Page 1

Education credits for cadets p. 19 • Age-appropriate learning p. 22

International army expedition Tests mental and physical limits of officers and cadets

Prior learning assessment Less training time for CIC officers?

Interest through ownership Retain cadets and engage sponsors

Gliding date cancelled? Augment local training with power flight

New course trial

Issue 21

Winter 2006

Looking for candidates


IN THIS ISSUE

12 Learning from the top of a mountain What one officer learned during this year’s international army cadet expedition. Capt Matt White 13 Looking for candidates for new course trial May trial for new basic officer and occupational training courses Maj Serge Dubé

14 CIC Prior Learning Assessment By formalizing its Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) process, the CIC training program will recognize that some individuals may already have academic achievements, learning experiences, knowledge and skills gaining during previous employment (civilian and CF) that fulfil existing CIC course requirements. Lt(N) Darin McRae and Capt Pierre-Archer Cournoyer

16 Operational risk management A five-step plan A squadron CO shares his preferred operational risk management model. Capt Jean-Paul (J.P.) Ferron 19 Education credits for cadets Help efforts to gain recognition in high schools for cadet training. 22 Age-appropriate learning Capt Catherine Griffin 23 First-year local training—sea Program changes Lt(N) Shayne Hall 24 First-year local training—army Combining best practices from army, air and sea Capt Rick Butson 26 First-year local training—air Change, one bite at a time Capt Andrea Onchulenko 27 Career opportunities for air cadets? Air Cadet League and industry look to the future. Craig Hawkins

20 ‘Interest through ownership’ A CO's strategy to instil in cadets, officers and sponsors the sense that the squadron ‘belongs’ to them. Lt Dale Crouch

2

30 New CIC course management system Gets you training when and where you need it. Capt Pierre-Archer Cournoyer 32 Command is command Whether your unit is big or small, command requires specific traits. Lt(N) Paul Simas 33 Telling it smart! Let cadets tell the Cadet Program story. Michael Harrison

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


UPCOMING

10 FRONT COVER International expedition Challenging officers to “think on their feet” The annual international army expedition is a challenge for top army cadets. It’s also a challenge for escort officers to practise their leadership skills in extreme circumstances. Here, Capt Daniel Rioux, 242 Army Cadet Corps in Petit-Rocher, N. B.—the officer in charge of the 2006 expedition—leads cadets during a hard day of hiking (more than 1000 metres) up the fenetre d’Arpete in Switzerland. (Photo by Capt Hope Carr, Atlantic Region public affairs)

28 Supplement classroom training with power flying Poor weather can result in the cancellation of a squadron’s gliding date(s), and gliding operations do not occur during the winter. One officer suggests supplementing your air cadets’ experience with powered flight. Lt David Jackson

IN EVERY ISSUE 4

Opening notes

29 Test your knowledge?

5

Letters

6

News and Notes

Some time ago, Cadence sent out a general CadetNet message asking, “What is the biggest challenge you face at your local corps/squadron?” Lt Harry Whale, an instructor with 835 Air Cadet Squadron in Squamish, B.C., answered that in his nine years as a CIC officer, he has worked with two squadrons—neither with a permanent headquarters. He asked Cadence to follow up with an article on other corps and squadrons in similar circumstances. Our next issue will look at some ‘homeless’ corps and squadrons, their trials and tribulations, and their triumphs in facing their challenges. You won’t want to miss it. Other articles in our Spring/Summer issue will include one on preparing your cadets for camp and another on the new Leadership in the Canadian Forces: Doctrine, issued in early 2005. This document is now the basis for the leadership training and education of all officers/non-commissioned members in the CF. This document will also form the core of new CIC leadership training currently under development. How has leadership changed? Part one of this two-part series will deal with the new definition of leadership and the CF’s renewed philosophy on leadership. Are your volunteers running out of steam? Are you having problems keeping them motivated? If so, you may be interested in what some others have to say about caring for your volunteers. And you will hear a lot more about the Cadet Program Update in our Spring/Summer issue. It will include articles on the design of the updated summer training program, information on regionally and nationally directed activities and more information on the recent decision to start the new first-year training programs in September 2008, instead of September 2007. Copy deadlines are Feb. 5 for the Spring/ Summer 2007 issue and mid-June for the Fall 2007 issue. If you are interested in writing for an upcoming issue, please contact the editor in advance at marshascott@cogeco.ca, scott.mk@ cadets.net or (905) 468-9371.

34 Viewpoint

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

3


OPENING NOTES

Marsha Scott

Learning through others' experience s our masthead proclaims, Cadence is the professional development magazine for leaders of the Cadet Program.

A

As a learning journal, it is just one professional development tool in an array of tools that includes you. Indeed, Kathleen Bailey, Andy Curtis and David Nunan, in their book Pursuing Professional Development: The Self as Source, describe selfawareness and self-observation as “cornerstones of all professional development.” As integral as self-reflection is to professional development, you can grow further by reflecting on the learning and teaching experiences of your Cadet Program peers in a variety of settings. Cadence helps you to do that through articles on a cross-section of topics and themes in each issue.

In addition to feature articles, two sections in the magazine—Viewpoint and Letters—feature our readers’ opinions.

How do we choose our articles?

Traditionally letters to the editor measure reader interest in topics and themes. Judging from reader response to our series on physical fitness and nutrition in the Cadet Program, readers are very interested in this subject. Never have we had so many letters on a single topic. Read this issue’s letters for more.

National staff from Directorate Cadets use Cadence as one more means of keeping you informed and reinforcing messages about new developments. Not timely enough to be a ‘news’ magazine, Cadence tries to present topics in a different way, often offering examples and personal experiences to tell the story. In this issue, for example, Cadence has what might be called ‘top down’ articles on Prior Learning Assessment; the new computer-based system that will be used to manage all CIC officer training; as well as updates on officer and cadet training.

4

Because Cadence strives for content balance, however, we also feature professional development articles from the Cadet Program’s grass roots—instructors and volunteers from corps and squadrons across Canada. In this issue, we have an article from an officer in Etobicoke, Ont., who uses a U.S. Navy model of operational risk management to ensure safety for his cadets. Another officer from Yellowknife, N.W.T., tells us how he has increased cadet retention by instilling in his senior cadets a sense of ‘ownership’. And yet another officer in Edmonton shares his views on supplementing classroom training for air cadets with power flying.

In this issue’s Viewpoint, an officer from Lunenburg, N. S., gives readers his ‘formula’ for achieving balance for cadets and staff in his local corps.

Letters are among the best read ‘features’ of any publication, so we encourage you to share your views with the rest of our readers. Or consider writing an article for Cadence. Reflecting on what you have to say may help others progress in their own professional development.

Issue 21 Winter 2006 Cadence is a professional development tool for officers of the Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC) and civilian instructors of the Cadet Program. Secondary audiences include others involved with or interested in the Cadet Program. The magazine is published three times a year by Chief Reserves and Cadets—Public Affairs, on behalf of Directorate Cadets. Views expressed do not necessarily reflect official opinion or policy. Editorial policy and back issues of Cadence are available online at http://cadets.ca/support/cadence/intro_e.asp.

Managing editor: Lt(N) Julie Harris, Chief Reserves and Cadets—Public Affairs

Editor: Marsha Scott, Antian Professional Services

Contact information Editor, Cadence Directorate Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers National Defence Headquarters 101 Colonel By Drive Ottawa ON, K1A 0K2

Email: marshascott@cogeco.ca CadetNet at cadence@cadets.net or scott.mk@cadets.net

Phone: Tel: 1-800-627-0828 Fax: 613-996-1618

Distribution Cadence is distributed by the Directorate Technical Information and Codification Services (DTICS) Publications Depot to cadet corps and squadrons, regional cadet support units and their sub-units, senior National Defence/CF officials and selected league members. Cadet corps and squadrons not receiving Cadence or wanting to update their distribution information should contact their Area Cadet Officer/Cadet Adviser.

Translation: Translation Bureau Public Works and Government Services Canada

Art direction: ADM(PA) Director Public Affairs Products and Services CS06-0480 A-CR-007-000/JP-001

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


LETTERS LOWER STANDARDS? I have noticed in the last five years with the Cadet Program, that we, as CIC officers, have allowed a reduction in standards for cadet summer training. Mainly the reduction is in physical fitness standards. At our corps, we are trying to get the cadets to help each other. On our Physical Training night, we do a 2.2kilometre run as a group—officers and cadets. We start as a group and end as a group. We hope to better our time each PT night. It has just begun and we have high hopes that as a corps, we will raise our fitness standard. Capt James Lewis CO, 3015 Army Cadet Corps St. Martin’s, N.B.

HEALTHY EATING? I have just read the spring/summer issue of Cadence. The article named “Healthy Eating in the Cadet Program” was very good and I’m happy that we are doing a lot more to give healthy choices to our youth. However, after talking with some of my cadets, there are some parts of the article concerning Eastern Region that I am not very happy about. Here is one: “We have gradually been removing trans-fats, deep-fried foods and sweetened cereals and have increased the selection of fruit, grains and salads offered at each meal,” says CWO Roger Audet, food services officer at RCSU (Eastern). Menus at all camps offer a selection of fruit juices at least four times a week,

fresh fruits daily, a choice of three dry cereals (at least one whole grain) daily and yogurt at least four times a week. Soft drinks are not available with meals.” Cadets that went to CSTC Valcartier said that the food was worse than ever there: it was very greasy and not always cooked well. And, even if the article is saying the opposite, there were soft drinks at every meal, even for breakfast. Maj Guillaume Paré Quebec detachment Regional Cadet Support Unit (Eastern) Former commanding officer 2898 Army Cadet Corps Ste-Marie de Beauce, QC

STRIVING TO IMPROVE Following is a response to the “Healthy Eating?” letter above. Thank you for your comments! It is true that the caterer at CSTC Valcartier had some difficulty early on adjusting to our new standards— reducing the amount of fat, particularly trans-fat, used in preparing the food. We chose CSTC Valcartier to implement our project, which comprises three stages, because we wanted to ensure a gradual withdrawal of these products that have no place in a healthy diet. As for soft drinks, our project provides for their total elimination. I can confirm to you that soft drinks are not offered at breakfast time. However, despite the fact that posters have been put up prohibiting soft drinks and glasses have been placed over the nozzles of the soft

drink fountains to limit access at breakfast, some cadets and staff continue to flout established procedure. The forthcoming elimination of soft drink dispensers from our cafeterias will resolve this problem. You may be sure that we are constantly striving to improve the food services at our CSTCs and schools. We have recently taken advantage of the new call for tenders for the CSTC Valcartier contract to move ahead with phase two. We have concluded a contract with the Faculty of Medicine of Laval University (obesity research chair) to support us by analyzing our recipes, suggesting substitutes for certain foods, modifying our recipes to make them healthier, providing new recipes to improve the salad bars, and advising us on the development

of vegetarian and multi-ethnic menus. We will continue in 2007 to adjust and improve the standards, requirements and responsibilities of the caterer to ensure that the services requested are provided in accordance with the terms of the contract. Once our objectives have been achieved, we will proceed with the third and final stage of our project—the implementation of this concept at all Eastern Region CSTCs and schools. Eat to live. CWO Roger Audet Food services officer Regional Cadet Support Unit (Eastern)

LETTERS continued on page 36

Cadence reserves the right to edit for length and clarity. Please restrict your letters to 250 words.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

5


NEWS AND NOTES

Cadets carry Winter Games torch

Pension plan update

Cadets and staff at Whitehorse Cadet Summer Training Centre (WCSTC) joined in the spirit of the 2007 Canada Winter Games last summer by taking part in a torch relay Aug. 15. The relay will touch 83 communities as it wends its way across Canada’s North before the Games in Whitehorse from Feb. 23 to March 10.

Changes to the CF Pension Plan to include Reserve Force members have generated questions concerning the status of CIC officers within the plan.

With the camp’s final graduation parade less than one week away—and only three days to plan a special activity to support the relay—staff took a careful look at the training schedule to check on the availability of cadets and staff. It was decided that 13 staff cadets, representing each province and territory, would

carry the Yukon torch while running a 13-kilometre relay from Miles Canyon Bridge (one of the training sites for the Army Cadet Leader Instructor (Adventure) Course) to the training centre. The cadets represented the crosssection of cadets and staff that attended WCSTC from every province (except Prince Edward Island) and territory last summer, as well as the diversity of athletes who compete at the Canada Winter Games. WCSTC staff worked closely with Games personnel to meet torch event guidelines and ensure the safety of cadets as they ran. This included medical support, safety vehicles, transport and markers along the route, media coverage, and the organization of a ceremony and celebration of the torch when it arrived at the training centre. Whitehorse resident and staff cadet Travis Friesen ran the final leg of the relay, accompanied by the other runners and Yúkā, the Yukon’s mascot for the Games. Another staff cadet played the part of the mascot. The torch, timed to arrive during the middle of a drill competition, remained on display for part of the day. More than 100 course cadets and adults took a few moments out of their schedules to run around the parade square with the torch and write in the torch relay journal. For more information on the Canada Winter Games, visit www.2007canadagames.ca.

For the benefit of all members, the Directorate General Compensation and Benefits (DGCB) has opened up lines of communication to address questions and concerns. To receive answers to specific questions, or to have your particular situation assessed, you may use a number of online resources. You can find full details of the upcoming changes to the existing CF pension plan on the CF Pension Modernization (CFPMP) website located at www.forces.gc.ca/hr/ dgcb/cfpmp. As well, DGCB has posted an extensive questions and answers page. If, after reading through it, your questions have still not been answered, you are encouraged to send an email to CFPMP@forces.gc.ca. You can also find an article on the CF Pension Modernization Plan in last May’s issue of the CF Personnel Newsletter. DGCB recommends consulting the CFPMP website frequently and on an on-going basis. New information will continue to be posted as things move forward. It is important to note that while the articles and online tools do not specifically mention CIC officers, as reservists, the CF Pension Modernization Plan applies to you.

Submitted by Capt Elisabeth Mills, WCSTC public affairs.

< Cadet David Oyukuluk, from Arctic Bay, Nunavut, runs a stretch of the relay along the Alaska Highway. Maj Lee-Anne Quinn bikes behind him to provide encouragement and medical support.

6

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


Looking for funding? Teamwork between Capt Leo Giovenazzo, 613 Army Cadet Corps in Fonthill, Ont., and Mrs. Deborah Dixon, chairperson of the corps’ support committee, has paid off handsomely. The two worked together to apply to the Ontario Trillium Foundation for a grant for new canoeing equipment for the corps. The Trillium Foundation is an agency of the Ministry of Culture, which allocates grants to eligible charitable and not-for-profit organizations in the arts and culture, environment, human and social services, and sports and recreation sectors. A $12 200 grant rewarded their efforts. The corps used the grant to purchase six canoes, paddles, personal flotation devices and a trailer to store and transport the equipment, which the corps is sharing with other corps/squadrons in Niagara Region.

The application process in Ontario is even easier now. Since Aug. 15, the Trillium Foundation has introduced a simplified application process for capital grants of less than $15 000. To learn more about it, visit www.trilliumfoundation.org/cms/en/index.aspx.

<

Capt Giovenazzo says that the time spent preparing the application forms was well worth the effort and he would like to see more corps and squadrons across Ontario take advantage of Trillium funding. Other provinces may have similar funding.

Among those attending the grant presentation were from left, Pelham Mayor Ron Leveans; corps CO Capt Bryan Lachapelle; Ontario Trillium Foundation representative Mrs. Adele Tanguay; Capt Giovenazzo; Mrs. Dixon; and Mike Haines representing the local provincial member of parliament.

CYA volunteer of the year Lt(N) Darin McRae, a CIC development courseware officer at Directorate Cadets and a contributor to this issue (see page 14), received the Canadian Yachting Association’s (CYA) volunteer of the year award for 2006. As a volunteer, Lt(N) McRae developed the association’s first training policy handbook and updated all of the association’s examinations, many coaching clinic texts and technical manuals. As well, he has worked with instructor development clinics, run an instructor evaluator clinic and rewritten course tests. The nomination for his award states, “Good volunteers are the best cornerstones of an organization. Darin is not a good volunteer; he is one of the best! He does not ask for anything in return for his dedication; he silently takes joy in watching his work being implemented for the betterment of sailing across Canada. He has significantly contributed to the improvement of CYA training.”

Lt(N) Darin McRae

Lt(N) McRae ran the Regional Cadet Sailing School (Central) in Trenton until 2005 when he moved to his current position in Ottawa. The CYA also presented the Recreation Event Award to the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets. The award recognizes a club/organization/individual/group that has contributed to the promotion of recreational sailing in Canada. The Cadet Program is the only youth organization that provides free sailing programs and promotes CYA sailing levels as part of its mandatory training. The CYA celebrated its 75th anniversary in 2006.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

7


NEWS AND NOTES

CIC officer unveils statue of heroic grandfather Life-size bronze sculptures of 14 heroic Canadians whose bravery and determination helped forge this nation were unveiled at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Nov. 5. Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers took part in the ceremony. A cadet/Junior Canadian Ranger, a veteran and a Regular Force member together unveiled each statue. The only exception was the unveiling of the statue of Gen Sir Arthur Currie, who helped plan the First World War assault at Vimy Ridge. Capt Bill Currie, the grandson of Gen Currie and commanding officer of 2870 Army Cadet Corps in Ottawa, unveiled that statue. In her speech at the unveiling ceremony, Governor General Michaëlle Jean said it is important to think about heroes of times past in a day when the mettle of this country is once again being tested, this time in Afghanistan. “Let us remember the 14 Valiants,” she said, “and all of the men and women who have served, and who will serve, in Canada’s military.”

<

Capt Currie with Governor General Jean and the life-size bronze statue of Capt Currie’s grandfather following its unveiling. (Canadian Press photo by Fred Chartrand)

Running ‘around the world’ Capt Don Lim, the administration officer with 2501 Army Cadet Corps in Halifax, has received the fourth scroll (Level 4) to the CF physical fitness award for aerobic excellence. Each scroll represents 12 000 kilometres, meaning Capt Lim has jogged 48 000 kilometres since he enrolled in the aerobic award of excellence program in 1979. As the circumference of earth is around 40 000 kilometres, Capt Lim has virtually run around the world. The aerobic award of excellence program accommodates various forms of physical activity. Six different ‘seals’ must be obtained to proceed to the next scroll. For jogging, a seal—indicating achievement and maintenance of a superior level of physical fitness—represents 2000 aerobic units (kilometers) and has to be completed in two years or less. Capt Lim will continue his run as he approaches the home stretch of his long military career, finishing as an officer with the Cadet Program, where he began as a cadet. His hope is to leave a legacy for the next generation to run the race well and pursue physical fitness.

< Capt Lim with his aerobics certificate. (Photo by Cpl Dan Viellette, Formation Imaging Services)

8

For more information on this program, visit www.cfpsa.com/en/psp/ fitness/index.asp and click on “Contacts” and then the “full list” at the bottom of the page for the email address of fitness personnel at the CF base nearest you.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


Cadet’s flag hangs in War Museum and many events to collect signatures. In June of 2005, during the squadron’s annual parade, CO Capt Andrew Thomson highly praised the project, and LAC Castilloux became the first cadet in 540 Squadron to receive the Royal Canadian Legion Medal of Excellence.

Even before he joined 540 Air Cadet Squadron in Oakville, Ont., Devin Castilloux began visiting Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto with his father, Mike. Devin met and interviewed several Second World War and Korean Conflict veterans, as well as First World War veteran, Clare Laking. (By the time he died at Sunnybrook on Nov. 26, 2005 at the age of 106, Mr. Laking had become Devin’s friend).

Toronto Sun columnist Peter Worthington also noted LAC Castilloux’ efforts, saying, “What struck me as significant—apart from a kid being so interested in those who served in past wars—was that Devin knew all about the Battle of Vimy Ridge, which took place 89 years [now almost 90 years] ago.”

Meeting Canadian veterans had a huge impact on Devin. In August of 2004, he began to collect veterans’ signatures on a Canadian flag, which he hoped would be flown in Ottawa on Remembrance Day. Learning that writing on a Canadian flag was not allowed, however, he set out anew—about the time he joined 540 Squadron—to collect signatures on a white banner (7 feet by 12 feet), with an unsigned Canadian flag stitched into the top left corner. In addition to visiting Sunnybrook, LAC Castilloux visited local Legions, invited veterans home, and went to museums, long-term care facilities

The cadet collected more than 1000 signatures—including those of about 600 Second World War veterans and two First World War veterans. Remaining signatures belong to Korean Conflict veterans, peacekeepers, astronaut Chris Hadfield and many CF members, who, in spite of decades of service, believed they did not have the right to sign the flag because they had not “earned” it by serving in a war, or peacekeeping operation. As LAC Castilloux put it, however, “If you have put your country before yourself, then you can put your name on my flag for the veterans.” Veterans Affairs Canada arranged for the cadet to take his flag to Ottawa for display outside the Senate

<

The Cadet Program tries to instil in its cadets an interest in the CF by teaching them about the past and present of Canada’s military. The interest of one cadet in particular has captured public attention, including that of Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Canadian War Museum.

LAC Castilloux with Prime Minister Stephen Harper after taking his flag to Ottawa.

and in the Hall of Honour at the Canadian War Museum in time for Remembrance Day 2006. LAC Castilloux met Prime Minister Harper, received the Minister of Veteran Affairs Commendation and took part in several special events. In the next year, Devin Castilloux (now a corporal) hopes his flag will travel to museums across Canada. “It’s a fantastic plug for the Cadet Program—getting the Cadet Program name out there and making it more visible,” says Capt Thomson. At the same time, Cpl Castilloux is enriching the knowledge of his fellow cadets about Canada’s military history.

Directorate name change The Directorate Cadets (D Cdts) is now officially known as Directorate Cadets and Junior Canadian Rangers (D Cdts & JCR). The responsibility for Junior Canadian Rangers moved from Directorate Reserves to D Cdts in 2004 to consolidate both

Department of National Defence youth programs under one directorate. To better reflect this reality, D Cdts changed its designation to D Cdts & JCR in 2006. While both programs come under D Cdts & JCR, and some sections within the directorate support both

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

youth movements, other sections will continue to support one or the other. For the sake of simplicity, designations for sections that relate to the Cadet Program (D Cdts 2, or D Cdts 3 for instance) will remain the same. NEWS AND NOTES continued on page 36

9


FEATURE

Capt Hope Carr

< Capt Rioux, officer in charge of the expedition, followed by a guide, crosses a river on a steel wire bridge in France.

International expedition Challenging officers to “think on their feet” Each year the Army Cadet League and the Department of National Defence co-sponsor an international expedition to challenge the top 16 army cadets in Canada and three army CIC officers. he expedition, which began in 2000, has taken CIC officers to Morocco, Australia, the Republic of Korea, the United States and Costa Rica. This once-in-a-lifetime experience allows army CIC officers to put skills into practice under extreme circumstances and learn along the way.

T

This year’s expedition took Capt Daniel Rioux, 242 Army Cadet Corps in Petit-Rocher, N. B., Capt Matt White, Regional Cadet Support Unit (Central) and Lt Joanne Morin, 2773 Army Cadet Corps in Quebec City, to the Tour du Mont Blanc in the Mont Blanc Massif—composed of Mont Blanc, the highest peak in Western

10

Europe at 4810 metres, and a flank of spectacular peaks and glaciers straddling the borders of France, Italy, and Switzerland. During the expedition, which took place Aug. 31

It was a great opportunity to learn to use and trust my skills of thinking on my feet, which will help at my corps and in my civilian job. ...Lt Joanne Morin. to Sept. 12, the officers and cadets hiked more than 160 kilometres, ascended more than 8500 metres and descended more than 10 000 metres in eight days.

“Because of the level of difficulty, we always had to be able to think quickly to adapt to changing environments and conditions,” says Lt Morin. “It was a great opportunity to learn to use and trust my skills of thinking on my feet, which will help at my corps and in my civilian job.” The focus of expedition training is the application of learned skills and leadership roles in a challenging environment. The outdoor challenge also teaches and encourages safety, a healthy lifestyle and environmental stewardship. The challenging environment was evident on each and every day of the expedition. Some days the physical side of the expedition was gruelling and some

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


days the challenge was staying mentally tough for another day of hiking. “Each day we had to push ourselves and help others to not only meet but also exceed their physical and mental limits,” says Capt Rioux. “My previous work with expedition and my civilian job as a police officer helped prepare me physically, but the expedition still pushed me to my

< Lt Morin at the Bonnati Mountain refuge in Italy, with Mont Blanc in the background.

Expedition publicity Capt Hope Carr, responsible for expedition public affairs, arranged 42 media interviews during the expedition. Carrying her laptop as she hiked with the group, she updated the Army Cadet League website daily with different photos and journal entries for each of the cadets and officers.

< A hard day of hiking (more than 1000 metres) up the fenetre d’Arpete in Switzerland.

limits and beyond, making me realize how much the cadets and I could do when put in a truly challenging situation.” Capt White adds, “The chance to teach a group of cadets in this type of environment, and in turn be taught by them, is what the international expedition is about and the reason why it is so valuable to the Army Cadet Program.”

“We had more than 100 media hits [articles and interviews] on the expedition,” she says. “The biggest coup was getting Canadian Press (CP) to do a pre-expedition and during-expedition interview that was picked up by media everywhere.” “It was tough some days because we were doing interviews throughout the expedition, and many happened while we were taking a break on the mountainside and trying to get reception on a satellite phone,” she says. “It was a challenge, but it was worth it.” Capt Carr says the success of the public relations effort was a reflection of the great group of cadets and especially CIC officers who allowed her to be part of the expedition. “They made me feel like one of the team and were willing to take the time (even though they were extremely tired) to help make the expedition something the Canadian public could share.” What did she learn from the expedition? “The expedition experience reminded me why I spend time and effort to do my best for the Cadet Program,” says Capt Carr. “The cadets woke up every morning and gave their absolute best, both mentally and physically. They deserved the same from me.”

Capt Carr, who also took these photos, is the regional public affairs officer, Atlantic Region.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

11


FEATURE

Capt Matt White

Learning from the top of a mountain The value of an experience like the 2006 international expedition to Mont Blanc cannot be measured in words or pictures. It can, however, be measured in memories and lessons learned. hile Canada offers rugged terrain, picturesque scenery and countless opportunities for adventure, there is much to be said for the chance to live the life of a mountain trekker in countries where the languages, cultures and even foods are new and exciting. This immersion into a new lifestyle gave me many valuable tools I can use in the Cadet Program.

W

<

Capt White on the eighth day of the hike on the French mountainside— just three hours from finishing.

Speaking on behalf of the escort officers, we received priceless training in leadership, management and command in a setting that simply cannot be duplicated within the confines of our system in Canada.

• We helped cadets gain self-confidence and comfort in dealing with new languages. • We practised our skills in leading cadets through adventure activities with an element of risk, all the while ensuring that they were having fun learning.

Expeditions like Mont Blanc challenge CIC officers to continue learning in a real, experience-based manner to become better, stronger officers. • We helped cadets see what their followers might feel in new, and potentially frightening, situations. • We mentored them in the leadership skills they need to help their followers overcome their fears and grow as people. • We gathered skills in building a team, dependant on each other, in a very short time. My own learning had a unique perspective. As a writer and editor with the ongoing Cadet Program Update, I am challenged daily with creating a new and exciting program for sea, army and air cadets. I learned things on this expedition that will influence my work. Now I truly understand the drive behind adventure and expedition training opportunities. They are the chance of a lifetime for some cadets,

12

whether in Canada or abroad. It is certainly worth the time and money being put into the updated program for domestic and international travel. These expeditions are also an excellent opportunity for professional development for CIC officers. Unfortunately, it seems that many local officers are not aware of these opportunities. Perhaps we need to review the degree to which we inform officers across the country of these opportunities. As much as I learned, I also realized that my CIC training didn’t completely hit the mark in preparing me for the expedition. While I had situational leadership training and basic physical fitness training, I hadn’t been taught some of the principles of trekking in altitudes, or selecting effectively the gear required for a long-term trek. The amount of clothing and equipment I wanted to bring had to be tempered with what I could carry during long treks. These may be potential subject areas for senior-level courses in the updated program. We know that 70 percent of our CIC officers are recruited from within the ranks of the Cadet Program. Why not provide our cadets with the tools during a period when they can use them in a controlled environment? Just as we train air cadets to become future pilots and gliding instructors, and sea cadets to become senior sail instructors, we have the chance to create effective basic expedition leaders within our own program. As a recent graduate of the Basic Military Parachutist course, I thought I had faced the greatest challenge of my life, and I had… until this! Our Cadet Program presents cadets with continuous challenges in an effort to develop better, stronger citizens. In a similar way, expeditions like Mont Blanc challenge CIC officers to continue learning in a real, experience-based manner to become better, stronger officers.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


OFFICER TRAINING

Maj Serge Dubé

Looking for candidates for new course trial “Cadet Instructors Cadre Military Occupational Structure Change Management Project” is a big name for a big project. f you have followed past issues of Cadence, you know that the project is about modernizing CIC policies and training.

