt David Owens, commandant du 334e Escadron des Cadets de l’Air du Canada à Oromocto (N.-B.) sait pour sa part que ce défi ne concerne pas seulement les équipes d’intervention de Choix d’avenir. Il croit que nous avons tous un rôle à jouer en trouvant de bonnes idées et aussi en partageant nos meilleures pratiques. Depuis le début de l’année d’instruction 1998–1999, son escadron de 75 membres utilise une base de données informatisée qui a permis d’améliorer grandement les pratiques administratives. « Si votre unité est vraiment petite, cela n’est peut-être pas nécessaire; si vous avez plus de 50 cadets, toutefois, la tenue des dossiers manuels demande beaucoup de temps, explique le capt Owens. L’ordinateur accélère sensiblement les choses ». Avant que l’unité adopte le système, l’ordinateur était seulement un « presse-papiers coûteux » qu’on utilisait pour dactylographier des lettres et des notes de service, explique l’ancien officier de la Force régulière; la grande puissance de calcul de l’appareil n’était pas mise à profit, en dépit de son indéniable utilité. Depuis, les choses ont bien changé. Le système permet maintenant aux officiers de l’administration, de l’instruction et de l’approvisionnement de partager des renseignements et de tenir un dossier électronique sur chacun des cadets et des membres du personnel. On y trouve des coordonnées, des dossiers d’instruction, des documents relatifs aux vêtements et d’autres données imprimables sur chaque cadet.

12

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Hiver

1999

Le capt David Owens Voici un exemple d’utilisation : « Le Nouveau-Brunswick prévoyait organiser une fin de semaine d’instruction pour 400 cadets de l’Air, explique le commandant de l’escadron. Nous savions que notre unité pouvait envoyer 19 cadets de première année, et je voulais désigner ceux et celles qui s’étaient joints à nous les premiers. Nous avons demandé à l’ordinateur de dresser une liste de cadets par date d’adhésion et, en deux minutes, la liste était prête, et nous avions nos 19 cadets. » L’an dernier, l’officier d’administration était le principal utilisateur du système. Pendant l’été, le capt Owens a ajouté au système un élément sur les présences. Cette année, les officiers qui utiliseront le système chercheront à l’améliorer et à en rendre l’utilisation plus facile. L’ordinateur permet aussi au système d’approvisionnement de l’unité de fonctionner plus efficacement. « Grâce à notre base de données, nous pouvons entrer dans l’ordinateur des données sur les départs de cadets et savoir quels accessoires d’uniforme n’ont pas été rendus, explique-t-il. Nous pouvons ensuite appeler les cadets et leur demander de rapporter les articles, ce qui nous permet de les utiliser de nouveau. » « Compte tenu du peu de temps disponible les soirs d’instruction et d’administration, il faut faire les choses le plus efficacement possible, ajoute-t-il. C’est précisément ce que l’ordinateur permet de faire. »


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 13

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Quel est donc le système sophistiqué qu’utilise le capt Owens? Le système exige au minimum un ordinateur de bureau ou même un ordinateur portatif muni d’un microprocesseur 486. L’unité du capt Owens a reçu cet automne un Pentium qui accélère un peu les choses; l’an dernier, le capt Owens se contentait de deux 486 en réseau. Il faut aussi avoir Windows 95 et Access 97, qui fait partie d’Office 97 de Microsoft. Il ne faut rien d’autre, si ce n’est la volonté d’utiliser le système. Comme l’intérêt d’une base de données tient à la qualité des renseignements qu’elle contient, il est important de la tenir à jour si l’on veut qu’elle permette des économies de temps. Il faut entrer les renseignements sur un cadet dès que celui-ci se joint à l’unité. « Cinq minutes au départ pourront vous économiser une demi-heure plus tard », affirme le capt Owens. Le système est-il facile à utiliser? « Un officier d’administration nouvellement arrivée de Nouvelle-Écosse, qui n’avait jamais vu le système, s’y est habituée le temps de le dire, explique le capt Owens. Comme la base de données est commandée par menus, il suffit de pointer et de cliquer. » Le capt Owens a-t-il partagé ses bons résultats? Deux fois plutôt qu’une! Il a communiqué avec l’équipe d’intervention responsable des systèmes d’information électronique. Il a parlé du système dans ses cours à l’École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (Atlantique). Il a offert le système à d’autres officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets de la Nouvelle-Écosse, et certains l’utilisent depuis le mois de septembre. Il a même offert le système au commandant d’une unité de Cadets de l’Armée. « Le système est conçu pour un escadron de Cadets de l’Air, explique-t-il, dont la base de données comprend une liste de tous les

13

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

escadrons de Cadets de l’Air du pays. Le capt Owens a cependant pu l’adapter assez facilement aux besoins d’une unité de l’Armée. Le fichier comprimé qui contient la base de données du capt Owens se trouve sur sa page d’accueil, à l’adresse http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/daveo/dbase.html. « Quiconque veut en faire l’essai le peut, ajoute le capt Owens. Je n’ai pas le temps de mettre le système au point pour l’Armée et la Marine. Ceux qui connaissent un peu Access de Microsoft pourront modifier le système eux-mêmes. » « Je sais qu’il reste à apporter des améliorations au système, et qu’il faudra par exemple le rendre bilingue et lui ajouter des fonctions, conclut-il. Toutefois, j’ai pensé que, en dépit de tous ses défauts, il pouvait rendre des services à d’autres unités du pays. » Merci au capt Owens d’avoir partagé ses « meilleures pratiques ». E

H o up ! Nous avons mal identifié cette cadette dans notre dernier numéro. Il s’agit du C/m 1 Amy Simoneau, du Corps des cadets de la Marine Falkland, à Ottawa. Toutes nos excuses Amy!


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 14

Aider les jeunes à s’épanouir chef de la cellule de coordination de Choix d’avenir, il apporte avec lui une expérience considérable. M. Boudreau assume ses nouvelles fonctions au sein de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée à une bonne époque. « Il y a probablement plus d’ouverture – et moins d’intentions cachées – aujourd’hui que jamais auparavant entre le ministère de la Défense nationale (MDN) et les bureaux nationaux des trois ligues, confie-t-il. Les relations de travail entre les trois ligues et la Direction des cadets se sont beaucoup améliorées cette année, et nous le devons en grande partie au nouveau directeur des Cadets, le col Rick Hardy. En invitant par exemple les directeurs exécutifs des ligues à ses réunions hebdomadaires et à d’autres activités, il a posé un geste très utile. J’aimerais bien voir la même atmosphère dans tous les QG régionaux. »

Dave Boudreau, le nouveau directeur exécutif national de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée du Canada.

«

L

e programme des Cadets aide les jeunes à s’épanouir », affirme Dave Boudreau, le nouveau directeur exécutif national de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée du Canada (LCAC). « Et c’est le message que le Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC) devrait faire passer à la population canadienne ».

Ce message correspond à ce que M. Boudreau considère comme l’une des questions dont la LCAC doit s’occuper actuellement. « Nous devons finir par comprendre que le MCC est un programme pour les jeunes et non un programme destiné à produire de futurs soldats, indique-t-il. Les activités militaires et les uniformes attirent peut-être les jeunes, mais peu entrent dans les Cadets de l’Armée à 12 ou 13 ans avec l’intention de devenir des fantassins. » Le nouveau directeur exécutif croit néanmoins que le fait de passer deux années seulement dans un milieu structuré comme celui qu’offre les Cadets aide les jeunes à s’épanouir et à envisager d’autres aspects de la vie. C’est pour cette raison qu’il est si important, à son avis, de faire clairement connaître aux parents les buts et les objectifs du Mouvement. Depuis qu’il occupe ce nouveau poste, M. Boudreau est préoccupé par l’avenir du MCC et de la LCAC du Canada. Ancien cadet lui-même, instructeur de cadets, membre des Forces canadiennes pendant 20 ans, commandant de détachement de 91 unités de cadets de la Marine, de l’Armée et de l’Aviation et

14

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Hiver

1999

Il ajoute que l’un des plus importants problèmes des relations entre les ligues et le MDN tient au fait qu’il n’y a pas assez de gens au courant de ce qui se passe et que cela a mené certains à tirer des conclusions erronées qui ont compliqué les relations. M. Boudreau se réjouit de voir que Choix d’avenir a enfin mené à la création d’une équipe d’intervention responsable du partenariat. À son avis, créer des voies de communication et préciser les responsabilités sont deux aspects fondamentaux d’un véritable partenariat. M. Boudreau est parfaitement au courant des plaintes d’empiétement du MDN sur le territoire des ligues et vice versa. Les rivalités de clocher sont cependant le moindre de ses soucis. « La Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée passe beaucoup de temps à parler d’instruction, soutient-il, et, même s’il est normal que les ligues fassent part au MDN des problèmes d’instruction qu’elles rencontrent, elles devraient laisser le MDN s’occuper des questions d’instruction et s’appliquer à résoudre leurs propres problèmes. Il en va de même des questions ou des problèmes relevés par le MDN. Nous devrions travailler ensemble à résoudre nos problèmes tout en respectant nos responsabilités respectives. » Les relations publiques et le recrutement ont toujours été et demeurent une responsabilité des ligues. Aujourd’hui, néanmoins, le MDN s’aventure de plus en plus dans ces domaines, comme en témoigne notamment la création d’une cellule des communications au


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:48 PM

Page 15

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Les activités militaires et les uniformes attirent peut-être les jeunes, mais peu entrent dans les Cadets avec l’intention de devenir des fantassins.

sein de la Direction des cadets. « Qu’y a-t-il de mal à ce que deux entités s’occupent des mêmes questions? demande-t-il. La cellule des communications ne fait que compléter nos efforts. Rien n’est exclusif. »

ver plus de commanditaires locaux pour les corps de cadets. « Les corps de cadets de l’Armée ont toujours été commandités par des unités du MDN, explique-t-il. Ces unités ont encore un rôle très important à jouer. Chacune de nos unités de cadets est affiliée à une unité de la Force régulière ou de la Réserve dont il est important d’apprendre les traditions et les valeurs. »

M. Boudreau estime que les ligues devraient aider davantage les corps de cadets locaux et amener un plus grand nombre de commanditaires et de comités de parents à appuyer les commandants, ce qui permettrait à ceux-ci de se consacrer à l’instruction et à la supervision des cadets.

Toutefois, en raison des changements récents, il est devenu moins facile pour les Forces canadiennes d’appuyer financièrement ou autrement les unités de cadets. La LCAC doit donc s’efforcer de trouver des commanditaires ou des associations de parents qui voudront appuyer financièrement ou autrement des unités de cadets.

