Issuu on Google+

EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:21

Page 1

The official publication of the Way-Ahead Process Volume 8, Spring 2000

Biathlon 2000 New ‘Cadets Canada’ logo Cool ‘runners’ and Tilley-style hats Poll shows low awareness of ‘Cadets’

Feature:

Cadets administration system a dinosaur

From cadet to Premier


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:21

Page 2

Proud To Be The official publication of the Way-Ahead Process Volume 8 Spring 2000 This publication is produced on behalf of the Canadian Cadet Movement including Cadets, Cadet Instructor Cadre, League members, civilian instructors, parents, sponsors, Regular Force and Reservists, and other interested parties. It is published by the Way-Ahead co-ordination cell under the authority of the strategic team. Proud To Be serves all individuals interested in change and renewal in relation to the Canadian Cadet Movement and the Canadian Forces. Views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect official opinion or policy.

Does anyone recognize this cadet? It is former cadet Cpl Brian Tobin meeting Nova Scotia Premier Gerald Regan at the annual inspection of the cadet summer training centre in Greenwood, NS, in the summer of 1970. Today, the former cadet is himself a premier — of Newfoundland and Labrador.

ON THE COVER: Cadet Becky Barton, 2137 Calgary Highlanders Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, and an unidentified cadet (behind) take part in the female unit team patrol race during the 2000 National Cadet Biathlon Championship. One hundred and eight biathletes competed in the event, held in Valcartier, QC, in March. Normally 116 cadets compete; however Northern Region cadets did not compete this year because of the Arctic Winter Games. In addition to the cadets, 32 coaches, about 60 staff cadets from across Canada and another 60 administrative and support staff congregated for the event.

Proud To Be is published four times a year. We welcome submissions of no more than 750 words, as well as photos. We reserve the right to edit all submissions for length and style. For further information, please contact the Editor — Marsha Scott. Internet E-mail: ghscott@netcom.ca Editor, Proud To Be Way-Ahead Process Directorate of Cadets MGen Pearkes Bldg, NDHQ 101 Colonel By Dr. Ottawa, ON K1A 0K2 Toll-free: 1-800-627-0828 Fax: (613) 992-8956 E-Mail: ad612@issc.debbs.ndhq.dnd.ca

Copy Deadlines 2

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Summer issue — May 5 Fall issue — July 28 Winter issue — October 20

Spring

Visit our Web site at www.vcds.dnd.ca/visioncadets Art Direction: DGPA Creative Services 99CS-0799

2000


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:21

Page 3

A Future Founded in Renewal

From the Editor

W

e’re late, we’re late! My sincere apologies to our readers for publishing the spring issue late. We had a choice — publish on time at the end of March and make you wait until the summer issue for news on everything that happened in February; or, publish at the end of April and give you the most upto-date news possible on everything that took place in February. That included a week-long training renewal workshop of cadet instructor cadre trainers from across the country, the first ever meeting of the national cadet communications

working group and a milestone meeting of the Way-Ahead strategic team. At that meeting, the strategic team measured the performance over the past two years of every Way-Ahead action team. Status reports on every action team are carried in this issue. This issue is packed with so much news, we had to hold over some of the stories we received. This is our biggest issue yet and it’s wonderful to see the contributions pouring in. Just a reminder — stories must relate in some way to change and renewal within the cadet movement. Even though the spring issue is

late, the summer issue will be published on schedule at the end of June. It will be delivered to cadet summer training centres. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Brian Tobin, premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, for taking time out from his busy schedule to be interviewed for our feature story. He is a role model for every cadet (or aspiring cadet) in this nation and displays the leadership and citizenship attributes so highly valued by the Canadian Cadet Movement. E

In this issue... Feature From cadet to premier — Brian Tobin, premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, started out as a cadet. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Way-Ahead news From the director: Moving the elephant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Cadets administration system a dinosaur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Training renewal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Adios to the electronic action team . . . . . . . . . 20 ‘Roll on’ partnership team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Measuring action team performance . . . . . . . . 30 Solutions from unexpected sources . . . . . . . . . 36 Bilingualism action team to be created . . . . . . 40 League news Improvements impressive, but disconcerting (Air Cadet League of Canada). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Securing the future (Navy League of Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

3

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Opinions What’s your beef? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Speakers’ Corner: Cadets — the Pokemon population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Letters to the editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 What’s new? New ‘Cadets Canada’ logo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Reducing administration top priority . . . . . . . . 12 W-W-Web notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Look who’s talking now . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Winning web site for Prairie Region Cadets . . . 28 Poll shows low awareness of Cadets. . . . . . . . . 29 An 80 per cent solution? (A new organization for directorate of cadets) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Cadet stuff Cool ‘runners’ and Tilley-style hats . . . . . . . . . . 11 Cadet corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 More high school credits for cadet training . . . 28 Citizenship and football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:21

From By Marsha Scott

W

hen people think of Brian Tobin, they may think of many things — the premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, who, along with other premiers, is currently fighting to preserve Canada’s national health-care system. Or they may think of Canada’s former minister of fisheries and oceans, who won national praise during an international dispute between Canada and Spain over turbot fishing in waters just beyond the Canadian 200-mile limit. They may even think of the man who was elected — at the age of 25 — to the House of Commons. It’s highly unlikely they will think of Brian Tobin, the former cadet. Yet Premier Tobin was a cadet. In fact, he believes that what he’s doing today has been shaped, in part, by his experience in the Canadian Cadet Movement.

Premier Tobin took time out from his hectic schedule for an interview with Proud to Be because he views Cadets as a first-class experience. Our interview was bumped once from his schedule because of a truckers’ protest in Newfoundland, but the premier found time two days later — as he waited for the unveiling of the nation’s Budget 2000 in Ottawa — to call and share his feelings about the movement. Minutes before his call, he says, he finished ironing a shirt to wear to the Budget announcement. “To this day, when I travel around the country, I’m still ironing my shirts and doing things I learned in

4

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Page 4

cadet Cadets.” He admits, however, that he no longer makes his own bed, which is too bad because he thinks hotel standards are not quite up to cadet standards. Kibitzing aside, Mr. Tobin is one of Canada’s ‘premier’ leaders and citizens — a role model for today’s cadets. “Young people in Canada should recognize the tremendous opportunity available to them and seize it with both hands,” says the premier. “Cadets is not a military organization — although there’s nothing wrong with the military. What Cadets is really about is helping young people achieve their full potential and learning to be good citizens.”

“What Cadets is really about is helping young people achieve their full

Brian Tobin discovered Cadets when he was 14 years old and living in Goose Bay, Labrador. His father was a civilian employee with the U.S. Air Force in Happy Valley — now the location for low-level flying training for air forces from around the world. He was recruited into the re-activated 764 Happy Valley Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron by its new commanding officer. Brian spent close to three years as a cadet. One of the high points was going to ‘cadet camp’ in Greenwood, NS. “It was a tremendous opportunity to travel, meet kids from across the country, pull together as a team and operate within a disciplined environment,” says Mr. Tobin. “It’s important to learn and grow in an environment of self-discipline — that’s the most important thing to come out of Cadets for me.”

Spring

2000

potential and learning to be good citizens.” “I learned I owed my squadron, but also the community at large.” – Brian Tobin, premier of Newfoundland and Labrador (Photo by Greg Locke)


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 5

A Future Founded in Renewal

To

Premier

There were really no low points in the premier’s cadet experience, although — like many cadets — it took him a while to get used to being away from home when he went away to summer camp. Still, he remembers a profound sense of loss on returning home from camp. “I missed the structure, having someone telling me what to do and especially, the camaraderie,” he says. Citizenship and leadership were as much a part of the cadet program then as they are today. “I was pressed into leadership roles quite early and learned that just being given a command did not make me a leader,” says Premier Tobin. “I had to demonstrate leadership — be ready to give to my team before myself — for my team to attain excellence. It was an eyeopening experience and I carry the lessons I learned with me today.”

According to his dad, Jack joined air cadets entirely on his own, after going with a friend to check out Cadets. “He’s probably a better air cadet than I was,” says the premier. “Jack was chosen, along with another cadet, as the best first-year cadet. “He’s much as I was — full of energy and enthusiasm — and he’s taken up the cadet experience in a big way,” says the premier. “He’s on the drill team and having a tremendous time. It’s a wonderful

By responding to authority, rising through the ranks and paying his dues, he learned about the merit principle. “I learned you have to earn your stripes (or your wings) in life. I learned that things don’t just come to you — you get out in equal proportion to what you put in,” he says. He also learned that he owed not only his squadron, but also the community at large — a lesson Canada can be thankful for. Premier Tobin’s son, Jack, is also a cadet. The thirteen-year-old is a second-year cadet with 515 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in St. John’s, Nfld.

5

Premier Tobin inspects 515 (North Atlantic) Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron — the squadron in which his son, Jack, is a cadet.

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

opportunity for him to learn self-discipline in a disciplined, coherent organization. It’s a great opportunity for him to grow and learn. If, as the premier states, Cadets really is “about helping young people achieve their full potential and learning to be good citizens”, then Jack’s on the right track. And perhaps — like his father — he’ll become another Cadets success story. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 6

New Cadets Canada logo

Y

ou’ve all heard of brand-name products. But have you ever wondered what makes you buy those brand-name products?

So where did this new logo come from and why was it created when the various partners of the cadet movement already have a dozen crests and logos to identify them?

It all comes down to marketing and image. And image is what the new corporate logo for the Canadian Cadet Movement (CCM) is all about. We’re going to start marketing a fresh new image for the new Millennium because we want Canadians to ‘buy in’ to the CCM for what it is — a strong national youth organization. The new logo is an important part of the packaging that we hope will help make ‘Cadets’ a household word in Canada. And the communications action team and the directorate of cadets communication cell will soon ‘go to market’ with the new logo. It will appear on everything from stickers and web sites to display material and generic communication materials.