I

One of that project’s outcomes is new CIC training designed to meet the requirements of the ‘jobs’ CIC officers do. Some of that training is ready for testing now, starting with a trial in May of the new basic officer and occupational training courses at Regional Cadet Instructors School (RCIS) (Pacific) in Esquimalt, B.C.

Over the next few months, regional schools will be looking for [trial] participants. Individuals who need basic training to become CIC officers and who can be available for most of the month of May are possible candidates. Fifty-four officers from across the country, with support staff from all RCISs, will participate in the trial. Over the next few months, regional schools will be looking for those

participants. Individuals who need basic training to become CIC officers and who can be available for most of the month of May are possible candidates. Trial participants will not be required to complete the current Basic Officer Qualification course because the Basic Officer Training Course (BOTC) and occupational training will replace it once the trial is over and any glitches have been fixed. The new training is divided into two phases—a distributed learning phase, which can be done from a home or cadet corps/squadron computer, and an in-house phase, which will be done at RCIS (Pacific) for the trial and, beyond that, at your own RCIS. In the new BOTC, you will learn general information about being an officer in the CF, including rules and regulations that pertain to being a CF member. You will also learn the basics of communications, planning and conducting activities. During the new occupational training course, you will learn things more specific to CIC officers, including regulations affecting the Canadian Cadet Organization, the different

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

stakeholders in the Canadian Cadet Movement, leading cadets and instructing personnel.

The new training is divided into two phases—a distributed learning phase, which can be done from a home or cadet corps/squadron computer, and an in-house phase, which will be done at RCIS (Pacific) for the trial and, beyond that, at your own RCIS. The trial will help us ensure that the CIC training we offer in future will adequately prepare you to be the best officer you can be at your corps/squadron. The trial will also help us establish, with the five RCISs and Northern Region, one common training standard across the country. Maj Dubé is the staff officer responsible for CIC officer program development at Directorate Cadets.

13


Lt(N) Darin McRae and Capt Pierre-Archer Cournoyer

OFFICER TRAINING

PLA factors The three fundamental factors considered when conducting PLAs for members entering the CIC are as follows: • Military knowledge, skills, experience and qualifications. • Youth-related (civilian or military) knowledge, skills, experience and qualifications.

< Constable Scott Hagarty, an RCMP constable in Grand Prairie, Alta, is also the training officer and biathlon coach with 2850 Army Cadet Corps in Grand Prairie Alta.

CIC Prior Learning Assessment To reduce the training time of recruits into the CF—and of those individuals transferring from one branch or component to another—the Department of National Defence recognizes prior learning through a “prior learning assessment” (PLA) process. ow, the CIC training program is formalizing its PLA process to help shorten or eliminate the training time required for individuals to work productively in the Cadet Program.

N

The intent of PLAs is not to shortcut required training, but rather to recognize that some individuals may already have academic achievements, learning experiences, knowledge and skills gained during previous employment (civilian and CF) that fulfil existing CIC course requirements. “The more formalized use of PLAs by the CIC training program will add training flexibility and increase recognition for civilian training,” says LCol Tom McNeil, responsible for training development at Directorate Cadets (D Cdts). “It will also reduce training costs.”

14

A new CATO 24-05 has been drafted to formalize the CIC PLA process. It is expected to be finalized soon. The best part of the new

“The more formalized use of PLAs by the CIC training program will add training flexibility and increase recognition for civilian training.” ...LCol Tom McNeil CATO is that it empowers individuals to initiate the PLA process themselves. Among those interested will be serving CIC officers who have acquired new skills outside the Cadet Program, or individuals with a military background wishing to join the CIC.

• General knowledge and understanding of the Cadet Program, its structure, its policies and procedures. Individuals applying for a PLA will be assessed on how they meet these factors, in addition to general or specialty military requirements. “Youth-related knowledge, skills, experience and qualifications form the basis of the new CIC training program and, therefore, should be central to any PLA,” explains Maj Serge Dubé, CIC program development officer for D Cdts. For example, an individual with prior military experience may meet the military requirements, but will still need to satisfy the other two PLA factors to be granted full equivalency. In this example, the individual would be granted only partial equivalency. PLA outcomes • Full equivalency for a specific course • Limited equivalency for specific performance objectives • Granting of a certain rank A PLA may direct you to undergo a formal assessment of your skills for equivalency to be granted. You and the applicable regional cadet support unit/RCIS will have the joint responsibility to ensure that the required course(s) or portions of course(s) are completed within the prescribed time limits set out in the PLA decision.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


If you have former CF service, your PLA may grant you a rank higher than the one normally given upon enrolment. Or, it may exempt you from the Basic Officer Training Course (BOTC). A former CF pilot may be exempt from up to 50 percent of the new air environmental course, by having previous training and experience in land-based radio, map and compass, air survival, aero-technical, meteorology, and air navigation. A teacher may be exempt from instructional elements on the BOTC, as well as cadet summer training centre Divisional Officer and Senior Instructor courses. PLA outcomes will differ based on specific knowledge, skills, training, and experiences. Situations requiring a PLA A PLA must be performed in the following instances: • You are a former CIC officer reenrolling in the CIC after being released for more than five years. • You are a former CF member re-enrolling/transferring into the CIC. A PLA may be warranted in the following instances: • You are a CF member requesting a sub-component transfer into the CIC. • You are a former CIC officer reenrolling into the CIC within five years of your release date from the CF. • You are an active CIC officer who has obtained additional training, educational qualifications, skills and/or experiential knowledge outside of the CF and wish to have them recognized by the CF.

PLA process The responsibility for initiating a PLA and gathering the required information will rest on the individual desiring it. You will need to create a portfolio of all necessary information, copies of certificates, transcripts and so on to substantiate your request. You must also complete a PLA Assessment Form and submit it through the chain of command for approval. The new CATO will describe the policies and procedures you must follow when requesting a PLA. A PLA assessor (either from your region or D Cdts) may contact you directly to obtain more information to substantiate your request. Once a decision is reached, you will receive a written report of the decision. The appropriate detachment and regional cadet instructors school (RCIS) will then implement the PLA recommendations and advise you on how to proceed with any applicable training. A positive step Formalizing the prior learning assessment process in the CIC is a positive step. It will lead to greater recognition of an individual’s prior knowledge and greatly reduce duplication of training. It will ease the transfer of current or former Regular or Reserve Force personnel into the CIC branch. It will also help CIC members who have youth-related skills (teachers and social workers, for example) to have their skills recognized formally within the CF. If you have more questions about PLA, consult CATO 2405 as soon as it is available. Lt(N) McRae is a CIC courseware development officer at D Cdts, who conducts CIC PLAs. Capt Cournoyer is the CIC training co-ordinator at the directorate.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Example of a PLA Capt John Doe requests a PLA upon his transfer from the Supplementary Reserve into the CIC. He was a member of the Supplementary Reserve for eight years after serving with the Primary Reserve from 1980 to 1984 and the Regular Force from 1984 to 1998. He achieved the rank of captain in 1988. He completed various Regular and Reserve courses, including Intermediate Officer, Training Development and Evaluation, Basic Parachute and Intermediate Tactics courses. He also completed a three-year posting as army cadet staff officer with a regional cadet support unit (RCSU). Capt Doe is currently a city police officer. The PLA assessment shows that Capt Doe achieved the military requirement through his 18 years of CF experience. He achieved the youth knowledge requirement through his training and experience as a police officer and RCSU staff officer. His Cadet Program knowledge is also exceptional because of his RCSU staff officer experience. The PLA decision is to enrol Capt Doe into the CIC as a captain with partial equivalencies for various CIC mandatory rank courses. He is required to complete the following training: Performance objective (PO) 478 (Comply with DND/CF policies on harassment and racism prevention) on the basic officer training course; PO 414 (Implement the training program) on the CIC (land) occupational training course; PO 403 (Carry out duties of a training officer) and PO 414 (Develop a local headquarters training schedule) on the lieutenant qualifying course; and PO 403 (Carry out the duties of a commanding officer) on the captain qualifying course.

Want more information? The Canadian Forces Manual of Individual Training and Education, Volume 12, CF Military Equivalencies program (www.forces. gc.ca/dln-rad/engraph/downloads_e.asp? docid=30) outlines how the CF should recognize, document and grant training/educational qualifications.

15


RISK MANAGEMENT

Capt Jean-Paul (J. P.) Ferron

Operational risk management A five-step plan When we consider everything we do, either at local headquarters or on exercise, the critical factor always turns out to be safety.

o why do we sometimes leave this to chance? We have been taught by our parents, teachers and the military that the better planned an activity, the smoother it will run. Safety will determine how well it progresses.

S

Having arrived at this basic conclusion and wanting to leave as little to chance as possible, our squadron has instituted a policy of operational risk management (ORM) for all activities. This may take the form of a formal assessment or a time-critical assessment (done on the run), but the subject of safety is always on our minds. Having studied a number of ORM models, 707 (MGen Richard Rohmer) Air Cadet Squadron has adopted the U. S. Navy framework as its preferred model. You can visit the U.S. Navy’s ORM site at www.safetycenter.navy.mil/orm/ default.htm. The five-step process we use to manage risk can easily be remembered as I-AM-IS.

I—Identify the hazards A hazard is a condition that may lead to an injury, illness, death, property damage, compromising the activity, or negative public perception. We break down each activity into operational activities (for example, load bus with materiel, move from the local headquarters to the exercise site, unload bus, establish bivouac site and so on). Then we brainstorm to create a list of hazards associated with each operational activity.

A—Assess the hazards A hazard is categorized as a risk, or not, by assessing how ‘probable’ it is that it will occur and how ‘severe’ the outcome will be if it occurs. To carry out the assessment, we use a matrix that rates the ‘probability’ as a) likely to occur immediately or within a short period of time; b) probable to occur in time; c) may occur in time; or d) unlikely to occur. We categorize ‘severity’ as one of a) may cause death, loss of facility/ asset; b) may cause severe injury, illness, property damage; c) may cause minor injury, illness, property damage; or d) minimal threat.

Since we sometimes task senior cadets with command decisions, we have established a local headquarters training program for our flight sergeants and warrant officers on the principles of ORM (see sidebar). Using the above criteria, we apply a risk matrix to help us determine if the risk should be classified as critical, serious, moderate, minor, or negligible. A sample of the U.S Navy’s risk matrix appears on page 17. Risk matrix “business cards” can be printed out from the website cited earlier.

< ASLt Dave Waterman, left, holds the safety line as a cadet from 65 Sea Cadet Corps in Burlington, Ont., attempts an “up the pole” exercise under the watchful eye of LCdr John Cox, regional seamanship officer (Central).

16

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


M—Make risk decisions Having evaluated the risks, we look at how to minimize them. For example, a survival exercise location has rough terrain, so reviewing proper hiking techniques may reduce the risk associated with traversing the terrain. When we have thought of everything we can do to minimize the risk, we re-assess it to see if risk has been downgraded to an acceptable level, if perhaps the activity should not be initiated, or if the decision to accept/reject the risk should be relegated up the chain of command.

Having studied a number of ORM models, 707 (MGen Richard Rohmer) Air Cadet Squadron has adopted the U. S. Navy framework as its preferred model.

We attempt to make everyone aware of the issues so they can be on their guard for potential hazards and apply assessments in the field. Keep in mind that youth, in general, seldom look at the risks involved in the performance of an activity.

If you actually take the time to apply the I-AM-IS, or any other procedure that forces you to objectively look at, assess and manage risk, you will be better prepared for your activities and they will proceed more smoothly. What is also important is that should one of the established risks actually occur, your response will be pre-planned, effective and decisive— limiting the potential of further injury or damage. Should an unforeseen risk occur, you will have the necessary tools to minimize the potential outcomes of that risk. This may seem like a lot of work and it is! But it is our job and responsibility to provide as safe a training environment as possible to those under our leadership. Capt Ferron is commanding officer of 707 Squadron in Etobicoke, Ont.

Since we sometimes task senior cadets with command decisions, we have established a local headquarters training program for our flight sergeants and warrant officers on the

There are four basic principles of ORM that are really common sense. • Accept risk only when the benefits outweigh the cost. • Accept no unnecessary risks. • Anticipate and manage risk by planning. • Make risk decisions at the right level.

Whether planning a local activity or a wilderness canoe exercise, safety is a critical factor. (Photo by Capt Elisabeth Mills, Northern Region Public Affairs)

Risk Matrix

S—Supervise

PROBABILITY

SEVERITY

We are vigilant for changes or issues that we may not have considered. We perform a time-critical assessment using the process above, implement new measures and make note of the ‘oversight’ or change for the after-action report so that as time goes on, the ORM for a particular activity will become more comprehensive.

Four principles of ORM

<

I—Implement controls

principles of ORM (see sidebar). With this training they are more aware and better qualified to understand the concepts and restrictions we impose in the field. We also hope these cadets will implement the concepts in their daily activities, both in and out of Cadets.

A

B

C

D

I

1

1

2

3

II

1

2

3

4

III

2

3

4

5

IV

3

4

5

5

Risk Assessment Code: 1 = Critical Risk 2 = Serious Risk 3 = Moderate Risk

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

4 = Minor Risk 5 = Negligible Risk

17


RISK MANAGEMENT

Risk management training Current Military Occupation Courses for all elements Performance objective (PO) 403.01: Apply risk management to adventure training activities. Lieutenant Qualification Course PO 402.01: Incorporate safety measures in training activities. Unit Environmental Course Teaching points include factors to consider during outdoor activities. General Safety Officer Course Teaching points include factors to consider during outdoor activities. Future Developmental Period (DP) 1 Preparedness is key to minimizing risk during winter field exercises. (Photo by

<

Capt Elisabeth Mills, Northern Region public affairs)

18

Basic Officer Training Course PO 105: Plan Activities—elements of risk management Safety factors are included in both enabling objectives (EOs) associated with this PO: “Develop a Plan using

the SMESSC [Situation, Mission, Execution, Services Support and Command] format” and “Prepare orders using logical analysis”. Occupational training courses PO 102: Perform the duties of a platoon commander/flight commander/divisional officer The following EOs introduce or focus directly on risk management: • EO 102.02: Explain the aspects of supervising cadets during activities • EO 102.03: Plan an aspect of a cadet training activity • EO 102.04: Apply risk management to local headquarters training activities. During this lesson, candidates will prepare a basic incident response plan and make a risk assessment on a local training scenario. DP 2 CIC Officer Training Course PO 107: Plan a unit-level activity. This builds on training in DP1, with a focus on unit-level (versus platoon/section-level) risk management. Candidates will be asked to prepare a risk assessment checklist on the more complex unit-level activity. Parental consent and risk awareness forms will be discussed as an element of preparing orders for a unit-level activity.

Applying common sense Although a formal operational risk management model can be helpful, using good common sense is often the best way to minimize risk. Here are two examples. A local CIC officer organizing a wilderness canoe exercise wanted to be well-prepared if an officer, or cadet, was injured during the exercise. She understood the pressure an officer is under when he/she doesn’t want to let down the group by evacuating early from a trek. Her approach was to sit down with her staff and discuss various injury scenarios. Together they developed standard operating procedures to deal with each. The logic was, it is better to make decisions with peers in the comfort of a group setting beforehand, than to place the burden of decision-making on a possibly stressed officer in the field. Another officer, qualified in cold weather indoctrination, says “preparedness” is key to minimizing risk; yet, he has seen a stark contrast in unit preparedness when he has supervised winter field exercises in the past.

Training Officer Course

He has seen cadets arrive in the field without a solid grasp of the basic principles of cold weather indoctrination; a bus-load of cadets arrive after dark, requiring set-up in the dark; and kit thrown into disorganized piles and under-trained individuals in charge.

PO 203: Co-ordinate safety, logistical and administrative requirements for training activities. Participants will be asked to look at risk management from the perspective of field training exercises (or comparable elemental training for sea/air cadets) and specific factors to take into consideration.

“None of these things should happen,” he says. “Without an experienced member of the staff to guide the process, a corps/squadron is really at a major disadvantage. A unit should do some work-up prior to going into the field, including issuing a minimum of equipment before arrival.”

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


CADET TRAINING

Education credits for cadets Efforts to gain recognition in high schools across the country for cadet experience—in the form of high school credits—have been ongoing for many years. Now local officers and sponsors can help. he Air Cadet League’s national education and high school credits committee, in particular, has spearheaded efforts so far.

T

In British Columbia/Yukon, Alberta, Manitoba and NewfoundlandLabrador, recognition of cadet training for credits, with specific application and reporting procedures, is a formalized process. In British Columbia/Yukon, 2500 cadets in all three elements have received credits since 1997.

During the 2005-2006 academic year, a Montreal school board approved and put into effect, for all its high schools, a central process enabling cadets to apply for credits [for cadet experience]. In Quebec, the Certification of Secondary School Studies policy allows local school board authorities to grant up to four graduation credits (out of 54) for locally recognized programs, says Grant Fabes, former national education and high school credits committee chairman and currently, a national vice-president of the Air Cadet League.

<

In Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia, a general process for recognizing learning outside the school setting exists, and cadets apply for credits using various procedures. The acceptance of these requests, however, varies greatly from province to province.

Capt Boudreau congratulates cadet Jean Gabriel Dumais for the high school credits he received for cadet training with 2768 Army Cadet Corps. During the 2005-2006 academic year, a Montreal school board approved and put into effect, for all its high schools, a central process enabling cadets to apply for credits. Air cadets submitted five ‘test cases’ to the board; all were accepted, forwarded to and approved by the Ministry of Education. Unfortunately, progress in Quebec can be slow because of the school board to school board process. “Our strategy needs to be adapted/ adjusted, depending on the nature and size of the local community,” says Mr. Fabes. In 2006, Capt Jean Boudreau, commanding officer (CO) of 2768 Army Cadet Corps in Grand-Rivière,

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Que., received the first CIC Award of Excellence—an Eastern Region award—for taking the initiative to adapt the process in the Gaspé region of Quebec. When Capt Boudreau took command of his corps in 2004, one of his priorities was cadet retention. He felt his cadets would be more likely to stay with the Cadet Program if their high school recognized their cadet experience in a formal way. His experience as chairman of the local school board for eight years gave him an advantage to pursue the issue of high school credits for cadet experience with the school. Continued on page 25

19


CADET TRAINING

Lt Dale Crouch

‘Interest through ownership’ The call came in early March of last year. I was the administration officer and biathlon coach for 825 Air Cadet Squadron in Yellowknife, N W. T. y commanding officer (CO), a pilot, had been offered a new job in London, Ont., and wanted me to take over as the new squadron CO. When I asked how much time I would have to prepare, the response came like a bombshell: “I leave next Thursday.”

M

Our ‘interest through ownership’ strategy is to instil in our cadets, officers and sponsors the sense that the squadron ‘belongs’ to them. There was one advantage to taking over so abruptly. Changing com-

mand before the start of the next training year gave me some ‘breathing room’ to consider the most pressing priorities of my new command and begin acting upon them. Those priorities would be strengthening lines of communication with a sponsor that had become somewhat disconnected from the squadron’s day-to-day activities; improving our waning cadet enrolment; and retaining the cadets we had. Our strategy to accomplish these priorities was to create ‘interest through ownership’. Our ‘interest through ownership’ strategy is to instil in our cadets, officers and sponsors the sense that the squadron ‘belongs’ to them. This view, we hope, will build a stronger desire, commitment and willingness to work as a team.

First steps In early April, I met with our Elks Club sponsors to update them on our squadron’s status, facilities, officers, key cadets, planned activities and what I believed to be our priorities. The idea was to re-engage them. They took up the challenge by agreeing to assist with recruiting for the upcoming year. This gave me a chance to focus on cadet retention. I thought I could create more interest and excitement among our senior cadets if they took ‘ownership’ of squadron training. My intent was to deflect attention from the always-present desire for promotion to an interest in contributing to squadron training. We needed to find, for each cadet, a position, or place to call their own. Here’s how we set about it: • Just weeks into my new command, I gathered all of my thirdand fourth-year cadets together during a winter field training exercise and asked them to help plan the next training year. I believed it was imperative that our senior cadets become involved as trainers and get teaching time throughout the year to hold their interest.

< Sgt Victoria Williams, the senior cadet responsible for Procedures, teaches a citizenship and sensible living class.

20

• With my training officer, I went through all of the performance objectives (POs) for the new training year, defining areas of expertise and drawing up terms of reference. POs, such as drill and physical fitness for instance, could be taught by senior cadets in positions of leadership. We were able to define 10 to 12 positions,

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


with terms of reference. Included in these were a cadet survival instructor, a senior cadet responsible for photos and another senior cadet responsible for operations (arranging duty corporals, schedules and so on). • We discussed with the cadets what needed to be included in our training program and discussed leadership versus knowledge. • We reviewed current training, receiving feedback from the cadets on how every exercise or activity had been carried out and how it could be improved.

• We reviewed with the cadets the terms of reference for each leadership position and created a model training plan that relied on the positions to deliver training. • We broke the cadets up into groups and asked each group to design a field training exercise taking those positions into account and assigning key roles to them. We asked them to identify the “who, what, where, when and why” and explain how the exercise related to the training year. • At the end of the seminar, we gave the cadets application forms—with terms of reference—and asked them to apply, in order of preference, for three of the positions. • Two weeks later, we interviewed the cadets, asking them why they

<

As we continue to build ‘interest through ownership’, we are moving into the second phase of our strategy, ‘retention through involvement’. This phase will ensure that everyone is involved in meaningful activity.

WO2 Kim Gibson, the senior cadet responsible for Instructional Lecture, assists the training officer by delivering instructional technique, effective speaking and training to levels 1, 2 and 3 cadets. should be considered and what credentials they had. We then assigned positions before the summer to give them time to develop some material and plan for the upcoming training year. • Each cadet signed terms of reference for their position, creating a kind of ‘contract’ with the squadron and confirming their commitment to act as the cadet expert in that capacity during training and exercises. These positions were then written into the squadron’s standing orders. • We also assigned an assistant, or back-up, for each position. Early successes • Every senior cadet who attended our field training exercise returned. • Our sponsor helped with recruiting by funding an information booth at two major events. • Our top three senior cadets helped plan our recruitment night, including following up on leads from earlier recruitment efforts.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

• We had 25 new enrollments on recruitment night, and the squadron roll call on our second parade night was 44 cadets—up from the previous year’s parade low of 15 to 20 cadets. We are well pleased with these numbers. As we continue to build ‘interest through ownership’, we are moving into the second phase of our strategy, ‘retention through involvement’. This phase will ensure that everyone is involved in meaningful activity. For officers, this means paying attention to training, operations orders and exercises to make sure that the cadets are employed in the ‘contracts’ they have built. In other words, officers must be sure not to short-circuit the contract by asking someone other than the cadet in charge of drill to do drill. If we can keep our cadets purposefully engaged once we have stimulated their interest, then we feel they will stay in the program. Lt Crouch was an air cadet in the 1970s in Lahr, Germany. He joined the CIC in 2004.

21


CADET PROGRAM UPDATE

Capt Catherine Griffin

Age-appropriate learning Cadets go through a lot of changes during their years in Cadets. The physical, mental, emotional and social changes they experience between 12 and 18 years of age are the basis for age-appropriate learning in the updated training program. oth training design and training delivery are in line with cadets’ development. Skills and knowledge will be taught when they can be best understood and remembered. This ensures cadets are challenged appropriately and can achieve the Cadet Program’s goals and objectives.

B

The Cadet Program didn’t invent the philosophy of age-appropriate learning. Over the past several years, CIC officers across Canada have reviewed contemporary research on youth development and its relationship to learning. This forms the basis of the Cadet Program’s learning philosophy and the establishment of three developmental periods (DPs) for our cadets. As cadets progress through each DP, they develop and

DP 1: Experience-Based (Years 1 & 2: ages 12-14) • Well-developed automatic responses. • Higher-level thinking is just beginning to mature. • These youths enjoy sampling many activities and getting involved. • They want to explore what the program offers. Effective learning • Active and interactive, with lots of hands-on experiences. • A lot of instructor supervision required.

22

ultimately refine higher-level thinking, behaviour and social skills. What are developmental periods? Each DP has a title that corresponds with the major developmental characteristics associated with the age group. These levels are generalized and youths progress through them at varying rates. Helping you understand You will have access to training tools to help you better understand DPs. This spring, you will receive some tips and tricks in your updated training documents that will help you train your first-level cadets.

DP 2: Developmental

DP 3: Competency

(Years 3 & 4: ages 15-16)

(Years 5 &6: ages 17-18)

• These youths are ready to start developing higher-level thinking skills such as problem solving. • They may participate in fewer activities now as they want to learn more about the activities that interest them. • They want to consider how the skills and knowledge they are developing in Cadets can be used in their lives today. Effective learning • Interactive and hands-on, allowing cadets to make some decisions. • Instructors provide some structure, while allowing cadets to make some choices (such as deciding roles in group activities).

• These youths are refining higher-level thinking skills • They are ready for more responsibility and independent learning. • They want to hone their skills as leaders and instructors and specialize in areas of greatest interest to them. • They are considering how skills and knowledge can be fine-tuned and used throughout their future lives. Effective learning • Organized and run by cadets, with coaching from officers. • Allow planning of real, active and hands-on activities • Follow through and follow up.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


Lt(N) Shayne Hall

Outdoor Adventure Training will now become an optional rather than mandatory weekend activity to create more on-water training opportunities for sea cadets.

First-year local training—sea t a glance, the updated Phase One sea cadet training that will begin in September 2008 doesn’t look all that different from the current program. In fact, the most significant changes are not related to content (the what), but rather ‘the how’. Corps training officers will now be required to schedule and manage 60 periods of mandatory training and 30 periods (out of a choice of 98 periods) of complementary training. This, along with instructional guides designed to make every period of instruction ageappropriate and fun, should make "the how" much more dynamic.

A

While the most significant changes apply to "the how", "the what" will see some changes too. Outdoor Adventure Training (OAT) has been reduced as a mandatory weekend activity to an optional weekend activity to create more on-water training opportunities; there will be more Canadian Navy and maritime community familiarization activities; and a greater focus will be placed on personal fitness and healthy living activities.

Content changes include: Serve within a Sea Cadet Corps. While renamed General Cadet Knowledge, the content remains much the same with the exception of things like naval terminology, which comes under a new topic area called Ship's Operations.