Selon lui, chacune des équipes d’intervention de Choix d’avenir servira les deux partenaires. Il croit en outre que la Ligue pourra apporter une contribution à beaucoup d’équipes. « De nombreux membres de la Ligue ont été des officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets et ils peuvent avoir de bonnes idées à soumettre aux équipes. On a toujours intérêt à écouter les gens d’expérience. »

Beaucoup d’unités bénéficient actuellement d’un tel soutien, mais il pourrait y en avoir plus, reconnaît M. Boudreau. Les unités qui en bénéficient fonctionnent nettement mieux. Les corps qui vont le mieux sont probablement ceux qui ont de solides racines dans la communauté et qui bénéficient de l’appui d’une unité militaire et d’un club philanthropique, d’une organisation municipale, voire des politiciens locaux. Les corps de cadets qui mettent à profit toutes ces ressources obtiennent de meilleurs résultats et atteignent leurs buts.»

« Nous devons enlever nos œillères, poursuit-il, et apprendre à utiliser de notre mieux les ressources dont nous disposons. » Dans les cinq prochaines années, l’une des priorités de la LCAC consistera, selon le directeur exécutif, à trou-

La Ligue vient de se livrer à un exercice de restructuration. Selon M. Boudreau, cette mesure a été bénéfique. « Dans la nouvelle structure, un comité exécutif national réduit s’occupe des affaires courantes, et le conseil national représente les provinces et les territoires. Cela signifie une participation plus directe au niveau national. Notre tâche consistera maintenant à instituer des procédures qui nous permettront d’utiliser au mieux cette nouvelle structure. » Pour renforcer les comités commanditaires, il faudra affermir les bureaux provinciaux. Selon M. Boudreau, l’exécutif national et le conseil national énonceront un plan en ce sens.

En 1990, le maj Boudreau remet le prix du meilleur officier subalterne à l’élof Power, au Centre d’instruction d’été des Cadets de l’Armée Argonaut.

15

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

La Ligue a donc du pain sur la planche. De toute évidence, elle est un important partenaire d’un mouvement qui aide les jeunes à s’épanouir. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 16

Le coin des cadets

L

a diversité a plusieurs visages dans le Mouvement des cadets du Canada. Accepter la diversité peut consister à écouter des points de vue de cadets, subalternes ou supérieurs : nul n’a le monopole des bonnes idées en matière de changement et de renouveau. Nous remercions le cadet Jessica Reynolds, 13 ans, de l’Escadron de Cadets de l’Aviation 110 Blackhawks, à Toronto de nous l’avoir rappelé. Ce numéro de Fiers d’être vous présente le C/cpl Reynolds, qui a participé à son premier camp d’instruction l’été dernier.

Le C/cpl Jessica Reynolds. Fd’ê : Pourquoi êtes-vous entrée dans les cadets? Jessica : L’aviation militaire m’intéresse depuis longtemps. J’ai appris l’existence des cadets il y a quelques années, dans une revue consacrée à un spectacle aérien, à l’Exposition nationale canadienne. Il peut paraître étonnant que je n’en aie pas entendu parler avant, puisque les cadets sont si intimement associés à la vie canadienne. Pourtant, les gens semblent mieux connaître les guides, les scouts et le hockey que les cadets. J’étais encore trop jeune pour devenir membre, et d’ailleurs mes parents hésitaient : ils craignaient que cela me distraie de mes études. Mais j’ai tenu bon, et ils ont accepté. Fd’ê : Les cadets ont-ils répondu à vos attentes? Jessica : Oui, et mieux que je ne l’aurais cru. Être cadet est très exigeant, mais en faisant les efforts voulus, on peut en retirer beaucoup. Je pensais que cela allait ressembler davantage à l’école – beaucoup de cours en classe et peu d’activités pratiques. Au contraire, nous sommes très actifs; nous ne nous contentons pas de regarder. La façon de faire des cadets est plus interactive qu’à l’école. Fd’ê : Pourquoi avez-vous donné votre nom pour vous associer à Choix d’avenir? Jessica : Je veux contribuer au changement. Même si certains cadets plus âgés ont davantage d’expérience, il y a beaucoup de jeunes cadets qui pensent que les choses peuvent être améliorées ou faites différemment et qui peuvent apporter une contribution.

16

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Hiver

1999

Fd’ê : Quel changement souhaiteriez-vous le plus dans le Mouvement des cadets? Jessica : J’aimerais qu’on s’efforce davantage de retenir les cadets. Notre escadron recrute de moins en moins, mais cela ne m’inquiète pas autant que la diminution du nombre de cadets après la première année. L’an dernier, 31 recrues ont obtenu leur diplôme. Cette année, 11 ont quitté l’escadron. Cela représente environ 40 p. 100 des recrues, sans compter les quatre sous-officiers supérieurs qui ont pris leur retraite. J’ai vu que les responsables de Choix d’avenir prévoient intensifier les efforts de relations publiques pour recruter davantage de cadets et améliorer l’image du Mouvement auprès du public. Je n’ai rien contre cela, mais je crois qu’on ne fait pas assez d’efforts pour garder les cadets. Je suis convaincue que mon escadron n’est pas le seul à avoir des problèmes de ce genre. Cela devrait être considéré comme priorité nationale. Fd’ê : Que devrait-on faire pour retenir les cadets? Jessica : On devrait augmenter le nombre de compétitions à l’intention des nouveaux et des cadets subalternes. La plupart des cadets de l’Air comprennent que nous devons beaucoup travailler et assimiler de nombreuses notions théoriques avant de pouvoir voler. Je crois que plus nous aurons de choses à faire pendant ce temps, mieux nous nous en porterons. S’il y avait plus de compétitions à l’intention des subalternes – même au niveau régional et provincial – nous aurions un but à atteindre qui soutiendrait notre intérêt. On devrait organiser des compétitions de drill et des joutes oratoires à l’intention des jeunes cadets. Je comprends que nous ne pouvons pas faire ce que


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 17

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

l’équipe de drill des cadets supérieurs arrive à faire. Mais nous aimerions faire plus de drill que nous n’en faisons actuellement en classe et dans des rassemblements occasionnels. Les compétitions fournissent une expérience irremplaçable et elles nous aident à réussir plus tard. Cette année, le Centre d’instruction d’été des cadets de l’Air de Trenton a offert à des cadets subalternes la possibilité de concourir pour faire partie de l’équipe de drill sans ordres. J’ai tenté ma chance et je me suis rendue en finale, mais je n’ai pas été choisie. Toutefois, je n’oublierai jamais cette expérience. La compétition m’a donné confiance en moi et plus d’amour-propre. Elle m’a amenée à prendre la résolution de suivre un jour le cours de cadet-chef. Les compétitions profitent à tous les cadets qui essaient d’atteindre des buts personnels à court terme et à long terme. Quand de jeunes cadets réussissent, ils ne sont pas reconnus au-delà du niveau des cadets subalternes. Des compétitions régionales et provinciales leur permettraient d’être un peu plus reconnus.

Fd’ê : Aimeriez-vous voir changer d’autres choses? Jessica : Le tissu du pantalon de notre uniforme. Empesé, l’ancien pantalon de coton restait droit – ce qui est souhaitable. L’empois ne donne pas de bons résultats avec le nouveau pantalon, qui est fait, je crois, d’un mélange de coton et de polyester. Les plis ne tiennent pas. J’aimerais qu’on revienne à l’ancien pantalon. Fd’ê : Qu’est-ce que les cadets vous ont appris jusqu’ici? Jessica : J’ai appris des choses sur le civisme, le pays, le fonctionnement du gouvernement, la communauté et les organismes communautaires. En tant que commandant d’escadrille, j’ai appris des choses sur le leadership. Il n’est pas facile d’être un chef. Pour se faire écouter, il faut être équitable et compréhensif. Il ne faut pas que les autres voient en vous quelqu’un qui se croit meilleur que tout le monde. À en juger par mon expérience, cela ne marche pas; au contraire, votre équipe se conduit affreusement mal et n’écoute pas. Fd’ê : En tant que jeune cadet, croyez-vous que l’instruction est adaptée à notre époque? Jessica : Oui. Même si le Mouvement véhicule beaucoup de traditions, il nous enseigne des valeurs qui sont importantes aujourd’hui. Par exemple, les gens sont de moins en moins nombreux à respecter des choses comme le civisme. Les cadets, par contre, respectent les autres. Ils apprennent qu’il est nocif de fumer ou de consommer des drogues et de l’alcool. Ces messages sont tous bons. Ceux qui disent que l’instruction des cadets n’est pas appropriée n’ont pas bien regardé les jeunes d’aujourd’hui. E

Le cadet Reynolds en compagnie d’un camarade de son corps de cadets, le cadet Jannette Yeun avant leur promotion à caporal.

17

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 18

Tr o u v e r u n e m e i l l e u r e f a ç o n d’habiller et d’équiper les cadets

L

e ministère de la Défense cherche une meilleure façon d’habiller et d’équiper les cadets.

« Les choses n’ont pas été trop bien », a rapporté le capc Peter Kay aux chefs des équipes d’intervention, en octobre. « Nous voulons énoncer des politiques là où cela est nécessaire et adopter une démarche stratégique plus proactive à l’égard de l’habillement et de l’équipement des cadets. Le processus doit autoriser les changements. »

L’une des difficultés est d’obtenir les fonds requis pour habiller et équiper 55 000 cadets. Pour l’instant, les cadets doivent livrer concurrence à la Force régulière et à la Réserve en ce qui concerne les fonds d’habillement. « Le système n’est pas le meilleur, mais nous devons nous en accommoder », a reconnu le capc Kay. La responsabilité de nombreux achats a été transférée du niveau national au niveau local (c’est le cas, par exemple, du baume pour les lèvres et des insectifuges), mais les fonds n’ont pas suivi au même rythme. La Direction des cadets a expliqué au vice-chef d’étatmajor de la Défense, le vam Gary Garnett, que le mode de financement actuel ne fonctionne pas bien et qu’Ottawa devrait réserver des fonds à l’habillement, à l’équipement et à l’entretien du MCC.