Well, the fact is, you asked for it. In 1997, the Way-Ahead recommended that a single crest or logo be created to take the confusion out of the cadet image. The consensus was that there were too many crests and logos out there, making it difficult to figure out who’s who and what’s what. Until now, league, cadet instructor cadre, Canadian Forces and other crests, as well as Cadets Caring for Canada, the Youth Initiatives Program and Millennium logos, have competed against each other for attention and somewhere, the Canadian Cadet Movement image was lost. So now we have a new ‘Cadets Canada’ logo that signifies a unified cadet movement. And we hope it’s a logo Canadians will remember.

The new Cadets Canada logo will appear on everything from stickers and web sites to the new cadet running shoes. (Photo by Lt Stephanie Sirois)

6

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000

The new logo won’t cancel out other crests and logos. Sometimes, it will be used in conjunction with those crests. But the new logo will be predominant on national communications and promotions about cadets in general, while the other crests will dominate on communications pertaining to specific cadet elements. “We hope the logo will appeal to everyone in the CCM and we will encourage its use,” says,” says Stéphane Ippersiel, communications manager for directorate of cadets. “But we can’t force anybody to use it.” Why didn’t cadets help design the logo? What appeals to people inside the movement isn’t necessarily what appeals to the general public. For example, heraldic symbols can be quite meaningful to those in the movement, but may be meaningless to the general public. But in addition to that, the logo had strict


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 7

A Future Founded in Renewal

technical needs that could only be met by highly trained professional designers. The final design is crisp and simple; the inclusion of the words ‘Cadets’ and ‘Canada’ makes clear what the logo represents. The process to choose a logo began last July with internal consultation followed by a design competition. Four professional design firms submitted a total of 27 logos (actually 15 different designs with varying word selections) by mid-August. Over the next few weeks, there was consultation with directorate of cadets, league and regional cadet staffs, as well as some Way-Ahead action teams. At the same time, the designs were posted on the national cadet web site and voted on. Six hundred votes later, the Way-Ahead communication action team confirmed the top three designs. The final hurdle was

focus testing. The top three designs were presented to six focus groups in Montreal and Toronto. Each city hosted one group of adults, one group of youths and one group of cadets. At the end of this transparent process, the cadet movement has a simple logo that identifies Cadets as a national organization that, according to focus groups, is youthful, vibrant, dynamic and forward-thinking. Last October, the Way-Ahead strategic team blessed the logo and the name ‘Cadets Canada’. This decision stems from the logo-voting process and subsequent research that showed that Cadets

Canada is better accepted and understood than the weightier sounding Canadian Cadet Movement. The fact that Cadets Canada is bilingual is also a plus! All that remains is promoting the logo and getting it out there. To help with this, the winning design firm has prepared guidelines for the logo’s use in a graphic standards guide, which is available on the national web site. It includes directions on when to use the logo, how to use it, what is not allowed, the correct sizes to use, colour specifications and so on. The website also houses the logo in various electronic formats in various document templates and samples — including elemental documents with elemental crests. – Watch for the new national logo — coming soon to a unit near you! E

7

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 8

From the director

Moving the elephant By Col Rick Hardy

Way ahead for rying to change such a huge, diverse the Way-Ahead and widespread organization as the The way ahead can be summed up in Canadian Cadet Movement is like trying one word: commitment. We will conto move an elephant. It takes a great tinue our renewal program because deal of energy, effort and teamwork, defence policy states that a but once the beast gets go“The Way-Ahead change and renewal program ing, there’s no stopping it. has been a means will be ingrained in every organization. But more imporSo how well are we doing of speaking with tant, we’re going to continue moving the elephant? a powerful voice.” our change program because we’re going to change anyBefore we get to that, way. That change can be self-directed, or I want to say thanks. ordered. What makes our cadet program fantastic is that we have decided to Thank you Way-Ahead strategic team for direct the change ourselves. working so hard to come to grips with

T

such a huge renewal program — bigger than anything in Canada, when you consider the size of the cadet movement, our diversity, and how geographically dispersed we are. Thank you coordination team — past and present — for the Herculean effort you’ve made in trying to surmount incredible challenges.

Self-directed change In recognition of long-time stagnation and problems that have built up over time, the cadet movement has continually sought ways to improve itself.

Mostly, thank you action teams for your physical, financial and emotional commitment to addressing such complicated issues. Please pass on my thanks to everyone in the cadet movement who has shown an interest and been supportive — and even critical from time to time.

Trying to change such a huge, diverse and widespread organization as the Canadian Cadet Movement is like trying to move an elephant.

8

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000

The Chief of Review Services study of 1995, the Way-Ahead process of 1997, Youth Initiatives of 1998, the Price Waterhouse Cooper study of 1999 and most recently, the Modern Management Comptrollership Review (See story on page 12) come to mind. In fact, we have put together a collated list of all of those studies, reports and about 200 recommendations on our national web site because we recognize we have to do something.

Performance measurement At the end of February, the Way-Ahead measured its performance after more than two years, hundreds of thousands of dollars and thousands of hours of work. I consider the Way-Ahead a success. What it has accomplished strategically — that I see and appreciate every day — is difficult to convey to people in the field who do not experience the practical application of what has happened. But I’m prepared to stand on a soapbox in front of any audience to prove that we have been successful. And I’m excited about our future.


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 9

A Future Founded in Renewal

“We have created more initiatives, taken on more new challenges and instituted more changes in the past year and a half than we have in the past decade.” A climate of change Often, we are pessimistic about our country, yet we live in the best country in the world. In the same way, we don’t recognize how great our organization is. From my perspective, the most important thing the Way-Ahead has done is create a climate of acceptance of change in our organization. People are willing to consider doing things differently. People are excited about advancing their ideas. I don’t believe that was the case three years ago. WayAhead has been a stimulus and a catalyst to allow many things to happen — outside of the Way-Ahead program itself. Things like three presentations to Armed Forces Council, a communications cell within directorate of cadets, an infrastructure committee review and much, much more would have never happened in a different climate.

A powerful voice Just as importantly, the Way-Ahead has been a means of speaking with a powerful voice. It’s allowed me to represent 60,000 uniformed members of the Canadian Cadet Movement and 500,000 more volunteers, parent committees, sponsor committees, mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, aunts and uncles. When I was able to stand in front of Armed Forces Council — advocating the need for greater Canadian Forces participation and support — and was able to state that

9

I represented half a million Canadians, my voice was heard.

• Are we moving knowledge from one part of the organization to another?

We have made tremendous improvements and created many initiatives. It’s almost routine for someone to state that we have created more initiatives, taken on more new challenges and instituted more changes in the past year and a half than we have in the past decade. It’s all because of a climate of change and a powerful voice.

• Are we looking outside our own boundaries for knowledge?

Litmus tests In my mind, we can use two litmus tests to measure the success of the Way-Ahead. The first is to ask ourselves, ‘If members of the cadet movement met today for the first time and tried to create a list of long-standing issues that needed change, how many of the 113 original key issues from 1997 would be listed?’ The second is to ask ourselves how well we are becoming a learning organization, capable of constant self-renewal. • Can we learn as much — if not more — from failure as from success? • Have we rejected the adage “if it ain’t broken, don’t fix it”? Are we re-examining periodically our systems, routines and procedures to discover whether they still perform the needed function? • Do we rely on teams so members of our organization can exchange and pool their knowledge? Have we learned the art of asking questions?

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

If you measure by these indicators, you’ll see that the Way-Ahead has been a success. When the strategic team met at the end of February, we found out what has been done, what worked, what didn’t, and how possible/or impossible some of the jobs were that we gave our action team volunteers. In my mind, there have been no failures. We only fail if we don’t learn, or don’t try to learn. The new focus for the Way-Ahead will be to build on lessons learned and look at what still needs to be done. In the next phase, the Way-Ahead coordination cell will be ingrained in the directorate of cadets. Proud to Be will continue to be published. Some action teams will no longer exist, while new ones will be created. And the strategic team will look closely at itself to ensure it has the right people — and composition — for the year ahead. As we develop options for the future, the only absolute certainty is a total commitment to ongoing change and renewal. And next year we will learn again — from what we did right and wrong — and continue to change to ensure that the Way-Ahead is truly the way ahead. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 10

Improvements impressive, but disconcerting A l e a g u e m e m b e r ’s v i e w By MGen (ret’d) Lionel Bourgeois were being made in the recruitment of cadet instructor cadre (CIC) officers, the creation of a cadet harassment and abuse prevention program, the recruitment of cadets, image enhancement and in the application of information technology. The improvements and activity resulting from the Way-Ahead process have been impressive, but also disconcerting to some in the air cadet league. MGen (ret’d) Lionel Bourgeois Why disconcerting?

H

aving been a strategic team member for two years and recently a member of the national cadet communications working group, I have noticed both positive and negative outcomes from the Way-Ahead process. Overall, some very positive initiatives have been introduced to help the image and activities of the cadet movement. Unfortunately, some of these may result in a loss by the leagues of some traditional responsibilities. Also, some initiatives have been implemented without adequate communication to all league levels. It is fortunate for the department of national defence (DND) that Way-Ahead came when it did. There was sufficient money in the Youth Initiatives Program and other programs to pay for the necessary travel and meetings, and money was found to implement many initiatives. It also came at a time when major changes

10

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Firstly, there’s been some poor communication — not intentional, but stemming mainly from a lack of knowledge of how the air cadet league is structured and where authorities lie. Thus, many action teams have applied results without various levels of league approval, let alone information-passing. A good example is the introduction of the new Cadets Canada logo. This is a great initiative and the final product is well done. The problem was that it came as a complete surprise to many air cadet league members who had reservations about its use and possible implications for league fund-raising, recruiting and image. These concerns will be addressed with guidelines on the logo’s use, but the initial rejection could have been averted with better communication and an understanding that the leagues consist of 34 separate, incorporated, non-profit corporations that do not

Spring

2000

have a hierarchical structure. It takes a lot of time and effort to properly inform such disparate volunteer organizations that meet only periodically. As to the reduction in the leagues’ responsibilities, DND funds and effort are being expended to improve recruitment and image and improve public affairs activity and paid advertisements. While necessary at this time, there is great danger that this may lead to a permanent loss of some of the leagues’ traditional responsibilities — skewing the partnership even more to the DND side. At a time when all volunteer movements in Canada are having difficulty recruiting adults, this reduction in league responsibilities further reduces its attractiveness to potential and current members. Despite the concerns noted above, the Way-Ahead has introduced an energetic, consultative process with great improvements in information technology, communications, training and CIC/civilian instructor policy. To come are reductions in the administrative workload, improved structure and command and control, and most important, a better working partnership. Yes, I am ‘proud to be’ part of the Way-Ahead. – Mr. Bourgeois is the public relations coordinator for the air cadet league E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 11

A Future Founded in Renewal

Cool ‘runners’ and Ti l l e y - s t y l e h a t s “ f Roots or GAP clothing is what we need, then that’s what we’ll buy,” says Capt Chris DeMerchant, the directorate of cadet’s logistics officer responsible for clothing cadets in the Canadian Cadet Movement. “Our clothing has to meet our training needs, but it also has to attract young people to the program. Fortunately, when we’re talking about dressing 55,000 cadets, we can drive the price.”