Outdoor Adventure Training (OAT) has been reduced as a mandatory weekend activity to an optional weekend activity to create more onwater training opportunities. Drill. Less time is allocated for drill. Mandatory drill focusses on meeting the training needs of the average corps conducting an annual review parade. Additional drill is permitted as part of optional training. Marksmanship. Marksmanship remains largely the same; however, classification shoots have evolved into recreational shooting, with a bigger awards program to include

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

recognition of performance over a longer time. Sailing. While sailing is a mandatory performance objective (PO) in Phase Two and beyond, it has become a complementary PO in Phase One. However, with the introduction of a new topic area called Small Craft Operations, cadets in every phase have two weekends (one mandatory and one complementary) per year to participate in on-water training, whether in a sailboat or some other type of watercraft. Naval Knowledge. The content formerly in this topic area is found now in two new topic areas, Ship's Operations and Canadian Navy and Maritime Community. Canadian Navy and Maritime Community introduces cadets to the Canadian Navy as we have done in the past, but goes a step further to introduce them to the civilian maritime community and Canada as a maritime nation. Continued on page 24

23


CADET PROGRAM UPDATE

Leadership. This topic remains much the same, focussing on being a team member. OAT. Although this is no longer part of phase training, corps may pursue basic camping activities as part of their optional training. Physical Fitness. This has been expanded into two topic areas. Recreational Sports remains similar to the current program, and Personal Fitness and Healthy Living introduces cadets to the components of fitness and the activities and nutritional choices that affect them. The performance objective focusses on goal setting and striving to achieve personal fitness goals. Citizenship. This has also been expanded to two topics. Citizenship introduces cadets to things like Canadian symbols, and Community Service involves Phase One cadets in a community service project. While the updated Phase One (and subsequent phases) looks similar, we will have many challenges as we implement the updated program. The transition to a new framework, the introduction of new activities such as the second weekend of onwater training, and the management of two phase training programs as the update rolls out year by year will not be easy, especially for corps officers. We do not expect the transition to be seamless, and there are bound to be hurdles and growing pains. Rest assured, however, that we will try to make the transition as smooth as possible. To help, you will receive updated Phase One training materials as early as this fall, giving you a full year to prepare for the new program.

First-year local training—army Wise training officers attempt to build best practices from years past into each new training schedule. However, in the 2008-2009 training year, training officers will face an additional challenge—implementing changes in the Green Star program.

T

o help meet this challenge, army training officers can expect to receive new Green Star curriculum documents as early as this fall.

applicable topic areas to fill the 10 complementary sessions (three periods per session) and two of the four complementary days.

The updated program bears a striking resemblance to the current program. Although the framework has changed significantly, the content has not.

With regard to content, there is a reduction in drill, more CF familiarization, the formalization of ‘expedition’ as the vehicle of army cadet training and a greater focus on recreational sports and fitness.

The introduction of 30 complementary periods, where the training officer will choose from an available list of 148 possible instruction periods, will seem confusing at first; however, corps staff will simplify the task by helping to decide which areas of training the corps wants to focus on. From there, it is a simple matter of picking periods from the

Some of the more significant program shifts include: Drill. Mandatory drill focusses on meeting the training needs of the average corps conducting an annual review parade. Additional drill is permitted under complementary periods.

Cadets from 2137 Army Cadet Corps in Calgary takes part in a winter field exercise. Army cadet participation in cold weather training exercises has been formalized as a complementary activity in the updated program.

<

Seamanship. Although renamed Ropework, this area of training remains much the same.

Capt Rick Butson

Lt(N) Hall is the sea cadet program development staff officer at Directorate Cadets.

24

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


Fundamental Training. This remains largely the same under a new topic area called General Cadet Knowledge. A new topic area called CF Familiarization introduces cadets to the role of the Canadian Army. Bushcraft. Renamed Field Training, this topic area shifts some higher supervision enabling objectives to Red Star, and formalizes army cadet participation in cold weather training exercises as a complementary activity. A new topic area called Trekking introduces cadets to movement while on an expedition and allows for two days of complementary adventure training.

The objective of the project to update cadet training was to take the best practices from all three elements and make the program better. Map and Compass. Renamed Navigation, this topic area introduces cadets to maps and how to use them during treks. Marksmanship. Marksmanship remains largely the same; however, classification shoots have evolved into recreational shooting, with a widened awards program to include recognition for performance over a longer duration. Public Speaking and Leadership. Team-building activities under the Leadership topic area replace public speaking as a confidence-building activity. Leadership is expanded to include goal setting. Citizenship. Citizenship has been expanded to include a second topic area, Community Service. Community service will be a mandatory component of the Cadet Program. Physical Fitness. This has been expanded into two topic areas,

Personal Fitness and Healthy Living and Recreational Sports. Mandatory and complementary sports are selected from 10 prescribed sports. A new range of physical assessments to evaluate endurance and strength, with a focus on goal setting, has replaced the army cadet fitness test. Training officers will find it challenging to juggle the implementation of an updated Green Star Program with current Red, Silver, and Gold Star programs. However, in many cases, the challenges are not as great as they may seem. For example, many cadet corps currently conduct sports evenings, citizenship activities, additional range nights and annual review parades in addition to the Star Program periods. Under the updated Star Program, these periods will be captured within mandatory or complementary training. In essence, the update recognizes periods that already exist, but are not in our training control documents. No one expects the updated program to be implemented perfectly in every cadet corps across the country in its first year. Questions are expected, and regional and detachment staff will be available to assist. The objective of the project to update cadet training was to take the best practices from all three elements and make the program better. Now corps training officers will continue to advance army cadet program best practices with valuable new tools—the best practices of the air and sea cadet programs. Capt Butson is the army cadet training development staff officer at Directorate Cadets.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Education credits for cadets ...Continued from page 19 Capt Boudreau met personally with the vice-principal to discuss granting cadets (in their fourth and fifth years of high school) extra credits for their cadet experience. The credits would be part of their academic record and remain on the students’ school files. He then reached an agreement with the school that the cadets must complete and pass Level 3 (Silver Star) exams to earn two credits and Level 4 (Gold Star) exams to earn two additional credits. He hopes the initiative will help retain cadets in his corps until the age of 18, encourage them to finish high school and forge stronger ties between the school administration and the corps. To further strengthen corps/school ties, Capt Boudreau invites high school representatives to the corps’ annual review to present the credits to the deserving cadets. Capt Boudreau proactively sent the full report of his project to 35 present and future corps/squadron COs in the region. “For a corps/squadron in a community with only one high school, it may be best to approach the school administration,” says Mr. Fabes. He adds, however, that where more than one high school exists, it may be best to approach the school board. He further encourages that where there is more than one cadet corps/squadron in a community, they should work together in dealing with education officials. Mr. Fabes agrees that an increase in cadet retention will be one of the major benefits. “Whatever strategy is followed,” he says, “it should be one that reflects the sponsoring committee/military staff partnership.”

25


CADET PROGRAM UPDATE

Capt Andrea Onchulenko

First-year local training— air

Physical Fitness. This area now has two topics—Develop a Personal Activity Plan and Participate in Recreational Sports. We still want to help cadets make healthy fitness-related choices and dedicate some mandatory time for team sports. Air Rifle Marksmanship. We have maintained the same activity. General Cadet Knowledge. The topic area remains similar.

< Updated training for first-year cadets like LAC Navin Woosaree, 810 Air Cadet Squadron in Edmonton, will include aviation, aerospace and airport operations activities. Here, LAC Woosaree experiences power flight.

26

September 2008 may seem a long way off, but it’s not too early to start planning! As you already know, new Proficiency Level One training for air cadets will not begin until then; however, there’s a bright side. his gives you more time to ‘digest’ the new training materials when they arrive this fall and prepare for the 2008-2009 training year.

T

Although the advent of planning for the new program while carrying out the current program represents some challenges, the updated program is something to look forward to. It introduces some new activities for first-year cadets, but what is especially positive is the introduction of complementary activities. For each of the program areas listed below, training staff will be able to select activities from 120 periods of training. Complementary training must fill 10 sessions (30 periods) and 2 days (18 periods). This will allow squadron staffs to tailor their training to their new cadets based on the cadets’ desires, local resources and squadron staff expertise.

Here are the shifts within the various program areas: Citizenship. This area has been expanded to include the new topic of Community Service.

This [complementary training choices] will allow squadron staffs to tailor their training to their new cadets based on the cadets’ desires, local resources and squadron staff expertise. Leadership. Leadership training starts with learning how to be a good follower and team member— and practising it. These skills will then serve as a basis for leadership training at higher levels.

Drill. We have reduced the number of periods devoted to drill, while maintaining enough time to teach the fundamentals of foot drill at the halt and on the march. The goal is to adequately prepare cadets to participate in their annual ceremonial review. Canadian Forces Familiarization. We have dedicated some mandatory time to learning about the CF. Aviation, Aerospace, and Airport Operations Activities. We have created three subject areas to allow for a variety of aviation, aerospace and aviation technology activities. These activities will continue through the various levels of air cadet training and are now linked to summer training. Field Exercise. We have maintained Air Crew Survival and Radio Communications. We have moved much of the field training to the mandatory exercise. Introducing the updated program a year at a time should allow squadron staffs to bite off change in smaller amounts—making change more digestible! Capt Onchulenko is the air cadet program development staff officer at Directorate Cadets.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


AIR CADET LEAGUE

Craig Hawkins

Career opportunities for air cadets? The Air Cadet League is continuing to build partnerships within the Canadian aviation and aerospace sector as part of its long-term commitment to build a dynamic and challenging program for air cadets across Canada. n November 2006, the league signed agreements with the Air Transport Association of Canada and the Canadian Business Aviation Association that commit the organizations to work together to foster an interest in aviation-related careers for Canadian youth. These agreements are in addition to similar agreements in 2005 with the Canadian Aviation Maintenance Council (CAMC) and the Canadian Aerospace Associations Human Resources Alliance (CAAHRA).

I

One of the aims of the air cadet program is to foster an interest in aviation. Canadian aviation and aerospace industries share the same interest, particularly when it comes to young people who are interested in entering many of the managerial, professional or technological careers that they represent. These agreements are seen as a win-win situation

<

For the Cadet Program, the benefits are obvious— contact with aviation and aerospace companies, training resources and facilities, tours, and access to industry experts as guest speakers or instructors.

With cadets from 632 Air Cadet Squadron in Orleans, Ont, looking on, Craig Hawkins, president of the Air Cadet League, centre, signs agreements with Glenn Priestley, Canadian Business Aviation Association, left, and Sam Barone, Air Transport Association of Canada. for everyone. Canada’s aviation and aerospace industries offer a wide range of career opportunities for young people today, and the demand for knowledgeable, enthusiastic people is growing as this sector of the Canadian economy continues to expand.

aviation and aerospace industries, the benefits are more long-term— opportunities to interact with young people who have an interest in aviation and might very well choose it as a career. They are investing in the future of their companies and the Canadian aviation/aerospace sector.

What is unique about these agreements is that they will benefit the program at all levels, from the local squadron that will be able to connect with a local aviation or aerospace company right up to the national level where a steering committee, composed of representatives from both sides, is looking at how to work together on specific projects.

Benefits are starting to appear at the local level. Some squadrons have already received industry-based training material from the Canadian Aviation Maintenance Council to support local training.

For the Cadet Program, the benefits are obvious—contact with aviation and aerospace companies, training resources and facilities, tours, and access to industry experts as guest speakers or instructors. For the

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

For more information on the agreements, and how your squadron can benefit from them, contact Air Cadet League national headquarters, your provincial office, or Grant Fabes, chair of the league/industry steering committee at gsfabes@videotron.ca. Mr. Hawkins is the national president of the Air Cadet League.

27


CADET TRAINING

Lt David Jackson

Supplement classroom training with power flying It is no secret that air cadets love to fly. Squadrons are allocated gliding dates, and cadets jump at the chance to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the real world. nfortunately, poor weather can cancel a squadron’s gliding date(s), and gliding operations do not occur during winter months.

U

CATO 52-07 governs power flying. Each region also has specific directives. Please contact your [Area Cadet Officer] and [Regional Cadet Air Operations Officer] for further information. When this happens, why not consider supplementing your air cadets’ experience with powered flight? Commanding officers can contact their Area Cadet Officer (ACO) and Regional Cadet Air Operations Officer (RCAOpsO) for assistance in arranging this activity, particularly if the squadron’s gliding date is cancelled or the squadron is too far

28

from a gliding zone. Special funding for power flying may be available from your regional cadet support unit, or from the local level of the Air Cadet League—depending on your circumstances. Power flying in your region CATO 52-07 governs power flying. Each region also has specific directives. Please contact your ACO and RCAOpsO for further information. It’s a good idea to rent aircraft from reputable, well-established local flying clubs. Flying clubs must meet certain standards set forth by Transport Canada for maintenance, inspections and liability insurance. No matter what region you are in, however, pilots must have the following when using flying club aircraft: • 30 hours as pilot in command (PIC) • One hour on the type of aircraft to be used for the activity • A flight on that type of aircraft as

Cpl Pooja Woosaree, Cpl David Jones and Cpl Ben Kaggwa wait for a familiarization flight.

PIC (or with an instructor) in the last 60 days • Within the past year, a flight with a flight instructor for an annual proficiency check on the type of aircraft to be used for the activity Popular aircraft such as the Cessna 172 permit as many as three cadets plus the pilot to fly at a time. What the cadets can learn Level One These air cadets will find many opportunities to improve their aircraft identification skills and knowledge of aeronautical facilities as a result of a trip to an aerodrome. Most importantly, instruction in airframe structures takes on special meaning when these cadets can accompany the pilot on a thorough walk-around of the aircraft, viewing up close all the main parts. A familiarization flight with these cadets provides an opportunity for the pilot to demonstrate the primary effects of the controls (pitch, roll, yaw) and what control surface is linked to which.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


These cadets have opportunities to explore principles of flight, propulsion, and radio communication on a familiarization flight.

your

They can see demonstrations of the further (secondary) effects of controls and the coupling of the four forces on the aircraft, as well as flying the circuit at an aerodrome. Active listening to radio communications, particularly on a busy radio frequency, adds depth to the cadet’s knowledge of radio communication. 1.

a) c) b) d) 2.

Take heart if bad weather and distance interrupt your gliding day(s). By augmenting your local headquarters training with power flying and actively linking the performance objectives to the flights, cadets will gain a greater appreciation for flight and a deeper knowledge early on. This will help them excel on scholarship course applications and in the civilian world of aviation. Lt Jackson is the former administration officer at 810 Air Cadet Squadron in Edmonton and is currently a pilot with the Edmonton Gliding Centre.

Commanding officer, regional cadet support unit Director General Reserves and Cadets Commanding officer, cadet corps/squadron Director Cadets

What is the maximum time limit for submission of a formal grievance? a) 12 months b) 6 months

Senior cadets Familiarization flights for the most senior cadets can involve dead-reckoning navigation. These flights will involve serious preparation work before stepping in the aircraft, as the cadets must make calculations for distance, speed, time, fuel, weight and balance, and altitude. They must also decipher aviation weather reports, which is part of their meteorology performance objective.

Under whose authority can an officer cadet be commanding officer of a cadet corps or squadron?

3.

How frequently must a CIC officer or civilian instructor update their Police Record Check/Vulnerable Sectors Screening? a) Once b) Every 3 years

4.

c) Every 5 years d) Every 10 years

On what date did the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Department of National Defence/CF and the three leagues take effect? a) Nov. 23, 2002 b) Dec. 1, 2005

5.

c) Indefinite d) 3 months

c) Sept. 1, 2006 d) July 1, 2006

Which of the following corps/squadron positions does not have access to Fortress—the Cadet Program’s database? a) Supply officer b) Band officer

c) Instructor 4 d) Commanding officer

Correction Gremlins were at work in our last Quiz. The correct answers for questions 4 and 5 were reversed, although the references were correct. The correct answer for question 4 should have been (b) and the correct answer for question 5 should have been (a). We apologize for the error.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

Answers

Navigation is one of the prime performance objectives for cadets at this level. Familiarization flights for these cadets can include pilotage exercises during which the cadets play the role of navigator and practise relating ground features to the map and directing the pilot to a predetermined location on the map.

Created by the directing staff at Regional Cadet Instructors School (Pacific)

1. (c) Reference: CATO 23-14, paragraphs 3-4 2. (b) Reference: QR&O Volume 1, Chapter 7, article 7.02 3. (c) Reference: CATO 23-04, paragraph 7 4. (d) Reference: www.cadets.forces.gc.ca/_docs/mem_ understanding/Mem_Understanding_e.pdf (page 40) 5. (b) Reference: CATO 11-35, paragraph 12

Level Three

?

Test Knowledge

Level Two

29


OFFICER TRAINING

Capt Pierre-Archer Cournoyer

New CIC course management system Get the training you need when you need it Starting soon, a computerbased system named MITE—Military Individual Training and Education— will be used to manage CIC officer training.

units (RCSUs). However, local officers will need to fill in a new course application form called the CIC Training Application Form, which will replace all current course application forms. Local officers will also need to familiarize themselves with the new process for course application and loading. Why are we using MITE? The goal is to: • Provide a consistent approach to course application, selection, loading and management. • Reduce the administrative burden of entering course results and verifying prerequisites manually. • Ensure fair and equitable access to training for all CIC officers. • Provide detachments with more input into candidate selection. • Ensure that candidates receive training

< Local officers will need to fill in a new course application form called the CIC Training Application Form.

ITE will keep track of the individual training and education of every CIC officer from the time a course is applied for until it is completed and will automatically update personnel files.

M

The transition to this system is expected to be relatively seamless for local CIC officers, who will require no training to use it because its primary users will be full-time personnel working at detachments, regional cadet instructors schools (RCISs) and regional cadet support

30

at the right time in their careers

in the right location

that meets their specific needs

that meets the needs of their current and future jobs, as well as the needs of their corps/ squadron

that is most cost-effective.

More benefits In the past, one of the biggest frustrations has been not getting loaded on a course you applied for and not

being given a reason why. In the MITE system, the Area Cadet Officer (ACO) responsible for your corps/squadron not only nominates you for training, but also indicates a priority level—based largely on how urgently you require training. This increases your chances of obtaining the course you need, when and where you need it. As well, if you don’t get selected for a specific course, your ACO will be able to tell you why.

MITE will keep track of the individual training and education of every CIC officer from the time a course is applied for until it is completed and will automatically update personnel files. Another benefit is that once your application is in MITE, it stays “in queue” for two years. If you don’t get loaded on a course the first time, your name will simply move up the list for the next available course. You will not have to re-submit an application form until the one-year period has elapsed, but it should not normally take that long to get you on course. You must, however, monitor the situation to ensure you are still available when the next course is offered.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


Course application process The big change is there will be a standardized process for course application and loading across the country. For most, the process will be similar to what you are doing now. It will work like this: 1. You will consult the RCIS training schedule on your regional website to choose your course session.

3. Your corps/squadron commanding officer (CO) will review your application, insert his/her recommendation (which takes into account your needs, as well as corps/squadron needs) and then forward it to your ACO. 4. Your ACO will decide whether or not to grant your training request. 5. If selected, your ACO will enter your name in MITE and assign a priority level. This will ensure that urgent training needs are met. 6. Your RCIS or RCSU (as applicable) will use MITE to load you on the course, and your detachment (or, in the case of Pacific Region, the RCSU) will inform you when you are loaded. 7. You will download joining instructions, make travel arrangements and prepare for training the same way you do now. 8. You will report for and attend training in accordance with your joining instructions. When you successfully complete the course, your RCIS will record your training results and MITE will update your personnel file automatically.

<

2. You will complete your application on paper, using the new CIC Training Application Form.

Local officers will require no training to use MITE because primary users will be fulltime personnel working at detachments, RCISs and RCSUs. Monitoring your email You and your CO will be notified by email when you are course loaded, so make sure to include a valid email address on your application form and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to check your email regularly!

You and your CO will be notified by email when you are course loaded, so make sure to include a valid email address on your application form and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to check your email regularly! Not on the corps/squadron establishment? If you belong to other cadet units (such as gliding schools, RCSUs, cadet summer training centres, sailing centres and so on), you will apply using the same process. However, you will submit your

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

application to your immediate supervisor, who will forward it to your RCSU. The implementation of MITE will not change the content or delivery methods of CIC courses. When new training is rolled out in the future as part of a completely separate project to modernize CIC training, the new courses will replace the old courses in MITE. When applying for Distributed Learning (DL) courses, apply as you would for any other course. This also applies to courses that have a pre-course DL component. Until the new system is implemented, you should follow current course application procedures. Using the MITE system is seen as an important step forward for CIC training. You should rapidly see its benefits in getting the training you need when you need it. Capt Cournoyer is the national CIC training co-ordinator at Directorate Cadets.

31


OFFICER DEVELOPMENT

Lt(N) Paul Simas

Decisiveness Indecision leads to disrespect. COs must act decisively and not secondguess themselves. Even though they may need to consult others for advice, they cannot allow too many outside influences to interfere with their decision-making. Empathy COs need to be able to read the pulse of their staffs. Only then can they understand when staffs need more discipline, or a pat on the back.

Command is command Is there a way to measure how formidable command can be? Is one command—command of a CF destroyer for instance—bigger, more valuable and more significant than command of a sea cadet corps?

Although the above attributes are all important components in a command strategy, motivation jumps to the fore as an attribute in the command strategy of the CO of a cadet corps or squadron—where the ‘crew’ is largely volunteer. Ability to motivate

here may be different levels of command or different missions, but no matter how big or how small your unit is, command is command.

T

You must have a command strategy that includes vision, an ability to instil loyalty, decisiveness and empathy. Especially important to the commanding officer (CO) of a cadet corps or squadron is the ability to motivate.

While motivation plays a major role in any command, it may be the only reason someone stays in the Cadet Program and allows you to command them. Vision Whether you are the CO of a Regular Force destroyer, or the CO of a cadet corps/ squadron, you need

32

vision. A vision serves to challenge the legacy left by a former CO, especially when the former was popular with staff. A vision establishes the personality of the CO. Ability to instil loyalty To gain loyalty, COs don’t necessarily need to be ‘nice people’. They do, however, need to have the courage of their convictions. They will instil loyalty if they stand behind their decisions, no matter how controversial. Those decisions must, however, be well informed. This does not mean that the CO has to be an expert in every field. Staff can understand and accept that a CO may sometimes rely on the expertise of others to make decisions. When decisions are based on solid advice, it’s easier for COs to believe in their decisions and ‘sell’ them to others.

While motivation plays a major role in any command, it may be the only reason someone stays in the Cadet Program and allows you to command them. If your decisions become too controversial, if you cannot instil loyalty and ‘read’ your crew, you will have problems. If you cannot motivate your ‘crew’, you will have a mutiny and possibly lose your command. Only your ability to motivate will give your ‘crew’ the loyalty you need to achieve your mission in a cadet corps/squadron. Whether commanding a CF destroyer, or a cadet corps/squadron, you must command with vision, be able to instil loyalty, be decisive and empathetic and be able to motivate, albeit in different measures. Command is command! Lt(N) Simas is the CO of 18 Sea Cadet Corps VANGUARD in Toronto.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


Michael Harrison

Telling it smart! Let cadets tell the Cadet Program story

I discussed the importance of connecting with people by emphasizing not only what the Cadet Program does well, but also tying that to the goals and expectations of others— whether it’s in schools, or in other community sectors.

Civic action and service sector • Set aside an evening to build bird feeders and bird houses for kids. • Teach sports and other activities to youngsters. • Sponsor a mini-hike. • Maintain a first-aid tent for major running, hiking or beach events. • Sponsor an astronomy night.

This article goes a step further. It focusses on increasing visibility within the service and business sectors of your community by letting cadets tell the Cadet Program story through actions and words. It is important to show community members how the program and your cadets can benefit them.

• Prepare a monthly article for local newspapers.

Remember to take photos or videos when engaged in an activity with your corps/squadron. Make your cadets responsible for digitizing the action. They often have advanced skills and a relevant perspective on what should be documented. Give a few of your cadets the responsibility for preparing an article with photos for a website, local newspaper or local cable producer. You will be impressed with how talented your cadets can be when given responsibility.

• Clean a section of highway.

• Visit the elderly/aged. • Help youngsters skate. • Play concerts in the park. • Walk dogs. • Clean up a local park in the spring. • Plant bulbs in the fall. • Canvass for cancer. • Work with Cub troops. • Volunteer with food banks. • Provide a colour party and platoons for parades. • Participate in demonstrations at summer and fall fairs.

Business sector • Provide a childcare service for parents in the mall. • Speak/meet with local business associations, emphasizing the skills and employability of cadets. • Set up booths and displays at conferences. • Deliver community newspapers. • Solicit businesses for sponsorship of cadet competitions and exercises. You and your cadets cannot do everything in one year. Start small and build each year. Each season of cadet activities, do one thing really well. Prepare and train your cadets to ‘tell the program’. They are your best ambassadors for telling it smart. Michael Harrison is currently a site administrator for the Ottawa District School Board and a part-time professor for the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa. Your cadets can help tell the Cadet Program story by playing concerts in the community. (Eastern Region photo)

<

n the last issue of Cadence, I focussed on strategies for recruiting and ‘selling’ the Cadet Program in schools.

I

Here are some suggestions for activities you can become involved in to help raise the profile of the Cadet Program within your community’s service and business sectors. You can probably add all sorts of activities to these lists, but obviously, you will not be able to do all of them. The lists are simply intended to give you ideas. Pick the best ones for your local situation.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

33


VIEWPOINT

Lt(N) Matthew Clark

Balance

Are we trying to do too much for cadets? A senior cadet recently came to see me after having an argument with her mother. It seems her mother was upset with her because she was spending too much time at Cadets. The mother felt that the huge amount of money that had been spent on hockey for her daughter was going to waste, as the daughter continually chose to miss hockey practices in favour of going to Cadets. This is a story of the importance of balance in our cadets’ lives. It is also a story of our corps’ response—the checks and balances we have put in place (see sidebar) to ensure balance in our corps.

ur corps was (and still is) very active. If an activity was offered in the Cadet Program, we made sure it was offered to our cadets.

O

It had come to this: “Sir, I think it is just becoming too much,” the cadet told me. “Maybe mom is right.” In her first couple of years in Cadets, the cadet in my story came out to regular and weekend training and from time to time, marksmanship practice. However, she became hooked on marksmanship, representing the corps in both provincial and national marksmanship matches. Soon came much more. On Mondays, she had marksmanship training On both Mondays and Thursdays, she trained with the biathlon team— something else she had become good at, competing at the provincial level and as a staff cadet at the national level. Tuesday nights were free, except when she attended a monthly Duke of Edinburgh Award meeting. On Wednesdays, our regular training night, she would arrive early from time to time to work with the drill

34

team. On Thursdays, before biathlon practice, she played flute with the corps band She attended weekend training events once to twice a month and went to the outdoor range for biathlon .22-calibre practice on Sunday afternoons. She was truly an elite cadet, with many team sport medals and the Lord Strathcona Medal. Now, it had come to this: “Sir, I think it is just becoming too much,” the cadet told me. “Maybe mom is right.” Where had we gone wrong? In our effort to ensure variety in our cadets’ lives, perhaps we were doing too much.

Now I had to consider whether we were taking the fun out of our local sea cadet program. Were we becoming too competitive? The Cadet Program had changed so much over the past 25 years. When I was a cadet, marksmanship was restricted to firing the old Lee Enfield—with a .22 calibre bore—at the local Rod and Gun Club. There were no competitions, no huge awards. We did it for the fun of it. From time to time, we were lucky enough to load the skeet traps for Rod and Gun Club members and looked forward to it. There was no such thing as biathlon for cadets, and while we did have a corps band, we did not take ourselves too seriously. In fact, I still remember fondly our homemade mace, made of a

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


Checks and balances It may be helpful to apply these checks and balances to ensure balance in your corps/ squadron activities. Can you be good at something? While you may want your corps/squadron to do everything, it’s best to limit programs and offerings to things that you have a reasonable chance at success with. There is no point in doing it all, if you aren’t successful at anything. Can you balance cadet corps/squadron demands with the demands of life? Consider each cadet and how much you can demand of that cadet. Remember that our young people have lives outside of Cadets— family, school and social commitments. Reflect too on the demands we place on our staff because everything that applies to cadets applies to our staff as well. Will it still be fun for cadets and staff?

broom stick, with a can on the end and a harshly cut crown of metal welded to the top of that. It sufficed, and once a year we would proudly parade and compete in Halifax against other cadet corps from across Atlantic Canada. As a youth in Lunenburg, I never heard of the Duke of Edinburgh Awards Program, although I know it existed then. Annual competitions were limited to dory races in Lunenburg, a sports competition and a seamanship competition in Halifax, and a sail regatta in Shearwater—events we spent little time preparing for outside our one night each week of training and a few weekends over the year. But we had fun. Now I had to consider whether we were taking the fun out of our local sea cadet program. Were we becoming too competitive? We certainly started all of our

programs for the right reasons: we wanted a variety of activities to attract and retain cadets in an environment competing for youth and we wanted our small corps to have the same opportunities as bigger corps for travel and competition. But we did not want angry parents. And we wanted our cadets to succeed not only in Cadets, but also in their family and social relationships. We did not want our cadets doing poorly at school. We had to find balance. We now have a checks and balance list that we consult before undertaking anything new. And we trust that the outcome will be happier parents, staff and cadets—who have a few evenings to themselves. Lt(N) Clark has commanded three corps, two in large cities in Ontario, over the past 16 years. Currently, he is commanding officer of 39 NEPTUNE Sea Cadet Corps in Lunenburg, N.S.