Pour l’instant, les cadets doivent livrer concurrence à la Force régulière et à la Réserve en ce qui concerne les fonds d’habillement. Espérons que cela va changer. (Photo des FC par le sgt David Snashall)

Le capc Kay, qui travaille à la Direction des cadets, à Ottawa, a expliqué que le système d’approvisionnement des Forces canadiennes avait grandement changé, mais que le système d’approvisionnement du Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC) n’avait pas suivi. « Nous passons notre temps à réagir aux problèmes », a-t-il déclaré. Il a donné l’exemple d’un QG régional qui était à ce point insatisfaite de la casquette en usage qu’elle en a acheté de nouvelles, avec des fonds de fonctionnement et d’entretien. « L’argent a été détourné des fonds d’instruction des cadets, et ce n’est pas comme cela que les choses doivent marcher », a affirmé le capc Kay. Il ne blâme pas la region. « Ils essayaient de résoudre un problème. Mais les fonds d’instruction ne peuvent pas servir à acheter des articles dont le financement est assuré au niveau national. Nous voulons avoir la certitude que nos décisions profitent à tous les cadets, pas seulement à certains. »

18

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Hiver

1999

L’objectif est d’échapper aux mesures de fortune qui ont cours actuellement. « Nous devons nous assurer que les vêtements sont pratiques, renoncer à garder dans des entrepôts des stocks de vêtements de plusieurs millions de dollars, tenir compte des coûts d’entretien, penser à la santé, à la sécurité et au confort, et recueillir le point de vue de chaque région et de chaque niveau de commandement, cadets compris », a expliqué le capc Kay. On envisage de former un comité de l’habillement des cadets qui supervisera la politique d’habillement ainsi que l’achat et la distribution de vêtements et d’équipement. Le comité comprendra un conseil supérieur d’examen (formé du directeur des Cadets, de représentants régionaux et de membres des ligues) et un groupe de travail. Les spécialistes actuels des questions d’habillement seraient consultés. L’équipe d’intervention responsable des ressources travaillera simultanément sur certains sujets de préoccupation. « Aucune possibilité n’est écartée, a fait état le capc Kay. L’uniforme actuel des cadets pourrait être remplacé au complet. » En premier lieu, cependant, il faudra énoncer en détail un cadre stratégique d’acquisition et d’entretien du matériel au sein du MCC. On espère définir et appliquer le nouveau programme en trois étapes, d’ici 2001. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 19

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Importance du leadership dans le programme d’instruction des cadets

D

ans le dernier numéro du bulletin, nous avons promis de publier les résultats d’une enquête menée par l’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction des cadets. Neuf cent trente-six questionnaires ont été envoyés, et 632 personnes y ont répondu. L’équipe remercie tous ceux et celles qui ont pris le temps de remplir le questionnaire. Quelque 68 % des répondants étaient des cadets, 20 %, des officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets, 6 %, des instructeurs civils et le reste, des représentants des ligues, des commanditaires ou des parents. L’analyse des réponses a permis à l’équipe d’intervention d’apprendre, entre autres, qu’ils auront besoin de l’aide de spécialistes pour préparer et analyser des questionnaires de suivi. Les renseignements recueillis serviront de base à l’élaboration d’autres questionnaires (éléments et musiques). Voici les résultats qui ont été obtenus à l’égard de certaines questions générales au sujet de l’instruction : • La grande majorité (91 %) des répondants estiment qu’il est important de continuer de faire une plus large place aux responsabilités des jeunes chefs dans le programme d’instruction des cadets. • La grande majorité (92 %) se disent d’avis que le programme des cadets devrait accorder plus d’importance à la formation pratique. • Une bonne majorité (79 %) se disent d’accord avec l’idée que le programme des cadets correspond bien à la réalité d’aujourd’hui. • La majorité (65 %) estiment que l’endroit où se fait l’instruction (QG local c. camp d’été) est important. • Une forte majorité (86 %) recommanderaient qu’on accroisse les ressources affectées à l’instruction. • Une bonne majorité (77 %) estiment que les programmes d’instruction axés sur le dépassement de soi ou d’autres formes d’entraînement en milieu sauvage ou de formation par l’aventure sont nécessaires. • Une bonne majorité (78 %) croient que le programme des cadets devrait faire appel à des méthodes d’instruction plus novatrices.

19

• Une bonne majorité (78 %) pensent qu’il est important que les programmes d’instruction des cadets perdent leur caractère scolaire.

• La majorité (55 %) déclarent que les unités d’affiliation NE DEVRAIENT PAS réserver aux cadets supérieurs leur appui à l’instruction professionnelle.

• La grande majorité (91 %) estiment qu’on devrait continuer d’envoyer certains cadets dans d’autres régions du pays pour l’instruction d’été.

• La majorité (59 %) se disent d’accord avec la création d’un programme national de validation de l’instruction des cadets à tous les niveaux.

• Une bonne majorité (82 %) se disent d’accord avec l’idée qu’on renforce l’unité nationale en envoyant des cadets dans d’autres régions du pays pour l’instruction d’été.

• La majorité (66 %) sont opposés à l’idée que les promotions soient fondées uniquement sur l’instruction régulière.

• Une majorité (57 %) sont OPPOSÉS à l’idée qu’on tienne un camp d’instruction d’été de base de deux semaines dans un centre local, un parc provincial ou d’autres installations de la région et non dans un établissement militaire ou un centre d’instruction d’été. • 58 % déclarent que leur unité de cadets a une unité d’affiliation. • 48 % se disent d’avis que leur unité pourrait les aider davantage; 30 % sont incertains à ce sujet.

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

• Une forte majorité (74 %) se disent d’avis que les manuels d’instruction commune (drill, tir, leadership, techniques d’instruction, musique, etc.) devraient être réunis, puisque cela assurerait l’uniformité de l’instruction des cadets, quel que soit l’élément. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:46 AM

Page 20

« Officiers responsables » à la rescousse par le maj Nanette Huypungco

L

a réunion des « super 7 » de l’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction des cadets à Ottawa en septembre devait être « une réunion comme une autre avec un ordre du jour défini ». Nous devions examiner les questionnaires du printemps, prendre connaissance des résultats des groupes de discussion de l’été et planifier un exposé à l’intention de l’équipe de la stratégie. Le premier matin de la réunion, nous nous sommes trouvés aux prises avec des questions auxquelles nous n’avions pas de réponse. Le questionnaire que nous avions envoyé en mars avait certes permis à chacun de nous d’apprendre quelque chose. Nous avions obtenu des réponses à de nombreuses questions, mais il restait encore plus de questions sans réponse. Des personnes plus avisées que moi avaient prévu cette inévitable difficulté. Des « officiers responsables » de chacun des trois éléments de la Direction des cadets avaient donc été invités à venir nous rencontrer pour nous aider à franchir cet obstacle. L’atmosphère était tendue quand les officiers responsables – le ltv Tammy Sheppard, le ltv Paul Fraser, le capt Éric Montmarquette, le capt John Scott et le capt Frank Carpentier – se sont joints à nous.

20

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Hiver

1999

Ils ne savaient pas quelles questions nous allions leur poser, et nous ne savions pas quelles réponses ils allaient nous donner. Notre principale question consistait à savoir si nos efforts se chevauchaient, si nous faisions du travail que les officiers responsables avaient déjà fait ou étaient en train de faire. Nous voulions aussi avoir la certitude que nous ne débordions pas le cadre de Choix d’avenir. Nous avions demandé de rencontrer ces officiers pour deux principales raisons. Nous voulions les informer de ce que nous étions en train de faire pour atteindre certains des objectifs qui nous avaient été attribués à la conférence de Cornwall de 1997 et nous voulions nous assurer


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub ferpdf

12/21/99 9:47 AM

Page 21

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

que nous pouvions collaborer avec eux à la réalisation de ces objectifs. Nous espérions obtenir de nouvelles idées et de nouvelles réponses. Nous avons passé en revue les questions qui figuraient dans notre premier questionnaire. Ce faisant, nous avons pu préciser et modifier les objectifs de notre équipe. Chacun des officiers responsables des trois éléments nous a donné des idées sur la façon d’atteindre nos objectifs. Nous avons aussi appris comment combiner nos idées pour éviter les doubles emplois dans la réalisation d’objectifs parallèles. Les officiers responsables nous ont aidés à recentrer et à préciser notre action. Après une courte période de questions, nous avons formé des groupes pour travailler avec des officiers responsables en particulier. Mon groupe a été jumelé à l’officier responsable de l’élément Air. Nous avons passé en revue les objectifs que nous voulions atteindre à l’aide d’un questionnaire de suivi et posé beaucoup de questions au capt Carpentier. La discussion a été très intéressante. Nous avons pu parler

de nos projets et des choix qui s’offraient à nous dans un cadre ouvert, détendu et amical. Dans l’ensemble, les rencontres nous ont paru productives. Les officiers responsables nous ont fait profiter de leurs compétences et ils ont offert à l’équipe d’intervention de l’aider pour obtenir ce dont elle avait besoin pour atteindre ses objectifs. La rencontre a largement contribué à ouvrir des voies de communication et nous a permis de nous faire une meilleure idée de ce que chacun s’efforçait d’obtenir. Au bout du compte, nous avons constaté que nos efforts se chevauchaient passablement et nous avons convenu de travailler ensemble à réduire ces doubles emplois. Les officiers responsables ont mis leurs connaissances et leurs compétences à notre disposition, et nous avons pu exprimer nos préoccupations, leur poser des questions et échanger des idées, puisque nous poursuivons tous le même but : travailler à l’amélioration du Mouvement des cadets du Canada. Pour l’instant, nous prévoyons préparer les questionnaires des éléments et de la musique qui seront envoyés en janvier 2000. Ce travail se fera en étroite collaboration avec les officiers responsables. Cela nous permettra de donner suite sans retard aux réponses reçues. Nous avons beaucoup appris en tant que membres de l’équipe d’intervention et nous souhaitons apprendre encore davantage, pour être en mesure de donner autant que nous avons reçu. Nous espérons pouvoir faire le point sur la question et de présenter un certain nombre de conclusions à l’équipe de la stratégie à la fin du printemps 2000. – Le maj Huypungco est co-chef de l’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction des cadets. E

21

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 22

Des officiers régionaux des cadets partagent leurs

Situer le changement par le capt Barry Saladana

Le capt Barry Saladana, officier régional des cadets (région du Pacifique).

D

eux facteurs ont été à l’origine du changement et du renouveau au sein du ministère de la Défense nationale (MDN) : les compressions budgétaires et la concurrence. Des fonctionnaires de tous les niveaux savaient depuis un certain temps que les façons de faire manquaient souvent d’efficience. Il a toutefois fallu attendre que la capacité opérationnelle soit menacée pour que le MDN prenne le changement au sérieux. Des réductions budgétaires successives risquaient de compromettre le statu quo, et le MDN savait qu’il lui fallait trouver des moyens d’offrir ses services avec plus d’efficience s’il voulait préserver sa base opérationnelle. Ces deux facteurs n’ont pas eu d’effet marqué sur le Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC). Personne n’a donné à entendre que des compressions budgétaires radicales étaient imminentes ou que nos concurrents (les scouts? les guides?) nous menaçaient.