I

Capt DeMerchant is a member of the working group responsible for changing the way cadets are clothed and equipped. The group — made up of regional logistics officers, directorate of cadets training staff, as well as technical experts and the people who set Canadian Forces’ clothing and equipment policy — met in March to discuss their vision of how cadets will be clothed in the future and plan their work for the next year.

a new coat — to replace the current gabardine jackets — either this year, or next year. That’s not all. Cadets will get a new wide-brimmed Tilley-style hat to replace their baseball caps. Unit commanding officers will be able to order them during the next training year as part of the standard training dress for all cadets. And cadets will receive totally cool running shoes at cadet summer training centres this summer and at local corps over the next year. The new runners will become standard issue, along with new t-shirts and the new athletic shorts issued last year.

In the meantime, the Clothe the Cadet program is moving ahead.

“We’re looking at big changes in how we clothe cadets,” says Capt DeMerchant. “In the years ahead, we’ll no longer clothe them at the summer training centres; our vision is to clothe them at local headquarters. We’re getting out of the business of warehousing clothing.”

Funding for the program has been approved and the go-ahead has been given for the program’s next stage — buying new all-season coats. Although the final okay will come from the project management board, Capt DeMerchant expects that every cadet will be wearing

The Clothe the Cadet program also includes the replacement of cadets’ operational clothing (the environmental training uniform). “We’re

Working group members will gather information from cadets and officers for a report to the review board (the director of cadets, regional cadet officers and league representatives) by early next year.

just at the project development stage now,” says Capt DeMerchant, “but our plan is to send cadets dressed in new prototype uniforms out to a number of summer training centres this summer to collect feedback on them. “Feedback is important,” he says. “We need cadets talking to cadets.” As well, the working group will conduct a survey to ask cadets about their operational clothing needs. “We’re looking forward to their input,” says Capt DeMerchant. “We need it to make sure they get the right clothes.” E Baseball hats will be replaced by Tilley-style hats similar to this one worn by a cadet at the cadet summer training centre in Cochrane, AB, last summer.

Leading air cadet Eric Lavoie, 832 Ottawa-Twillick Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in Ottawa, tries on his “totally cool” running shoes. The shoes will be issued at cadet summer training centres this year. (Photo by Lt Stephanie Sirois)

11

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 12

Reducing administration top priority

T

he number one priority of the cadet program is to reduce the administrative burden within the cadet movement so cadet instructor cadre (CIC) officers can devote more time to delivering the cadet program, according to the Cadet Program — Modern Management Comptrollership Review (MMCR). Col Rick Hardy, director of cadets in Ottawa, agrees. “This is critical,” he says. “The administrative burden we have placed on our corps and squadrons is unacceptable, and we’re going to reduce it!”

Reducing administration has been talked about for so long that a lot of people may not believe that changes will be made. But according to Col Hardy, it’s finally happening. The “kicker” was the review, released in March. VAdm Gary Garnett, vice-chief of the defence staff, initiated the review last October to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of the management and comptrollership practices of the cadet movement. The review’s main objective was to make recommendations to reduce the administrative burden at corps, without jeopardizing due diligence. The review team — consisting of subject matter experts from cadet operations, human resources, materiel, finance and related policy areas — conducted focus groups in five regions to arrive at its recommendations Both the chief of the defence staff and VAdm Garnett endorsed the recommendations. Those responsible for making the changes will prepare action plans for review by May 15.

12

Proud To Be

Volume 8

To read the detailed recommendations, visit the national CIC web site. A 12page annex to the report details the administrative implications of everything from the shortage of CIC officers to the imposition of mandatory training by the bureaucracy. It proposes solutions for each problem. For example, to expedite the recruiting of cadet instructor cadre officers, it proposes that Canadian Forces Recruiting Centres be used only where they add value. The report also recommends further study to identify bottlenecks. To solve the problem of “too many reference documents at the local headquarters level” the report recommends using Cadet Administrative and Training Orders for policy direction and augmenting CATOs — only as required — with regional orders for procedural direction. All could be integrated into a single reference book, with regional orders following applicable CATOs. To ease the unit burden of CIC pay administration, the review suggests different methods of compensating unit CICs, such as an honorarium paid monthly or yearly. Legal and regulatory implications would have to be confirmed. The review also makes the following recommendations: • Directorate of Cadets, with the regions, should implement information technology (IT) at the unit level to accelerate administrative automation where appropriate.

Spring

2000

(Right now, regional cadet offices and detachments are well automated; however implementation of IT at units is slower. It is most complete in Central Region.) • Regions should conduct annual CIC focus groups within their regions to find ways to reduce units’ administrative burden without reducing due diligence. (Items identified within the authority of the regions could be actioned immediately; other items could be forwarded to directorate of cadets for action.) • Reducing the administrative burden at the unit level (without reducing due diligence) should be a standing agenda item at the national regional cadet officer conference. (Suggestions from focus groups and directorate of cadets could be discussed at that time.) According to Col Hardy, the work of the Way-Ahead administration action team dovetails beautifully with the review. The administration action team is not responsible for coming up with solutions to the problems. However, in the words of one strategic team member, the team should act in an advisory capacity . “The action team will keep us honest to ensure improvements to the administration system,” he said. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 13

A Future Founded in Renewal

Administration system a dinosaur

A

dministration action team co-leader LCdr Brent Newsome was grinning from ear to ear when he left the strategic team meeting at the end of February. The reason? The cadet movement is moving towards one single administration system for local units. Corps/squadrons will be filling out the same paperwork, no matter where they are, or what element they are — sea, army or air.

This is huge — really huge — for the administration action team. “Without the regional cadet officers agreeing to one unified unit-level administration process, we couldn’t standardize anything,” says LCdr Newsome. “It was a major hurdle. Our team would never have gotten ahead without this decision.” According to the action team leader, there are six different regional administration systems and within each region, each detachment is doing things differently. “There’s all sorts of duplication and overlap that is causing all kinds of work at the unit level,” he adds. He admits that the issue of reducing the administrative burden is even bigger than an elephant. “A dinosaur is a good analogy for the movement’s administration system,” he says. The team’s new starting point will be to comment on the recommendations of the modern management comptrollership review released in March. “We’ll be discussing the impact of those recommendations on the corps and squadrons,” says LCdr Newsome. “And we may want to make recommendations to take things even further.”

13

Cadet Sgt Stephen Wellsby, left, and Cadet WO2 Max Burke, both from 692 Air Canada Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in Richmond, BC, try out CADETNET — the cadet Internet network. Common forms — standard to all units — will soon become available in electronic form on the network. (Photo by Maj Steve Deschamps)

The administration action team will also continue to determine the common administrative requirements in local units. Once those requirements are defined, common standard forms will be available in electronic form on CADETNET — the cadet Internet network. The team is also working on terms of reference for unit administration officers. At the strategic team meeting, the administration action team was promised more support from directorate of cadets. League members will also be sought to work with the team, since the leagues’ administrative requirements add to the paperwork burden at local units.

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

The strategic team decided that if the regional and national levels need more paperwork, it should not be imposed on corps and squadrons. “We’ve downloaded our paper requirements to corps and squadrons too long, said LCol Sam Marcotte, regional cadet officer (Prairie). “We have to stop.”

Added Cdr Murray Wylie, regional cadet officer (Atlantic), “We have to ask ourselves, do we really need all these checks and balances. We have to open up the stops. We don’t want the bureaucracy.” E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 14

W-W-Web notes

I

f you haven’t visited the National Cadet Web Site recently (www.cadets.dnd.ca), you’re in for a pleasant surprise. Maj Guy Peterson, former national site web master, has added some popular new “tools” to the site. The new tools are a national directory of Canadian cadet units, as well as links to popular cadet-related forums, which allow cadets, cadet instructor cadre (CIC) officers and others to chat or exchange information on-line. The new national directory has been the biggest hit. “It’s a fantastic tool,” says Maj Peterson, recently appointed the new information management/information technology coordinator at directorate of cadets in Ottawa. “People are using it and writing to thank us for it. There was a real need there. We have been working at it for some time now and people are pleased with the results.” To access the well-designed directory, just click the web site’s National Directory

14

Proud To Be

Volume 8

button. “It allows visitors to conduct a search based on province and city,” says Maj Peterson. “We designed it that way, instead of using the name and number of the unit, so potential recruits can easily locate the cadet unit closest to them.” Visitors with a corps number can also search for the information they need by going to another search window. The national directory provides Capt Al Harland, adventure training coordinator a mailing address, training with Pacific Region Cadets, checks on-line CATOs address (if different from the on the national cadet instructor cadre web site mailing address), as well as a at www.vcds.dnd.ca/cic. phone number for every unit. Eventually, it will also contain a link “I received several requests from cadets to corps/squadron web sites officially and officers to add a forum/ chat room/ approved by regional headquarters, newsgroup to the national web site,” as well as to corps’ e-mail. says Maj Peterson. The idea is good, but the web master doesn’t have the The directory is popular with young peoresources to manage a national forum. ple trying to track down the names and So, he’s doing the next best thing — numbers of nearby units. But others are linking up to existing on-line forums that using it too. “I get e-mails every day from are well managed by cadet movement commanding officers who are trying members. The national web site curto keep the information current,” says rently provides a link to CadetWorld Maj Peterson. The national directory is Forums, managed by 2Lt Ryan Sales, connected directly a CIC in Edmonton. (See page 25) to the ANSTATS (annual statistics) Another new on-line development is database mainthe availability to corps/squadron staffs tained by regional of CATOs (Cadet Administrative and cadet headquarters, Training Orders) on the recently redesigned so it’s the most national CIC web site. The site can be up-to-date inforreached by clicking the CIC button on the mation available. national cadet web site or, more directly, by visiting www.vcds.dnd.ca/cic. But if you’re looking for a good Editor’s note: Maj Peterson was discussion, tune replaced as national web site in to Forums. manager by Capt Ian Lambert. E