Professional Development for Leaders of the Cadet Program

As long as the cadet experiences more fun than stress during the events they compete in, you’re probably heading in the right direction. If they can be challenged by it and truly enjoy the experience, it is probably worth undertaking. Is there an opportunity to serve another segment of your cadet corps? Will the new activity provide an interest for cadets that don’t do something already, or will you have the same cadets doing all the activities? By diversifying our program offerings, we attract more cadets to more activities; however, we can’t be totally focussed on sports or athletics. Challenges of the mind can be just as important as challenges of the body. Does it fit into the schedule, or will you have to ask cadets and staff to attend another evening? Our corps effectively manages to undertake most programs offered. However in past years we conducted training on four to five nights a week—requiring an hour’s drive each night for some of the cadets in our rural community. Now we conduct weekly training on Sunday afternoons, and cadets can rotate through program offerings. Encourage your cadets to confide in you if they feel overwhelmed by activities.

35


LETTERS

...Continued from page 5

EXPECTATIONS FOR OVERWEIGHT CADETS I believe that expectations in our current training program are too high for cadets who are overweight and out of shape. Those who have difficulty at a cadet summer training centre (CSTC) will take the easy road out, suffering the stigma of going to a medical inspection room rather than subjecting themselves to the embarrassment of public display. The expectations placed on these cadets, more often than not, directly relate to a misunderstanding of the intended use of the CTP [Cadet Training Program] for physical training—often the only resource available to the person responsible for

NEWS AND NOTES

NCdt Ebert

36

delivering that training. The CTP is intended only as a guide to assist us in delivering the program. Instructors can use their own initiative to modify program delivery to accommodate participation, while meeting Cadet Program goals. Not every child is capable of attaining the gold, silver and bronze levels of physical fitness in our current physical training program. However, every child can attain some level of enhanced physical fitness if they have the opportunity to establish their own personal goals. Some effort should be made to empower kids, provide them with knowledge

Teach them Tai Chi, vary the program, hire some professionals and ensure those professionals are qualified. Don’t lower the bar. Simply make achieving the goal possible by thinking outside the box. Maybe everyone who tries won’t get there, but we can sow the seed, give them some tools and encourage them to change by realizing the benefits. Capt Dale Chadsey Special projects officer Regional Cadet Support Unit (Pacific)

...Continued from page 9

Scholarship recipients

recipients of Central Region’s $1500 CIC Citizen Scholarships.

Capt Trevor Henderson, CO of 2893 Army Cadet Corps in Port Coquitlam, B.C., and NCdt Ernest Ebert of Windsor, Ont., currently a volunteer with 37 Sea Cadet Cadet Corps in London, Ont., are the 2006

The two scholarships are awarded annually to CIC officers who are pursuing their first post-secondary degree or diploma. Selections are based on character, leadership qualities/potential, scholarship, and financial need. One scholarship is awarded to a Central Region applicant; the second is open to all regions. Eligibility is limited to currently serving CIC officers who have been cadets.

Capt Henderson

related to physical fitness training and allow them to plan their own nutritional and physical goals.

Capt Henderson is a former cadet from 2812 Army Cadet Corps in Surrey, B.C. In 1992, he became a CIC officer with 1922 Army Cadet Corps in Aldergrove, B.C. and eventually served as corps commanding officer for six years before transferring back to his original corps in Surrey in 2004. He has also served in a variety of capacities at cadet summer training centres in Vernon, B.C. and Whitehorse, Yukon.

He is currently enrolled in the public relations program at Kwantlan College in Richmond, B.C., and resides in Aldergove. NCdt Ebert was a cadet for six years with 48 Sea Cadet Corps AGAMEMNON in Windsor, Ont. He worked as a sailing instructor at HMCS ONTARIO in the summer of 2004 and after that as a sail instructor with 9 Sail Centre in Sarnia. He has worked with Canadian Coast Guard search and rescue for the past two summers— thanks to his experience with sea cadets, he says. NCdt Ebert is in his second year of an honours Bachelor of Medical Science degree at the University of Western Ontario. To review eligibility criteria and access an online application form, go to www.central.cadets.ca/rcis/ news_e.html. Applications for the 2007 scholarships are due no later than June 30.

CADENCE

Issue 21, Winter 2006


Crédits pour études accordés aux cadets, p. 19 • Apprentissage selon l’âge, p. 22

Expédition internationale de l’Armée Les capacités mentales et physiques des officiers et des cadets à l’épreuve

Reconnaissance des acquis Moins de temps d’entraînement pour les officiers du CIC?

L’intérêt par la participation Retenir les cadets et s’adjoindre des commanditaires

Annulation des sorties de vol à voile? Augmenter l’entraînement local des vols à moteur

Nouveaux cours à l’essai

Numéro 21

Hiver 2006

Candidats recherchés


DANS CE NUMÉRO

12 Apprentissage au sommet de la montagne L’expédition internationale des cadets de l’Armée de cette année, formatrice pour un officier Capt Matt White 13 Candidats recherchés pour tester de nouveaux cours Les nouveaux cours élémentaires d’officier et de formation professionnelle testés en mai Maj Serge Dubé

14 Reconnaissance des acquis du CIC L’officialisation du processus de reconnaissance des acquis (RA) permettra que dans le cadre du programme de formation CIC, l’on reconnaisse pour certains participants les connaissances scolaires, les expériences d’apprentissage, ainsi que les connaissances et compétences acquises au cours d’emplois précédents (civils et dans les FC), qui répondent aux exigences actuelles des cours du CIC. Ltv Darin McRae et Capt Pierre-Archer Cournoyer

16 Gestion du risque Un plan en cinq étapes Le commandant d’un escadron partage son modèle préféré de gestion du risque Capt Jean-Paul (J.P.) Ferron 19 Crédits pour études accordés aux cadets De l’aide pour que l’expérience des cadets soit reconnue dans les écoles secondaires 22 Apprentissage selon l’âge Capt Catherine Griffin 23 Instruction locale de première année – Marine Changements au programme Ltv Shayne Hall 24 Instruction locale de première année – Armée Combiner les pratiques exemplaires pour l’Armée, l’Air et la Marine Capt Rick Butson 26 Instruction locale de première année – Air Un pas à la fois Capt Andrea Onchulenko 27 Perspectives de carrière pour les cadets de l’air La Ligue des cadets de l’Air et l’industrie planifient l’avenir Craig Hawkins

20 L’intérêt par la participation La stratégie d’un cmdt consiste à insuffler un sentiment d’appartenance aux cadets, officiers et parrains. Lt Dale Crouch

2

30 Nouveau système de gestion des cours du CIC L’instruction là et quand vous en avez besoin Capt Pierre-Archer Cournoyer 32 Le commandement, c’est le commandement Peu importe l’envergure de votre unité, le commandement a ses caractéristiques Ltv Paul Simas 33 Faites passer le message Laissons les cadets parler du Programme des cadets Michael Harrison

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


À VENIR

10 PAGE COUVERTURE Expédition internationale Les officiers au défi d’agir sur le moment L’expédition internationale annuelle de l’Armée représente un défi pour les meilleurs cadets de l’Armée. Il s’agit également d’un défi que doivent relever les officiers accompagnateurs qui exercent leur leadership dans des circonstances extrêmes. Ici, le Capt Daniel Rioux, du Corps de cadets de l’Armée 242 de Petit-Rocher, au N. B. – officier en charge de l’expédition de 2006 – mène les cadets au cours d’une journée de randonnée particulièrement difficile (plus de 1 000 mètres) jusqu’à la fenêtre d’Arpete en Suisse. (Photo du Capt Hope Carr, Affaires publiques, région de l’Atlantique)

28 Compléter l’instruction en classe par l’expérience de vols à moteur La mauvaise température peut occasionner l’annulation de sorties de vol à voile. De plus, l’hiver ne permet pas le vol à voile. Un officier a suggéré de compléter l’expérience des cadets de l’Air par des vols à moteur. Lt David Jackson

DANS CHAQUE NUMÉRO 4

Mot d’ouverture

5

Courrier

29

Testez vos connaissances?

34 Point de vue

6

Bloc-notes

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

Il y a un certain temps, Cadence a envoyé un message pour diffusion générale par le biais de CadetNet demandant : « Quelle est la plus grande difficulté à laquelle votre corps ou escadron local de cadets fait face? » Le Lt Harry Whale, instructeur de l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 835 à Squamish, en C. B., nous a répondu qu’au cours de ses neuf années à titre d’officier du CIC, il a travaillé auprès de deux escadrons et qu’aucun ne possédait de quartier général permanent. Il a demandé à Cadence de faire le suivi dans un article portant sur les autres corps ou escadrons de cadets aux prises avec des situations semblables. Dans le prochain numéro, nous présenterons certains corps et escadrons de cadets « sans abri », sans oublier leurs tribulations et leurs triomphes face aux problèmes auxquels ils se butent. À ne pas manquer. Le numéro printemps-été proposera d’autres articles, dont un sur « La préparation de vos cadets pour le camp » et un autre sur le nouveau Leadership dans les Forces canadiennes : Doctrine, publié au début de 2005. Ce document est maintenant le fondement de l’instruction et de la formation au leadership pour tous les officiers et militaires du rang des FC. Il constitue également le principe fondamental de la nouvelle instruction au leadership du CIC, actuellement en cours d’élaboration. En quoi le leadership a-t-il changé? La première partie de cette série de deux articles traitera de la nouvelle définition du leadership et de la philosophie renouvelée des FC en la matière. Vos volontaires sont-ils en perte de vitesse? Avez-vous des difficultés à stimuler leur motivation? Si oui, vous voudrez peut-être savoir comment les autres prennent soin de leurs bénévoles. Vous en apprendrez beaucoup plus sur la mise à jour du Programme des cadets dans notre numéro printemps-été. Ce numéro comprendra des articles sur le concept du programme révisé d’instruction d’été, des informations sur les activités dirigées régionalement et nationalement et d’autres renseignements concernant la décision récente de commencer les nouveaux programmes d’instruction de première année en septembre 2008, au lieu de septembre 2007. Les dates de tombée pour le numéro printemps-été 2007 et le numéro d’automne 2007 sont le 5 février et la mi-juin, respectivement. Si vous êtes intéressé à collaborer au prochain numéro, communiquez à l’avance avec la directrice de la rédaction à marshascott@cogeco.ca, scott.mk@cadets.net ou à (905) 468 9371.

3


MOT D’OUVERTURE

Marsha Scott

Apprendre par l’expérience des autres omme notre bloc générique l’indique, Cadence est le magazine de perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets.

C

À titre de journal d’apprentissage, il ne représente qu’un outil de perfectionnement professionnel parmi une gamme d’outils dont vous faites partie. En effet, Kathleen Bailey, Andy Curtis et David Nunan décrivaient, dans leur livre Pursuing Professional Development : The Self as Source, « la connaissance de soi et l’auto-observation comme étant les pierres angulaires de tout perfectionnement professionnel.» Autant l’autoréflexion peut constituer une forme de perfectionnement professionnel, vous pourrez aller encore plus loin en réfléchissant sur la foule d’expériences d’apprentissage et d’enseignement acquises par vos pairs engagés dans le Programme des cadets. C’est ce que Cadence vous permet de faire en publiant des articles qui abordent, dans chaque numéro, un échantillon représentatif de sujets et de thèmes. Comment choisissons-nous les articles? Le personnel national de la Direction – Cadets utilise Cadence pour vous tenir au courant des nouveaux développements et appuyer les messages connexes. Bien qu’une faible fréquence de publication empêche que Cadence soit considéré comme un magazine d’actualité, on y présente des sujets sous divers angles souvent soutenus par des exemples et enrichis d’expériences personnelles. Dans le présent numéro, par exemple, Cadence présente des articles sur la reconnaissance des acquis, sur le nouveau système informatisé qui servira à gérer toute l’instruction des officiers du CIC, et aussi des mises au point sur le CIC et l’instruction des cadets.

4

Numéro 21 Hiver 2006

Cadence cherche toujours à équilibrer son contenu. Cependant, les responsables s’efforcent toujours d’offrir des articles sur le perfectionnement professionnel qui est la base même du Programme des cadets, c’est-à-dire sur les instructeurs et les bénévoles des corps et des escadrons de cadets de partout au Canada. Dans le présent numéro, vous pourrez lire un article sur un officier d’Etobicoke, en Ontario, qui emprunte à la Marine américaine son modèle de gestion du risque opérationnel pour assurer la sécurité de ses cadets. Un autre officier de Yellowknife, dans les T.N.O., nous décrit la façon dont il réussit à retenir ses cadets en insufflant un sentiment d’appartenance aux cadets supérieurs. Un autre officier-cadet d’Edmonton partage son point de vue sur la possibilité de compléter l’instruction des cadets de l’Air par des vols à moteur. En plus des articles vedettes, deux sections du magazine, Point de vue et Courrier, présentent les opinions de nos lecteurs. Dans la rubrique Point de vue du présent numéro, un officier de Lunenburg, en N. É., partage avec les lecteurs sa « formule » qui lui permet d’atteindre l’équilibre chez les cadets et le personnel de son corps de cadets. Traditionnellement, les lettres envoyées à la rédaction nous permettent d’évaluer l’intérêt suscité par les différents sujets et les différents thèmes. À en juger par la réponse des lecteurs à notre série d’articles sur la condition physique et l’alimentation dans le Programme des cadets, on peut en conclure que ce sujet intéresse grandement notre lectorat. Nous n’avons jamais reçu autant de lettres faisant référence à un seul sujet. Lisez la rubrique Courrier pour en savoir un peu plus. Le Courrier est l’une des rubriques les plus lues de toute la publication. Nous vous encourageons donc à partager vos points de vue avec les autres lecteurs. Vous pouvez aussi envisager d’écrire un article pour Cadence. Le partage de vos réflexions pourrait aider d’autres personnes à progresser dans leur cheminement professionnel.

Cadence est un outil de perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) ainsi qu’aux instructeurs civils du Programme des cadets. Les destinataires secondaires comprennent tous ceux qui participent au Programme ou qui s’y intéressent. Le magazine est publié trois fois par année par les Affaires publiques - Chef – Réserves et cadets, au nom du Directeur des cadets. Les points de vue exprimés dans cette publication ne reflètent pas nécessairement l’opinion ou la politique officielle. Vous pouvez consulter la politique rédactionnelle et les numéros antérieurs de Cadence en ligne au http://cadets.ca/support/cadence/intro_f.asp.

Rédactrice en chef : Ltv Julie Harris, Affaires publiques Chef – Réserves et cadets

Directrice de la rédaction : Marsha Scott, Antian Professional Services

Renseignements Rédactrice en chef, Cadence Direction – Cadets & Rangers juniors canadiens Quartier général de la Défense nationale 101, promenade du Colonel-By Ottawa (Ontario), K1A 0K2

Courriel : marshascott@cogeco.ca CadetNet à cadence@cadets.net ou scott.mk@cadets.net

Téléphone : Tél. : 1 800 627-0828 Télécopieur : (613) 996-1618

Distribution Cadence est distribué par la Direction du service d’information technique et de codification (DSITC), Dépôt des publications, aux corps et escadrons des cadets, aux unités régionales de soutien des cadets et à leurs sous-unités, aux cadres et officiers supérieurs de la Défense nationale et des FC ainsi qu’à certains membres des ligues. Les corps et escadrons de cadets qui ne reçoivent pas Cadence ou qui désirent mettre leurs renseignements à jour aux fins de la distribution doivent communiquer avec le cadet-officier ou le conseiller des cadets de leur secteur.

Traduction : Bureau de la traduction, Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada

Direction artistique : Directeur - Produits et services d'affaires publiques CS06-0480 A-CR-007-000/JP-001

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


COURRIER DES NORMES À LA BAISSE? J’ai constaté qu’au cours des cinq dernières années, nous, les officiers du CIC, avons toléré un certain relâchement des normes relatives à l’instruction d’été du Programme des cadets, et tout particulièrement en ce qui concerne celles liées à l’entraînement physique. Dans notre corps, nous tentons de favoriser l’entraide entre cadets. Le soir de l’entraînement physique, nous parcourons en groupe – officiers et cadets – 2,2 kilomètres. Nous débutons l’entraînement en groupe et l’achevons en groupe. Nous tentons d’améliorer notre performance à chaque fois. Nous venons tout juste de commencer l’entraînement avec le ferme espoir d’améliorer notre niveau de forme physique. Capt James Lewis Commandant, Corps des cadets de l’Armée 3015 Saint-Martin, N.-B.

UNE SAINE ALIMENTATION? Je viens de lire l’édition printemps/été de la revue Cadence. L’article intitulé « Une saine alimentation dans le cadre du Programme des cadets » est très intéressant et je suis ravi qu’on fasse plus d’efforts pour offrir à nos jeunes des choix santé. Toutefois, après avoir discuté avec des cadets, j’ai quelques réserves à propos de certains extraits de l’article concernant l’URSC Est, dont celui qui suit.

des yogourts au moins quatre fois par semaine. Aucune boisson gazeuse n’est disponible avec les repas.]

[« Nous avons progressivement retiré les gras trans, les aliments frits et les céréales sucrées, et nous avons augmenté pour chaque repas la sélection de fruits, de céréales et de salades », explique l’Adjuc Roger Audet, officier des services d’alimentation à l’URSC Est. Les menus de tous les camps présentent un assortiment de jus de fruits au moins quatre fois par semaine, des fruits frais tous les jours, un choix de trois céréales sèches (dont au moins une de grains entiers) quotidiennement ainsi que

Maj Guillaume Paré Détachement de Québec Unité régionale de soutien aux cadets (Est) Ancien commandant Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2898 Ste-Marie-de-Beauce (Qc)

Les cadets qui sont allés au CIEC Valcartier ont affirmé que la nourriture y était pire que jamais : très grasse et pas toujours bien cuite. Et même si l’article prétend le contraire, on offrait des boissons gazeuses à tous les repas, y compris au petit déjeuner.

TOUT FAIRE POUR MIEUX FAIRE Réponse à la lettre ci-dessus, intitulée Une saine alimentation? Merci d'avoir soumis vos commentaires ! Effectivement, au tout début des activités du CIECA Valcartier, le traiteur responsable de la préparation des repas a eu quelques difficultés à s'ajuster à nos nouvelles normes, dont la réduction des gras, et surtout les "trans". Nous avons choisi le CIECA Valcartier pour mettre en application notre projet en trois étapes, afin de retirer graduellement les produits ciblés et néfastes à une saine alimentation. Concernant les boissons gazeuses, qui ne sont pas par ailleurs offertes au petit déjeuner, leur élimination complète est prévue dans notre projet. Par contre, bien qu’ afin d'en restreinte l'accès lors du petit déjeuner, des affiches interdisant ce type

de boissons et des verres aient été placés au-dessus des têtes de chaque fontaine, il y a toujours des personnes (aussi bien des cadets que des membres du personnel) qui désobéissent aux procédures mises en place. L'élimination future des fontaines de soda dans nos cafétérias règlera ce problème. Soyez assuré que nous travaillons constamment à améliorer le service d'alimentation de nos CIEC et Écoles. D'ailleurs, nous profiterons du nouvel appel d'offres relatif au contrat du CIECA Valcartier pour aller de l'avant avec notre deuxième phase. Nous avons d’autre part conclu un contrat avec la chaire de recherche sur l’obésité de la faculté de médecine de l'Université Laval, sur laquelle nous comptons désormais pour nous aider à analyser nos recettes, nous suggérer des aliments de

substitution, modifier nos recettes pour en faire des aliments plus "santé ", nous en fournir de nouvelles afin d'améliorer les buffets de crudités et nous conseiller dans l'élaboration de menus végétariens et multiethniques. En conclusion, nous allons encore, en 2007, ajuster et améliorer les normes, les exigences et les responsabilités du traiteur afin que le service exigé soit fidèle au contrat. Une fois ces objectifs atteints, la troisième et dernière étape de notre projet consistera à implanter ce concept dans tous les CIEC et Écoles de la Région de l'Est. Manger pour vivre. Adjuc Roger Audet Officier des services d’alimentation Unité régionale de soutien des cadets (Est) suite du COURRIER à la page 36

Cadence se réserve le droit d’abréger et de clarifier les lettres. Veuillez vous limiter à 250 mots.

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

5


BLOC-NOTES

Les cadets transportent la flamme des Jeux d'hiver L’été dernier, le 15 août plus précisément, les cadets et le personnel du Centre d'instruction d'été pour cadets Whitehorse (CIECW) ont, unis dans l’esprit des Jeux d’hiver du Canada 2007, participé à une étape du parcours du flambeau. Le parcours complet aura traversé 83 collectivités du nord du Canada avant de se terminer à Whitehorse où les Jeux se dérouleront du 23 février au 10 mars. Le rassemblement de fin de cours ayant lieu moins d’une semaine plus tard, — ce qui ne laissait que trois jours pour préparer l’activité de soutien du parcours —, le personnel a examiné soigneusement le calendrier d'instruction afin d'établir la disponibilité des cadets et du personnel. On a décidé que 13 cadets-cadres, représentant chaque

province et territoire, transporteraient la flamme au Yukon en franchissant à la course un parcours de 13 kilomètres allant de Miles Canyon Bridge (l'un des sites d'entraînement du cours de cadet-instructeur [aventure] de l'Armée) au centre d'entraînement. Ces cadets représentaient les cadets et le personnel de toutes les provinces, à l’exception de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, et des territoires qui ont pris part au CIECW l'été dernier ainsi que les athlètes qui participent aux Jeux d'hiver du Canada. Le personnel du CIECW a collaboré étroitement avec le personnel des Jeux afin d’être en conformité avec les lignes directrices régissant le parcours de la flamme et de s’assurer que les cadets pourraient courir en toute sécurité. Ces exigences comportaient un soutien médical, des véhicules de sécurité, des moyens de transport et des repères le long du parcours ainsi que l'organisation d'une cérémonie et de célébrations lors de l'arrivée de la flamme au centre d'entraînement. Les habitants de Whitehorse et le cadetcadre Travis Friesen ont couru lors de la dernière partie du parcours, accompagnés des autres coureurs et de Yúka, la mascotte des Jeux du Yukon. Un autre cadet-cadre a joué le rôle de la mascotte. La flamme, dont l'arrivée était prévue durant une compétition de drill, a été exposée une partie de la journée. Plus de 100 cadets et adultes inscrits à un cours ont interrompu leurs activités pour courir avec le flambeau autour du terrain de parade et inscrire leur nom dans le journal de parcours. Pour obtenir des renseignements supplémentaires sur les Jeux d'hiver du Canada, consulter le site www.2007canadagames.ca. Soumis par le Capt Elisabeth Mills, Relations publiques CIECW

Quelques renseignements sur le régime de retraite Des changements apportés au régime de retraite des FC visant à inclure les membres de la Force de réserve ont suscité des questions concernant le statut des officiers CIC dans le régime. Dans l’intérêt de tous les militaires, la Direction générale - Rémunération et avantages sociaux (DGRAS) a mis sur pied des voies de communication visant à répondre aux questions et aux préoccupations. Pour obtenir des réponses à des questions bien précises, ou une évaluation de son cas personnel, on peut utiliser plusieurs ressources en direct. On peut trouver des informations complètes sur les changements annoncés au régime de retraite actuel des FC dans le site Web Projet de modernisation du régime de retraite des Forces canadiennes (PMRRFC) à l'adresse www.forces.gc.ca/hr/dgcb/cfpmp. La DGRAS a également inclus dans le site une page de questions et réponses très élaborée. Si, après l'avoir consulté, des questions restent en suspens, nous vous recommandons de les soumettre par courriel à CFPMP@forces.gc.ca. Vous pouvez également consulter l'article du numéro de mai dernier du Bulletin du personnel des FC sur le Projet de modernisation du régime de retraite des FC. La DGRAS vous recommande de consulter le site Web du PMRRFC fréquemment et sur une base permanente. D'autres renseignements seront publiés au fur et à mesure des développements. Il importe de noter que, bien que les articles et les outils en direct ne traitent pas spécifiquement des officiers CIC, comme les réservistes, le Projet de modernisation du régime de retraite des FC s'applique à vous.

< Le cadet David Oyukuluk d’Arctic Bay, au Nunavut, effectue à la course une partie du relais sur la route de l’Alaska. Le Maj Lee Ann Quinn le suit à bicyclette pour l’encourager et lui fournir les premiers soins, au besoin.

6

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


Besoin de financement? La collaboration entre le Capt Leo Giovenazzo, du corps des Cadets de l'Armée 613 à Fonthill, en Ontario, et Mme Deborah Dixon, présidente du comité de soutien du corps, a donné de très bons résultats. Ces deux personnes ont uni leurs efforts afin de présenter une demande de subvention à la Fondation Trillium de l'Ontario afin d'acquérir du matériel de canoë-kayak pour le corps. La Fondation Trillium est un organisme du ministère de la Culture qui alloue des subventions à des organisations charitables et sans but lucratif admissibles dans les domaines des arts et de la culture, de l'environnement, des services à la personne et des services sociaux, ainsi que des secteurs du sport et des loisirs. Les efforts du Capt Gionvenazzo et de Mme Dixon ont été récompensés puisqu’ils ont obtenu une subvention de 12 200 $. Grâce à cette subvention, le corps a pu acheter six canoës, des pagaies, des vêtements de flottaison individuels ainsi qu’une remorque qui permet d'entreposer et de transporter le matériel; le corps utilise ce matériel conjointement avec les autres corps et escadrons de la région de Niagara.

Le processus de demande est encore plus simple maintenant. Depuis le 15 août, la Fondation Trillium a instauré un processus de demande simplifié pour les subventions destinées à l’achat d'équipement de moins de 15 000 $. Pour en savoir davantage à ce sujet, visiter le site www.trilliumfoundation.org/cms/en/index.aspx.

<

Le Capt Giovenazzo affirme que le temps passé à préparer les formulaires de demande a été profitable et qu'il aimerait qu'un plus grand nombre de corps et d'escadrons de l'Ontario tirent profit du financement offert par Trillium. D’autres provinces peuvent obtenir un financement similaire.

Parmi ceux qui ont assisté à la remise des subventions, on retrouve à partir de la gauche, le maire de Pelham, Ron Leveans; le cmdt du corps, le Capt Bryan Lachapelle; la représentante de la Fondation Trillium de l'Ontario, Mme Adele Tanguay; le Capt Giovenazzo; Mme Dixon et Mike Haines le député provincial local.