Certains prétendent que le Bureau du vérificateur général et des cadres supérieurs du MDN jettent un œil menaçant sur l’argent consacré aux cadets et s’intéressent au « rendement de leur investissement ». Ceux et celles d’entre nous qui voient les choses de l’intérieur savent que nous ne sommes pas toujours aussi efficients que nous pourrions l’être. Personne ne prétend, cependant, que des questions d’efficience pourraient justifier des changements radicaux. Qu’entendrait-on dans ce cas par « radical »? On pourrait par exemple faire passer le nombre de centres d’instruction d’été des cadets de 27 à 20 ou à 9. On pourrait aussi se contenter d’une seule école d’instructeurs de cadets. On pourrait encore céder à contrat le vol à voile, la voile et la formation par l’aventure. On pourrait enfin exiger que, à l’avenir, tous les officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets de la Direction des cadets ou des centres régionaux aient un grade universitaire ou un diplôme collégial attestant de deux années d’études dans le domaine de la formation de la jeunesse. Ces changements permettraient-ils au gouvernement de tirer un meilleur rendement des sommes qu’il consacre à son plus important programme pour les jeunes? Qui sait? Il n’est pas dit non plus que ces changements méritent d’être faits, ni même qu’ils sont dignes d’intérêt. Ils sont seulement mentionnés ici pour montrer l’importance d’un changement.

Comment peut-on donc expliquer le projet actuel de changement?

Amener les membres d’une organisation à participer de bon gré, activement et même avec enthousiasme à un impor-

22

Hiver

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

1999

tant projet de changement se résume souvent à une question fondamentale très personnelle et hautement émotive : « Que puis-je en retirer? » Dans le secteur privé et dans le secteur public, on a souvent répondu à cette question en affirmant que l’adhésion à des changements radicaux pourrait sauver quelques emplois, même si beaucoup allaient être perdus. Suite aux changements qui ont été faits dans les années 1990, l’effectif militaire et civil du MDN a beaucoup diminué. Des personnes avec des hypothèques, de jeunes enfants et l’assurance de travailler pour le MDN pendant de nombreuses années encore se sont soudain trouvées sans travail. Par comparaison, les personnes qui travaillent au sein du MCC ne souffriront pas beaucoup des changements. On pourra toujours compter sur la grande générosité qui caractérise les membres du Mouvement, surtout si les changements ne sont pas trop mordants. Les changements de moindre importance ne menacent pas beaucoup les emplois, la situation des personnes, ni les conditions de travail, y compris le lieu de travail. En revanche, si des changements importants doivent être faits, il faudra les justifier d’une manière logique et compréhensible et les faire largement connaître. Il sera aussi essentiel de répondre à la question : « Que puis-je en retirer? » Si cela n’est pas fait, les personnes chargées de déterminer les changements radicaux à faire, puis de les planifier et de les mettre en œuvre ne seront certes pas bien motivées. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 23

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

vues sur le changement

La gestion du changement par le lcol Michel Coutur e

D

epuis mon arrivée comme officier régional des cadets (ORC) de la région de l’Est, j’ai rapidement constaté que le concept de gestion du changement dans une organisation comme celle des cadets s’avérait un défi de taille. La diversité des intervenants et les traditions locales des corps et escadrons de cadets sont des facteurs primordiaux qui doivent être pris en considération si l’on veut assurer le succès des changements envisagés.

La gestion du changement s’avère un élément tout aussi important que le changement lui-même lorsque l’on considère les énormes différences de culture entre les partenaires responsables du Mouvement des cadets à un niveau régional et local. Tout changement peut rapidement susciter une mauvaise interprétation ou des craintes au sein des états-majors de Région, des corps et escadrons de cadets et des organismes de soutien bénévole si son concept et son application sont mal compris. Il est donc important d’assurer un programme d’information efficace et bien coordonné pour obtenir l’appui de tous les intervenants concernés. Mais il faut avouer qu’il n’est pas toujours évident d’assurer ce besoin, surtout à court avis, étant donné la structure même du Mouvement des cadets et nos moyens limités de communications directes et rapides avec les unités de cadets sous notre responsabilité. Dans le processus de gestion du changement, il faut aussi prendre en considération le rôle très important de leadership pour projeter une vision de l’avenir qui favorise les changements proposés. Je crois sincèrement que notre crédibilité à faire accepter par les unités de cadets et les organismes de soutien bénévole la mise en place de nouvelles procédures doit passer par notre propre capacité au niveau supérieur

Le lcol Michel Couture, officier régional des cadets (région de l’Est) des états-majors de favoriser et de valoriser des changements novateurs et performants. Il faut toujours se rappeler que la majorité des intervenants auprès du Mouvement des cadets sont des membres à temps partiel qui travaillent plus souvent qu’autrement bénévolement. C’est pourquoi le concept de gestion du changement est si important dans une organisation comme la nôtre. La valorisation de nos membres, les objectifs visés, l’évaluation des risques, le renouvellement de nos procédures et notre capacité de se renouveler et de s’adapter dans une société en constante évolution ne sont que quelques facteurs qui doivent guider les changements dans notre organisation. Mais plus important encore, il faut constamment se rappeler que nous sommes une organisation publique responsable de la formation des jeunes et par conséquent nous avons cette obligation d’actualiser nos programmes et nos méthodes de travail pour demeurer dynamique et compétitif au profit des cadets.

N’oublions pas le cadet !

23

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 24

Une expérience révélatrice

L

es deux cadets-chefs qui viennent de se joindre à l’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction des cadets reconnaissent que leur participation à leur première réunion des chefs des équipes d’intervention de Choix d’avenir a été une expérience révélatrice. Le C/m 1 Christine Pinnock du Corps des Cadets de la Marine 25 (Crusader), à Winnipeg, 18 ans, et le C/sgt s Rebecca Evans, de l’Escadron des Cadets de l’Air du Canada 330 (DT Vipers) à Toronto, 17 ans, ont été enthousiasmées par une expérience qui leur a ouvert de plus larges perspectives. Et cela est important pour les deux. Elles veulent faire valoir leur point de vue comme cadets, mais aussi se renseigner sur les idées des autres – officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets, représentants des ligues et autres chefs du Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC). « Depuis trois ans, j’entends dire que l’avenir nous appartient, indique le C/m 1 Pinnock. Si nous devons porter le flambeau du MCC, il faut que nous sachions ce qui se passe. » « Tout change dans le Mouvement, ajoute le C/sgt s Evans. Il faut aborder les problèmes avec la bonne attitude, et je suis ouverte aux opinions des autres. Pour cette raison, je crois que je peux apporter quelque chose à l’équipe et que j’ai l’attitude voulue pour participer à Choix d’avenir. » Les cadets Pinnock et Evans savent qu’elles vont profiter de leur expérience au sein de Choix d’avenir. « C’est une bonne façon de voir les différents points de vue sur l’administration du MCC et d’acquérir une expérience pratique, poursuit le C/m 1 Pinnock. C’est l’occasion rêvée de voir comment les dirigeants abordent les problèmes, comment ils réagissent et quelles solutions ils entrevoient. » Le C/m 1 Pinnock en est à sa sixième année comme cadet et à sa première année à l’université; elle aimerait devenir chimiste et officier instructeur de cadets. En tant que nouveau membre de l’équipe d’intervention responsable

24

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Hiver

1999

Le C/m 1 Christine Pinnock de l’instruction des cadets, elle souhaite que le point de vue des cadets et des officiers sur l’instruction des cadets finisse par s’harmoniser. « À mon avis, il est important que les officiers sachent ce que les cadets apprécient », déclaret-elle. Elle explique que des cours ont été tronqués ou modifiés parce que les autorités les croyaient trop difficiles ou trop violents pour les cadets. Pourtant, les cadets estiment qu’ils peuvent apprendre beaucoup de ces cours.


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 25

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Le C/sgt s Evans, qui est encore au secondaire, mais qui souhaite s’inscrire dans un collège militaire et entrer dans la Marine, donne des précisions sur cette question. « Les cadets ont l’impression que certains cours sont dilués, ce qui leur offre moins de défis à relever. Dans le cours de cadet-chef offert aux cadets des trois éléments, par exemple, nous avons suivi un cours qui nous a tous paru tempéré, expliquet-elle. Nous avons eu l’impression que les instructeurs pensaient que nous n’étions pas à la hauteur. Je comprends aujourd’hui que ce n’était peut-être pas là la vraie raison, mais il faut que les raisons soient données aux cadets. Nous avons l’impression de voir les traditions et les défis s’envoler et nous ne comprenons pas pourquoi. Cela tient peut-être simplement au fait que les cours ne conviennent plus. En fait, le système est peut-être en train de s’améliorer. »

« J’apprécie beaucoup ce que les Cadets m’ont donné; cela a été l’une des plus belles chances de ma vie, admet le C/m 1 Pinnock. J’ai appris à traiter avec des gens, à comprendre le point de vue d’autrui, à me faire comprendre des autres et à être un chef. » L’esprit d’équipe dans le MCC est ce qui a le plus influencé le C/sgt s Evans. « Il y a une différence entre mes amis à l’école et mes amis cadets, dit-elle. Quand je suis avec mes amis cadets, il est facile de voir que nous formons une équipe. Nous excellons, non pas individuellement, mais collectivement. Nous nous acceptons les uns les autres, quoi qu’il arrive. Le milieu social et les vêtements à la mode importent peu. En tant que cadet, on me juge uniquement sur ma personnalité. Et cela est important. Cela me donne une confiance que je n’aurais peut-être jamais eu autrement. » E

Les deux cadets sont du même avis au sujet de l’instruction sur la Prévention du harcèlement et des abus des cadets (PHAC). Elles croient qu’il faudrait l’étendre! « Beaucoup de cadets éprouvent des difficultés avec l’instruction sur la prévention du harcèlement et des abus parce qu’ils la trouvent trop prohibitive, admet le cadet Pinnock. On nous a montré certaines façons de corriger le comportement d’autres cadets; ces façons de faire n’étaient peut-être pas les bonnes, mais ce sont celles que nous avons apprises. Maintenant, on nous dit de faire autrement, parce que les anciennes manières ne sont plus acceptables. Je suis de cet avis, mais je crois que le PHAC ne nous enseigne pas assez bien comment nous comporter dans diverses situations. » Les deux nouveaux chefs d’équipe prennent à cœur leur participation à Choix d’avenir parce que le Mouvement a exercé une grande influence sur leur vie.