Spring

2000


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 15

A Future Founded in Renewal

Tr a i n i n g R e n e w a l

Does the word ‘bizkit’ mean anything to you? By Maj Jim Greenough

I

n February, myself, the administration officer and three staff instructors from the Regional Cadet Instructor School (RCIS), Prairie Region, attended a training seminar in Cornwall, ON. The anticipation and expectations of getting all regional RCIS staff together were high. This was a precedent-setting meeting, and we were very optimistic at finally having an opportunity to meet our compatriots after many years of faceless electronic communications. About 40 of us met to discuss the renewal of cadet instructor cadre (CIC) training. My experience has been that when you start off a session with a TKT (threshold knowledge test), you know you’re in trouble. Dr. Alan Leschied, an associate professor in the faculty of education at the University of Western Ontario in London, ON, presented us with a TKT on youth verbiage. Do the words ‘bizkit, ‘pop shove it’, ‘the Dreds’ or ‘let’s go cop a blunt’ mean anything to you? Needless to say not many of us, except for the very hip, knew the meanings.

Dr. Leschied then proceeded to point out that adult negative opinions of youth have been around for a long time. One of the better quotes he brought to our attention was, “I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on the frivolous youth of today,

15

for certainly all youth are reckless beyond words. Why, when I was a boy we were taught to be discreet and respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly wise and independent of restraint.” – Socrates, 3rd Century B.C. Ring any bells? We spent the rest of the morning listening attentively to what the youth of today are really about! The next exercise was a unique brainstorming session. We focussed on what was wrong with the CIC training system. It was quite an experience and after the dust settled, we identified approximately 70 issues, concerns and frustrations. We then voted for our top five priorities. In the end, we found that the prime concern of CIC trainers from across Canada is ensuring that the CIC training program meets the requirements of the cadettraining program. To me that said it all. We all remembered the ‘raison d’etre’ for the Canadian Cadet Movement — the cadet! We knew we were on the right track. The next day Dr. Mary Anne Robblee taught us about learning and learning strategies. First we became better aware of ourselves by filling out a learning style inventory and then a life styles inventory. The hum around the seminar after we recovered from a “carousel of senses” became what does your “KITE” look like and show me your “CIRCUMFLEX” and

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

The training renewal seminar brought together regional cadet instructor school (RCIS) staffs, selected corps/squadron commanding officers and others from across Canada. Here, from left, are the Prairie Region contingent: Lt(N) Barbara Cross, commanding officer of Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Jervis Bay; Maj Jim Greenough; Capts Jack White, Bob Bogovics, and Deborah Smart, RCIS instructors; and Capt Kerrie Johnston, administration officer. (Photo by Maj Francois Dornier) I’ll show you mine! Don’t ask — just take my word for it — it was productive! The remainder of the session was spent building an action plan to start changing the way we do business to best train CIC to ensure that the cadet movement remains the best youth program in Canada. LCol Michel Lefebvre, the new director of program development at the directorate of cadets in Ottawa, closed the meeting with an excellent motivational speech — basically saying that the ball is in our court and success will be determined by the follow-on actions of the group. Finally, we thanked LCdr Peter Kay for spearheading the idea of the first CIC training renewal workshop through to its fruition. Well done Peter! – Maj Greenough is the commandant of RCIS (Prairie Region). E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 16

Tr a i n i n g R e n e w a l

Personally and professionally enriched By Lt Stella Mylonakis

I

did not know what to expect from the training renewal conference. But looking back, it was an interesting and unforgettable event. It was remarkable that the ‘higher powers’ were able to get officers from across Canada, from all walks of life and with diverse experience, in one room. We left the conference with an action plan and a commitment to it. The conference was enriching — professionally and personally.

I learned a lot from individuals who have been part of the cadet instructor cadre (CIC) for many years. At first, I thought it would be intimidating and difficult to work with individuals who had a lot of experience. I thought the opinions and ideas of less experienced officers would not be taken seriously. But I was wrong! It was an environment of equals. We shared ideas, thoughts, worries, frustrations and everybody’s opinion was respected and acknowledged. We shared one ideal — we were there for ‘cadets’. At first, I found the process long, and some of us wanted to get down to implementation right away. But our facilitators had something else in mind for us. Looking back I can see how each activity led us to our final goal — to improve the CIC training program. In the end, we established an action plan — the easiest step in my opinion. The hard part is to come. We now have to implement the changes we agreed upon.

16

Proud To Be

Volume 8

It would be unfortunate if the ‘action plan’ was forgotten and we did not evolve. The conference made me feel that we have a real chance to improve the CIC training program, but it is up to us. The personal development we went through was enriching. We did a Life Styles Inventory (LSI). This self-assessment tool promotes change and improvement by increasing personal understanding of one’s own thinking and behaviour. This activity was the high point of my week, and the honesty and results of the LSI also affected many other individuals. As leaders in the Canadian Forces and as youth leaders in the Canadian Cadet Movement, we sometimes fail to see how our personality — the way we perceive the world and our place in it — affects the way we interact with people and the way we think. But the LSI put everything into perspective. The objective of the LSI is to strengthen organizations through individual effectiveness and I truly believe it met its aim. I would like every officer in the CIC to have the opportunity to take this selfassessment because we are only as strong as our weakest link! As a young officer I was pleased to see how many people genuinely care about the needs and training of CIC officers. But as I said, the hardest part is to come. We must all ‘get our hands dirty’ if we want to ensure that the CIC training program continues to change, adapt

Spring

2000

“We sometimes fail to see how our personality — the way we perceive the world and our place in it — affects the way we interact with people and the way we think.” – Lt Stella Mylonakis and meet the needs of cadet movement leaders. As the saying goes, “You are either part of the problem or the solution.” It’s up to each one of us to choose! – Lt Mylonakis is the training officer with 2802 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps in Montreal, PQ, and an instructor with Regional Cadet Instructor School (Eastern Region). E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 17

A Future Founded in Renewal

Was it as good for you as it was for me? “As a representative from the local headquarters level in Prairie Region, the week in Cornwall offered a fascinating and privileged insight into the future of CIC training in Canada. Officers from all levels of the cadet organization joined forces, as equals, to create a vision for CIC training that is national, standardized and progressive. As a corps officer I am confident that future CIC courses for the local headquarters officer will provide us with the tools to run a cadet program that is youth-oriented, exciting, dynamic and fun!” – Lt(N) Barbara Cross Commanding officer, 45 Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps, Jervis Bay, SK “It was saddening and refreshing to note that this workshop perhaps marks the first time in approximately 25 years that each of the stakeholders in CIC officer training met face-to-face nationally. We compiled a list of close to 100 items that we thought could be improved within the current Regional Cadet Instructor School system. We summarized these points into a 37-item draft action plan. The plan assigned responsibility and ownership of issues to regions.

17

Consequently, regions will be tasked to guide issues through to fruition. Having spent the last 20 years in the Canadian Cadet Movement and the last 13 years as a CIC officer, I was proud to take part in this historic first step. We must remember that it is only a first step. We must continually revisit, augment and revise these strategies to ensure that the needs of the CIC officer and the cadet are being satisfied. – Maj Mike Anglin Training Detachment Commander, London, ON “I wasn’t quite sure what I was getting myself into, but I was taken on the ‘roller coaster’ ride of my life. Some of the people, we’d never met before. Some we’d only talked to on the phone. We could finally put a face with a voice. The atmosphere was relaxing, until we got into the meat and potatoes of the main focus of the week — commitment. It’s fine to say one thing and put things on paper. Now the real task is to put them into action. I will certainly help to the best of my knowledge and ability to implement the action plan and I hope that all those who were there will aim to do the same. The ride is not over yet! – Capt Joan Eager Administration officer Regional Cadet Instructor School (Atlantic)

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Have you ever asked yourself why the basic officer qualification course lasts 10 days? You haven’t? Then perhaps you know why most of the other mandatory courses last only eight days. Even the staff members from the five regional cadet instructor schools who met at the training renewal workshop were unable to answer these questions. Before we could, we had to find answers to more important and fundamental questions, including “What new directions should cadet instructor cadre training take during the next 10 years?” Before we could even begin the teamwork required to answer this, we had to create a team. We spent the first three days of the workshop doing that. In the last two days, we presented, discussed, argued over, sorted out and catalogued all of our concerns. From our long list, we drafted 20 initiatives that will help bring about unprecedented change to the cadet instructor cadre training program across Canada. You’re curious aren’t you? Be patient. I’ll have more to say on these initiatives in the next issue. – Maj Francois Dornier Deputy Commander Regional Cadet Instructor School (Eastern) E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 18

Cadet Corner

‘Cadets’ already a household word in the Read family

I

“ would say that Cadets is definitely a household word at our place,” says Malcolm Read in response to a story in our last issue about making Cadets a household word in Canada. It’s been that way since his eldest son, Jonathon, first brought his cadet uniform home. Today, Malcolm and Gail Read are the proud parents of three sons and one daughter who have ALL attained national gold star status and the rank of cadet chief warrant officer, or cadet master warrant officer, in 1442 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps in River Hebert, NS.