Le bénévole de l'année de l'ACY Le Ltv Darin McRae, officier de perfectionnement par didacticiel à la Direction – Cadets et collaborateur de ce numéro (consulter la page 14), a reçu le prix du bénévole de l'année de l'Association canadienne de yachting (ACY) pour 2006. Comme bénévole, le Ltv McRae a élaboré le premier manuel de la politique d'instruction et a mis à jour tous les examens de l'Association ainsi qu’un grand nombre de textes de cours pratiques et de manuels techniques. Il a aussi collaboré à des stages de perfectionnement des instructeurs, donné un cours pratique d'évaluation des instructeurs et réécrit les tests des cours. Le texte de présentation de sa candidature pour le prix se lit ainsi : « Les bénévoles efficaces sont les pierres angulaires des organisations. Darin n'est pas seulement un bénévole accompli, c'est l'un des meilleurs! Il ne demande rien en échange de son dévouement; il se réjouit discrètement de voir que son travail sert au développement de la voile dans l'ensemble du pays. Il a contribué de manière importante à l'amélioration de l'entraînement de l'ACY. » Le Ltv McRae a dirigé l'unité régionale (Centre) des cadets à Trenton jusqu'en 2005, moment où il a rejoint son poste actuel à Ottawa. Ltv Darin McRae

L'ACY a également présenté le mérite de l'événement récréatif de l'année aux Cadets de la Marine royale canadienne. Ce mérite permet de rendre hommage à un club, à une organisation, à une personne ou à un groupe ayant contribué à la promotion de la voile récréative au Canada. Le Programme des cadets est la seule organisation jeunesse qui offre des programmes gratuits de voile et fait la promotion des niveaux de navigation de l'ACY dans le cadre de son entraînement obligatoire. L'ACY a célébré son 75e anniversaire en 2006.

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

7


BLOC-NOTES

Un officier CIC dévoile la statue de son héroïque grand-père Des sculptures de bronze grandeur nature de 14 héros canadiens, dont la bravoure et la détermination ont contribué à forger la nation, ont été dévoilées le 5 novembre 2006 au Monument commémoratif de guerre du Canada d’Ottawa. Les cadets et les Rangers juniors canadiens ont participé à la cérémonie. Un cadet, un Ranger junior canadien, un ancien combattant et un membre de la Force régulière ont dévoilé ensemble chaque statue. À l’exception d’une cependant, celle du Général Sir Arthur Currie qui a contribué à préparer l'assaut de la crête de Vimy lors de la Première Guerre mondiale. Dévoilement d’autant plus émouvant que c’est au Capt Bill Currie, petit-fils du Général Currie et commandant du corps des Cadets de l'Armée 2870 à Ottawa, que ce privilège a été confié. Dans l’allocution qu’elle a prononcée lors de la cérémonie de dévoilement, la gouverneure générale Michaëlle Jean a déclaré qu'il était important de se remémorer les héros du passé en des temps où le courage du pays est une fois de plus mis à l'épreuve, comme c’est aujourd’hui le cas en Afghanistan. « Souvenons-nous des 14 braves, a-t-elle déclaré, ainsi que de tous les hommes et de toutes les femmes qui ont servi, et qui servent, dans les Forces canadiennes. »

<

Le Capt Currie et la gouverneure générale Michaëlle Jean auprès de la statue du grand-père du Capt Currie, après le dévoilement. (Photographie de la Presse canadienne par Fred Chartrand)

Le tour du monde à la course Le Capt Don Lim, officier d'administration au corps des Cadets de l'Armée 2501 à Halifax, a reçu la quatrième commission (niveau 4) du Certificat d'excellence en aptitude physique des FC. Comme chaque commission représente 12 000 kilomètres, cela signifie que le Capt Lim a couru 48 000 kilomètres depuis qu'il s'est engagé dans le programme du Certificat d'excellence en aptitude physique en 1979. La Terre ayant une circonférence d’environ 40 000 kilomètres, on peut dire que le Capt Lim a fait le tour du monde en courant. Le programme du Certificat d'excellence en aptitude physique comprend diverses formes d'activités physiques. On doit obtenir six « sceaux » différents pour passer à la commission supérieure. Dans le cas du jogging, un sceau — qui indique l'atteinte et la conservation d'un niveau supérieur de bonne forme physique — représente 2 000 unités aérobies (kilomètres) qui doivent être réalisées en deux années ou moins. Mais quels que soient ses succès, le Capt Lim continuera à courir, même si la carrière de militaire qu’il avait entamée comme cadet et qu’il termine comme officier du Programme des cadets tire à sa fin. Il souhaite par-dessus tout laisser un héritage à la prochaine génération de cadets : le désir de bien courir et de chercher à atteindre une bonne forme physique.

< Le Capt Lim exhibant son certificat d'aérobie. (Photographie prise par le Cpl Dan Viellette, Services d'imagerie de la formation)

8

Pour obtenir des renseignements supplémentaires sur ce programme, visiter le site www.cfpsa.com/fr/psp/fitness/index.asp et cliquer sur Personnes-ressources, ensuite sur la liste complète du bas de la page pour obtenir l’adresse courriel du personnel responsable du conditionnement physique de la base des FC la plus près de chez vous.

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


Le drapeau des cadets déployé au Musée de la guerre Le Programme des cadets s'efforce de susciter l'intérêt des cadets pour les FC en les sensibilisant à l’histoire actuelle et passée de l’institution militaire canadienne. L'intérêt manifesté par un cadet a attiré non seulement l’attention du public, mais aussi celle du Premier ministre Stephen Harper et du personnel du Musée canadien de la guerre.

La rencontre de Devin avec des anciens combattants l'a marqué profondément. En août 2004, il commence à collectionner les signatures d'anciens combattants sur un drapeau canadien dans l’espoir de le voir flotter à Ottawa le jour du Souvenir. Mais voilà qu’il apprend qu'il est interdit d'écrire sur un drapeau canadien. Il ne s’avoue pas vaincu pour autant. Il repart à zéro — à peu près au moment où il rejoint l’Escadron 540 — et recueille les signatures sur une bannière blanche (de 7 pieds par 12 pieds) sur la partie supérieure gauche de laquelle est cousu un drapeau canadien. L'Avc Castilloux ne se cantonne pas à Sunnybrook. Décidé à recueillir le plus de signatures possibles, il rencontre aussi les

L’initiative du l'Avc Castilloux attire également l'attention de Peter Worthington, chroniqueur au Toronto Sun, qui a déclaré : « Ce qui m'a surtout frappé — en plus du vif intérêt que manifeste ce gamin envers ceux qui ont combattu pendant les guerres passées, — c'est tout ce que Devin connaît de la bataille de la crête de Vimy qui a eu lieu il y a 89 ans [presque 90 ans maintenant] .» Ce cadet a obtenu plus de 1 000 signatures — dont celles d'environ 600 anciens combattants de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et de deux autres de la Première Guerre mondiale. Les autres signatures recueillies proviennent d'anciens combattants de la guerre de Corée, de soldats du maintien de la paix, de l'astronaute Chris Hadfield et de nombreux membres encore actifs des FC. On ne saurait passer sous silence l’étonnement de ces derniers, qui, bien qu’ayant servi leur pays pendant des dizaines d’années, ne croyaient pas mériter le droit de signer le drapeau sous prétexte qu’ils n’avaient pris part ni à une guerre, ni à une opération de maintien de la paix. Mais comme l’a fait remarquer l'Avc Castilloux : « Si vous avez fait passer l'intérêt de votre pays avant le vôtre, vous pouvez inscrire votre nom sur le drapeau des anciens combattants .»

<

Bien avant de se joindre à l’Escadron de cadets de l'Air 540 d’Oakville, en Ontario, Devin Castilloux avait déjà visité l'hôpital Sunnybrook de Toronto avec son père Mike. C’est là que Devin a rencontré et interviewé plusieurs anciens combattants de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et de la guerre de Corée, ainsi que Clare Laking, un ancien combattant de la Première Guerre mondiale. (Ce dernier se liera d’ailleurs d’amitié avec l’adolescent avant de mourir à l’hôpital Sunnybrook le 26 novembre 2005, à l'âge de 106 ans).

légions locales, invite des anciens combattants chez lui et se rend dans des musées, des établissements de soins de longue durée et à de nombreuses manifestations. En juin 2005, durant le défilé annuel de l'escadron, le Capt Andrew Thomson (cmdt) est tellement impressionné par le projet que l'Avc Castilloux deviendra le premier cadet de l’Escadron 540 à recevoir la Médaille d'excellence de la Légion royale canadienne.

L'Avc Castilloux avec le Premier ministre Stephen Harper. Anciens Combattants Canada a pris des dispositions pour permettre au cadet d'amener son drapeau à Ottawa et de l'exposer à l'extérieur du Sénat et dans le Hall d'honneur du Musée canadien de la guerre, à temps pour le jour du Souvenir de 2006. L'Avc Castilloux a rencontré le Premier ministre Harper, a reçu les éloges du ministre des Anciens combattants et a participé à plusieurs manifestations spéciales. Devin Castilloux, qui est maintenant caporal, souhaite que durant l’année à venir son drapeau soit exposé dans des musées du pays. « C'est une publicité formidable pour le Programme des cadets — qui fait connaître le nom du Programme et lui donne davantage de visibilité », d’affirmer le Capt Thomson. Grâce à son geste, le Cpl Castilloux a également enrichi les connaissances de ses collègues cadets sur l'histoire militaire du Canada.

La Direction change de nom La Direction – Cadets (D Cad) est maintenant connue officiellement sous le nom de Direction – Cadets et Rangers juniors canadiens (D Cad et RJC).

de la Défense nationale dans une seule direction. Dans le but de mieux refléter cette réalité, le nom de la D Cad a été changé à D Cad et RJC en 2006.

soutiennent que l'un ou l'autre. Il est alors plus simple de conserver le nom des sections ayant trait au seul Programme des cadets (D Cad 2 ou D Cad 3 par exemple).

La charge des Rangers juniors canadiens a été transférée de la Direction – Réserves à la D Cad en 2004 afin d'intégrer les deux programmes pour la jeunesse du ministère

Bien que les deux programmes relèvent de la D Cad et RJC et que certaines sections de la direction soutiennent les deux mouvements de jeunes, d'autres sections ne

suite du BLOC-NOTES à la page 36

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

9


ARTICLE VEDETTE

< Précédant un guide, le Capt Rioux, officier chargé de l’expédition, traverse une rivière sur un pont d’acier, en France.

Expédition internationale Les officiers au défi d’agir sur le moment Chaque année, la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée et le ministère de la Défense nationale coparrainent une expédition internationale pour mettre au défi les 16 meilleurs cadets et trois officiers du CIC de l’Armée canadienne. ’expédition, inaugurée en 2000, a amené des officiers du CIC à Morocco, en Australie, en République de Corée, aux États-Unis et au Costa Rica. Cette expérience unique permet à des officiers du CIC de l’Armée de mettre en application leurs compétences dans des circonstances extrêmes, tout en poursuivant leur apprentissage.

L

Cette année, le Capt Daniel Rioux, du Corps des cadets de l’Armée 242 s’est aventuré à Petit-Rocher, au N.-B., le Capt Matt White de l’Unité régionale de soutien aux cadets (Centre) et le Lt Joanne Morin du Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2773, tous deux de Québec, ont jeté leur dévolu sur le Tour du Mont Blanc, dans le massif du même nom. Car c’est là que se dresse le majestueux Mont Blanc, le

10

Capt Hope Carr

sommet le plus élevé d’Europe occidentale, avec ses 4 810 mètres de hauteur, ses pics et ses glaciers spectaculaires chevauchant les frontières de la France, de l’Italie et de

« C’était l’occasion idéale d’apprendre à utiliser en toute confiance mes capacités d’agir sur le moment, faculté dont je pourrais faire usage auprès de mon corps des cadets et dans mon emploi civil. » ... Lt Joanne Morin.

officiers et les cadets ont parcouru à pied plus de 160 kilomètres, grimpé au total 8 500 mètres et descendu sur une distance de plus de 10 000 mètres, le tout en huit jours. « Compte tenu du degré de difficulté, nous devions garder notre esprit en éveil car nous devions sans cesse nous adapter au milieu et aux conditions changeantes, a déclaré le Lt Morin. C’était l’occasion idéale d’apprendre à utiliser en toute confiance mes capacités d’agir sur le moment, faculté dont je pourrais faire usage auprès de mon corps des cadets et dans mon emploi civil. »

la Suisse. Au cours de l’expédition qui a eu lieu du 31 août au 12 septembre, les

Une expédition de ce type nous permet de mettre nos compétences et nos qualités de chef en pratique dans un milieu stimulant. L’expérience de plein air favorise égale-

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


ment un mode de vie sain et une bonne gérance de l’environnement. Chaque jour offrait de nouveaux défis. Parfois, l’expédition exigeait un effort physique peu commun et à d’autres moments, le défi consistait à se préparer mentalement en vue d’une autre journée de marche. « Nous devions quotidiennement nous motiver et aider les autres non seulement à atteindre leurs limites physiques et mentales, mais à les surpasser, d’ajouter le Capt Rioux. Mon travail préalable en vue de l’expédition et mon emploi civil de policier m’ont aidé à

< Le Lt Morin au refuge de Bonnati Mountain en Italie, avec le Mont Blanc à l’arrière plan.

Publicité entourant l’expédition Le Capt Hope Carr, chargée des affaires publiques, a organisé 42 entrevues avec les médias lors de l’expédition. Transportant son portable dans les randonnées pédestres du groupe, elle mettait à jour quotidiennement le site Web de la Ligue des cadets de l’Armée, intégrant des articles avec photos à l’appui sur chaque cadet ou officier .

< Une dure journée de marche (altitude de plus de 1 000 mètres) pour gravir la fenêtre d’Arpète en Suisse. me préparer physiquement, mais l’expédition m’a poussé au-delà de mes limites et m’a fait comprendre tout ce que les cadets et moi-même pouvons accomplir dans une situation vraiment exigeante. » Et le Capt White de conclure : « La chance d’enseigner à un groupe de cadets dans ce type d’environnement et d’apprendre d’eux, en retour, est la raison d’être d’une telle expédition internationale et en justifie l’utilité pour le Programme des cadets de l’Armée ». Le capt Carr, qui est également l’auteur des photos, est officier régional des affaires publiques de la région de l’Atlantique.

« Nous avons réalisé plus d’une centaine d’entrevues et écrit de super articles sur l’expédition, a-telle déclaré. Notre meilleur coup a été d’accorder une entrevue à la Presse canadienne (PC) avant et pendant l’expédition qui a été diffusée par tous les médias. » « Nous avons accordé des entrevues tout au long de l’expédition, ce qui n’était pas toujours évident car plusieurs ont eu lieu lors de pauses à flanc de montagne. Nous devions alors établir le contact à l’aide d’un téléphone mobile GSN, a-t-elle ajouté. C’était tout un défi, mais ça valait le coup. » Le Capt Carr fait remarquer que si le côté relations publiques de l’exercice a réussi, c’est en grande partie grâce à l’enthousiasme des cadets et tout spécialement des CIC qui l’ont autorisée à participer à l’expédition. « Je me suis sentie membre à part entière de l’équipe. Malgré un état de fatigue extrême, ils n’ont pas hésité à prendre tout le temps nécessaire pour partager avec le public canadien l’expérience de l’expédition. » Qu’a-t-elle appris de l’aventure? « Cette expérience m’a permis de me souvenir pourquoi je me suis investie sans réserve dans le Programme des cadets, souligne le Capt Carr. Les cadets se levaient tous les matins bien décidés à donner le meilleur d’eux-mêmes, aussi bien sur le plan mental que physique. Je me devais de leur rendre la pareille. »

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

11


ARTICLE VEDETTE

Capt Matt White

Il s’agit d’une expérience unique pour certains cadets, où qu’ils la vivent, et qui justifie largement le temps et l’argent investis dans les voyages effectués au Canada ou à l’étranger.

Apprentissage au sommet d’une montagne Les mots et les images ne suffisent pas pour exprimer toute la valeur d’une expérience comme l’expédition internationale de 2006 au sommet du Mont Blanc. Valeur qui peut cependant se mesurer en souvenirs et en leçons retenues. e Canada offre certes un terrain accidenté, des paysages pittoresques et d’énormes possibilités. Toutefois, la chance que nous avons eue de vivre comme les habitants des hautes montagnes dans les pays de langue, de culture et même de nourriture différentes est unique. Cette immersion dans un nouveau mode de vie m’a fourni des outils utiles que je pourrai mettre à profit dans le Programme des cadets.

L

<

Le Capt White, dans sa huitième journée d’escalade, sur le versant français, à trois heures de l’arrivée.

En tant que porte-parole des officiers accompagnateurs, je peux dire que nous avons reçu une formation inestimable en leadership, en gestion et en commandement dans un milieu qu’on ne trouve nulle part au Canada.

• Nous avons aidé les cadets à acquérir assurance et aisance face à des langues qui leur étaient étrangères. • Nous avons mis nos compétences en pratique, du fait de diriger des cadets dans des activités de type aventure comportant un élément de risque, et en veillant à ce qu’ils aient du plaisir tout en participant au processus d’apprentissage.

Des expéditions comme celle du Mont Blanc obligent les officiers du CIC qui cherchent à améliorer leurs qualités de leaders à continuer d’apprendre à partir d’expériences concrètes. • Nous avons aidé les cadets à réaliser ce que leurs subalternes pouvaient ressentir face à des situations nouvelles et potentiellement dangereuses. • Nous leur avons permis d’acquérir des compétences en leadership dont ils auront besoin pour aider leurs subalternes à vaincre leurs peurs et à devenir de meilleurs adultes. • Nous avons appris à former des équipes solidaires en très peu de temps. Mon propre apprentissage avait une perspective unique. En tant qu’auteur et rédacteur participant à la mise à jour du Programme des cadets, je dois quotidiennement m’efforcer de créer un programme nouveau et stimulant pour les cadets de la Marine, de l’Armée et de l’Air. J’ai appris des choses durant cette expédition qui auront des répercussions sur mon travail. J’entrevois vraiment aujourd’hui tout le dynamisme que génèrent les possibilités de formation par l’aventure et l’expédition.

12

Ces expéditions constituent également une excellente occasion de perfectionnement professionnel pour les officiers du CIC. Malheureusement, il semble que bon nombre d’officiers locaux ne soient pas au courant de ces possibilités. Il faudrait peut-être que nous réévaluions dans quelle mesure nous informons les officiers à cet égard dans l’ensemble du pays. Autant j’ai appris, autant j’ai pu constater que ma formation de CIC ne suffisait pas à me préparer pour l’expédition. Bien que je possède une formation en commandement de situation et la formation de base en aptitude physique, on ne m’avait pas appris certains principes de randonnée en altitude ou à choisir le matériel adéquat pour les longues randonnées. Par exemple, j’ai dû modifier la quantité de vêtements et d’équipement que je voulais apporter en fonction de celle que je pouvais réellement transporter. Ces aspects mériteraient d’être abordés dans les cours de niveau supérieur du programme révisé. Nous savons que 70 p. 100 de nos officiers du CIC sont recrutés dans les rangs du Programme des cadets. Pourquoi ne pas offrir à nos cadets les outils dont ils ont besoin quand ils peuvent les utiliser dans un environnement contrôlé? En même temps que nous préparons les cadets de l’Air à devenir de futurs pilotes et des instructeurs de vol à voile, et les cadets de la Marine à devenir des instructeurs principaux de voile, nous avons la possibilité de former des chefs d’expéditions courantes dans notre propre programme. En tant que nouveau diplômé du cours de base de parachutiste militaire, je pensais que j’avais vécu le plus grand défi de ma vie, et c’était le cas… jusqu’à ce que je vive cette formidable aventure! Le Programme des cadets offre continuellement des défis qui feront de ceux qui veulent les relever de meilleurs citoyens. De même, des expéditions comme celle du Mont Blanc obligent les officiers du CIC qui cherchent à améliorer leurs qualités de leaders à continuer d’apprendre à partir d’expériences concrètes.

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


FORMATION DES OFFICIERS

Maj Serge Dubé

Candidats recherchés pour tester de nouveaux cours Le projet de gestion des changements de la structure des groupes professionnels militaires du Cadre des instructeurs des cadets : un projet ambitieux mérite bien un nom à sa mesure. i vous avez lu les derniers numéros de Cadence, vous savez sans doute que ce projet vise à moderniser les politiques et l’instruction du CIC.

S

Au cours des prochains mois, les écoles régionales se mettront à la recherche de participants [pour l’essai]. Les individus qui doivent suivre le cours élémentaire pour devenir officiers du CIC et qui peuvent se libérer pendant la majeure partie du mois de mai sont des candidats éventuels. De nouveaux cours du CIC, conçus pour répondre aux besoins « professionnels » des officiers du CIC, résultent de ce projet. Certains sont prêts à être mis à l’essai. Ainsi, en mai prochain, les nouveaux cours élémentaires d’officier et d’instruction professionnelle se donneront pour la toute première fois à l’École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (ERIC) (Pacifique) d’Esquimalt, en Colombie-Britannique. Cinquante quatre officiers provenant de l’ensemble du pays, ainsi que du personnel

de soutien de toutes les ERIC, participeront à l’essai. Au cours des prochains mois, les écoles régionales se mettront à la recherche de participants. Les individus qui doivent suivre le cours élémentaire pour devenir officiers du CIC et qui peuvent se libérer pendant la majeure partie du mois de mai sont des candidats éventuels. Ceux qui prennent part à l’essai ne seront pas tenus de terminer le Cours de qualification élémentaire d’officier actuel parce qu’une fois l’essai terminé et les éventuels problèmes réglés, il sera remplacé par le cours élémentaire d’officier (CEO) et le cours d’instruction professionnelle. Les nouveaux cours sont divisés en deux phases : une d’apprentissage à distance, qui peut se faire du domicile étant ou à partir d’un ordinateur du corps de cadets ou de l’escadron, et une à l’interne, qui peut être effectuée à l’ERIC (Pacifique) pendant l’essai et, par la suite, à votre propre ERIC. Durant le nouveau CEO, vous assimilerez des connaissances générales sur le rôle d’officier des FC, ainsi que sur les règlements qui s’appliquent aux membres des FC. Vous apprendrez également les rudiments des communications, de la planification et de la conduite d’activités. Pendant le nouveau cours d’instruction professionnelle, on vous inculquera des notions propres aux officiers du CIC, y compris les règlements qui touchent l’Organisation

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

des cadets du Canada, les différents intervenants du Mouvement des cadets du Canada, les cadets de 1re classe et le personnel d’instruction.

Les nouveaux cours sont divisés en deux phases : une d’apprentissage à distance, qui peut se faire du domicile étant ou à partir de l’ordinateur d’un corps de cadets ou d’un escadron, et une à l’interne, qui peut être effectuée à l’ERIC (Pacifique) pendant l’essai et, par la suite, à votre propre ERIC. Cet essai nous aidera à nous assurer que les cours qui seront offerts par le CIC vous prépareront adéquatement à être le meilleur officier qui soit au sein de votre corps de cadets ou de votre escadron. L’essai nous aidera également à définir, avec la collaboration des cinq ERIC et de la région du Nord canadien, une norme d’instruction commune à l’ensemble du pays. Le Maj Dubé est l’officier d’état-major responsable de l’élaboration du programme des officiers du CIC à la Direction – Cadets.

13


Ltv Darin McRae et le Capt Pierre-Archer Cournoyer

FORMATION DES OFFICIERS

Facteurs de la RA Les trois facteurs fondamentaux qui sont considérés durant la RA des militaires nouvellement admis au CIC sont les suivants : • Connaissance, compétences, expérience et qualifications militaires. • Connaissance, compétences, expérience et qualifications relatives aux jeunes (civiles ou militaires).

<

• Connaissance et compréhension générale du Programme des cadets, de sa structure, de ses politiques et de ses procédures.

L’agent Scott Hagarty, agent de la GRC à Grande Prairie, en Alberta, est également l’officier d’instruction et l’entraîneur de biathlon du Corps 2850 des Cadets de l’Armée à Grande Prairie.

Reconnaissance des acquis du CIC Afin d’abréger la durée de l’instruction des recrues des FC – et des individus qui sont mutés d’une branche ou d’une composante à une autre – le ministère de la Défense nationale reconnaît l’apprentissage antérieur au moyen d’un processus « de reconnaissance des acquis » (RA). ujourd’hui, on est en voie d’officialiser le processus de RA du programme d’instruction du CIC afin de contribuer à abréger ou à éliminer la durée de l’instruction nécessaire pour que les individus soient productifs dans le cadre du Programme des cadets.

A

14

Les individus qui demandent une RA seront évalués d’après ces facteurs ainsi que des exigences militaires générales ou spécialisées.

On a rédigé l’ébauche d’une nouvelle OAIC 24-05 pour officialiser le processus de RA du CIC. Elle devrait être terminée sous peu. Le grand avantage de la nouvelle

Le but de la RA n’est pas de simplifier l’instruction, mais plutôt de reconnaître que certains individus peuvent avoir acquis des connaissances scolaires, des expériences d’apprentissage, des connaissances et des compétences dans le cadre d'un emploi antérieur (civil ou dans les FC), qui satisfont aux exigences des cours actuels du CIC.

« L’utilisation officialisée de la RA dans le cadre du programme d’instruction du CIC permettra d’assouplir le processus d’instruction et de mieux reconnaître la formation civile. » ...Lcol Tom McNeil

« L’utilisation officialisée de la RA dans le cadre du programme d’instruction du CIC permettra d’assouplir le processus d’instruction et de mieux reconnaître la formation civile. Les coûts d’instruction diminueront d’autant », a déclaré le Lcol Tom McNeil, responsable de l’élaboration de l’instruction à la Direction – Cadets (D Cad).

OAIC, c’est qu’elle habilite les individus à entreprendre eux-mêmes le processus de RA, ce qui intéressera notamment les officiers du CIC en service actif qui ont acquis de nouvelles compétences à l’extérieur du Programme des cadets ou les individus ayant des antécédents militaires, qui désirent se joindre au CIC.

« La connaissance, les compétences, l’expérience et les qualifications relatives aux jeunes constituent le fondement du nouveau programme d’instruction du CIC et, par conséquent, elles doivent être un élément central de n’importe quelle RA », explique le Maj Serge Dubé, officier d’élaboration du programme du CIC à la D Cad. Par exemple, un individu qui possède une expérience militaire peut satisfaire aux exigences militaires, mais il doit quand même satisfaire aux deux autres facteurs de la RA pour obtenir une équivalence complète. Dans cet exemple, l’individu n’obtiendrait qu’une équivalence partielle. Résultats de la RA • Équivalence complète pour un cours donné • Équivalence limitée à certains objectifs de rendement • Octroi d’un grade À la suite d’une RA, on peut vous recommander d’obtenir une évaluation officielle de vos compétences afin qu’une équivalence vous soit accordée. Vous aurez, avec l’unité régionale de soutien aux cadets/ERIC applicable, la responsabilité conjointe de vous assurer que les portions de cours ou les cours requis sont terminés dans les délais prescrits dans la décision relative à la RA.

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


Si vous avez servi dans les FC, on peut vous accorder, à la suite de la RA, un grade supérieur à celui qui est normalement attribué à l’enrôlement. On peut aussi vous exempter du cours élémentaire d’officier (CEO). Un ancien pilote des FC peut être exempté d’une partie du nouveau cours pour les cadets de l’Air (jusqu’à 50 p. 100) s’il a suivi des cours et acquis de l’expérience en matière d’émetteurs récepteurs terrestres, de cartes et de boussoles, de survie dans les airs, de connaissances aéronautiques, de météorologie et de navigation aérienne.

Processus de RA

Un enseignant peut être exempté des parties du CEO relatives à l’instruction, ainsi que des cours d’officier divisionnaire et d’instructeur principal du centre d’instruction d’été des cadets. Les résultats de la RA diffèrent suivant les connaissances, les compétences, l’instruction et l’expérience des candidats.

Un évaluateur chargé de la RA (de votre région ou de la D Cad) peut communiquer directement avec vous pour obtenir plus d’information afin de justifier votre demande. Une fois qu’une décision est rendue, on vous adresse un rapport écrit à ce sujet. L’École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (ERIC) et le détachement approprié mettent ensuite en œuvre les recommandations de la RA et vous indiquent comment procéder pour suivre n’importe quel cours applicable.