Le C/sgt s Rebecca Evans

25

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 26

Décollage d’une autre équipe d’intervention par Ron Bell

L

’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) et des ligues est organisée et en activité! L’équipe s’est réunie à Toronto, en octobre dernier, pour recevoir des premiers éléments d’instruction et définir ses objectifs et son plan de travail pour les deux prochaines années. La première étape consistait à nous entendre sur les questions dont nous devons nous occuper et à définir nos priorités. Au cours des prochaines réunions, les membres de l’équipe recevront une formation dans des domaines comme le leadership, la constitution d’équipes et la dynamique de groupe. L’équipe s’intéressera à 11 principaux domaines d’activité : • reconnaissance de la mission, de la vision et des valeurs communes du Mouvement des cadets du Canada; • coordination des cours communs par la Direction des cadets; • production en temps opportun de normes de cours; • harmonisation de l’instruction et du programme de base des cadets; • recyclage des officiers du CIC; • initiation au règlement de différends; • apprentissage à distance des officiers du CIC; • nouvelles méthodes d’instruction; • programme de qualification de major; • validation du programme du CIC; • instruction structurée des ligues. Nous avons dû attendre que d’autres équipes d’intervention progressent dans leur travail avant de pouvoir aborder

26

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

plusieurs de ces questions. Le travail de l’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction des cadets et de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des changements de la politique relative au CIC et aux instructeurs civils est toutefois maintenant assez avancé pour que nous nous occupions de l’instruction du CIC afin de mettre en œuvre les changements qui ont été approuvés au sujet de la politique du CIC ou de l’instruction des cadets. L’instruction du CIC se ressentira aussi du travail d’autres équipes comme l’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications (éléments « recrutement » et « image ») et l’équipe d’intervention responsable de la diversité et des valeurs. L’un des facteurs de réussite les plus importants consistera à s’entendre sur l’idée que le changement profite à tous. En tant que premiers consultés, vous aurez, comme cadets, un rôle important à jouer dans l’orientation et la teneur des changements. Notre travail consistera à coucher les idées sur papier, à en préciser les avantages et les inconvénients, puis à vous communiquer ces renseignements afin que vous puissiez nous faire part de vos vues. Il ne peut pas y avoir de consultation si vous ne réagissez pas. Vous aussi avez la responsabilité d’orienter les changements.

Nous ferons périodiquement rapport de nos progrès dans Fiers d’être. N’hésitez pas à communiquer avec nous. Voici mon adresse et celle du co-chef de l’équipe, Paul Dowling : Ron Bell 11142 - 24A Ave Edmonton (Alb.) T6J 4P4 tél. : (780) 438-0377 fax : (780) 430-0269 cpbell@telusplanet.net Paul Dowling 749 Waasis Rd. Oromocto (N.-B.) E2V 2N4 Travail : (506) 357-4012 Domicile : (506) 446-4297 dowling@nbnet.nb.ca E

Le chef d’équipe Ron Bell donne un nouveau sens à l’expression « équipe d’intervention » dans cet accoutrement de héros de film d’action. Quand il a invité les 945 personnes de sa propre organisation à s’engager dans un effort d’apprentissage permanent et de renouveau il y a dix ans, il portait cette tenue pendant une réunion de gestionnaires. Il affirme que leur réaction a été « des plus intéressantes ». Voyons maintenant comment l’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction du CIC et des ligues réagira.

Hiver

1999


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 27

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Nouveau processus de sélection de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air par Jean Mignault

L

a Ligue des Cadets de l’Air du Canada a approuvé un nouveau processus d’inscription et de sélection de ses membres lors de sa réunion générale annuelle, qui s’est tenue à St. John’s (T.-N.), en juin dernier. Cette mesure a été prise pour faire en sorte que les membres de la Ligue soient dûment inscrits et choisis en conformité avec les lignes directrices du Canadian Volunteer Bureau. L’application en a été confiée aux comités provinciaux de la Ligue.

solvabilité sont recommandées dans le cas des candidats qui vont travailler auprès des jeunes ou qui sont susceptibles d’agir comme trésorier. Afin de protéger les droits individuels des candidats, les autorités policières se contentent d’indiquer si la personne est apte ou non à travailler avec des jeunes. • Une fois qu’on s’est assuré que la personne convient, celle-ci est mise au courant de ce qu’on attend d’elle et elle peut alors commencer à exercer ses fonctions.

Le modèle de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air s’apparente à celui qui a été retenu par d’importants organismes de bienfaisance du Canada. Il comprend les étapes suivantes :

Une période d’essai est recommandée au début; un membre d’expérience du comité de présentation supervise la personne pour voir si elle fait son travail comme il faut.

• Les candidats remplissent une formule d’inscription grâce à laquelle on recueille des renseignements sur leurs antécédents et leurs compétences. Chaque candidat donnent le nom d’au moins trois répondants qui ne sont pas des parents.

La Ligue des Cadets de l’Air du Canada a accepté de soumettre au processus de sélection les membres des comités de commandite, y compris les présidents, les secrétaires, les trésoriers et les autres membres. Notre objectif était de soumettre tous les membres au processus de sélection avant le 1er novembre. La méthode retenue nous permet de garantir la confidentialité des renseignements et de mener à bien le processus sans retard, tout en assurant la protection des jeunes.

• Deux membres du comité local de sélection convoquent le candidat à une rencontre destinée à faire ressortir les compétences de la personne et sa capacité de travailler avec des jeunes, s’il y a lieu, ou de s’associer à la Ligue comme membre ou comme sympathisant. • L’un des interviewers fait un contrôle des références et communique avec les répondants désignés par le candidat pour s’assurer que les renseignements donnés dans la formule de demande d’adhésion sont complets et véridiques et voir si la personne est apte à travailler avec des jeunes ou à devenir un membre de confiance de la Ligue. • Une vérification auprès du Centre d’information de la police canadienne ou une vérification de

Des jugements récents de cours supérieures du Canada contre le Club de garçons et filles du Canada et des organismes privés de la Colombie-Britannique ont mis encore une fois en évidence la nécessité pour tous les organismes bénévoles de sélectionner soigneusement leurs membres et leurs employés pour bien protéger les jeunes et répondre aux normes et aux attentes de la collectivité. La Ligue des Cadets de l’Air du Canada s’est engagée à offrir à tous les cadets un milieu sûr et elle se reconnaît le devoir social de sélectionner chacun de ses membres. – Jean Mignault est directeur exécutif de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air du Canada. E

« La Ligue des Cadets de l’Air du Canada s’est engagée à offrir à tous les cadets de l’Air un milieu sûr. »

27

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 28

Leçons tirées de C a d e t s d u C a n a d a à l ’ o e u v re par le maj Bruce Covington

A

u moment de la lecture de cet article, la plupart d’entre vous aurez participé aux activités prévues dans la campagne ‘Cadets du Canada à l’œuvre’, tenues le 12 juin 1999, ou, à tout le moins, en aurez pris connaissance dans la livraison estivale du bulletin Fiers d’être. Dès ses débuts, la campagne, d’envergure nationale, a connu du succès. J’aimerais maintenant partager avec vous les ‘leçons tirées’ de l’événement, parce qu’elles traduisent directement les objectifs retenus pour Choix d’avenir.

L

e lancement national de Cadets du Canada à l’oeuvre a eu lieu au Sénat du Canada. Un groupe de cadets de l’Air, de l’Armée et de la Marine ont été invités à recevoir les honneurs au terme d’un bref discours de félicitations prononcé par le Président du Sénat, Gildas Molgat. Les cadets ont aussi été présentés au ministre de la Défense nationale, Art Eggleton, et au vam Gary Garnett, vice-chef d’étatmajor de la Défense. Les trois dignitaires se sont engagés à soutenir Cadets du Canada à l’oeuvre.

Le C/pm 2 Tabitha Moulton, capitaine d’armes du Corps de cadets de la Marine 153, à Woodstock (Ont.), fait partie des milliers de cadets qui ont participé à la campagne Cadets du Canada à l’œuvre.

28

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

En octobre 1998, un groupe de travail de la campagne rencontrait pour la première fois des membres du personnel du ministère de la Défense nationale (MDN) ainsi que des représentants des trois Ligues. Ce mouvement compte parmi les premiers et les plus importants plans conjoints formulés par le MDN, les trois Ligues et le Corps des cadets de la Ligue navale. Les efforts d’expansion se sont heurtés à de nombreux obstacles, ce qui nous a permis de mieux nous connaître et de mettre à profit nos forces respectives. Une des premières questions que nous avons dû aborder tenait au fait que le MDN et les trois Ligues (les partenaires traditionnels) allaient devoir se partager la responsabilité de l’élaboration et de la mise en œuvre de la campagne. Les membres des trois Ligues acceptaient de chapeauter certains comités provinciaux, tandis que la présidence de certains autres comités incombait aux membres du MDN. Les mécanismes de communication, les chaînes de commandement et les procédures d’autorisation différaient d’un comité à l’autre. Les représentants des trois Ligues et les membres du personnel du MDN ont travaillé conjointement à chacun des comités, le MDN contribuant l’effectif militaire et les trois Ligues s’acquittant des relations publiques et des commandites. Nous n’avons pas tardé à apprendre que les communications allaient être la clé du succès. Nous nous sommes efforcés de créer des voies de communications

Hiver

1999

jusqu’alors inexistantes. Les leçons tirées de cette expérience auront des retombées utiles pour les membres de Choix d’avenir et l’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications. Une deuxième question à potentiel litigieux avait trait à la capacité du MDN d’absorber les coûts du transport ainsi que les frais d’administration engagés par les membres des comités provinciaux. Bien qu’initialement la Direction des cadets (D Cad) ait donné son aval, les choses se sont compliquées par la suite. Normalement, le service des finances n’acquitte les frais engagés par les civils que s’ils travaillent pour le MDN. Toutes les réclamations adressées pour les activités qui ont eu lieu cette année seront honorées; il faudra néanmoins parvenir à trouver une solution qui rendra les activités des Cadets du Canada à l’oeuvre conformes aux règlements. Les membres des Ligues engagés dans Choix d’avenir sont confrontés à une situation semblable. Nous avons aussi tiré quelques leçons relevant du domaine des relations publiques qui s’appliqueront aussi à Choix d’avenir. Le mandat du groupe de travail était de créer un réseau de relations publiques à l’échelle nationale, une responsabilité qui, normalement, relevait des Ligues. Le Directeur des cadets a récemment haussé la barre en créant une cellule nationale responsable des communications avec les représentants des trois Ligues, dans le contexte de leur mandat. Encore une entreprise conjointe pour les partenaires!