cadets, Mr. Read said “yes”. Jonathon became a cadet because his dad let him and he never looked back. Neither did his brothers and sister. They all worked hard and were named best first-year cadets and achieved dozens of awards. Wednesday nights at the Reads was cadet night. But even when everyone was involved, it was never hectic. Uniforms were readied and tasks

completed throughout the week, so when cadet night — or any other cadet events — came along, the Reads were ready and out the door. All four cadets won the master cadet award. Jonathon, Julie and Chris became chief warrant officers and regimental sergeant majors. Justin became a master warrant officer and company sergeant major. Jonathon, Justin and Julie became

“It’s like four members of the same family reaching the rank of general in the Canadian Forces,” says Mr. Read, a former cadet instructor cadre officer. Only the youngest Read, Chris, is still a member of the corps. But there was a time when all four Read children were in the same cadet corps at the same time. It all started when Jonathon asked his dad if he could join the school soccer team. His dad said, “no” because the Reads live in the country and it was difficult to pick up Jonathon after practices. The answer was the same when Jonathon asked to play basketball and take music lessons. But then Mr. Read realized he had to let his son get involved in something. So when Jonathon asked to join army

18

Proud To Be

Volume 8

From left, Christopher, Jonathon, Julie and Justin Read with the many trophies and awards they’ve won as cadets. (Photo by Georgie Seguin, Breezy Acres Photography)

Spring

2000


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 19

A Future Founded in Renewal

staff at Cadet Summer Training Centre Argonaut in Gagetown, NB. Jonathon and Justin went on outward bound exchanges in Wales; Chris went on an outward bound exchange to Scotland; and Julie went on an exchange to Vernon, B.C. Jonathon won the cadet medal of excellence and the biathlon. Julie won the Lord Strathcona Medal for military excellence and physical fitness and carried the Nova Scotia flag in an international tattoo in Halifax in 1998. Chris was instrumental in building the cadet confidence course. Twenty-two-year-old Jonathon, a student at the Computer Training Institute in Saint John, NB, and 19-year-old Justin, a computer service technician in Amherst, NS, have put Cadets behind them because they don’t have the time to devote to it right now. But 18-year-old Julie, a biology major at Acadia University, has applied to become a cadet instructor cadre officer this summer at Camp Argonaut. Chris, 17, plans to attend Royal Military College in Kingston, ON, and join the military.

For that reason, he’d like to see even more discipline in the cadet movement. As a former instructor at Camp Argonaut, he knows that “When cadets listen to their instructors, they end up learning more.” One of the things he learned was respect for older people, respect for experience and respect for the planet. Julie learned to take on leadership positions and interact with people. She also found that what her brothers said about Cadets was true: Cadets is fun. With a father who was a CIC, a mother who was a civilian instructor and three siblings in the corps, Chris had to go to the corps with his family on cadet nights anyway, so he became a cadet. “It was better than playing with my dinky cars in the office,” he says.

He did comment on the Cadet Harassment and Abuse Prevention program, instituted by Cadets last year. “It’s easy to go a bit too far with CHAP — the rules themselves can be open to abuse,” he says. “I hope the cadet movement is very careful in making sure that that doesn’t occur.” Otherwise, he appreciates the fact that the government has put extra money into the cadet program to make it more interesting for cadets. And he thinks Cadets is “pretty near as good as you can get”. Adds Mr. Read, “For some reason, Cadets was a go right from the start in our household. Everyone jumped in with both feet and just went with it.” For the Reads, ‘Cadets’ is undoubtedly a household word! E

The Reads are so happy with Cadets that it was hard for them to think of anything that should be changed. Justin would like to see more emphasis on recruiting new cadets because there can never be too many cadets. “Most of the kids I went to school with didn’t want to join Cadets because they thought it was all hollering and drill,” he says. “But Cadets is a lot more than drill — it’s a learning experience.”

19

‘Cadets’ is a household word for, from left, Jonathon, Justin, Julie and Christopher Read. (Photo by Georgie Seguin, Breezy Acres Photography)

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 20

Adios to the electronic action team management/information technology (IM/IT) coordinator within directorate of cadets, Maj Guy Peterson, work with DND’s information management organization to ensure life cycle planning of the cadet movement’s information technology.

T

hree cheers for the Way-Ahead electronic action team!

The team’s work is done, but team members will continue to advise on electronic issues raised by other teams. “I think this team has been very successful and well-received out in the field,” said Lionel Bourgeous, strategic team member, at the performance measurement meeting in February. “I recommend that the team close, but I would like to see it go out to the leagues and explain what has been done.” According to team leader, Maj Michael Zeitoun, a lot of credit for the team’s success goes to directorate of cadets. “Without the directorate’s moral support and funding, we wouldn’t have been able to do it,” he said. When the electronic action team was created, it set out to equip cadet units with computers; provide an Internet capability for cadet units and other levels; create a national directory of e-mail addresses; and create a national web site, with Cadet Administrative and Training Orders (CATOs) and other current information on line. All corps should have computers now. “The days of sending out hand-medowns from department of national defence (DND) desks are gone!” says Maj Steven Deschamps, action team

Cadet F/Sgts Thomas Wan, left, and Mike Beasley, check out lesson plans on the Pacific Region web site. The cadets are from 692 RCACS in Richmond, BC. Cadet units across Canada are provided with free Internet access through the CADETNET program. (Photo by Maj Steve Deschamps)

co-leader and information systems officer for Pacific Region. “In our region, we have been sending out Pentium II computers, and most corps/squadrons are just now receiving them. In the next few months, we have plans to add Pentium III technology with colour printers to the mix of equipment we give our units, and I know we are not the only region to do this.”

CADETNET — an Internet capability for cadet units and other levels — has also been established now. Four regions are already on CADETNET (Pacific, Central, Atlantic and Northern). Both Prairie Region and Eastern Region are seriously considering it and are expected to be on side soon. The national directory of e-mail addresses, CATOs and other current information are all on-line on the national cadet web site. That’s been done, with strong support from former national cadet site web master Maj Peterson. In addition, regional web sites are now listing local orders and directives and providing a myriad of lesson plans and computer-based training opportunities. For example,

At the strategic team meeting, it was thought that personal computer product life cycle — maintaining and replacing computers — should not have to be a unit responsibility. It was suggested that the new information MS Peter Oke, left, and PO2 Robert Gale take an inventory of some of the many computer printers destined for corps/squadrons in Pacific Region. (Photo by Maj Steve Deschamps)

20

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 21

A Future Founded in Renewal

Pacific Region Cadets has Boatswain Pipes on-line, as well as over 70 pieces of military music where you can listen to and print out the musical scores for each piece of music. Check them out at www.cadets.bc.ca. The electronic team’s final quest — to provide software to cadet units that will include a database and standardized forms in electronic format — has been turned over to the administration action team. But first, a set of standardized software products conforming to DND standards must be adopted. Cadet units can expect to have access to the same suite of office productivity software (like Microsoft Word, and so on) as all DND users.

The directorate of cadets gave the electronic team $30,000 to create a ‘proof of concept’ for a cadet unit administration system. “In essence we wanted to know if it was technically possible to create a web-based software program that could store the database information on central servers,” says Maj Deschamps. The system would allow a unit to track the life cycle of a cadet — from enrolment to graduation. According to Maj Zeitoun, the proof of concept report will go to the national IM/IT coordinator and regions for implementation. The technology exists today to do it, and the electronic action team has created the prototype. “Maj Peterson’s

new role is to get six different regions to take a common approach to the issue of information management and information technology,” says Maj Zeitoun. In closing his presentation, Maj Zeitoun left the strategic team with one thought: “The ability to buy technology is easy — that’s just a matter of funding. But the ability to keep people trained and using technology is a policy/change management issue.” Editor’s note: Thanks to Maj Zeitoun, Maj Deschamps, co-leader Cadet MWO Ghislain Thibault and all electronic team members for their contribution to the Way-Ahead. E

‘Roll on’ partnership team

O

nce again, the strategic team has given the partnership action team its hearty endorsement to get on with its work. The strategic team decided last year on the makeup of the team. Leagues were asked to name three regional and local representatives; cadet detachments were also asked for three names (one from detachment level and two from local headquarters level). From this list, a team was to be formed. But the team has not met yet.

The team will look at the eight key activity areas originally identified as concerns. It will also examine the recommendations on partnership made in the modern management comptrollership review.

21

The review, released in March, recommended that League-Department of National Defence(DND)/Canadian Forces (CF) responsibilities be reviewed and updated to reflect current program realities and changing circumstances. “The partnership should allow for appropriate flexibility in the arrangement. For example, perhaps leagues could continue to be responsible for unit accommodation, but the CF would assist (not necessarily financially) where the leagues have difficulty securing adequate facilities.” The review also recommends that the leagues and DND/CF should actively seek to form strategic partnerships with likeminded organizations (such as provincial ministries of education, Heritage Canada and corporate sponsors) to help promote and support the program.

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

In strategic team discussion, it was suggested that the team be co-chaired by one league representative and one DND representative — in effect, practising the partnership. There were questions as to whether this action team should respond to the strategic team or the National Cadet Advisory Group, which includes the vicechief of the defence staff and top-level representatives of the leagues. However, the strategic team concluded that recommendations should go to the strategic team first and if accepted, go to the NCAG, or a special league committee formed to consider Way-Ahead recommendations. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 22

L o o k w h o ’s t a l k i n g n o w !

H

istory was made at the first meeting of the national cadet communications working group in Ottawa in February. People from across Canada, who are in the business of cadet communications, got together for the first time to look at cadet communications from a national perspective. The new working group includes the public relations coordinators and national executive directors of the three leagues;

regional public affairs officers; regional Youth Initiatives Program/Way-Ahead coordinators; a representative of the Way-Ahead communication action team; representatives of the directorate of cadets communication cell; and the web master for the national cadets web site.

The mandate of the new working group is to develop and sustain a national, coordinated strategic communication plan approved by senior leaderships, with the aim of raising the profile and relevancy of the Canadian Cadet Movement to Canadians.

The main thrust of the first meeting was information-sharing, as well as hammering out a mandate and roles and responsibilities of communicators within the movement at local, regional and national levels.