Situations exigeant une RA Une RA doit être effectuée dans les cas suivants : • Vous êtes un ancien officier du CIC qui se réenrôle dans le CIC après avoir été libéré pendant plus de cinq ans. • Vous êtes un ancien membre des FC qui se réenrôle dans le CIC ou qui y est muté. Une RA peut être justifiée dans les cas suivants : • Vous êtes un membre d’un sous-élément constitutif des FC qui demande une mutation au CIC. • Vous êtes un ancien officier du CIC qui se réenrôle dans le CIC moins de cinq ans après la date de sa libération des FC. • Vous êtes un officier du CIC en service actif qui a suivi des cours supplémentaires, a atteint un niveau de scolarisation, a acquis des compétences et/ou de l’expérience en dehors des FC et qui désire les faire reconnaître par les FC.

La responsabilité d’entreprendre une RA et de recueillir l’information nécessaire incombe à l’individu concerné. Vous devez monter un portfolio contenant toutes les informations nécessaires, des copies des certificats et des relevés de notes que vous avez obtenues, etc., pour justifier votre demande. Vous devez aussi remplir un formulaire de RA et l’acheminer par l’intermédiaire de la chaîne de commandement, pour approbation. La nouvelle OAIC décrira les politiques et les procédures à respecter pour faire une demande de RA.

Une étape positive L’officialisation du processus de reconnaissance des acquis du CIC constitue une étape positive. Elle entraînera une plus grande reconnaissance des connaissances antérieures d’un individu et réduira de beaucoup le double emploi de l’instruction. Elle facilitera la mutation du personnel actuel ou antérieur de la Force régulière ou de la Force de réserve à la branche du CIC. Elle aidera aussi les membres du CIC qui possèdent des compétences relatives aux jeunes (enseignants et travailleurs sociaux, par exemple) à faire reconnaître officiellement leurs compétences dans les FC. Si vous avez d’autres questions au sujet de la RA, consultez l’OAIC 24-05 dès sa publication. Le Ltv McRae est officier d’élaboration des didacticiels du CIC à la D Cad et il effectue des RA au CIC. Le Capt Cournoyer est coordonnateur de l’instruction du CIC à la Direction.

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

Exemple d’une RA Le Capt Pierre Untel demande une RA au moment de sa mutation de la Réserve supplémentaire au CIC. Il a été membre de la Réserve supplémentaire pendant huit ans après avoir servi dans la Première réserve de 1980 à 1984 et dans la Force régulière de 1984 à 1998. Il a obtenu le grade de capitaine en 1988. Il a réussi divers cours de la Force régulière et de la Réserve, y compris le cours d’officier – Niveau intermédiaire, le cours d’évaluation et de développement de l’instruction, le cours élémentaire de parachutisme et le cours de tactique intermédiaire. Il a également été affecté trois ans à une unité régionale de soutien aux cadets (URSC) à titre d’officier d’état-major des Cadets de l’Armée. Le Capt Untel est actuellement policier municipal. La RA montre que le Capt Untel a satisfait à l’exigence militaire grâce à ses 18 années d’expérience dans les FC. Il a également satisfait à l’exigence relative à la connaissance des jeunes, compte tenu de sa formation et de son expérience de policier et d’officier d’état-major dans une URSC. De plus, sa connaissance du Programme des cadets est exceptionnelle en raison de son expérience d’officier d’état-major dans une URSC. La décision rendue à la suite de la RA est d’enrôler le Capt Untel dans le CIC à titre de capitaine et de lui accorder des équivalences partielles pour divers cours obligatoires du CIC relatifs à son grade. Il doit recevoir l’instruction suivante : l’objectif de rendement (OREN) 478 (Se conformer aux politiques du MDN et des FC sur la prévention du harcèlement et du racisme) du cours élémentaire d’officier; l’OREN 414 (Mettre en œuvre le programme d’instruction) du cours d’instruction professionnelle (Terre) du CIC; l’OREN 403 (Remplir les fonctions d’officier d’instruction) et l’OREN 414 (Élaborer un calendrier d’instruction pour le quartier général local) du cours de qualification de lieutenant; et l’OREN 403 (Remplir les fonctions d’un commandant) du cours de qualification de capitaine.

Vous désirez obtenir plus d’information? Le volume 12, Programme d’équivalences militaires des FC (www.forces.gc.ca/dln-rad/frgraph/downloads_f.asp?docid =30) du Manuel d’instruction individuelle et d’éducation des Forces canadiennes explique comment les FC devraient reconnaître, documenter et accorder des qualifications de formation ou d’éducation.

15


GESTION DU RISQUE

Capt Jean-Paul (J. P.) Ferron

Gestion du risque Un plan en cinq étapes Lorsque nous considérons tout ce que nous faisons, tant au quartier général local que durant les exercices, la sécurité demeure toujours l’élément critique.

lors, pourquoi laisser les choses au hasard? Nos parents, nos professeurs et nos supérieurs ne nous ont-ils pas toujours répété qu’une activité bien planifiée est une activité rondement menée? La sécurité contribuera forcément au succès de nos activités.

A

Parvenu à cette conclusion de base et soucieux de ne rien laisser au hasard, notre escadron s’est doté d’une politique de gestion des risques opérationnels (GRO) pour chacune de ses activités. Cette politique peut revêtir la forme d’une évaluation officielle ou celle d’une évaluation prioritaire (effectuée à la course), mais elle demeure omniprésente. Après étude de divers modèles de GRO, l’Escadron 707 (Mgén Richard Rohmer) des Cadets de l’Air a adopté celui de la U.S. Navy. Vous pouvez vous rendre sur le site ORM de la U.S. Navy à l’adresse www.safetycenter.navy.mil/orm/default. htm. Le processus en cinq étapes que nous utilisons pour gérer le risque a été baptisé I-AM-IS.

I—Identification des risques Un risque est une situation pouvant devenir source de blessure, de maladie, de décès, causer des dommages à la propriété, faire échouer une mission ou encore donner une mauvaise impression au public. Chaque activité est subdivisée en composantes opérationnelles (p. ex., charger le matériel à bord de l’autobus, aller du quartier général local au terrain d’exercice, décharger l’autobus, établir le site du bivouac, etc.). Nous avons ensuite recours à un remue-méninges pour pouvoir créer la liste des risques associés à chacune de ces composantes opérationnelles.

A—Appré ciation des risques Un risque sera qualifié comme tel en fonction de la probabilité de sa réalisation et de la gravité de ses conséquences. Afin d’apprécier les risques, nous utilisons une matrice qui permet d’évaluer le potentiel de danger : a) forte probabilité qu’un événement se produise dans l’immédiat ou à court terme; b) probabilité qu’un événement se produise à la longue; c) possibilité qu’un événement se produise à la longue; d) événement improbable.

Comme il nous arrive d’inclure des cadets supérieurs dans le processus décisionnel, nous avons mis sur pied, au quartier général local, un programme d’instruction destiné aux sergents de section et aux adjudants, selon les principes propres à la GRO (voir l’encadré latéral). La gravité est qualifiée comme telle si elle est peut : a) entraîner la mort ou la perte d’installations ou de moyens ; b) entraîner de graves blessures, maladies ou dommages à la propriété ; c) entraîner de modestes blessures, maladies ou dommages à la propriété ; d) représenter une menace minimale. À partir des critères ci-dessus, nous utilisons une matrice qui nous permet de déterminer si le risque doit être classé comme critique, grave, moyen, faible ou négligeable. Un modèle de la matrice du risque de la

< L’ASLt Dave Waterman, à gauche, retient le filin de sécurité pendant qu’un cadet du corps de Cadets de la Marine 65 de Burlington, en Ontario, essaie d’atteindre le sommet du poteau sous le regard vigilant du Capc John Cox, officier de matelotage régional (Centre).

16

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


U.S. Navy figure sur la présente page. On peut imprimer des matrices de risques dont le format est semblable à celui d’une « carte professionnelle » à partir du site Web indiqué en page 16.

M—Minimisation des risques Après évaluation des risques, il s’agit de voir comment les réduire au minimum. Ainsi, lorsqu’un exercice de survie se déroule en terrain accidenté, il faudra passer en revue les bonnes techniques de randonnée pour réduire les risques associés au parcours. Après avoir réfléchi à tout ce qui pourra réduire le facteur de risque, nous devons réévaluer le danger pour voir si nous sommes parvenus à le ramener à un seuil acceptable, si l’activité devrait être reportée ou si la décision en ce sens devrait être laissée à la chaîne de commandement.

Après avoir étudié plusieurs modèles de GRO, l’Escadron 707 (Mgén Richard Rohmer) des Cadets de l’Air a adopté le modèle de la U.S. Navy.

Nous nous efforçons toujours de mettre les cadets en garde contre les dangers potentiels et d’appliquer les leçons tirées de l’évaluation sur le terrain. Cependant, il ne faut pas oublier qu’en général, les jeunes tiennent rarement compte des risques associés à l’exécution d’une tâche.

Si vous prenez vraiment la peine de mettre en place le système I-AM-IS ou tout autre processus qui vous contraint à une étude, à une évaluation et à une gestion objective des risques, vous serez mieux préparé pour vos activités et celles-ci se dérouleront sans accroc. Il importe aussi qu'en cas de difficultés, votre réaction soit bien préparée, efficace et décisive et qu’elle permette de limiter le potentiel de blessures ou de dommages additionnels. En cas d’imprévu, vous disposerez alors des outils nécessaires pour réduire au minimum les éventuelles conséquences du risque couru. On pourrait donc dire, avec raison d’ailleurs, que nous avons du pain sur la planche! Mais c’est bien à nous qu’il incombe d’offrir le milieu d’instruction le plus sécuritaire possible. Le Capt Ferron est le commandant de l’Escadron 707 des Cadets de l’Air, à Etobicoke, en Ontario.

Comme il nous arrive d’inclure des cadets supérieurs dans le processus décisionnel,

La GRO est fondée sur quatre principes fondamentaux qui font appel au bon sens. • Accepter les risques seulement lorsque les avantages l’emportent sur les coûts. • Ne pas courir de risques inutiles. • Prévoir et gérer les risques grâce à la planification. • Prendre les décisions en matière de risque au niveau approprié.

Que l’on planifie une activité localement ou un exercice en canot en région sauvage, la sécurité constitue le facteur critique. (Photo : Capt Elisabeth Mills, Affaires publiques, région du Nord)

Matrice des risques

S—Supervision

PROBABILITÉ

GRAVITÉ

Nous faisons preuve de vigilance à l’égard de modifications ou de problèmes qui auraient pu passer inaperçus. Nous procédons à des évaluations prioritaires en utilisant le processus indiqué ci-dessus, introduisons de nouvelles mesures et prenons note des « omissions » ou changements afin de dresser un rapport « postaction » de manière à ce que la GRO d’une activité particulière devienne de plus en plus exhaustive au fil des ans.

Les quatre principes de la GRO

<

I—Introduction de contrôles

nous avons mis sur pied, au quartier général local, un programme d’instruction destiné aux sergents de section et aux adjudants, selon les principes propres à la GRO (voir l’encadré latéral). Grâce à une telle formation, ces cadets se trouvent sensibilisés et mieux placés pour comprendre les concepts et restrictions que nous imposons sur le terrain. Nous espérons aussi qu’ils pourront appliquer les concepts dans leurs activités quotidiennes, que ce soit chez les cadets ou ailleurs.

A

B

C

D

I

1

1

2

3

II

1

2

3

4

III

2

3

4

5

IV

3

4

5

5

Code d’évaluation des risques : 1 = Risque critique 2 = Risque grave 3 = Risque moyen

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

4 = Risque faible 5 = Risque négligeable

17


GESTION DU RISQUE

Instruction sur la gestion du risque Faire preuve de bon sens À l’heure actuelle Cours professionnels militaires pour les armées toutes Objectif de rendement (OREN) 403.01 : Appliquer la gestion des risques aux activités de formation par l’aventure. Cours de qualification de lieutenant OREN 402.01 : Intégrer des mesures de sécurité aux activités d’instruction. Cours sur l’environnement de l’unité Les points d’enseignement comprennent les facteurs à considérer durant les activités à l’extérieur. Cours d’officier de la sécurité générale Les points d’enseignement comprennent les facteurs à considérer durant les activités à l’extérieur. À venir L’état de préparation est la clé qui permet de diminuer les risques pendant les exercices en campagne hivernaux.

<

(Photo : Capt Elisabeth Mills, Affaires publiques, région de Nord).

Période de perfectionnement (PP) 1 Cours élémentaire d’officier OREN 105 : Planifier des activités – éléments de la gestion des risques Les facteurs de sécurité sont compris dans les deux objectifs de compétence (OCOM) associés au présent OREN :

« Élaborer un plan à l’aide du modèle SMESSC [situation, mission, exécution, service de soutien et commandement] » et « Préparer des ordres au moyen de l’analyse logique ».

Cours d’instruction professionnelle OREN 102 : Remplir les fonctions de commandant de peloton/d’escadrille/de officier divisionnaire Les OCOM suivants présentent la gestion des risques ou sont axés directement sur cette dernière : • OCOM 102.02 : Expliquer les aspects de la supervision des cadets durant les activités • OCOM 102.03 : Planifier un aspect d’une activité d’instruction des cadets • OCOM 102.04 : Appliquer la gestion des risques aux activités d’instruction du quartier général local. Durant cette leçon, les stagiaires prépareront un plan d’intervention de base en cas d’incident et feront l’évaluation des risques d’un scénario d’instruction local. PP 2 Cours de formation des officiers du CIC OREN 107 : Planifier une activité au niveau de l’unité. Ce cours se situe dans le prolongement de la PP 1 et met l’accent sur la gestion des risques au niveau de l’unité (par opposition au niveau du peloton/de la section). On demandera aux stagiaires de préparer une liste de contrôle pour évaluer les risques des activités au niveau de l’unité, qui sont plus complexes. On discutera du consentement parental et des formulaires de sensibilisation au risque dans le cadre de la préparation des ordres en vue d’une activité au niveau de l’unité. Cours d’officier de l’instruction OREN 203 : Coordonner les besoins en matière de sécurité, de logistique et d’administration pour les activités d’instruction. On demandera aux participants d’étudier la gestion des risques du point de vue des exercices d’instruction en campagne (ou d’une instruction comparable pour les Cadets de la Marine/de l’Air) et de facteurs particuliers à prendre en considération.

18

Bien qu’un modèle officiel de gestion des risques opérationnels puisse être utile, le bon sens est souvent le meilleur moyen de diminuer les risques. En voici deux exemples. Un officier du CIC à l’échelon local, qui organisait un exercice de canotage en milieu sauvage, voulait être bien préparé advenant qu’un officier ou un cadet soit blessé durant l’exercice. Elle savait à quelle pression est soumis un officier placé malgré lui dans l’obligation d’évacuer le groupe avant la fin d’une randonnée. Elle a donc réuni son personnel pour discuter de divers scénarios relatifs aux blessures. Ensemble, ils ont élaboré des instructions permanentes d’opération pour chaque scénario. Elle partait du principe qu’il est préférable de prendre des décisions à l’avance avec ses pairs, au cours d’une réunion, que de laisser un officier stressé et livré à lui-même régler le problème sur le terrain. Selon un autre officier, qui possède la qualification de familiarisation hivernale, « l’état de préparation » est la clé qui permet de diminuer les risques; et pourtant, il a constaté, alors qu’il supervisait des exercices en campagne pendant l’hiver, que l’état de préparation variait énormément d’une unité à l’autre. Par exemple, certains cadets ne maîtrisaient pas les principes fondamentaux de familiarisation hivernale; d’autres sont arrivés en autobus à la nuit tombée et ont dû s’installer à la noirceur; le fourbi était éparpillé sur le sol; ou encore les individus responsables de l’activité souffraient d’un manque de formation. « Rien de tel ne devrait se produire », a déclaré l’officier. « Si la direction de l’activité n’est pas confiée à un membre du personnel expérimenté, le corps de cadets ou l’escadron en souffre. Avant un exercice en campagne, une unité doit se soumettre à des exercices préparatoires, comprenant la distribution d’un minimum d’équipement avant d’arriver sur les lieux de l’activité. »

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


FORMATION DES CADETS

Crédits pour études accordés aux cadets Depuis de nombreuses années, on s'efforce de faire reconnaître l'expérience des cadets — sous forme de crédits de niveau secondaire — dans les écoles secondaires. Maintenant, les officiers locaux et les parrains peuvent s’impliquer dans le processus. e comité de l'éducation nationale et des crédits pour études de niveau secondaire de la Ligue des cadets de l'Air s'est fait le fer de lance du projet.

L

En Colombie-Britannique, au Yukon, en Alberta, au Manitoba et à Terre-Neuve-etLabrador, la reconnaissance de l'instruction des cadets aux fins de crédits pour études, ainsi que le recours à des procédures particulières d'application et de production de rapports, sont systématiques. En Colombie-Britannique et au Yukon, 2 500 cadets des trois armes ont bénéficié de crédits pour études depuis 1997.

Au cours de l’année scolaire 2005-2006, une commission scolaire montréalaise a approuvé et mis en vigueur dans toutes ses écoles secondaires, un processus centralisé permettant aux cadets de faire des demandes d’équivalences [équivalences pour l’expérience avec les cadets]. « Au Québec, la politique du certificat d'études secondaires permet à la direction des commissions scolaires locales d'accorder jusqu'à quatre crédits (sur un total de 54) pour des programmes reconnus localement, a confirmé Grant Fabes, ancien président du comité des crédits pour études de niveau secondaire et actuellement l'un des

<

En Saskatchewan, en Ontario, au Québec et en Nouvelle-Écosse, un processus global de reconnaissance des apprentissages acquis en dehors de l'école existe, et les cadets peuvent demander des crédits au moyen de diverses procédures. Cependant, l'approbation de ces demandes varie beaucoup d'une province à l'autre.

Le Capt Boudreau félicite le cadet Jean Gabriel Dumais pour l’obtention d’équivalences d’études secondaires reçus à la suite de l’instruction des cadets au sein du Corps de cadets de l’Armée 2768. vice-présidents nationaux de la Ligue des cadets de l'Air. » Durant l'année scolaire 2005-2006, une commission scolaire de Montréal a approuvé et mis en application, dans toutes ses écoles secondaires, un processus centralisé permettant aux cadets de réclamer des crédits pour études. Les cadets de l'Air ont soumis cinq « cas types » à la commission; tous ont été acceptés puis transmis au ministre de l'Éducation qui les a approuvés. Malheureusement, les choses peuvent se dérouler lentement au Québec, car les formalités pour passer d'une commission à une autre sont longues. « Notre stratégie doit être adaptée et ajustée selon la nature et la taille de la collectivité locale », a déclaré M. Fabes. En 2006, le Capt Jean Boudreau, commandant (cmdt) du Corps de cadets de l'Armée 2768 à Grande-Rivière, au Québec, a reçu

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

le premier Prix d'excellence du CIC — un prix de la région de l'Est — pour avoir pris l'initiative d'adapter le processus pour la région de Gaspé, au Québec. Quand le Capt Boudreau a pris le commandement de son corps en 2004, le maintien de l'effectif des cadets constituait l'une de ses priorités. Il pressentait que ses cadets seraient davantage fidèles au Programme des cadets si leur école secondaire reconnaissait leur expérience de manière officielle. Son expérience de huit années à la présidence de la commission scolaire locale lui a permis de soulever avec l’école la question des crédits pour études de niveau secondaire liée à l'expérience de cadet. Il a personnellement rencontré le directeuradjoint afin de discuter de l'octroi aux cadets, durant leur quatrième et leur cinquième années d'école secondaire, de suite à la page 25

19


FORMATION DES CADETS

Lt Dale Crouch

L’intérêt par la participation J’ai reçu l’appel au début de mars, l’an dernier. J’étais officier d’administration et entraîneur de biathlon de l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 825 de Yellowknife, dans les T.N.-O. on commandant (cmdt), un pilote, venait de recevoir une proposition d’emploi à London, en Ont., et il voulait que je devienne le nouveau cmdt de l’escadron. Quand je lui ai demandé de combien de temps je disposais pour me préparer, sa réponse produisit l’effet d’une bombe : « Je pars jeudi prochain. »

M

Notre stratégie d’intéressement par la participation consiste à inculquer à nos cadets, officiers et parrains l’idée que l’escadron leur appartient. Être contraint de prendre la relève aussi soudainement présentait au moins un avantage. Le fait que le changement de

commandement ait lieu avant le début de la prochaine année d’entraînement me donnait « un peu de répit » pour évaluer les priorités les plus pressantes inhérentes à mes nouvelles responsabilités et prendre les mesures nécessaires. Mes priorités consisteraient donc à raviver les liens avec un parrain qui s’était quelque peu désintéressé des activités quotidiennes de l’escadron, à revigorer l’enrôlement des cadets, qui était au ralenti, et à conserver notre effectif. La stratégie que nous avons décidé d’adopter pour relever le défi a été d’« Éveiller l’intérêt par la participation ». Notre stratégie d’intéressement par la participation consiste à inculquer à nos cadets, officiers et parrains l’idée que l’escadron leur appartient. Cette façon de voir, nous l’espérions, renforcerait chez eux le désir, l’engagement et la volonté de travailler en équipe.

Premières étapes Au début d’avril, j’ai rencontré nos parrains du Elks Club pour les renseigner sur le statut, les installations, les officiers, les cadets principaux, les activités prévues au sein de l’escadron et leur expliquer quelles étaient, selon moi, nos priorités. Mon but était de les convaincre de s’engager à nouveau. Ils ont relevé le défi en acceptant de participer au recrutement au cours de l’année à venir. Leur engagement m’a permis de me concentrer sur le maintien en poste des cadets. J’ai pensé que je pourrais susciter plus d’intérêt et d’enthousiasme chez nos cadets supérieurs s’ils participaient à l’entraînement de l’escadron. Mon but était de remplacer leur désir omniprésent de promotion en les incitant à participer à l’entraînement de l’escadron. Il fallait trouver, pour chaque cadet, un poste ou une fonction qui lui soit propre. Voici notre modus operandi : • Quelques semaines après avoir pris en charge mon nouveau commandement, j’ai rassemblé tous mes cadets comptant trois ou quatre années de service lors d’un exercice d’entraînement en campagne d’hiver et je leur ai demandé de participer à la planification de la prochaine année d’entraînement. J’étais convaincu qu’il fallait que nos cadets supérieurs deviennent entraîneurs et aient la possibilité d’enseigner tout au long de l’année question de garder leur intérêt en haleine.

< Le Sgt Victoria Williams, cadet supérieur chargé des procédures, donne un cours d'éducation civique et de principes de vie.

20

• Mon officier d’entraînement et moimême avons révisé tous les objectifs de rendement (OREN) pour la nouvelle année d’entraînement, défini les domaines de compétence et rédigé les attributions. Les OREN comme

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


l’exercice militaire et l’aptitude physique, par exemple, pouvaient être enseignés par des cadets supérieurs occupant des postes de leadership. Nous sommes parvenus à définir 10 à 12 postes et les attributions, dont un poste de cadet instructeur de survie, un de cadet supérieur chargé des photographies et un de cadet supérieur chargé des opérations (établissement de la liste des caporaux de service, des calendriers, entre autres).

• Nous avons examiné l’entraînement actuel, recueilli les commentaires des cadets sur le modus operandi de chaque exercice ou activité, et tenté de voir comment améliorer les choses.

Nous continuons à développer l'« intéressement par la participation » et, en même temps, nous passons à la deuxième phase de notre stratégie : le « maintien de l'effectif par l'engagement ». Cette phase permettra de s'assurer que chacun est engagé dans des activités importantes • Nous avons examiné avec les cadets les attributions de chaque poste de leadership et créé un modèle de plan d’entraînement où les titulaires des postes seraient chargés de la formation. • Nous avons divisé les cadets en groupes et demandé aux membres de chaque groupe de concevoir un exercice d’entraînement en campagne qui prendrait en compte ces postes en leur assignant des rôles clés. Nous leur avons demandé d’identifier les « qui, quoi, où, quand et pourquoi » et d’expliquer le lien entre l’exercice et l’année d’entraînement.

• À la fin de l’exercice, nous avons remis aux cadets des formulaires d’inscription – contenant les attributions – et leur avons demandé de s’inscrire, par ordre de préférence, à trois des postes de leadership. • Deux semaines plus tard, nous les avons interrogés pour leur demander pour quelles raisons nous devions retenir leur candidature et quels étaient leurs titres de compétences. Nous avons ensuite pourvu des postes avant l’été pour donner aux cadets le temps de préparer de la documentation et un plan pour la prochaine année d’entraînement. • Chaque cadet a signé les attributions liées à son poste, concluant ainsi un genre de « contrat » avec l’escadron et confirmant son engagement à agir comme cadet expert dans ce domaine, durant l’entraînement et les exercices. Ces postes ont ensuite été inscrits dans les ordres permanents de l’escadron. • Nous avons également désigné un adjoint, ou remplaçant, pour chaque poste. Succès à court terme • Tous les cadets principaux qui ont participé à notre exercice d’entraînement en campagne sont revenus. • Notre parrain a participé au recrutement en finançant l’installation d’un kiosque d’information lors de deux événements importants. • Nos trois meilleurs cadets principaux ont participé à la planification de notre

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

soirée de recrutement, notamment en analysant les résultats des efforts de recrutement antérieurs. • Vingt-cinq (25) nouveaux cadets se sont enrôlés lors de la soirée de recrutement et 44 cadets ont répondu à l’appel nominal de l’escadron lors de notre deuxième soirée de parade – un gain par rapport à la parade de l’année précédente à laquelle avaient participé seulement 15 à 20 cadets. Nous sommes très satisfaits de ces chiffres.

<

• Nous avons discuté avec les cadets de ce qu’il fallait inclure à notre programme d’entraînement et de la notion de leadership, comparée à celle du savoir.

L'Adj2 Kim Gibson, cadet supérieur chargé des exposés de l'instruction, collabore avec l'officier de l'instruction pour les techniques d'instruction, l'art oratoire et l'instruction aux cadets des niveaux 1, 2 et 3.

Tout en poursuivant notre stratégie « Éveiller l’intérêt par la participation », nous entreprenons la deuxième étape « Le maintien en poste par l’engagement », qui fera en sorte que tous les cadets participent à une activité valable. Pour les officiers, cela signifie qu’ils doivent se concentrer sur l’entraînement, les ordres d’opérations et les exercices pour s’assurer que les cadets accomplissent les tâches prévues dans les « contrats » qu’ils ont créés. Les officiers doivent donc s’assurer de ne pas court-circuiter les clauses du contrat en demandant à un cadet autre que celui qui est chargé de l’exercice militaire de s’acquitter de cette tâche. Si nous pouvons motiver nos cadets à respecter de bon gré leur engagement une fois que nous avons éveillé leur intérêt, nous sommes persuadés qu’ils demeureront dans le programme. Le Lt Crouch était cadet de l’Air dans les années 70 à Lahr, en Allemagne. Il a joint les rangs du CIC en 2004.

21


MISE À JOUR DU PROGRAMME DES CADETS

Capt Catherine Griffin

L’apprentissage selon l’âge Les cadets vivent une foule de changements durant les années qu’ils passent dans le programme. Entre 12 et 18 ans, ils vivront des changements fondamentaux tant sur le plan physique, mental, émotif que social et cela constitue le fondement du programme d’instruction revisé.

PD 1 : Basée sur l’expérience (1re et 2e années : 12-14 ans) • Automatismes bien développés. • Capacités de raisonnement de plus haut niveau commencent à évoluer. • Ces jeunes aiment explorer de nombreuses activités et s’engager. • Ils veulent explorer le contenu du programme. Apprentissage efficace • Actif et interactif, beaucoup d’expériences pratiques. • Exige la supervision étroite des instructeurs.

22

a conception et la prestation de l’instruction vont de pair avec le développement des cadets. On leur enseigne des compétences et ils acquièrent des connaissances au moment où ils sont le mieux en mesure de comprendre et de retenir les notions apprises. Les cadets relèvent ainsi des défis à leur mesure qui leur permettent d’atteindre les buts et objectifs du Programme des cadets.