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 29

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Étant donné que nous en sommes tous à nos premières armes en la matière, nous avons tous expérimenté des petits problèmes de croissance à mesure que nous tentions de définir ce qui avait des chances de réussir, qui devait faire quoi, etc. Au fil de nos pérégrinations, nous avons créé de nouveaux réseaux de communications qui lient toutes les parties concernées : la Direction générale des affaires publiques, la D Cad, les présidences des comités provinciaux, les directeurs exécutifs des ligues nationales et provinciales, et autres. Les résultats de cette nouvelle initiative de communication et de relations publiques sont quelque peu mitigés, Cadets du Canada à l’oeuvre servant de cobaye à l’implantation du nouveau système. Toutefois, les leçons tirées de l’expérience ont entraîné des avantages évidents lors du lancement national, la semaine suivante, du Programme pour la prévention du harcèlement des agressions à l’intention des cadets. Les outils de communication créés pour Cadets du

Canada à l’oeuvre servent désormais de modèle à toutes les initiatives de relations publiques de la D Cad. Nous sommes convaincus que les traces de nos débuts hésitants auront été effacées d’ici l’an 2000, lors du lancement de Cadets du Canada à l’oeuvre dans le cadre des projets du nouveau millénaire. La dernière question soulevée par le groupe de travail en raison de ses répercussions sur Choix d’avenir, concerne la participation de cadets du Corps de la Ligue navale, qui est un organisme distinct du Corps des cadets de la Marine, bien que tous deux soient placés sous l’égide de la Ligue navale du Canada. Leur participation aux activités de la campagne dans la région de l’Atlantique ayant été couronnée de succès, notre souci était de renouveler leur mandat de participation au niveau national. Des problèmes épineux sont toutefois apparus concernant l’allocation de fonds du MDN à des organisations distinctes réunies dans un projet commun. Il a été décidé d’inviter les cadets de la

Ligue navale à assumer les frais de leur participation. Encore une fois, Cadets du Canada à l’oeuvre s’avançait en territoire inconnu, tout comme les membres de Choix d’avenir ont appris à le faire quotidiennement. La similitude des expériences vécues par les membres de la campagne et de Choix d’avenir met en évidence la nécessité de garder les communications ouvertes et de rester attentifs aux défis et aux problèmes qui se dressent sur nos voies respectives. Comme le MCC compte multiplier les entreprises conjointes, il faut souligner l’importance de mettre en commun les fruits de l’expérience. Ensemble, nous pouvons améliorer les choses et faire en sorte que les initiatives futures puissent bénéficier de la concertation de tous les participants.. – Le maj Covington est membre du groupe de travail de Cadets du Canada à l’oeuvre. E

La participation des cadets aux initiatives de civisme et d’environnement a été mise en évidence en juin dernier lorsque le ministre de la Défense Art Eggleton a signé un engagement à soutenir Cadets du Canada à l’œuvre. Les leçons tirées de cette initiative nationale sont partagées ici.

29

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 30

À vous la parole

Obstacles au changement? par le capt Paul Bourque

Le capt Bourque

adapté et intéressant et à divulguer le « secret le mieux gardé » du gouvernement canadien à la population. Si nous voulons demeurer un programme public, il nous faudra renoncer à certaines idées conventionnelles pour ranimer l’intérêt des jeunes d’aujourd’hui. Pour le cas où vous ne le sauriez pas, les jeunes d’aujourd’hui ne voient plus les choses comme nous dans les années 1970 (ou même avant, pour certains d’entre nous).

C

À quels obstacles faisons-nous face?

hoix d’avenir fera face à bien des obstacles dans ses efforts de changement du Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC). La résistance au changement peut être considérée comme un obstacle et se manifester de bien des façons, y compris dans les communications, les décisions budgétaires, les attitudes générales et la structure administrative.

Nous résistons tous d’instinct au changement parce que nous croyons sincèrement que nous faisons du bon travail et que nous ne voulons pas nous faire dire qu’il y aurait moyen d’améliorer nos méthodes. Le changement tend en outre à véhiculer l’idée que nos méthodes sont mauvaises et doivent être modifiées, ce qui équivaut à renier le passé et tout ce qu’il avait de bon.

Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de communication et de la nécessité d’échanger des idées. Cela est vrai, et ce bulletin même prouve bien que le système cherche à surmonter les obstacles aux communications. Nous commencerons aussi à communiquer par Internet, ce qui accroîtra notre capacité de nous parler les uns les autres. Il s’agit là de mesures positives. Avant d’examiner d’autres obstacles, j’aimerais parler de l’importance de l’unité d’action dans les efforts que nous déployons pour surmonter les obstacles. Au cours de la dernière année, nous avons tous entendu dire que la cellule de coordination et les diverses équipes constituées pour revitaliser le programme des cadets avaient trimé dur. Même si ces efforts sont louables, il faut nous demander si nous ne sommes pas en train de « mettre la charrue devant les bœufs ». Les équipes connaissent-elles l’orientation que le MCC veut prendre dans le XXIe siècle?

Choix d’avenir ne devrait pas être porteur de telles idées, parce que le MCC a été à l’origine de bien des succès. De nombreux jeunes Canadiens n’auraient jamais pu réaliser pleinement leur potentiel sans notre intervention. Ceux d’entre nous qui appartiennent au Mouvement depuis des années peuvent d’ailleurs l’attester. À mon avis, Choix d’avenir vise à ouvrir plus grandes les portes du succès – à faire entrer le Mouvement dans le XXIe siècle avec un plan d’instruction

À l’heure actuelle, les trois éléments partagent les mêmes objectifs : civisme,

30

Hiver

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

1999

leadership, aptitudes physiques et stimulation de l’intérêt pour les Forces canadiennes (FC). Voulons-nous poursuivre ces objectifs? Devrions-nous en ajouter? Avons-nous réussi à atteindre nos objectifs actuels? À mon avis, nous devons répondre à un certain nombre de questions fondamentales au sujet de notre programme avant de nous attaquer à des questions relatives à l’instruction, aux officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets, etc. Nous devrions tous nous demander si nous contribuons vraiment à stimuler l’intérêt des jeunes pour les FC quand nous les exposons au tiers seulement de l’expérience. Comme nos traditions nous empêchent de sortir du cadre de notre élément, nos cadets sont privés de l’expérience que pourraient leur offrir les autres deux tiers du Mouvement et des FC.

Autres obstacles : attitude et structure administrative Dans la structure actuelle, le MCC est régi par la tradition. Les trois éléments travaillent de façon indépendante et se font concurrence à l’échelle locale pour obtenir des recrues, des commandites et des installations. Au niveau national, les éléments manœuvrent pour obtenir les fonds publics nécessaires à leurs programmes d’instruction et à leurs centres d’instruction d’été. En fait, chaque élément a créé une telle bureaucratie qu’il détourne des sommes importantes de l’objet même du programme : les cadets. Si ce phénomène n’est pas jugulé, il pourrait carrément étouffer le programme des cadets.


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 31

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Cela me rappelle un article que j’ai lu sur l’évolution de la doctrine militaire des forces armées américaines. Selon la tradition militaire américaine, les forces armées (l’armée de terre, la marine, l’aviation et l’infanterie de marine) demeuraient indépendantes, même en temps de guerre. Selon certains, cette indépendance aurait contribué à affaiblir la puissance des États-Unis pendant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, en Corée et au Viêt-nam. Cette doctrine a prévalu aux États-Unis jusqu’à l’adoption de la doctrine de combat aéroterrestre dans les années 1980. L’adoption de cette nouvelle doctrine supposait l’élimination des barrières que la tradition avait élevées entre les éléments des forces armées. Des groupements tactiques ont été formés et, quand les éléments ont été réunis pour le combat, les lacunes opérationnelles du passé ont été comblées. La première mise à l’essai de cette nouvelle doctrine a été l’opération Tempête du désert, les forces terrestres, aériennes et navales étant réunies en une force de combat efficace. Nous devons nous inspirer de cet exemple et continuer d’éliminer les barrières que nous avons érigées en nous séparant par éléments et devenir le Mouvement des cadets du Canada. Les jeunes d’aujourd’hui ne veulent pas vivre un tiers de l’expérience. Ils veulent vivre une expérience complète! Ils veulent faire de la voile, voler ET dormir sous la tente en hiver, et seules nos traditions les en empêchent. En somme, en unifiant le MCC, nous pourrions faire vivre aux cadets des expériences plus diverses et leur offrir une meilleure instruction à un moindre coût. Nous n’aurions plus besoin de trois entités administratives et de trois systèmes d’instruction distincts. Et en réunissant une foule de petites unités en une seule grande unité, nous pourrions réduire le fardeau d’adminis-

31

tration. Nous pourrions enfin cesser de nous livrer concurrence et faire porter notre attention sur ce qui compte vraiment : les jeunes.

Le Cadre des instructeurs de cadets appartient-il à l’armée de terre, à l’aviation ou à la marine? Non. Le CIC est formé d’officiers pour administrer le MCC, et non les FC. Vous pouvez me croire : j’ai fait ma part pour l’armée et je sais que ce n’est pas la même chose. Nous ne servons pas le pays et la Couronne de la même façon que les FC, mais cela ne nous enlève rien. Nous avons toutes les raisons du monde d’être fiers de notre appartenance au CIC et de notre dévouement envers le pays. Je crois que nous devrions former une branche distincte des FC et avoir un uniforme, une commission d’officier et une instruction qui nous

soient propres. Même si j’appartiens en ce moment à l’élément Terre du CIC, la dernière fois que j’ai pris place à bord d’un char remonte au jour où j’ai quitté le régiment. Je ne fais plus ce genre de travail. Je suis un officier du CIC et je suis fier de le dire. À mon avis, notre avenir dépendra de notre solidarité et de notre fierté collective. Ensemble, nous valons plus que la somme de nos éléments. Et c’est précisément ce que nos jeunes méritent : le meilleur de nous-mêmes. N’est-ce pas précisément ce que nous attendons d’eux? Je sais que mes idées ne seront pas facilement acceptées par les plus conservateurs, mais j’espère qu’elles auront au moins pour effet de stimuler la réflexion et les échanges d’idées. Si nous nous contentons indéfiniment de rafistolages, il se peut que notre rêve finisse par s’évanouir. – Le capt Bourque est le commandant du Corps de Cadets de l’Armée 3006, à Dieppe (N.-B.). E

L’auteur estime que nous devons continuer d’éliminer les barrières que nous avons érigées en nous séparant par éléments et devenir le Mouvement des cadets du Canada. « Les jeunes d’aujourd’hui ne veulent pas vivre un tiers de l’expérience. Ils veulent vivre une expérience complète! », affirme-t-il.

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 32

L’équipe responsable des ressources : « c’est parti »! par Bill Paisley

N

e vous laissez pas induire en erreur par le titre : nous sommes bel et bien partis, mais pas avec vos ressources!

Bill Paisley

Les membres du Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC) qui se sont peut-être inquiétés d’avoir peu entendu parler des activités de notre équipe se réjouiront d’apprendre que nous avons enfin pris notre départ et que nous nous démenons pour rattraper les autres équipes de Choix d’avenir. Nous avons tenu notre première réunion les 16 et 17 octobre. Après son arrivée à Toronto, le groupe – Cleve Beeler, Claude Duquette, Julie Garand, Fernand Gervais, Colin Haveroen, Chris DeMerchant et moimême – s’est attelé à sa tâche, sous la conduite d’un expert, Leo Kelly, animateur de la cellule de coordination de Choix d’avenir. Malheureusement, plusieurs membres de l’équipe n’ont pas eu le plaisir et la satisfaction d’assister à la réunion de Toronto. Ils nous ont beaucoup manqué, mais nous ne les avons pas oubliés pour autant et nous avons de nombreux défis à leur confier. Les autres membres de l’équipe sont Richard Choquette, Lisette Desgagné, Jean-Paul Dupuis, Ellis Landale, Fred Maniak, Lawrence Pelletier, R. Phenix et Kris Von Apedoom.