The group reviewed the state of communications within the cadet movement simply by sharing personal perspectives on what’s going well and what’s not. The leagues — who to a large extent have been responsible for cadet communications in the past — clarified their positions. Because of the lack of funding and shortage of volunteers, they welcome the involvement of directorate of cadets in communications. They do, however, have concerns about long-term commitment. “Will we have to fill the vacuum again when department of national defence funding is no longer available?” asked Lionel Bourgeois, public relations coordinator for the air cadet league. The leagues especially welcome strategic guidance from the national level, as well as communication tools that can be used at the local level. The league representatives said they cannot make decisions on behalf of the leagues, without consulting back with their committees at various levels. “Don’t be surprised if we have a situation where I have to get back to you,” said Dave Boudreau, army league executive director.

Looking at communications from a national perspective can result in communication materials such as these sea, army and air cadet information pamphlets which have a common look and feel, but still honour the uniqueness of the sea, army and air elements of the Canadian Cadet Movement.

22

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 23

A Future Founded in Renewal

Regional communicators were enthusiastic about getting a national communications perspective through the working group. “In the past, we’ve had no opportunity to share information or a national communication strategy,” said LCdr Rick Powell, Atlantic Region Youth Initiatives coordinator and Way-Ahead representative. “I see this as a major step ahead.” It was clear that the most effective cadet communications have occurred where regions have trained public affairs officers. At this time, four regions have public affairs officers. The working group decided that training cadet instructor cadre officers in public relations should be a communications priority. Other working group priorities are managing communications to support the recruiting and retention of the cadet instructor cadre (CIC); increasing the visibility of the cadet movement and managing communications to support the retention and recruiting of cadets. The working group meeting was an opportunity for Stéphane Ippersiel, communications manager with the directorate of cadets, to update people on the results of the CROP/Environics public opinion survey on Canadian attitudes towards the cadet program (see story on page 29); to discuss standards for the application of the new Cadets Canada logo; to inform people about Reserve Force Uniform Day (May 3); and inform about requirements to comply with the Federal Identity Program.

Participants also learned about directorate general public affairs (DGPA) resources that cadet communicators may be able to tap in to over time, specifically communications training and support from the newly created DND regional outreach offices. The possibility of tailoring public affairs training for CIC was discussed with Maj John Blakeley, who works in the DGPA training cell. Creating working relationships with the DND regional outreach offices was discussed with Maj Tony White, media outreach officer. The aim of the media outreach offices is to create a public awareness of the Canadian Forces,

by reaching out to ethnic media, associations and parliamentarians. According to Mr. Ippersiel, Cadets could be a ‘client’ for the outreach offices and piggyback on many of the office’s communication opportunities. The offices can also serve as an outlet for cadet communication material. In just three days, the working group created a focus for future communications in the Canadian Cadet Movement. In the words of Col Rick Hardy, director of communications, “It has never been more important to know what’s going on and to communicate in a consistent manner. Just the fact that you’re here makes this meeting a success!” E

National cadet photo contest

2000

P

osters for the second national cadet photo contest should be in your unit now, or arriving soon. Check the poster for details of this year’s photo contest and grab your camera to shoot some award-winning photos! Contest deadline is November 1, 2000.

Recycle Me! When you’re done reading me, pass me along to someone else. Thanks! 23

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 24

Securing the future… Navy League of Canada By Kevin Guérin

I

n 1995, the navy league conducted a series of workshops intended to identify our requirements one, three, and five years down the road. Our efforts revealed an increasing need for additional revenue at the national level for enhancing and developing programs. The chairman of the fund-raising and public awareness committee, John MacKillop, proposed a national fundraising campaign, approved by national council in February 1996. A needs assessment was completed in the summer of 1997 and more than 130 representatives from navy league divisions and branches, cadet corps and the corporate community were contacted. They gave their views and comments on the state and the future of the navy league and its youth programs, navy league cadets and Royal Canadian Sea Cadets.

As a result, the national council agreed in principle to launch a $5 million national fund development campaign. The navy league’s corporate fund-raising endeavours began in January 1998. The goals of the national fund development campaign are:

• To reach out to new communities, which will increase the number of branches and corps • To create a visible cadet and navy league presence in communities and in local and national media • To enhance communications and information dissemination to and from the national office, the divisions, the branches and the corps

One of the goals of the national fund campaign is to raise money to enhance sea cadet training programs

• To provide a significant and enhanced focus on training at all levels. Specific needs include training programs for navy league cadet officers, navy league cadets, volunteers, and community fundraising. They also include enhancements of the Royal Canadian Sea Cadet officer training program (in consultation with the Department of National Defence) and of the Royal Canadian Sea Cadet part two training program.

• To strengthen existing corps

To date, donations have reached $473,000. This represents $208,000 in pledges (96 per cent of which will be contributed in the first quarter of this year), $85,000 in cash and $180,000 of ‘gifts-in-kind’, including campaign materials and equipment.

• To increase the combined enrolment of navy league cadets and Royal Canadian Sea cadets from 14,000 to 18,000

With these initial donations, the league can now proceed with projects arising from our five-year development plan. Potential projects have already been

• To help divisions in the support of branches and corps striving to deliver a first-class youth program

24

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000

examined and all involved should see results at the branch and corps level by the end of the year. The fund development team — a group of volunteers and staff at the national office — is monitoring campaign progress, but we need your help. If you know any person or company that may be interested in supporting our nautical youth initiatives, please let us know; we can make a professional approach to ‘corporate Canada’. For further information, or to make a donation, please contact me at 1-800-375-6289 or kguerin@navyleague.ca or check out our web site at www.navyleague.ca. – Kevin Guérin is the fund development administrator at the Navy League of Canada’s national office. He is a former cadet with 106 Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Drake, and recently retired commanding officer of 33 RCSCC St- Lawrence. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:22

Page 25

A Future Founded in Renewal

Chatting on line

C

adetWorld Forums is a place where people in the Canadian Cadet Movement — and beyond — can come together and share ideas and thoughts, or even just make friends,” says 2Lt Ryan Sales in Edmonton, the site manager of the Internet forum discussion site. “It’s one of the few places where you can get feedback from every element of every cadet organization in the world.”

2Lt Sales started the web site because he was frustrated by the fact that Canadian cadets had little communication with other cadets across the country, or outside Canada. “We started out a year ago providing free web space to cadet groups and individuals, for anything that was cadet-oriented,” says the former cadet from 539 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in High Prairie, AB. Since 2Lt Sales introduced Forums to CadetWorld last August, registration and participation — from Canada, the United States, Australia, New Zealand, England, Hong Kong and other locations — has been active. And since the site has been linked to the national cadet web site, interest has ‘soared’. That’s a word the cadet instructor cadre gliding instructor identifies with. On-line discussions cover everything from whose cadet band is best to the quality of food at summer camps. And there’s even a discussion on the Pentium computers being installed now at cadet corps and squadrons. “Tell us what you think about them,” says

25

2Lt Ryan Sales, site manager of CadetWorld Forums Maj Steve Deschamps, Way-Ahead electronic action team leader. He’s getting some interesting feedback.

with us’. He thinks people can still get across their ideas and communicate without using profanity.

Links are provided to active topics, international issues, or separate sea cadet, army cadet and air cadet forums. One forum, called cadet chat, allows cadets to talk about whatever they want to talk about — within reason.

People have become aggressive in only a couple of instances. “Our policy gives people three strikes — a warning, a oneweek suspension and finally permanent removal from the forum if they continue to break the rules,” says 2Lt Sales.

Site rules prohibit vulgar language, harassment, or inappropriate topics. “If the content is getting to the point where it is no longer suitable for the general audience, we shut down those topics very quickly,” says 2Lt Sales. “We have to be careful because our audience can be anywhere from 12 to 60 years old.” His philosophy is ‘If you don’t mind talking to your mom about it, then it’s okay

Site staff checks the forums to ensure participants are behaving. Staff includes 2Lt Sales, one current cadet, three former cadets and someone with no cadet experience. They maintain the site in their spare time.

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

The site is paid for through minimal advertising and a private sponsor. The CadetWorld Forums site was revamped in March to celebrate its first birthday. “We’re adding bigger and better services and more prizes,” says 2Lt Sales. “It’s amazing.” E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 26

What’s your beef?

W h a t ’s y o u r b e e f ? ‘

W

hat’s your beef?’ is a new feature of Proud to Be — suggested by Cadet Sgt J.R.K. Bergeron of Gatineau, QC. It gives cadets — and others in the cadet movement — an opportunity to raise questions about change (or the lack of it). It also provides an opportunity to respond.

PO1 Katie Dyson’s (112 Howe Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps, Peterborough, ON) beef is that hair dyeing and body piercing are not allowed in Cadets.

regulations for the Canadian Forces are carried over into cadets, and therefore cadets are prohibited from having any tattoos, body piercing, and unnaturally coloured hair.

I am concerned about the subjects of hair dyeing and body piercing, and how they relate to the people we attract to the cadet movement. The dress

I understand that Cadets is considered as a civilian branch of the military, so cadets’ uniformity regulations are the same. But we are also a youth organization. The reality is that at present, body piercing and dyed hair is very trendy, and by prohibiting cadets from participating in the trends, we are losing a lot of potential cadets. I can understand the tradition of military uniformity being very important, but something as small as a tiny stud in the nose isn’t that bad. Of course, having various hoops protruding from one’s person may pose a personal safety hazard. Studs, however, aren’t that big a concern, especially when it comes to pierced tongues, which aren’t even visible except when calling drill. At the present time, we are required to put a Band-Aid on all of our external piercing, which only draws attention to it and looks really silly. My officers gave me a really hard time with my nose stud. I chose the more discreet method of using cover-up make-up, which doesn’t look so dumb, but really, it only made

PO1 Katie Dyson

26

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000

the stud skin-coloured. That would indicate that the entire issue is about tradition, and not about safety at all. In my five years, I have been a dedicated cadet, but I was hassled about it until I removed it. I don’t think that a small stud is such a big deal, especially considering the care I put into camouflaging it. People choose different ways to express themselves at this age, and you have to take the hair color and piercing with the rest of the package. A cadet is, after all, just a civilian in a uniform. You can’t change people by trying to force conformity on them; they will only turn away. If we want to bring more kids into the movement, we have to try to ease away from the conformist stereotype that we have right now. I think that Cadets is a great opportunity for everyone, but we have to face the fact that we have entered a new time with a different youth. If we don’t open the doors to change, our numbers will decline drastically. Cadets aren’t about moulding a group of kids into a bunch of conformist tinsoldiers, as many kids now think. It’s about bringing out the leadership potential in everyone, and of course, having fun and learning. What difference does appearance make?