L

Le Programme des cadets n’a pas inventé la philosophie de l’apprentissage approprié à l’âge.

développement (PD) que subissent nos cadets. À mesure que ces derniers franchissent ces PD, ils développent et affinent des capacités de raisonnement, des comportements et des aptitudes sociales de plus haut niveau. Qu’est-ce que les PD? Chaque PD a un titre qui correspond aux principales caractéristiques de développement associées aux différents groupes d’âge. Ces niveaux sont généralisés et les jeunes progressent à leur rythme. Pour mieux comprendre les PD

Au cours des dernières années, les officiers du CIC ont examiné dans l’ensemble du Canada les résultats de la recherche contemporaine sur le développement des jeunes et la relation avec l’apprentissage. Ces résultats ont été consolidés et constituent la pierre angulaire de la philosophie d’apprentissage du Programme des cadets et de l’établissement de trois phases de

Vous aurez accès à des outils de formation qui vous permettront de mieux comprendre les PD. Ce printemps, vous recevrez des trucs et astuces en même temps que la mise à jour des documents de formation, qui vous aideront à former les cadets au premier niveau de développement.

PD 2 : Phase de développement

PD 3: Compétence

(3e et 4e années : 15-16 ans)

(5e et 6e années : 17-18 ans)

• Ces jeunes sont prêts à développer des capacités de raisonnement de plus haut niveau, comme la résolution de problèmes. • Il se peut qu’ils participent à moins d’activités car ils veulent apprendre davantage des activités qui leur plaisent. • Ils veulent réfléchir sur la façon de mettre en pratique quotidiennement les compétences et les connaissances qu’ils acquièrent chez les cadets. Apprentissage efficace

• Ces jeunes améliorent leurs capacités de raisonnement de plus haut niveau. • Ils sont prêts à assumer plus de responsabilités et à apprendre de façon autonome. • Ils veulent affiner leurs compétences en tant que chefs et instructeurs et se spécialiser dans les domaines qui les intéressent davantage. • Ils se demandent comment ils peuvent approfondir leurs compétences et leurs connaissances et les utiliser à l’avenir. Apprentissage efficace

• Apprentissage interactif et expériences pratiques permettant aux cadets de prendre des décisions.

• Organisé et dirigé par les cadets, sous la supervision des officiers.

• Les instructeurs fournissent une structure aux cadets, tout en leur permettant de faire des choix, comme de décider de leur rôle dans les activités de groupe.

• Permet la planification d’activités réelles, actives et pratiques. • Encadrement et suivi.

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


Ltv Shayne Hall

La formation par l’aventure en plein air ne sera plus une activité de fin de semaine obligatoire, mais une activité facultative destinée à fournir davantage d’occasions d’entraînement nautique.

Instruction locale de première année - Marine première vue, la nouvelle Phase un de l’instruction qui commencera en septembre 2008 ressemble à bien des points de vue au programme actuel. En fait, les modifications les plus importantes ne concernent pas le contenu (le quoi), mais plutôt « le comment ». Les officiers de l’instruction des corps devront dorénavant planifier et gérer 60 périodes d’instruction obligatoire et 30 périodes (sur un choix de 98) d’instruction complémentaire. Cela, ainsi que les guides d’instruction conçus pour adapter les périodes d’instruction à l’âge des cadets et les rendre plus agréables, devrait rendre « le comment » beaucoup plus dynamique.

À

Bien que les changements les plus importants concernent « le comment », certaines modifications seront également apportées « au quoi ». La formation par l’aventure en plein air ne sera plus une activité de fin de semaine obligatoire, mais une activité facultative destinée à fournir davantage d’occasions d’entraînement nautique; on comptera un plus grand nombre d’activités de sensibilisation à la Marine canadienne et aux milieux maritimes; on mettra davantage l’accent sur l’aptitude physique et les saines habitudes de vie. Les modifications apportées au « contenu » comprennent :

Le service au sein d’un corps de cadets de la Marine. Le contenu de cette activité, maintenant désignée sous le nom de Connaissances générales du cadet, est à peu près le même, à l’exception de sujets comme la terminologie navale que l’on trouve sous la nouvelle rubrique Manoeuvres à bord d’un navire.

La formation par l’aventure en plein air ne sera plus une activité de fin de semaine obligatoire, mais une activité facultative destinée à fournir davantage d’occasions d’entraînement nautique. Exercice militaire. On consacre moins de temps à l’exercice militaire. L’exercice obligatoire consiste à répondre aux besoins d’instruction d’un corps moyen qui dirige une parade de revue annuelle. Il est permis de faire plus d’exercice militaire dans le cadre d’un cours facultatif. Tir de précision. L’instruction au tir demeure foncièrement la même; toutefois, la classification de tir est devenue le tir récréatif, avec un programme de récom-

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

penses plus imposant qui reconnaît le rendement sur une plus longue période. Voile. Bien que la voile soit un objectif de rendement (OREN) obligatoire de la Phase deux de l’instruction et des phases plus avancées, elle est devenue un OREN complémentaire de la Phase un. Toutefois, avec l’introduction d’un nouveau volet appelé Manœuvres à bord de petites embarcations, les cadets qui participent à toutes les phases doivent suivre annuellement deux fins de semaine de formation sur l’eau (une obligatoire et une complémentaire), soit sur un voilier ou sur un autre type d’embarcation. Connaissance de la marine. Cette activité comprend désormais deux volets, Manoeuvres à bord d’un navire et Marine canadienne et milieux maritimes. Le volet Marine canadienne et milieux maritimes renseigne les cadets sur la Marine canadienne comme nous l’avons fait par le passé, mais va plus loin en les initiant aux milieux maritimes civils et au Canada en tant que pays maritime. Matelotage. Bien qu’on l’appelle désormais Câbles et cordages, ce volet de l’instruction demeure à peu près le même. suite à la page 24

23


MISE À JOUR DU PROGRAMME DES CADETS

Formation par l’aventure en plein air. Bien que cette activité ne fasse plus partie de l’instruction de la Phase 1, les corps peuvent poursuivre les activités de camping de base dans le cadre de leur entraînement facultatif. Conditionnement physique. Cette activité comprend désormais deux volets. Sports récréatifs dont le contenu demeure à peu près le même et Conditionnement physique et saines habitudes de vie où l’on explique aux cadets les composantes du conditionnement physique, et où l’on discute des activités et des habitudes alimentaires qui ont des conséquences sur celle-ci. L’objectif de rendement consiste à établir des objectifs et à tenter de les atteindre pour être en bonne condition physique. Citoyenneté. Cette activité comprend également deux volets : Citoyenneté portant sur des aspects comme les symboles canadiens et Service communautaire où les cadets inscrits à la Phase un participent à un projet communautaire. Bien que la Phase un révisée (et les phases subséquentes) semblent identiques, la mise en œuvre du nouveau programme comportera de nombreux défis. La transition à un nouveau cadre, l’introduction de nouvelles activités comme la deuxième fin de semaine de formation sur l’eau, et la gestion des deux phases du programme d’instruction qui seront mises à jour année après année ne seront pas faciles, spécialement pour les cadets officiers des corps. La transition ne se fera pas sans heurts. Elle frappera sans doute bien des obstacles et pourrait avoir quelques crises de croissance. Soyez assuré que nous ferons notre possible pour que la transition se fasse en douceur. Vous recevrez donc, à cette fin, dès l’automne, le matériel de formation de la nouvelle Phase un, ce qui vous laissera une année complète pour préparer le nouveau programme.

Instruction locale de première année - Armée Les officiers d’instruction futés s’efforcent de développer des pratiques exemplaires à partir des expériences passées lorsqu’ils élaborent le nouveau programme d’instruction.

T

outefois, durant l’année d’instruction 2008-2009, ils feront face à un défi supplémentaire : la mise en œuvre des changements au programme Étoile verte. Pour les aider à cet égard, ils devraient recevoir la documentation relative à ce programme dès l’automne prochain.

En ce qui concerne le contenu, il y a moins d’exercice militaire, davantage de familiarisation inhérente aux FC et le recours aux « expéditions » comme moyen privilégié d'instruction des cadets de l'Armée. Par ailleurs, on insiste davantage sur les sports récréatifs et le conditionnement physique.

Certes, le programme modifié ressemble de manière frappante au programme actuel. Même si le cadre a changé de manière significative, le contenu est resté pratiquement semblable.

On trouve ci-après une description des changements les plus importants apportés au programme.

L'instauration de 30 nouvelles classes d'instruction complémentaires, choisies par l'officier de l'instruction à partir d'une liste de 148 classes possibles, peut sembler compliquée à première vue; cependant, le personnel des corps de cadets pourra simplifier les choses en identifiant les domaines d'instruction à privilégier. Dès lors, il ne s'agira que de choisir des classes à partir des domaines pertinents pour remplir les 10 cours complémentaires (trois classes par cours) et deux des quatre journées complémentaires.

Exercice militaire. L’exercice militaire obligatoire vise à répondre aux besoins d'instruction ordinaires pour le défilé annuel des corps des cadets. Il est permis d'effectuer des exercices militaires supplémentaires dans le cadre des classes complémentaires. Instruction élémentaire. Cet élément demeure essentiellement inchangé et fait partie d'un nouveau domaine appelé Connaissances générales des cadets. Un nouveau domaine baptisé Familiarisation avec les FC permet d'offrir aux cadets une introduction au rôle de l'Armée de terre du Canada.

Des cadets du corps de Cadets de l’Armée 2137 de Calgary participant à un exercice de campagne hivernal. La participation de cadets de l’Armée à des exercices par temps froid a été officialisé à titre d’activité complémentaire du nouveau programme.

<

Leadership. Cette activité demeure à peu près la même et met l’accent sur le travail d’équipe.

Capt Rick Butson

Le Ltv Hall est l’officier d’état-major chargé de l’élaboration du programme des cadets de la Marine à la Direction – Cadets

24

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


Entraînement aventurier. Rebaptisé Instruction appliquée, ce domaine permet de transférer des objectifs de compétence en matière de supervision de niveau supérieur au programme Étoile rouge, et d'officialiser la participation des cadets de l'Armée à des exercices d'entraînement par temps froid au titre d'activité complémentaire. Un nouveau domaine baptisé Trekking offre aux cadets une introduction aux mouvements effectués dans le cadre d'une expédition et comporte deux jours de formation par l'aventure complémentaire.

L'objectif du projet de mise à jour de l'instruction était d'améliorer le programme en utilisant les pratiques exemplaires des trois armes. Carte et boussole. Rebaptisé Navigation, ce domaine fournit aux cadets une introduction aux cartes et à leur utilisation durant les randonnées. Tir de précision. Ce domaine demeure essentiellement le même; les tirs de classification se sont cependant transformés en tirs récréatifs et s'accompagnent d'un programme de récompenses élargi qui inclut la reconnaissance des performances durant une période plus longue. Art oratoire et leadership. La promotion du travail d'équipe du domaine Leadership remplace l'art oratoire comme activité de renforcement de la confiance. Le domaine du Leadership est élargi et inclut maintenant l'établissement des objectifs. Citoyenneté. Ce domaine comprend maintenant une deuxième activité nommée Service communautaire. Le service communautaire constituera un élément obligatoire du Programme des cadets. Conditionnement physique. Ce domaine réunit maintenant deux autres domaines : Conditionnement physique personnel et modes de vie sains et Sports récréatifs. Les sports obligatoires et complémentaires peuvent être choisis à partir d'une liste de

10 sports recommandés. Une nouvelle gamme de tests de condition physique permettant d'évaluer l'endurance et la force dans la perspective de l'établissement des objectifs, remplace le test de conditionnement physique des cadets de l'Armée. Les officiers de l'instruction auront du pain sur la planche pour composer avec la mise en œuvre du programme Étoile verte tout en maintenant les programmes actuels Étoile rouge, Étoile d'argent et Étoile d'or. Dans un grand nombre de cas, cependant, la tâche n'est pas aussi lourde qu'il n'y paraît. De nombreux corps de cadets, par exemple, offrent actuellement des soirées sportives, des activités d'éducation civique, d'observation nocturne de longue portée additionnelles et des défilés annuels en plus des classes du programme des étoiles. Dans le cadre de la nouvelle version du programme des étoiles, ces classes feront partie de l'instruction obligatoire ou complémentaire. Cette mise à jour reconnaît essentiellement des classes qui existent déjà, mais qui ne sont pas incluses dans nos documents de gestion de l'instruction. Personne ne compte que la nouvelle version du programme puisse être mise en œuvre de manière parfaite dans tous les corps de cadets de l'ensemble du pays dès la première année. On s'attend à recevoir des questions, et le personnel des régions ainsi que le personnel détaché seront prêts à y répondre. L'objectif du projet de mise à jour de l'instruction était d'améliorer le programme en utilisant les pratiques exemplaires des trois armes. Maintenant, les officiers de l'instruction des corps de cadets continueront à promouvoir les pratiques exemplaires du programme des cadets de l'Armée de terre, mais à partir de nouveaux outils de valeur — les meilleures pratiques des programmes des cadets de l'Air et de la Marine. Le Capt Butson est l'officier d’état-major pour le perfectionnement de l'instruction des cadets de l'Armée à la Direction – Cadets.

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

Crédits pour études accordés aux cadets ...suite de la page 19 crédits supplémentaires pour tenir compte de leur expérience de cadet. Les crédits feraient partie de leur dossier scolaire et seraient consignés dans les fichiers des étudiants à l'école. Le Capt Boudreau a alors conclu un accord avec l'école selon laquelle les cadets doivent avoir terminé et réussi les examens de niveau 3 (Étoile d'argent) pour avoir droit à deux crédits, et de niveau 4 (Étoile d’or) pour obtenir deux crédits additionnels. Il souhaite que cette initiative incite les cadets à rester au sein de son corps jusqu'à l'âge de 18 ans, qu'elle les encourage à terminer leurs études secondaires et qu'elle permette de tisser des liens entre l'administration de l'école et le corps des cadets. Afin de renforcer davantage les liens entre le corps des cadets et l'école, le Capt Boudreau invite des représentants de l'école secondaire à la revue annuelle du corps pour qu'ils présentent les crédits pour études aux cadets méritants. Le Capt Boudreau a agi de manière proactive en expédiant le rapport intégral de son projet à 35 cmdt actuels et futurs de corps et d'escadrons de la région. « Dans le cas d'un corps ou d'un escadron qui fait partie d'une collectivité possédant une seule école secondaire, il vaut mieux communiquer avec l'administration de l'école », a affirmé M. Fabes. Il ajoute, cependant, que là où il y a plus d'une école secondaire, il est préférable de contacter la commission scolaire. De plus, il préconise d'agir de concert auprès des représentants de l'éducation lorsqu'il existe plus d'un corps ou d'un escadron dans une collectivité. M. Fabes considère que le fait d’améliorer le processus de maintien de l'effectif des cadets constitue un acquis majeur. « Quelle que soit la stratégie employée, elle doit refléter le partenariat entre le comité répondant et le personnel militaire. »

25


MISE À JOUR DU PROGRAMME DES CADETS

Capt Andrea Onchulenko

Instruction locale de première année - Air

Conditionnement physique. Ce domaine comprend maintenant deux sujets – Élaborer un plan d’activités personnel et Participer à des sports récréatifs. Nous voulons encore aider les cadets à faire des choix judicieux en matière de conditionnement physique et à consacrer des périodes obligatoires aux sports d’équipe. Tir de précision. L’activité n’a pas été modifiée. Connaissances générales. Ce sujet n’a pas subi de changements.

< L’instruction de première année destinée aux cadets, comme Navin Woosaree, cadet de l’Air de première classe de l’Escadron 810 d’Edmonton, qui s’exerce ici au vol à moteur, comprendra des activités liées à l’aviation, à l’aérospatiale et aux opérations aéroportuaires.

26

Septembre 2008 peut sembler bien loin, mais il n’est jamais trop tôt pour commencer la planification. Comme vous le savez déjà, le nouveau niveau d’aptitude un destiné aux Cadets de l’Air ne sera pas implanté avant cette période. Toutefois, il faut prendre les choses du bon côté. ous aurez ainsi davantage de temps pour assimiler le nouveau matériel de formation qui vous parviendra à l’automne et pour vous préparer en prévision de l’année de formation 2008-2009.

V

Bien que la planification du nouveau programme, parallèlement à la réalisation du programme actuel, comporte certains défis, le programme remanié est attendu avec impatience. Il comprend de nouvelles activités pour les cadets de première année, mais ce sont surtout les nouvelles activités complémentaires qui sont intéressantes. Dans chacun des domaines énumérés cidessous, le personnel d’instruction pourra choisir des activités parmi 120 périodes d’instruction. L’instruction complémentaire doit totaliser 10 séances (30 périodes) et deux jours (18 périodes) d’instruction. Ces choix d’instruction complémentaire permettront au personnel des escadrons d’adapter son instruction aux nouveaux cadets en fonction des désirs de ces derniers, des ressources locales et de ses propres compétences.

Voici certaines des modifications apportées dans divers domaines du programme : Citoyenneté. Ce domaine comprend maintenant un nouveau sujet, le service communautaire.

Ces choix d’instruction complémentaire permettront au personnel des escadrons d’adapter son instruction aux nouveaux cadets en fonction des désirs de ces derniers, des ressources locales et de ses propres compétences. Leadership. On commence par enseigner aux cadets à être de fidèles adeptes et de bons coéquipiers, et à mettre cet enseignement en pratique. Ces compétences serviront ensuite de fondement à l’instruction en leadership à des niveaux plus élevés.

Exercice militaire. Nous avons diminué le nombre de périodes consacrées à cet exercice, tout en conservant assez de temps pour enseigner les principes fondamentaux des exercices sans armes à la halte et pendant la marche. Le but est de préparer adéquatement les cadets à leur revue annuelle. Familiarisation avec les Forces canadiennes. Nous avons établi des périodes obligatoires d’apprentissage portant sur les FC. Activités relatives à l’aviation, à l’aérospatiale et aux opérations aéroportuaires. Nous avons créé trois domaines pour offrir une variété d’activités en matière d’aviation, d’aérospatiale et de technologie de l’aviation. Ces activités se poursuivront aux divers niveaux d’instruction des Cadets de l’Air et elles sont maintenant liées à l’instruction d’été. Exercice en campagne. Nous avons conservé les cours de Survie à l’intention des équipages et de Communications radio. La majeure partie de l’exercice en campagne est maintenant intégrée à l’exercice obligatoire. Le fait d’implanter la mise à jour du programme au rythme d’une année à la fois devrait permettre au personnel des escadrons de s’adapter progressivement au changement – et d’y adhérer plus facilement. Le Capt Onchulenko est l’officier d’état-major affecté à l’élaboration du Programme des Cadets de l’Air à la Direction –Cadets.

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


LIGUE DES CADETS DE L’AIR

Craig Hawkins

Y a-t-il des perspectives de carrière pour les Cadets de l’Air? La Ligue des cadets de l’Air continue d’établir des partenariats avec le secteur canadien de l’aviation et de l’aérospatiale, car elle est déterminée, à long terme, à mettre sur pied un programme dynamique et stimulant pour les Cadets de l’Air dans tout le Canada. n novembre 2006, la Ligue a signé des ententes avec l’Air Transport Association of Canada et le Canadian Business Aviation Association selon lesquelles ces organisations s’engagent à collaborer pour inciter les jeunes Canadiens à s’intéresser aux carrières liées à l’aviation. Ces ententes s’ajoutent à des accords similaires signés en 2005 avec le Centre canadien de l’entretien des aéronefs (CCEA) et le Canadian Aerospace Associations Human Resources Alliance (CAAHRA).

E

Ces ententes sont avantageuses à tous les niveaux du Programme, de l’escadron local, qui sera en mesure d’établir des liens avec

<

L’un des buts du Programme des cadets de l’Air est de susciter l’engouement des jeunes pour le domaine de l’aviation. Pour leur part, les industries canadiennes de l’aviation et de l’aérospatiale souhaitent également attirer dans leurs rangs les jeunes adultes désireux de faire carrière dans un domaine professionnel, technologique ou encore de gestion. Ces ententes, en fait, profitent à tous. Les industries canadiennes de l’aviation et de l’aérospatiale offrent de nombreuses perspectives de carrière et recherchent des jeunes adultes bien renseignés et enthousiastes, et la demande à cet égard croît à mesure que ce secteur de l’économie canadienne prend de l’expansion.

Sous le regard des membres de l’Escadron 632 des cadets de l’Air d’Orléans, en Ontario, Craig Hawkins, président de la Ligue des cadets de l’Air, au centre, signe l’entente avec Glenn Priestley, de la Canadian Business Aviation Association, à gauche, et Sam Barone, de l’Air Transport Association of Canada. une entreprise d’aviation ou d’aérospatiale locale, à l’échelon national, où un comité directeur, composé de représentants des deux parties, pourra envisager de collaborer à des projets particuliers. Les avantages sont évidents pour le Programme des cadets. On pense ici à des contacts possibles avec des entreprises d’aviation et d’aérospatiale, à l’accès à des ressources et à des installations d’instruction, à des visites guidées, à la possibilité d’avoir recours à des experts de l’industrie qui interviennent à titre de conférenciers invités ou d’instructeurs. Dans le cas des industries de l’aviation et de l’aérospatiale, on parle surtout d’avantages à long terme, comme les possibilités d’interagir avec de jeunes adultes passionnés d’aviation qui pourraient bien décider de faire carrière dans ce domaine. Ces industries investissent dans l’avenir de leurs entreprises et

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

dans celui du secteur canadien de l’aviation et de l’aérospatiale. Les avantages commencent à se faire sentir à l’échelon local. Le Conseil canadien de l’entretien des aéronefs a déjà envoyé à certains escadrons du matériel d’instruction de l’industrie afin d’appuyer l’instruction locale. Pour obtenir de l’information supplémentaire sur les ententes et pour savoir comment votre escadron peut en bénéficier, communiquez avec le Siège national de la Ligue des cadets de l’Air, avec votre bureau provincial ou encore avec M. Grant Fabes, président du comité directeur de la Ligue/l’industrie, à l’adresse gsfabes@videotron.ca. M. Hawkins est le président national de la Ligue des cadets de l’Air.

27


FORMATION DES CADETS

Lt David Jackson

Parfaire l’instruction en salle par le vol à bord d’un appareil à moteur Tout le monde sait que les cadets de l’Air aiment voler. Des journées de vol à voile sont attribuées aux escadrons et les cadets sautent sur l’occasion pour appliquer ce qu’ils ont appris en classe. alheureusement, ces journées de vol à voile peuvent être annulées en raison du mauvais temps et on ne peut faire de vol à voile en hiver.

M

Le vol propulsé est régi par l’OAIC 52-07. De plus, chaque région publie des directives particulières. Pour obtenir plus de renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec votre [officier des cadets du secteur] et votre [officier régional des opérations (Air) des cadets]. Lorsque cette situation se produit, pourquoi ne pas envisager de compléter l’expérience des cadets de l’Air par un vol propulsé? Les commandants peuvent communiquer avec l’officier des cadets du secteur (OCS) et avec l’officier régional des opérations (Air) des cadets (OR Ops AC) pour

28

qu’ils les aident à organiser cette activité, particulièrement si la journée de vol à voile de l’escadron a été annulée ou si ce dernier est situé trop loin d’une zone de vol à voile. Vous pouvez obtenir des fonds spéciaux pour le vol propulsé auprès de l’unité régionale de soutien aux cadets ou de l’échelon local de la Ligue des cadets de l’Air – suivant les circonstances.

• Un vol à bord de ce type d’avion à titre de PIC (ou en compagnie d’un instructeur) au cours des 60 derniers jours • Durant la dernière année, un test de compétence passé avec un instructeur de vol à bord du même type d’avion que celui qui sera utilisé durant l’activité Un avion populaire, comme le Cessna 172 par exemple, peut accueillir à son bord jusqu’à trois cadets, en plus du pilote.

Le vol propulsé dans votre région Le vol propulsé est régi par l’OAIC 52-07. De plus, chaque région publie des directives particulières. Pour obtenir plus d’informations, communiquer avec votre OCS et votre OR Ops AC. Il est recommandé de louer un avion dans un aéroclub local accrédité ayant bonne réputation par aéroclub local accrédité reconnu. Les aéroclubs doivent satisfaire à certaines normes établies par Transports Canada relativement à la maintenance, aux inspections et à l’assurance responsabilité. Quelle que soit la région où vous vous trouvez, les pilotes doivent cependant posséder les compétences suivantes pour piloter un avion d’un aéroclub : • 30 heures de pilote commandant de bord (PIC) • Une heure de vol à bord du type d’avion

Le Cpl Pooja Woosaree, le Cpl David Jones et le Cpl Ben Kaggwa s’apprêtent à participer à un vol de familiarisation.

qui sera retenu pour l’activité

Ce que les cadets peuvent apprendre Niveau un Les cadets de l’Air auront plusieurs possibilités d’améliorer leurs compétences en matière d’identification des aéronefs et leurs connaissances des installations aéronautiques durant la visite d’un aérodrome. Plus important encore, l’instruction relative aux structures d’une cellule prend une dimension spéciale quand ils peuvent accompagner le pilote durant une inspection approfondie de l’avion et examiner de près toutes les pièces principales. Un vol de familiarisation avec ces cadets permet au pilote de montrer les effets principaux des commandes de vol (dégagement à l’horizontale, tonneau, lacet) et d’expliquer quelle gouverne est liée à chaque effet.

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


?

Testez connaissances

Niveau deux Les cadets ont l’occasion d’explorer les principes du vol, de la propulsion et des radiocommunications durant un vol de familiarisation.

vos

Le pilote peut leur montrer les effets secondaires des gouvernes et du couplage des quatre forces sur l’avion et faire un circuit au-dessus d’un aérodrome. L’écoute active des radiocommunications, surtout sur une radiofréquence très utilisée, permet aux cadets d’approfondir leurs connaissances en matière de radiocommunications. Niveau trois La navigation est l’un des principaux objectifs de rendement des cadets à ce niveau. Les vols de familiarisation peuvent comprendre des exercices de pilotage durant lesquels les cadets jouent le rôle du navigateur et s’exercent à faire la corrélation entre les reliefs sur les cartes et au sol, ainsi qu’à diriger le pilote jusqu’à un endroit prédéterminé sur la carte.

Créé par les dirigeants de l’École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (Pacifique)

1.

En vertu de quelle autorité un élève-officier peut-il être commandant d’un corps ou d’un escadron de cadets? a) c) b) d)

2.

Commandant, Unité régionale de soutien aux cadets Commandant, corps ou escadron de cadets Directeur général – Réserves et cadets Directeur - Cadets

Quelle est la limite maximale de temps établie pour déposer officiellement un grief?

Cadets supérieurs

Le Lt Jackson était l’officier d’administration de l’Escadron 810 des Cadets de l’Air à Edmonton; il est maintenant pilote au centre de vol à voile d’Edmonton.

3.

À quelle fréquence les officiers du CIC et les instructeurs civils doivent-ils se soumettre à une vérification de leurs dossiers de police et procéder au filtrage des secteurs vulnérables? a) Une fois b) Tous les 3 ans

4.

c) Tous les 5 ans d) Tous les 10 ans

À quelle date le Protocole d’entente (PE) entre le ministère de la Défense nationale/ les FC et les trois ligues de cadets est-il entré en vigueur? a) 23 nov. 2002 b) 1 er déc. 2005

5.

c) Indéfini d) 3 mois

c) 1 er sept. 2006 d) 1 er juillet 2006

Lesquels des postes suivants d’un corps/escadron de cadets n’ont pas accès à Fortress – la base de données du Programme des cadets? a) Officier d’approvisionnement b) Officier de musique

Correction Une erreur s’est glissée dans notre dernier questionnaire. Les réponses exactes pour les questions 4 et 5 ont été inversées; par contre, les références sont exactes. La réponse de la question 4 est b) et la réponse de la question 5 est a). Nous nous excusons de cette erreur.