Notre équipe a comme mission d’examiner attentivement les ressources matérielles dont le MCC a besoin pour fonctionner de façon efficiente. Les ressources matérielles désignent l’ensemble des moyens matériels – crayons, papier, vêtements, équipement, etc. – dont le Mouvement a besoin pour remplir son mandat. Toutes les personnes présentes se sont réjouies de voir que Choix d’avenir avait retenu une approche sans « vache sacrée » où tout pouvait être remis en question. Pendant la journée et demie qu’a duré la réunion, nous avons défini et précisé nos objectifs. Nous recommanderons à l’équipe de la stratégie que l’une de nos tâches soit donnée à une autre équipe et qu’une autre tâche nous soit confiée. Des modifications mineures ont aussi été apportées au libellé de nos principales activités : • Étudier la possibilité de recourir à des organismes de l’extérieur pour l’instruction des cadets et des membres du CIC. • Examiner les politiques/pratiques actuelles de financement à tous les niveaux afin de voir s’il y a lieu d’adopter un plan national/provincial/local. • Étudier la question du transfert des responsabilités en matière de gestion des ressources au plus bas niveau possible. • Modifier les barèmes de dotation en matériel en fonction de l’instruction. • Analyser l’efficacité du système de gestion et de distribution du matériel du MCC.

À Toronto, nous avons été mis au courant des dernières nouvelles au sujet de Choix d’avenir, puis nous avons participé à un très bon exercice de constitution d’une équipe. Nous avons aussi fait beaucoup de progrès à l’égard de notre tâche principale.

Après avoir précisé nos tâches, nous avons dressé une feuille de planification provisoire assez détaillée. Nous l’avons délibérément qualifiée de « provisoire », parce que nous

32

Hiver

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

1999

savons qu’il faudra la modifier. En fait, elle conservera peut-être toujours un caractère provisoire, puisque notre équipe se voue au changement. La plupart des éléments de la feuille de planification ont été confiés à des « membres responsables de l’équipe », qui devaient définir des dates cibles et des jalons avant la fin d’octobre. Les membres responsables de l’équipe sont en train d’énoncer un plan de réalisation des tâches. Comme la plupart des tâches demanderont beaucoup de travail, les membres responsables de l’équipe auront besoin de l’aide des autres membres de l’équipe et de l’apport de divers intervenants de l’intérieur et de l’extérieur du MCC. C’est ici que les dizaines de bénévoles qui ont rempli le questionnaire de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des ressources il y a presque un an vont entrer en jeu. Nous nous excusons sincèrement d’avoir mis tant de temps à mettre les choses en branle; nous tenons néanmoins à vous assurer que nous avons l’intention d’agir le plus rapidement possible dans le but de rendre le MCC encore meilleur. Nous aurons besoin de votre aide et nous ferons faire appel à votre contribution à divers moments dans les douze mois qui viennent. L’équipe doit se réunir de nouveau les 15 et 16 janvier 2000. Si vous n’avez pas rempli le questionnaire et que vous êtes intéressé à nous aider à remplir notre tâche, ou si vous avez des questions au sujet de notre mission, n’hésitez pas à communiquer avec moi au 613-384-2116 (courriel : wpaisley@netcom.ca) ou avec le maj Claude Duquette, au 800-817-2761, poste 7042 (courriel : clauduc@odyssee.net). – M. Paisley est co-chef de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des ressources. E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 33

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Nouvelle CPCA dans les Prairies

L

e capt Rusty Templeman est la nouvelle coordonnatrice du processus Choix d’avenir (CPCA) de la région des Prairies; elle remplace le ltv Tracey Roath. Elle s’est jointe aux CPCA des cinq autres régions qui servent d’intermédiaires entre les équipes d’intervention de Choix d’avenir et le personnel régional et qui agissent comme représentants régionaux du Programme Initiative Jeunesse et du Millénaire. Officier du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets auprès de l’Escadron 176 des Cadets de l’Air du Canada à Winnipeg, le capt Templeman fait partie du CIC depuis 1989; elle travaillait auparavant dans la Force régulière. Elle a été cadet de l’Air pendant six ans, à Ottawa, à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard et à Winnipeg.

Le capt Templeman aime le milieu militaire et les cadets. « Je souhaite que le programme existe quand mes propres enfants vont avoir 12 ans », expliquet-elle. Pour l’instant, ils sont un peu jeunes. Sa fillette de 3 ans veut devenir ballerine ou pilote. Ses deux jumeaux de 5 ans veulent aussi devenir des pilotes, comme leur mère. Cela n’a rien d’étonnant. Selon le capt Templeman, ils ont l’aviation « dans le sang ». Son père était aussi aviateur. Le capt Templeman souhaiterait qu’il y ait d’autres activités que le camp, l’été. Elle pense que le changement est une bonne affaire. « La chose la plus difficile à faire comprendre aux gens en période de changement est que nous ne croyons pas que tout va de travers, affirme-t-elle.

Relève de la garde

L

a cellule de coordination de Choix d’avenir a un nouveau commis d’administration. Le cplc Jean Benoit, réserviste du Governor General’s Foot Guards, à Ottawa, a remplacé l’officier d’administration, le capt Mark David, qui s’est joint à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada.

33

Le cplc Benoit a étudié à l’université Carleton, où elle s’est spécialisée en français et en histoire. Elle est membre de la Réserve et résidante d’Ottawa depuis 1992. Même si elle n’avait pas entendu parler de Choix d’avenir avant son entrée en fonction, elle est une spécialiste de la relève... de la r elève de la garde sur la Colline du Parlement, bien sûr. E

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

« Nous voulons simplement changer ce qui doit être changé, pas ce qui va bien. » E

Le capt Rusty Templeman, nouvelle CAPC de la région des Prairies. tél. : (204) 833-2500, poste 6975 fax : (204) 833-2585 courriel : rust13@yahoo.com.

La voie de l’avenir Lorsque l’équipe de la stratégie de Choix d’avenir se réunira de nouveau les 26 et 27 février prochain, la rencontre comportera un volet sur la mesure du rendement afin d’évaluer les progrès des équipes d’intervention de Choix d’avenir.


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 34

Échos du milieu

Critique constructive Je vous écris en réaction à un article sur l’image du Mouvement des cadets qui figurait dans le dernier numéro de Fiers d’être. Alors que j’attendais de prendre l’avion, à l’aéroport international d’Edmonton, l’été dernier, je n’ai pas pu m’empêcher de voir un grand nombre de personnes en uniforme déambuler dans l’aérogare. Il importe peu de savoir où elles allaient ni d’où elles venaient : l’important est qu’elles étaient en uniforme. Ceci dit, je dois avouer que la vue de certains de ces cadets – pas tous, cependant – m’a consterné. Non seulement la tenue de ces cadets laissait-elle à désirer, mais ces jeunes auraient eu besoin aussi qu’on leur montre comment un « militaire » doit se conduire. Mon attention a été attirée par l’accoutrement de plusieurs cadets supérieurs. Certains d’entre eux – sergents d’état-major, adjudants d’escadrille et premiers maîtres – se promenaient avec une cravate ou un veston défait, sans coiffure ou avec plusieurs boucles d’oreille. L’un des cadets de sexe féminin portait dans les cheveux une multitude d’accessoires non réglementaires. Autant d’exemples d’infraction aux règlements relatifs à la tenue. De plus, les cadets ignoraient manifestement les règles de conduite : au lieu d’utiliser les fauteuils mis à leur disposition, ils étaient assis par terre et ils gênaient les déplacements des autres passagers. Pendant l’embarquement, j’ai abordé l’officier de transport pour lui dire que je trouvais révoltante l’attitude des personnes dont il avait la responsabilité. Il est resté muet. À mon avis, l’officier de transport a la responsabilité d’énoncer des règles fondamentales de conduite et de les faire appliquer par son groupe dans un aéroport.

34

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Hiver

1999

Si ce comportement est acceptable et que les officiers de transport laissent les cadets supérieurs se conduire de la sorte, que vont penser les cadets subalternes? Il s’agit d’une affaire de leadership : tout gradé DOIT « donner l’exemple ». Vous ne pourrez pas améliorer votre image publique tant que vous n’appliquerez pas ce principe fondamental. C’est d’ailleurs dans cet esprit que j’écris cette lettre. Mon intention n’est pas de dénigrer le Mouvement des cadets, mais bien de formuler une critique constructive pour vous aider à comprendre que l’image du Mouvement n’est pas seulement une affaire de relations publiques. Il est parfois difficile pour le grand public de faire une distinction entre un membre de la Force régulière, un réserviste et un cadet : les gens voient seulement quelqu’un en uniforme. La tenue et la conduite sont une affaire de fierté personnelle; quand cette fierté vient à faire défaut, tous en souffrent. Nous avons donc tous la responsabilité de projeter une bonne image, quelle que soit notre branche. J’appartiens à la Force régulière depuis 20 ans et je garde d’excellents souvenirs du Mouvement des cadets puisque j’ai été officier de liaison de deux corps de cadets de l’Air et de deux corps de cadets de la Marine, et quartier-maître du Camp national des cadets de l’Armée à Banff. Je crois au dynamisme du Mouvement et à sa capacité d’aider à former le caractère de ses membres. – Sgt R.D. Lundy BFC Borden, Ont.


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 35

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Impressionné J’ai lu le dernier numéro de Fiers d’être et j’ai été très impressionné par la grande qualité du bulletin. Ayant moi-même été cadet de l’Air à compter de 1965 (dans l’Escadron des Cadets de l’Aviation 6, Jim Whitecross), j’ai été très heureux de voir que les Cadets sont pleinement engagés dans le changement. Je fais actuellement à Toronto des études militaires avancées dans le cadre d’un cours qui s’adresse à des capitaines de vaisseau et des colonels. Le capv Harrison et moi-même avons déjà été des cadets, lui dans la Marine et moi dans l’Aviation. J’espère avoir bientôt l’occasion de vous lire de nouveau. – Bonne chance! Capv R.R. Town

Bravo! Je viens tout juste de parcourir la version Internet de votre excellent bulletin. Bravo! Voilà de l’excellent travail. Comment pourraisje me procurer cinq copies papier du bulletin et inscrire mon nom à votre liste de distribution? J’aimerais faire circuler votre bulletin dans le U.S Naval Sea Cadet Corps pour montrer ce qui peut être fait.