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 27

A Future Founded in Renewal

Capt Andrea Onchulenko, air cadet program development with directorate of cadets, responds: At this time, these issues do not fall within the scope of dress regulations in the cadet organization. This has resulted in two attitudes — “there are no rules prohibiting me from doing that, therefore I can,” and “there are no rules allowing me to do that, therefore I cannot.” Dress regulations for all three elements are set out in the Cadet Administrative and Training Orders. CATOs 35-01 (sea cadets), 46-01 (army cadets) and 55-04 (air cadets) stipulate the standard for hair and jewellery. Although female cadets (sea and air cadets only — the army cadets have no policy) are not allowed to sport “unusual hair colours such as green, bright red, orange, purple”, there is no mention of hair dyeing for any male cadets. To date, there is no CATO on body piercing (other than ear piercing for female cadets). The cadet organization typically follows the example of the Canadian Forces (CF) in matters of policy and in November of 1999, CANFORGEN 103/99 completely precluded male and female members in the CF from wearing visible and non-visible body piercing adornments (except women’s earrings).

27

We know that male and female cadets wear tattoos, dye their hair and engage in body piercing and it is clear that the cadet organization needs to address these issues. The ‘Band-Aid’ solution does nothing to address the concerns of either cadets or directing staff. I believe these issues should be examined through focus groups and then, pertinent policy can be established. F/Sgt Chris Wonnacott, 60 Confederation Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron in Charlottetown, PEI, wants on-job-training resumed for air cadets in air traffic control courses. Time and time again, as the warrant officer for my squadron, I hear from my commanding officer and other members about all this new funding for cadets, and all of the wonderful programs being offered. If this is so, why are good programs getting cut? This summer, myself and 23 other cadets from across the country were selected from hundreds to attend the air traffic control course (ATC) in Trenton, ON. When we arrived, we were so proud of being selected for such a prestigious course. However, on the second day

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

after our arrival, we were informed that unlike past years, there would be no onjob-training. In previous years, after five weeks, ATC cadets were dispersed across the country to different military air bases to have hands-on practice in air traffic control. Last summer, it was cut and we were told there was no compensating program for it. We were told the program was cut because of funding losses. Now don’t get me wrong. The time I had at air traffic control last summer is still the best memory of my cadet career and it would be hard to replace. However, I’m left wondering with all this new funding we are being offered, why some of our best courses are being cut? LCol Gary Merritt, directorate of cadets (air), answers: The ATC course is undergoing a major review to revamp the course training standards and course training plan. As part of the review, we would like to increase the number of cadets attending the course and make greater use of simulators for on-job-training. Hopefully, the first changes will be seen this summer with greater use of the ATC facilities at the NavCan training facility in Cornwall, ON, and at CFB Trenton, ON. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 28

Winning web site

Y

ou may have heard of the Golden Globe Awards, but chances are you haven’t heard about the Golden Web Award. It’s an international award recognizing creativity and excellence on the World Wide Web. And the Prairie Region Cadets web site is a winner! The web site (www.prairiecadets.com) received the 1999 Golden Web award from the International Association of Web Masters and Designers. The site was designed by OCdt Jan Macauley, a former civilian instructor and an officer cadet with the cadet instructor cadre since last November. OCdt Macauley

is also a former cadet and a glider pilot at the Gimli Gliding Centre in Gimli, MB. “I have been working with computers my whole life,” says OCdt Macauley. “I am now a certified computer technician, but I taught myself to do web site design.” He worked with Prairie Region Headquarters in a full-time position until January 2000 designing and updating the web site.

The web site offers information on everything from upcoming events in prairie region to joining instructions for the region’s cadet summer training centres. The site receives from 100 to 125 hits a day. Congratulations to OCdt Macauley and Prairie Region Cadets. E

“This award is meaningful to me because it isn’t given to just anybody,” he says. “I feel quite proud that my site won the award.”

More high school credits for cadet training By Capt Linda Hildebrandt

S

ince our article in the last issue of Proud to Be, we’ve received information on even more opportunities for cadets to obtain high school credit in various parts of Canada.

The following information was forwarded by Brenda Pinto, navy league — Newfoundland Labrador division. As of last October, the province’s Department of Education approved sea cadet courses and programs for credit towards high school graduation. Sea cadets in Newfoundland and Labrador may now receive credit for completing phases four and five training, as well as courses that are six weeks or more in duration, such as boatswain, musician (levels four and five), staff cadet position, medical assistant, marine engineering and more.

28

Proud To Be

Volume 8

We also appreciate the efforts of Eddie Mathews, army cadet league in Saskatchewan, for providing information on that province. In Saskatchewan, cadets may receive one special project credit for out-of-school activities, which can be applied towards graduation. To qualify for this credit, cadets must register their intention of using cadet training as a special option credit and receive approval from their school. The important thing to remember is that cadets in Saskatchewan must register their intent to use cadet training for credit before they begin the local headquarters training or cadet courses. A sincere thank you goes out to Brenda Pinto and Eddie Mathews for providing this up-to-date information to add to

Spring

2000

our ‘high school credit for cadet training’ portfolio of Canada. Our eventual goal, of course, is to see the education boards in all the provinces and territories across Canada recognize the value of cadet training. It is exciting to see how things are progressing in Newfoundland and Labrador in just the last while. With air and sea cadet training now having received recent approval, acknowledging army cadet training for credit in this province is, hopefully, not far behind. – Capt Hildebrandt was co-leader of the miscellaneous training action team until it was closed at the end of February. Further action on high school credits will be carried on by the leagues. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 29

A Future Founded in Renewal

Poll shows low awareness of Cadets

Y

ou may have thought Cadets was Canada’s best kept secret, but now you know it! CROP — a marketing research and opinion survey firm — has conducted a public opinion poll of Canadian adults and teens to find out their attitudes and perceptions of Cadets

The poll showed you were right all along. Spontaneous awareness of the cadet movement is relatively low — only four per cent among adults and teenagers. However, if it’s any consolation, it’s just as low for the Scout movement in Canada. The good news is that the overall image of Cadets is very positive (86 per cent of the teenagers and 83 per cent of the adults interviewed). And the teens saw the cadet movement as formative (84 per cent); an organization with modern ideas (68 per cent); dynamic (65 per cent); and cool (52 per cent).

Now here’s a shock! More teenagers were against being in Cadets than in favour. The younger the teenagers were, however, the more interested they were in being cadets. Twenty-six per cent of the youths surveyed said they had thought of joining cadets The teenagers interviewed heard about Cadets mainly from their relatives. A small number heard of Cadets through school. The main perceived benefits of the cadet movement are: • Discipline (Teens 28%; adults 49%) • Social skills (Teens 12%; adults 11%) • Responsibilities (Teens 8%; adults 14%) • Team spirit (Teens 4%; adults 12%) • Sense of respect (teens 3%; adults 11%) • Technical skills (teens 15%; adults 6%)

The perceived disadvantages are: • Too time-consuming (teens 29%; adults 8%) • Discipline (teens 8%; adults 7%) • Too militaristic (teens 2%; adults 5%) • Bad influence (teens 1%, adults 2%) The poll was conducted for the communication cell of directorate of cadets and provides valuable information for planning communications for the Canadian Cadet Movement. To compare the opinions and perceptions of Canadian adults (over 18 years old) with that of teenagers (12 to 17 years old), CROP conducted 1,616 phone interviews in both official languages across Canada between Nov 19 and Dec 5 of last year. E

Overall, how do Canadian teens perceive the cadet movement? • 92% of the surveyed teenagers believe that cadets distinguish themselves by their personality and leadership. • 80% believe the movement promotes Canadian pride and identity. • 76% of them consider the cadet movement too time-consuming. • 56% think Cadets prepares people for the army.

29

Fifty-six per cent of Canadian teens think Cadets prepares young people for the army! The perception is created because cadets wear military clothing and do some military-type things — like these cadets on an Ontario Regiment Cadet Garrison winter exercise at Canadian Forces Base Borden, ON, in January. One hundred and forty cadets from army cadet corps in Oshawa, Pickering, Port Perry and Uxbridge, ON, tested their survival skills during the weekend event. (Photo by Ken Globe, a civilian volunteer with the garrison.)

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 30

Measuring action team performance

P

erformance measurement was the name of the game at the Way-Ahead strategic team meeting at the end of February. It was time for action teams to ‘fess up’ to what they’d accomplished since the beginning of the Way-Ahead.

What was the final report card? Some teams have made more progress than others. Some key activities have been completed — often with strong support from directorate of cadets. Other have been taken over by ongoing initiatives. Work is continuing in many key activity areas; and new key activities are being created as action teams continue their research. In other words, a lot of work has been done, but there’s a lot more to do. The strategic team decided that the electronic action team and the miscellaneous training team should be dissolved. The electronic action team has completed its activities. The miscellaneous action team had two activities, but one of them has been taken over by the leagues; the other will be taken on by a new bilingual action team, created to enhance bilingualism in the cadet movement. Col Rick Hardy, director of cadets, said he was not in favour of putting a command and control action team in place at this time. “We’re in the process of embracing the direction of Armed Forces Council to put a command and control structure in place, where regional commanders will be responsible for implementing the cadet program,” says Col Hardy. So it’s too soon for people in the field to comment on it.” It’s not too soon for the partnership action team to jump into action, however. The strategic team expects

30

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000

the partnership team to get on with its issues as soon as possible and gave the team some additional work to do. (See story page 21.) Every action team reported that establishing closer links with directorate of cadets (DCdts) staff is key to success. Many reported they simply do not have the time or resources, as volunteers, to do a lot of what has to be done.