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

c) Instructeur de niveau 4 d) Commandant

Réponses

Donc, ne perdez pas courage si le mauvais temps et la distance viennent gâcher vos journées de vol à voile. En complétant l’instruction au quartier général local par le vol à bord d’un appareil à moteur et en faisant le lien entre les objectifs de rendement et les vols, les cadets pourront mieux comprendre le vol et approfondir leurs connaissances dès le début. Cela les aidera à obtenir d’excellents résultats lorsqu’ils feront une demande de bourse d’études et dans le monde de l’aviation civile.

a) 12 mois b) 6 mois

1. c) Référence : OAIC 23-14, paragraphes 3-4 2. b) Référence : ORFC Volume 1, chapitre 7, article 7.02 3. c) Référence : OAIC 23-04, paragraphe 7 4. d) Référence : www.cadets.forces.gc.ca/_docs/mem_ understanding/Mem_Understanding_f.pdf (page 40?) 5. c) Référence : OAIC 11-35, paragraphe 12

Dans le cas de la plupart des cadets supérieurs, les vols de familiarisation peuvent comprendre la navigation selon le point estimé. Ces vols nécessitent beaucoup de préparatifs puisque les cadets doivent calculer à l’avance la distance, la rapidité, le temps, la quantité de carburant, le poids, l’équilibre et l’altitude. Ils doivent également déchiffrer les messages météo aéronautiques dans le cadre de l’objectif de rendement relatif à la météorologie.

29


FORMATION DES OFFICIERS

Capt Pierre-Archer Cournoyer

Le nouveau système de gestion des cours du CIC Vous pouvez suivre un cours quand et où vous voulez Très bientôt, un système informatique appelé IIEM – Instruction individuelle et éducation militaire – sera utilisé pour gérer l’instruction des officiers du CIC.

nouveau formulaire d’inscription à un cours appelé Formulaire de demande d’instruction du CIC qui remplacera tous les formulaires d’inscription à un cours en vigueur actuellement. Les officiers locaux devront également se familiariser avec la nouvelle procédure d’inscription et d’admission à un cours. Pourquoi utilisonsnous le système IIEM? L’objectif consiste à : • offrir une approche cohérente pour l’inscription, la sélection, l’admission et la gestion relatives à un cours; • réduire le fardeau administratif que constituent l’enregistrement manuel des résultats des cours et la vérification des préalables; • permettre aux officiers du CIC d’avoir accès à l’instruction de façon juste et équitable;

<

• permettre une plus grande intervention des détachements dans le choix des candidats;

Les officiers locaux devront remplir un nouveau formulaire d’inscription à un cours appelé Formulaire de demande d’instruction du CIC.

30

e système IIEM assurera le suivi de l’instruction individuelle et de l’éducation de tous les officiers du CIC, à partir du moment où ils s’inscrivent à un cours jusqu’à la fin de celui-ci, et mettra à jour automatiquement les dossiers personnels.

L

La transition à ce système devrait se faire de façon homogène pour les officiers du CIC locaux qui n’auront pas à suivre une formation pour l’utiliser, étant donné que ses principaux utilisateurs seront des employés à temps plein des détachements, des écoles régionales d’instructeurs de cadets (ERIC) et des unités régionales de soutien aux cadets (URSC). Toutefois, les officiers locaux devront remplir un

• veiller à ce que les candidats reçoivent la formation ✔

au moment propice de leur carrière

au bon endroit

qui répond à leurs besoins précis

qui répond aux besoins liés à leur emploi actuel ou futur, de même qu’aux besoins du corps/escadron

la plus rentable.

Avantages additionnels Par le passé, l’une des plus grandes frustrations était de ne pas être admis à un cours et d’ignorer pourquoi. Dans le système

IIEM, l’Officier des cadets du secteur (OCS) responsable de votre corps/ escadron non seulement vous désigne pour suivre la formation, mais il spécifie également un niveau de priorité – basé en grande partie sur l’urgence pour vous de suivre la formation. Cela augmente vos chances de suivre le cours dont vous avez besoin, au moment et à l’endroit qui vous conviennent. De même, si vous n’êtes pas sélectionné pour un cours précis, votre OCS pourra vous en donner les raisons.

Le système IIEM assurera le suivi de l’instruction individuelle et de l’éducation de tous les officiers du CIC, à partir du moment où ils s’inscrivent à un cours jusqu’à la fin de celui-ci, et mettra à jour automatiquement les dossiers personnels. Un autre avantage, c’est qu’une fois que votre demande est enregistrée dans le système IIEM, elle demeure « en attente » durant deux ans. Si votre candidature n’est pas retenue la première fois, votre nom progresse dans la liste pour le prochain cours disponible. Vous n’avez pas à soumettre un nouveau formulaire d’inscription jusqu’à ce que la période d’une année soit échue; normalement le délai d’attente pour suivre un cours n’est pas aussi long. Vous devez cependant surveiller de près la situation pour être toujours disponible lorsque le prochain cours sera offert.

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


Procédure d’inscription à un cours Le principal changement consiste en une procédure uniformisée d’inscription et d’admission à un cours, qui sera en vigueur dans l’ensemble du pays. Pour la plupart, cette procédure sera identique à celle qui a déjà cours dans votre corps/escadron. En voici la description : 1. Vous consultez le calendrier d’instruction de l’ERIC sur votre site Web régional pour choisir votre cours. 2. Vous devez remplir une copie papier du formulaire d’inscription, en utilisant le nouveau Formulaire de demande d’instruction du CIC.

4. Votre OCS accepte ou non votre demande de formation. 5. Si vous êtes sélectionné, votre OCS inscrit votre nom dans le système IIEM et établit un niveau de priorité. On s’assure ainsi de répondre aux besoins urgents de formation.

<

3. Le commandant (cmdt) de votre corps/escadron examine votre formulaire d’inscription, y inscrit ses recommandations (en tenant compte de vos besoins et de ceux de votre corps/ escadron) et l’envoie ensuite à votre OCS.

Vous et votre cmdt serez avisés par courriel de votre admission à un cours. Assurez-vous d’inscrire une adresse électronique valide sur votre formulaire d’inscription et vérifiez régulièrement si vous avez reçu des courriels.

6. Votre ERIC ou URSC (selon le cas) utilise le système IIEM pour vous inscrire au cours et votre détachement (ou l’URSC dans la région du Pacifique) confirme votre admission.

Vous et votre cmdt serez avisés par courriel de votre admission à un cours. Assurezvous d’inscrire une adresse électronique valide sur votre formulaire d’inscription et vérifiez régulièrement si vous avez reçu des courriels.

7. Vous téléchargez les instructions de ralliement, faites vos réservations de voyage et vous préparez à suivre la formation de la même manière que vous le faites actuellement.

Vous ne faites pas partie de l’effectif du corps/escadron?

8. Vous devez vous présenter et suivre la formation conformément aux instructions de ralliement. Lorsque vous réussissez le cours, votre ERIC enregistre vos résultats et le système IIEM met à jour votre dossier personnel automatiquement.

Si vous appartenez à une autre unité de cadets (comme une École de vol à voile, une URSC, un centre d’instruction d’été des cadets, une École de voile, etc.) vous devez suivre la même procédure d’inscription. Vous devez cependant remettre votre formulaire à votre superviseur immédiat, qui l’enverra à votre URSC.

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

La mise en œuvre du système IIEM ne modifiera pas le contenu ou la prestation des cours du CIC. À l’avenir, lorsque de nouveaux cours seront mis en oeuvre dans le cadre d’un projet tout à fait distinct pour moderniser la formation au sein du CIC, les nouveaux cours remplaceront les anciens dans le système IIEM. Lorsque vous vous inscrivez à un cours d’apprentissage distribué (AD), vous devez vous inscrire comme vous le feriez pour tout autre cours. Cette règle s’applique également aux cours pour lesquels il faut suivre au préalable un cours d’AD.

Les officiers locaux n’auront pas à suivre une formation pour utiliser le système IIEM, étant donné que ses principaux utilisateurs seront des employés à temps plein des détachements, des ERIC et des URSC.

Jusqu’à l’entrée en vigueur du nouveau système, vous devez suivre les procédures d’inscription à un cours en vigueur actuellement. L’utilisation du système IIEM est perçue comme un pas en avant quant à l’instruction du CIC. Vous constaterez sous peu ses avantages lorsque vous recevrez la formation dont vous avez besoin au moment où vous en avez besoin. Le Capt Cournoyer est le coordonnateur national de l’instruction du CIC à la Direction – Cadets.

31


DÉVELOPPEMENT DES OFFICIERS

Ltv Paul Simas

cesse ses propres décisions en question. Même s’il peut avoir besoin de consulter d’autres personnes, le cmdt ne doit pas prendre de décisions sous l’influence de facteurs externes. L’empathie Le cmdt doit être capable de prendre le pouls de son personnel. Lui seul peut savoir si son personnel a besoin de davantage de discipline ou d’encouragements.

Le commandement, c’est le commandement

Certes, dans une stratégie de commandement, les éléments énumérés précédemment sont tous aussi importants les uns que les autres. Toutefois, dans le cas qui nous préoccupe, il ne faut pas perdre de vue que le tout premier élément d’une stratégie de commandement est la motivation qui anime le cmdt d’un corps de cadets ou d’un escadron, dont « l’équipage » est principalement composé de volontaires.

Peut-on mesurer à quel point le domaine du commandement peut être extraordinaire? Est-ce qu’un type de commandement, par exemple, celui d’une frégate des FC, est plus important, plus intéressant et plus significatif que celui d’un corps de cadets de la Marine? l existe certes différents niveaux de commandement ou différentes missions, mais peu importe la nature de votre unité, le commandement, c’est le commandement.

I

Bien que la motivation joue un rôle essentiel dans n’importe quel commandement, il se peut qu’elle soit la seule raison pour laquelle un jeune demeure dans le Programme des cadets et vous permet de le commander. Une bonne stratégie de commandement exige du commandant (cmdt) qu’il possède une vision, qu’il soit capable d’inculquer des principes de loyauté, qu’il possède un bon esprit de décision et qu’il fasse montre d’empathie. Le cmdt d’un corps de cadets ou d’un escadron doit absolument être capable de motiver son personnel. La vision Que vous commandiez une frégate de la Force régulière ou un corps de cadets/

32

escadron, vous devez posséder une vision. Une vision sert à défier l’héritage laissé par le cmdt précédent, particulièrement s’il était populaire auprès du personnel. Une vision établit la personnalité du cmdt. La capacité de susciter la loyauté Pour mériter la loyauté, il n’est pas nécessaire pour le cmdt d’être « gentil ». Cependant, il doit avoir le courage de ses convictions. Il suscitera la loyauté s’il ne revient pas sur ses décisions, même si elles sont controversées.

La capacité de motiver Bien que la motivation joue un rôle essentiel dans n’importe quel commandement, il se peut qu’elle soit la seule raison pour laquelle un jeune demeure dans le Programme des cadets et vous permet de le commander. Si vos décisions deviennent trop controversées, si vous ne pouvez susciter la loyauté et « tâter le pouls » de votre équipage, vous ferez face à des difficultés. Si vous ne pouvez motiver votre « équipage », ce dernier se mutinera et vous pourriez perdre votre commandement.

Toutefois, il doit prendre des décisions éclairées. Cela ne signifie pas pour autant qu’il doive être un expert dans tous les domaines. Le personnel peut comprendre et accepter que pour prendre des décisions judicieuses, un cmdt doive parfois consulter d’autres personnes. Lorsque ses décisions sont fondées sur des conseils judicieux, il est plus facile pour le cmdt d’être convaincu de la justesse de ses choix, et d’en convaincre les autres.

Seule votre capacité à motiver « votre équipage » suscitera chez lui la loyauté dont vous avez besoin pour réussir votre mission de cmdt d’un corps de cadets ou d’un escadron.

L’esprit de décision

Le Ltv Simas est le cmdt du Corps 18 (VANGUARD) des Cadets de la Marine à Toronto.

De l’indécision naît l’irrespect. Le cmdt doit agir de façon résolue et ne pas remettre sans

Que vous commandiez une frégate des FC ou un corps de cadets/escadron, vous devez faire preuve de vision, inspirer la loyauté, être résolu, compréhensif et être une source de motivation. Le commandement, c’est le commandement !

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


Michael Harrison

Faites passer le message Laissons les cadets parler du Programme des cadets ans le dernier numéro de Cadence, j’ai mis l’accent sur les stratégies de recrutement et la « vente » du Programme des cadets dans les écoles.

Action civique et secteur de service

D

• Réserver une soirée pour construire des mangeoires et des nichoirs d’oiseaux pour les enfants

J’avais abordé l’importance de favoriser les contacts avec la population en valorisant les bons coups du Programme des cadets et en les reliant aux objectifs et attentes de la communauté, qu’elle gravite autour des institutions scolaires ou autres.

• Enseigner des sports et d’autres activités aux jeunes • Organiser une mini-randonnée • Monter une tente de premiers soins lors d’activités importantes de course, de randonnée ou de plage

Le présent article propose plutôt d’augmenter notre visibilité auprès des secteurs publics et privés de vos communautés en laissant les cadets parler eux-mêmes, en gestes et en paroles, de leur Programme. Il importe de montrer aux gens de la communauté qu’ils peuvent tirer avantage du Programme des cadets et, par le fait même, de vos cadets.

• Organiser une soirée d’astronomie • Préparer un article mensuel destiné aux journaux locaux • Visiter les personnes âgées • Aider les jeunes à patiner • Donner des concerts dans le parc • Promener des chiens

Lorsque vous organisez des activités avec votre corps/escadron, prenez des photos ou des images vidéo et confiez aux cadets la responsabilité de les numériser. Ils possèdent en général de solides compétences en la matière et sont capables de déterminer ce qui vaut d’être consigné. Chargez certains d’entre eux de préparer un photo-reportage pour un site Web, le journal local ou le câblodistributeur du coin. Vous serez surpris par tout le talent que peuvent déployer vos cadets lorsqu’on leur confie des responsabilités.

• Faire le nettoyage printanier dans un parc local • Planter des bulbes à l’automne • Nettoyer une section de l’autoroute • Solliciter des dons pour le cancer • Collaborer avec les louveteaux • Faire du bénévolat dans les banques alimentaires

• Offrir des services de garde d’enfants au centre commercial • Communiquer avec les associations locales de gens d’affaire ou rencontrer les représentants, en insistant sur les compétences et l’employabilité des cadets • Monter des kiosques et faire des présentations lors de conférences • Livrer les journaux communautaires • Solliciter l’appui des commerces pour les compétitions et les exercices des cadets Vous et vos cadets ne pouvez tout faire en une seule année. Commencez peu à peu et augmentez graduellement année après année. Chaque saison, tenez-vous en à une activité, et transformez-là en succès. Préparez et formez vos cadets à parler de leur Programme. Il n’y a pas de meilleurs ambassadeurs pour faire passer le message. Michael Harrison est actuellement administrateur de site au Conseil scolaire d’Ottawa et professeur à temps partiel à la faculté d’éducation de l’Université d’Ottawa.

• S’occuper de la garde du drapeau et fournir des pelotons lors de parades • Participer aux expositions des foires estivales et automnales

Les suggestions d’activités suivantes vous permettront d’aider à améliorer la visibilité du Programme des cadets dans les secteurs public et privé. Choisissez celles qui vous conviennent le mieux.

<

Vos cadets peuvent parler du programme des Cadets en donnant des concerts dans la communauté. (photo : région de l’Est)

Secteur commercial

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

33


POINT DE VUE

Ltv Matthew Clark

Le juste équilibre Essayons-nous d’en faire trop pour les cadets? Dernièrement, une cadette supérieure est venue me parler à la suite d’une discussion animée avec sa mère. Cette dernière était apparemment contrariée parce que sa fille consacrait trop de temps aux cadets. Elle avait aussi l’impression que l’argent dépensé pour le hockey l’était en pure perte car sa fille préférait manquer les séances d'entraînement de hockey plutôt que de renoncer aux activités proposées par son corps de cadets. L’anecdote ci-dessus traite de l’importance de trouver un juste équilibre dans la vie de nos cadets. Elle traite aussi de la réaction de notre corps de cadets à cet égard, en expliquant le système de « freins et de contrepoids » que nous avons mis en place (voir l’encadré) afin d’assurer un juste équilibre dans notre corps de cadets.

otre corps de cadets était, et est toujours, très actif. Lorsque le Programme des cadets proposait une activité, nous faisions tout pour l’offrir à nos jeunes.

N

Maintenant, elle en était arrivée au point de m’avouer : « Monsieur, je pense que j’en fais trop. Peut-être que maman a raison. »

Mais maintenant, elle en était arrivée au point de m’avouer : « Monsieur, je pense que j’en fais trop. Peut-être que maman a raison. »

C’est ainsi qu’au cours des deux ou trois premières années, la jeune fille de l’anecdote a participé aux soirées et aux fins de semaine d’instruction et, occasionnellement, aux exercices de tir de précision, discipline dans laquelle elle s’est particulièrement distinguée, à tel point qu’elle a représenté le corps aux compétitions provinciales et nationales. Mais ce n’est pas tout. Le lundi, elle s’exerçait au tir de précision. Le lundi et le jeudi, elle s’entraînait avec l’équipe de biathlon – un autre sport où elle excellait, et qui l’a menée jusqu’aux compétitions provinciales et nationales en tant que cadetcadre. Le mardi soir, elle s’offrait un petit congé, sauf lorsqu’elle assistait, une fois par mois, à la réunion du Prix du Duc d’Édimbourg. Le mercredi, qui était notre soirée d’instruction hebdomadaire, elle arrivait parfois un peu plus tôt pour s’entraîner avec l’équipe d’exercice militaire. Le jeudi, avant l’entraînement

34

au biathlon, elle jouait de la flûte dans la Musique du corps. De plus, une ou deux fois par mois, elle prenait part aux activités d’instruction de fin de semaine, et le dimanche après-midi, elle se rendait au champ de tir extérieur pour l’entraînement de biathlon au fusil de calibre .22. Véritable cadet d’élite, elle avait remporté de nombreuses médailles de sports d’équipe ainsi que la Médaille Strathcona.

Quelle erreur avionsnous commise? Et si, en voulant absolument offrir tout un éventail d’activités à nos cadets, nous forcions un peu la dose? Il faut reconnaître que le Programme des cadets a considérablement changé au cours des 25 dernières années.

Aujourd’hui, me voici à me demander si les Cadets de la Marine s’amusent encore. Et si nous étions devenus trop compétitifs? Lorsque j’étais cadet, le tir de précision se limitait à l’utilisation du bon vieux Lee Enfield – de calibre .22 – au club de chasse et de pêche local. Il n’y avait ni compétition, ni grosse récompense. Nous voulions seulement nous amuser. Parfois, nous avions la chance de pouvoir charger les lanceurs du tir au pigeon d’argile pour les membres du club de chasse et de pêche et nous nous en réjouissions à l’avance. Il n’existait pas de biathlon pour les cadets et, même si le corps possédait une Musique, nous ne nous prenions pas au sérieux. En fait, je m’émeus encore aujourd’hui au

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006


Système de freins et de contrepoids Il pourrait être utile d’avoir recours au système de freins et de contrepoids ci-dessous pour assurer que les activités que vous proposez à votre corps de cadets/escadron soient équilibrées. Pouvez-vous remporter du succès dans un domaine en particulier? Même si vous souhaitez que les membres de votre corps de cadets/escadron participent à toutes les activités offertes, vous devriez vous limiter à celles qui présentent des chances de succès. Il est inutile de participer aux activités qui risquent de se solder par un échec. Pouvez-vous assurer un juste équilibre entre les exigences du corps de cadets/de l’escadron et celles de la vie quotidienne? Réfléchissez à la situation de chaque cadet et aux exigences que vous lui imposez. N’oubliez pas que les cadets ont une vie en dehors du corps/de l’escadron – une famille, des études et des activités sociales. Réfléchissez aussi à ce que vous imposez au personnel parce que tout ce qui s’applique aux cadets concerne aussi au personnel.

souvenir de notre masse, fabriquée de nos propres mains au moyen d’un balai surmonté d’une couronne de métal grossièrement découpée dans une boîte de conserve que nous avions soudée au sommet. Elle faisait amplement l’affaire, et une fois par année, nous défilions fièrement dans Halifax et nous nous mesurions aux autres corps de cadets de la région de l’Atlantique. Lorsque j’étais jeune, à Lunenburg, je n’ai jamais entendu parler du programme du Prix du Duc d’Édimbourg, même si je sais qu’il existait déjà à cette époque. Les compétitions annuelles se limitaient à quelques activités : courses de doris à Lunenburg, compétitions sportives et de matelotage à Halifax, régates à Shearwater. Nous ne nous préparions guère en vue de ces événements, à l’exception de notre soirée d’instruction hebdomadaire et de quelques fins de semaine par année. Mais quel plaisir nous avions! Aujourd’hui, me voici à me demander si les Cadets de la Marine s’amusent encore. Et si nous étions devenus trop compétitifs? Nos intentions ont toujours été des plus louables. Nous désirions seulement offrir une variété d’activités susceptibles d’attirer

et de retenir les cadets dans un environnement où les jeunes sont recherchés. Nous voulions, en outre, que notre corps, si modeste soit-il, puisse profiter des mêmes possibilités de voyage et de compétition que les corps plus imposants. En aucun cas nous ne voulions nous mettre les parents à dos. Notre seul but était la réussite de nos cadets, dans le programme des cadets en tant que tel bien sûr, mais aussi dans leurs activités familiales et sociales. Nous ne voulions pas non plus qu’ils obtiennent de mauvais résultats scolaires. Il nous fallait absolument trouver le juste équilibre. Nous avons donc élaboré une liste de freins et de contrepoids que nous consultons avant de nous lancer dans de nouvelles aventures. Nous espérons qu’elle fera le bonheur des parents, du personnel et des cadets, de telle sorte que tous puissent profiter de quelques soirées de liberté. Au cours des 16 dernières années, le Ltv Clark a commandé trois corps de cadets, dont deux dans de grandes villes de l’Ontario. À l’heure actuelle, il est le commandant du Corps 39 (NEPTUNE) des Cadets de la Marine à Lunenburg, en Nouvelle-Écosse.

Perfectionnement professionnel destiné aux leaders du Programme des cadets

Est-ce que les cadets et le personnel s’amusent encore? Tant que les cadets éprouvent plus de plaisir que de stress durant les compétitions, vous êtes probablement sur la bonne voie. Si les activités constituent un défi pour eux et qu’ils apprécient vraiment l’expérience, le jeu en vaut probablement la chandelle. Existe-t-il une activité susceptible d’intéresser un autre segment du corps de cadets? La nouvelle activité pourrait-elle intéresser les cadets qui ne participent pas déjà à une activité ou est-ce qu’elle attirera ceux qui participent déjà à toutes les activités existantes? En diversifiant les activités du programme, on attire plus de cadets à un plus grand nombre d’activités; cependant, nous ne pouvons nous concentrer uniquement sur les sports ou sur l’athlétisme. Qu’ils soient de nature intellectuelle ou sportive, les défis peuvent être aussi importants les uns que les autres. Est-ce que la nouvelle activité peut être intégrée à l’horaire ou devrez-vous demander aux cadets et au personnel de se déplacer un soir de plus? Notre corps de cadets parvient à offrir la plupart des programmes existants. Cependant, au cours des dernières années, nous avons donné de l’instruction de quatre à cinq soirs par semaine – ce qui exigeait une heure de déplacement, chaque soir, pour certains des cadets de notre collectivité rurale. Aujourd’hui, nous donnons l’instruction hebdomadaire les dimanches après-midi et les cadets peuvent s’inscrire à tour de rôle aux différentes activités des programmes. Encouragez vos cadets à se confier à vous s’ils se sentent submergés par les activités.

35


COURRIER

...suite de la page 5

ATTENTES POUR LES CADETS SOUFFRANT D’EMBONPOINT Je crois que les attentes relatives à notre programme d’entraînement actuel sont trop élevées pour les cadets qui souffrent d’embonpoint ou qui ne sont pas en forme. Ceux qui ont de la difficulté dans un Centre d’instruction d’été des cadets (CIEC) choisiront la solution de facilité, préférant l’embarras de devoir se rendre dans une salle d’examen médical à la honte de devoir s’afficher en public. Plus souvent qu’autrement, les attentes concernant ces cadets découlent directement de la fausse conception que l’on a de l’utilité du Programme d’instruction des cadets (PIC) pour le conditionnement physique – souvent la seule ressource dont dispose la personne chargée de cet

BLOC-NOTES

Aspm Ebert

36

entraînement. Le PIC doit uniquement servir de guide. Les instructeurs peuvent faire preuve d’initiative et modifier le programme pour favoriser la participation, tout en répondant aux objectifs du Programme des cadets. Tous les enfants ne sont pas capables d’atteindre les niveaux or, argent et bronze en conditionnement physique au moyen de notre programme d’entraînement actuel. Toutefois, chacun d’entre eux peut progresser dans ce domaine s’il a la possibilité d’établir ses propres objectifs. Il faudrait renforcer l’autonomie des jeunes, les renseigner sur le conditionnement physique et leur permettre de planifier leurs propres objectifs en matière de nutrition et d’aptitude physique.

Capt Dale Chadsey Officier des projets spéciaux Unité régionale de soutien aux cadets (Pacifique)

...suite de la page 9

Boursiers et boursières

civique CIC d’une valeur de 1 500 $, de la région du Centre.

Le Capt Trevor Henderson, Cmdt du Corps de cadets de l'Armée 2893 de Port Coquitlam, en C. B., et l'Aspm Ernest Ebert de Windsor, en Ontario, actuellement bénévoles au Corps de cadets de la Marine 37 à London, en Ontario, sont les lauréats 2006 des Bourses d'éducation

Les deux bourses sont accordées annuellement à des officiers CIC qui s'inscrivent en vue de l’obtention de leur premier diplôme d'études postsecondaires. La sélection se fait selon la personnalité, les qualités et le potentiel de leader, l'éducation et les besoins financiers. Une bourse est accordée à un candidat de la région du Centre; la deuxième est offerte à toutes les régions. L'admissibilité est limitée aux officiers CIC actuellement en service qui ont été cadets par le passé.

Capt Henderson

Apprenez-leur le tai-chi, variez le programme, engagez des professionnels après vous être assuré qu’ils sont compétents. Ne réduisez pas les exigences. Faites simplement en sorte qu’il soit possible d’atteindre les objectifs en sortant des sentiers battus. Tous n’atteindront peut-être pas le but fixé, mais nous pouvons semer des graines, procurer à nos jeunes certains outils et les inciter à modifier leur comportement en prenant conscience des avantages qu’ils peuvent en tirer.

Le Capt Henderson est un ancien cadet du Corps de cadets de l'Armée 2812 de Surrey, en C. B. En 1992, il devient officier CIC dans le Corps de cadets de l'Armée 1922 à Aldergrove, toujours en C. B.. Par la suite, il sert à titre de commandant du corps de cadets pendant six ans avant d'être transféré à son corps d'origine à Surrey en 2004. Il sert également à divers titres dans des centres d'instruction d'été des cadets à Vernon, en C. B., et à Whitehorse, au Yukon.

Il fait actuellement partie du programme de relations publiques du Kwantlan College à Richmond, en B.-C., et habite à Aldergove. L'Aspm Ebert a été cadet pendant six ans au sein du 48e Corps de cadets de la Marine Agamemnon à Windsor, en Ontario. Il travaille comme instructeur de navigation sur le NCSM Ontario durant l'été 2004, puis comme instructeur de voile auprès du 9e Centre de voile de Sarnia. Il a participé à des opérations de recherche et sauvetage avec la Garde côtière canadienne durant les deux derniers étés — grâce à son expérience de cadet de la Marine, a-t-il déclaré. L'Aspm Ebert en est à sa deuxième année d'étude menant à l'obtention d'un baccalauréat spécialisé en sciences médicales de l’Université de Western Ontario. Pour connaître les critères d'admissibilité et accéder à un formulaire de demande en direct, se rendre à l'adresse www.central. cadets.ca/rcis/news_f.html. Les demandes pour les bourses 2007 doivent être reçues au plus tard le 30 juin.

CADENCE

Numéro 21, Hiver 2006

2006 3