Dates de tombée Je viens tout juste de recevoir la livraison de l’été 1999 de Fiers d’être et je constate que la date limite de présentation des articles pour la livraison de l’automne tombe précisément aujourd’hui (le 26 juillet). J’espère que cette réception tardive de votre excellent bulletin n’est pas un indice de la qualité des services de distribution du Groupe Communication Canada. Continuez votre bon travail. – Lcol (à la retraite) Brian Darling Coordonnateur régional Région de l’ouest de l’île Ligue des Cadets de l’Air du Canada P.S. : En qualité de membre de la Ligue, je n’entends pas beaucoup parler de Choix d’avenir de la part du comité provincial du Québec. NDLR : En raison du temps de production du bulletin, la publication paraît généralement peu de temps avant la date limite de présentation des articles du numéro suivant. C’est pour cette raison que nous publions toujours les dates de tombée des deux numéros suivants en deuxième couverture.

– LCdr Joseph M. Land Sr. U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps Chiefland, Floride

Recyclez-moi! Après m’avoir lu, passez-moi à quelqu’un d’autre. Merci!

35

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 36

Adresses de courriel toutes fraîches des équipes d’intervention/hiver 1999

T

ravailler dans le domaine du changement nous aide à nous plier aux nombreux changements de chefs et d’adresses électroniques. Voici donc la liste la plus récente. Jetez votre ancienne liste et utilisez celle-ci si vous souhaitez communiquer directement avec l’un ou l’autre des chefs des équipes d’intervention. Les chefs des équipes d’intervention qui n’ont pas d’adrélec peuvent être rejoints par l’intermédiaire de la cellule de coordination de Choix d’avenir (voir les numéros en deuxième couverture).

Systèmes d’information électronique

Instruction des cadets

Instruction (questions diverses)

Maj Steve Deschamps (CIC – Air) schamps@direct.ca

Capt Linda Allison (CIC – Air) lallison@cadets.net

Capt Linda Hildebrandt (CIC – Armée) ds4@rcispacific.com

C/adjum Ghislain Thibault (Cadets de l’Armée) thibo68@hotmail.com

C/sgt Ele Rebecca Evans (Cadets de l’Air) revans@wwonline.com

Lcol Robert Langevin (CIC – Air) rolang@nb.sympatico.ca

Maj Michael Zeitoun (CIC – Armée) mzeitoun@cadets.net

Ltv Peter Ferst (CIC – Marine) pferst@ferstcom.com

Ressources

Pratiques administratives

Maj Nanette Huypungco (CIC – Air) nanette@mb.sympatico.ca

Capc Brent Newsome (CIC – Marine) brent.newsome@prior.ca

Bill Paisley (Ligue des Cadets de l’Air) wpaisley@netcom.ca Maj Claude Duquette (CIC – Armée) clauduc@odyssee.net

Communications

C/m 1 Christine Pinnock (Cadets de la Marine) tinie@hotmail.com

Lcol Tom McGrath (CIC – Armée) tmcgrath@nfld.com

C/adj Chantal Richard (Cadets de l’Armée) Pas d’adresse électronique

Maj Roman Ciecwierz (CIC – Air) rciecwierz@aol.com

Elsie Edwards (Ligue navale) eedwardswex@mb.imag.net

Lcol Bill Smith (CIC – Air) w.m.smith@sympatico.ca

Capt Steve Dubreuil (FC – Terre) sdubray@ibm.net

Changements de la politique relative au CIC et aux IC

Maj Paul Westcott (CIC – Armée) paulw@nfld.com

Valeurs et diversité

Adresse électronique du groupe

Maj Lance Koschzeck (CIC – Armée) lancek@hypertech.yk.ca

Lcol Francois Bertrand (CIC – Armée) qgrec@videotron.ca Capt John Torneby (CIC – Air) johntorneby@connect.ab.ca Capt Michael Blackwell (CIC – Armée) m.blackwell@sympatico.ca

Wayahead7@nfld.com

Instruction du CIC et des ligues Ron Bell (Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée) cpbell@telusplanet.net Paul Dowling (CIC – Air) dowling@nbnet.nb.ca

36

Fiers d’être

Volume 7

Hiver

1999

Structure (effectifs)

Maj Kenneth Fells kfells@nwes.ednet.ns.ca

Ltv Pierre Lefebvre (CIC – Marine) lefebvre@rocler.qc.ca Capt Alison MacRae-Miller (CIC – Air) alisonmm@home.com E


EM2543 DND Cadets Fpub rev

12/17/99 4:49 PM

Page 37

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Photos gagnantes par Stéphane Ippersiel

Q

uel pool de talent avons-nous au sein du Mouvement des cadets! Que ce soit par des initiatives personnelles, le rendement individuel ou la pure créativité, les cadets et leurs partisans prouvent quotidiennement qu’il sont bons. Le premier concours annuel de photos pour cadets qui s’est terminé le 1er octobre porte témoignage à la créativité et à l’enthousiasme des membres du Mouvement des cadets. Nous sommes heureux d’annoncer que ce tout premier concours annuel de photos pour cadets a été un franc succès. Parrainé par la Direction des cadets, les ligues et des sociétés de l’entreprise privée, le concours était ouvert à tous les photographes au sein du Mouvement des cadets. Une soixantaine d’enthousiastes de l’obturateur ont relevé le défi et soumis 154 photos. Un jury de concours représentant les parrains a évalué les photos selon leurs attributs techniques, leur qualité artistique et leur pertinence relative aux cadets. Les gagnants ont été choisis dans chacune des catégories suivantes : la vie à l’unité, la vie à un Centre d’instruction d’été des cadets, et la catégorie ‘ouverte’. Chacune de ces catégories était subdivisée en trois volets de participants : les cadets, les membres du Mouvement qui ne sont pas cadets et les professionnels.

37

Corel Corporation, BGM Imaging, Ilford Imaging Canada, Kodak Corporation, DayMen Photo Marketing, la Ligue navale du Canada, la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée du Canada et la Ligue des cadets de l’Air du Canada ont généreusement fourni les prix. Chaque photo gagnante représente un moment particulier ‘dans la vie d’un cadet’. Certaines illustrent la camaraderie qui se développe chez les cadets, d’autres montrent des cadets luttant pour vaincre un défi particulier. Les deux meilleurs envois (par le C/m 1 Jason Pesant, qui a remporté la palme dans la catégorie ‘cadet’ et le capt Rick Butson dans la catégorie ‘Mouvement des cadets du Canada) immortalisent deux moments distincts qui ont beaucoup en commun. Les deux montrent une personne prenant une pause pour s’imprégner de l’immensité du milieu dans lequel ils œuvreront dans les prochaines heures. Les thèmes du défi personnel vis-à-vis la transition (ce que les cadets sont remarquablement prêts à faire) ont fait vibrer la corde des juges. D’autres photos gagnantes montrent les jeunes sous un angle typique aux cadets. La photo de l’adjum Jacky Wong qui

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

montre un saut en parachute constitue une perspective unique d’une activité réservée à un groupe sélect de cadets. Il en est de même de la photo de groupe de l’adjum Jeremy Nason au sommet du mont Yotto. Les photos de planeur et de vol propulsé de l’élof Emmanuelle Brière de Saint-Jean (Qc), montrent une activité de jeunes quasi exclusive aux cadets. D’autres photos racontent un événement qui va au-delà de l’image, comme la photo noir et blanc de l’élof Paramjit Singh qui montre un trompettiste qui pratique seul dans une salle de classe ou la photo du capt Chantal Thompson montrant quelqu’un qui franchit un plan d’eau sur une corde. Beaucoup de mouvement! Les deux pages suivantes présentent les prix et mentions honorables du concours national de photos pour cadets. On peut aussi les voir en consultant la galerie d’images du site Web www.cadetscanada.org et suivre les liens. Lisez le numéro du printemps pour connaître les détails du concours de photos de l’an 2000. Suite à la page 38


National Cadet

Photo Contest Winners Photo par le C/adjum Jeremy Nason

Photo par le C/sgt s Jason Binns

Photo par le C/pm 1 Geneviève Chartier

Escadron des cadets de l’Aviation 513, Coquitlam (C.-B.) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (Cadet) Prix de la Ligue des cadets de l’air du Canada

Corps des cadets de la Marine 210 Amiral Le Gardeur, Repentigny (Qc) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (Cadet) Prix de la Ligue navale du Canada

Corps des cadets de l'Armée 2951 CFS Leitrim, Kanata (Ont.) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (Cadet) Prix de la Ligue des cadets de l'Armée du Canada

Photo by Cadet FSgt Jason Binns

Photo by Cadet CPO1 Genevieve Chartier

Photo by Cadet MWO Jeremy Nason

513 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron, Coquitlam, BC Honourable mention — life at CSTC (Cadet) Air Cadet League of Canada award

210 Amiral Le Gardeur Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps, Repentigny, QC Honourable mention — life at CSTC (Cadet) Navy League of Canada award

2951 CFS Leitrim Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Kanata, ON Honourable mention — life at CSTC (Cadet) Army Cadet League of Canada award

Photo par le C/adjum Jacky Wong

Meilleur – ensemble MCC

Corps des cadets de l'Armée 105, Streetsville (Ont.) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (Cadet)

Photo by Cadet MWO Jacky Wong

Best overall (CCM)

105 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Streetsville, ON Honourable mention — life at CSTC (Cadet)

Photo par le capt Rick Butson

Photo par le capt Chantal Thompson

Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2814, Hamilton (Ont.) Meilleur – Vie au CIEC (Mouvement des cadets du Canada)

Corps des cadets de l'Armée 2773 (Royal 22e Régiment), Québec (Qc) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (MCC)

Photo by Capt Chantal Thompson 2773 (Royal 22 nd Regiment) Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Quebec City, QC Honourable mention — Life at CSTC (CCM)

Photo by Capt Rick Butson 2814 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Hamilton, ON Best life at CSTC (Canadian Cadet Movement)

Photo par le slt Emmanuelle Brière Escadron des cadets de l’Aviation 96 Alouette, Montréal (Qc) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (MCC)

Photo by SLt Emmanuelle Brière 96 Alouette Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron, Montreal, QC Honourable mention — Life at CSTC (CCM)

Photo par le lcdr Valérie Lafond Quartier général, région de l'Est, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu (Qc) Mention honorable – Vie au CIEC (MCC)

Photo par le C/m 1 Jason Pesant Corps des cadets de la Marine 240 Amiral Le Gardeur, Repentigny (Qc) Gagnant – meilleur (cadets)

Photo by P01 Jason Pesant Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps 240 Amiral Le Gardeur, Repentigny, QC Winner — Best overall cadets

Photo by LCdr Valerie Lafond Headquarters, Eastern Region, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, QC Honourable mention — life at CSTC (CCM)

Photo par l'élof Paramjit Singh Escadron des cadets de l'Aviation 801, Montréal (Qc) Gagnant – Vie à l'unité (MCC)

Photo by OCdt Paramjit Singh 801 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron, Montreal, QC Winner — Life at the Unit (CCM)

Les gagnants du concours

national de photos pour Cadets Art Direction: DGPA Creative Services 99CS-0503 / Direction artisique : DGAP Services créatifs 99CS-0503

99 win