“The responses (to a structure action team survey asking local corps/squadrons if national, regional and detachment cadet organizations are meeting their needs) represent valuable input from the field.” – Maj Roman Ciecwierz, action team co-leader.

• The training action team will continue to work closely with DCdts staff on several activities and with the leagues on two key activities. The team was told to go ahead with a second training survey of each element. • The cadet instructor cadre (CIC)/league training team will also establish a closer link with DCdts staff and perhaps group some of its activities to speed up the process. League members on the team will be responsible for circulating ideas through their membership to ensure a consensus before recommendations are brought to the strategic team. This team will assist implementation.


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 31

A Future Founded in Renewal

• The key to the success of the communication action team has been its active working alliance with the DCdts communication cell. The team does, however, need to consult more closely with the leagues before making recommendations to the strategic team. This team has completed six of its key activities, all reported in former issues of Proud to Be. The others will be ongoing — forever. The team will continue to provide feedback from the field. • The resources action team will continue as a consultative body to liaise with a working group created at DCdts with the regions to look at regional resources. Action team co-leader, Maj Claude Duquette, is already a member of the working group. The key activity of “making use of outside agencies for training assistance” was moved to a training team. “Developing a fundraising plan” was moved to the partnership team.

are meeting their needs. “The responses represent valuable input from the field,” says team leader Maj Roman Ciecwierz. Results will be compiled by May. The team will continue to be involved in branch advisory group issues. It was suggested that this team could go even further. • According to Col Hardy, we can’t shut down the values and diversity action team. “Diversity is probably the toughest thing we have to deal with. We try to make one shoe fit all, but we have to keep hitting ourselves between the eyes every time we do anything and become more diversitysensitive.” The team will continue to raise awareness for diversity issues in the cadet movement. Diversity will be ingrained into the organization’s strategic guidance. E

• The CIC/CI policy change action team will continue. According to the strategic team, future policy will not be created without discussions with this team. The team will work with an appointed DCdts representative. Three of the team’s activities are being dealt with as part of the creation of the military occupation structure (MOS) for cadet instructor cadre officers. • Many of the structure action team’s issues have been addressed by Armed Forces Council. Others are addressed by the MOS. The team will be retained for feedback from the field on structure issues. This team has had excellent response to a survey asking local corps and squadrons if national, regional and detachment organizations

31

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Maj Ken Fells is a co-leader of the values and diversity action team, which will continue to raise awareness of diversity issues in the cadet movement.


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 32

Speakers’ Corner

Cadets — the Pokemon Population? By LCdr David Kirby

I

recently read an article from The London Free Press that featured experts predicting what our future society would be like. Their responses were interesting and set me thinking about the cadet program, present and future.

Professor Marty Puterman of the University of British Columbia said, “…Generation X will give way to the Pokemon Population … They’ve spent their youth solving very complex adventure games and surfing the Net and just reacting at a much

faster pace.” Professor Puterman feels that “The main trend we’ll be facing is ever-quickening change to the extent that the skills that we learned today are not going to have a very long life.” Frank Ogden, a Vancouver futurist, ominously predicts the implication of this. “The industrial age gave us the haves and have-nots”. He foresees a new gap “… between the know and know-nots.” Our up-and-coming cadet instructor cadre is part of Generation X. They are accustomed to change, even expect it and quickly adapt to new ways of doing things. What is real, what is a fact, is what they just downloaded from the Internet. They get the latest operating systems and web browsers for their computers and don’t need a course on how to operate them. They change as required. Change is a part of their ethos, a positive part of their attitude.

Our cadets are becoming the Pokemon population. Their economy and societal values will demand constant change. (Photo by Sgt Chris Coulombe)

32

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000

Our cadets are becoming the Pokemon Population. Their economy and societal values will demand constant change. What they download from the Internet is instantly a piece of history. A fact will be something necessary to advance to the next temporary fact, much like the skill levels in the computer games considered


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 33

A Future Founded in Renewal

by Professor Puterman. Change will become an ethical imperative, one of their rules of conduct. To not drive change will be antisocial. It is completely foreign to my generation, the Baby Boomers. We Boomers enjoy a varied lifestyle but have not embraced change. Facts are in books. We took courses on exactly how to run our new computers. We complained when Windows appeared, but took the upgrade course. Change is something that has to be explained, organized, managed. Our economic system — consumerism — encourages change while our society admires tradition and permanence. Change is either very slow or there is a big change followed by a new steady state. However, as Puterman and Ogden point out, the world is changing faster and faster and there will be no steady state. If we don’t pursue constant change we will be one of the know-nots and fall into the dusty pages of history. Why are we having such a difficult time changing the cadet program? I think it is because we are trying to fix a Boomer system with Generation X tools for the Pokemon Population. We are trying to patch up the holes in an old system. But we don’t need a new system that needs to be changed again either. Rather, we must put into place a non-system that operates on constant change.

33

What kind of a cadet program do I envision? Well, I am constrained by my heritage; I’m a Boomer. I feel that the purpose of cadets — leadership, citizenship, fitness and an interest in the CF — are valid and good goals. I tend towards a pyramid organization structure and well-defined lines of responsibility. I value tradition, but not habits. However, I see the cadet program embracing the fast pace of change that modern communications allows. There will not be a book of rules but a place where today’s rules can be found when needed. Local programs will weave in and out of other structures, like other government programs, that can support some of our goals. When they no longer help, we drop them. Authorities at every level will have the flexibility to achieve the goals of the program. We will understand and accept that what happened last year or last week doesn’t have to be the way we do it today and cannot be the way we do it tomorrow. Most importantly, we will accept that constant change will make some of our efforts appear as failures. My advice to the cadet program? Start changing. If it doesn’t work, change again. If it works, be prepared to change again anyway. Our young CIC are ready for it; the cadets need it. The rest of us can try to adapt … or maybe take a course! E

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

“We are trying to fix a Boomer system with Generation X tools for the Pokemon Population.” –

LCdr David Kirby, regional cadet officer (Northern Region)


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 34

An 80 per cent solution? The new directorate of cadets By Cdr Jurgen Duewel ast October, Director of Cadets Col Rick Hardy asked me to head a team to examine the reorganization of the directorate. Over the past several years, the cadet organization had been the subject of a number of reviews which had all reached the same broad conclusion — past reorganizations had given little consideration to long-term strategic planning. Instead, the major result had been an increase in the size of staff without the necessary staff training. In addition there had been a distinct absence of clear communication and consistent direction both internally and externally.

L

Our team’s task was to examine the proposed structure to ensure it would simplify and improve coordination, maximize efficiency and eliminate duplication of administration and planning. We were tasked to rewrite terms of reference for all personnel to ensure that the best qualified, educated and trained people would hold the new positions. Most important, the new organization had to be capable of leading the cadet movement through innovation and strategic vision. Col Hardy’s instruction was to produce an 80 per cent solution in less than six weeks!

As the directorate was organized, only the director had the “big picture”. This resulted in two unsatisfactory scenarios. First, the director was forced into micromanaging — involved in even the most trivial and minute details of the cadet organization. Second, and more serious, in his absence all useful work could come to a complete halt. As well, there was no section dealing with the overall needs of the movement, nor was there a strategic (forward-looking) cell. Instead the organization was stove-piped by environment, and there was no co-ordination among sections. Consequently, common training such as music, physical fitness and marksmanship were all handled differently depending on the environment (sea, army or air).

Col Hardy gave me absolute freedom to pick the team. I chose people who had worked in higher management positions at national defence headquarters and would therefore have an understanding of strategic thinking. Team members included Cdr (ret’d) Gerry Gadd, former commanding officer of HMCS Fraser and now vice-president of the navy league in British Columbia; Maj Rick Trute, detachment commander of Western Area Central Region Headquarters, former Service Battalion; LCdr Rick Powell, MARS officer and special projects officer in Regional Cadet Staff Establishment (Atlantic); Capt (ret’d) Rick Peters, former infantry officer, father of an army cadet and a flight instructor for the air cadet scholarship program; and Maj Jim Greenough, pilot and commandant of Regional Cadet Instructor School (Prairie).

34

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000

We took the organization apart, questioned it, examined it and identified the functions that needed to be carried out. We also attempted to qualify and quantify the skill sets required for personnel in future positions. We interviewed as many key players as possible to ensure we had captured every duty and function. On completion we reassembled the organization under the new headings of strategic planning — responsible for strategic vision and change management; program development — responsible for developing and writing the training programs; and co-ordination — responsible for dealing on a day-to-day basis with local headquarters and cadet summer training centre issues. As well we identified the internal sections of corporate services, finance and communications. Did we get the 80 per cent solution? Yes, I believe we provided the director with a framework for an organization that can respond strategically to the future. It remains to be seen whether the staff can meet the challenges of the future and demonstrate their capabilities as leaders to serve the entire cadet movement. I am sure there will be future modifications down the road, but I believe the organization is now on the right road. – Cdr Duewel is commanding officer of HMCS Ontario. He is also a graduate student at Royal Military College, working on a masters degree in war studies. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 35

A Future Founded in Renewal

Citizenship and football

R

eaching out to their community — and to their country — is all part of the citizenship so highly valued by cadets across Canada.

Cadets in Pacific Region paraded their citizenship before hundreds of thousands of Canadians last fall when they unfurled the Canadian flag during Grey Cup 99 in Hamilton, ON. How did they get there? The cadets from the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island forged a partnership with the B.C. Lions football club last year, unfurling a 40 by 20-metre Canadian flag at the opening of every home game. The flag, held by 70 to 100 sea, land and air cadets, filled half the field. They did the same at Grey Cup 99.

The cadets’ affiliation with the B.C. Lions football club represented the first affiliation of cadets with a professional football team for the entire season, according to Capt Judith-Ann Jarrett, area cadet officer (air) with Pacific region. “We will be campaigning to encourage these kinds of affiliations of cadets in other cities with professional sports teams,” he says. “It’s terrific tri-service exposure for the cadets and a fitting way to pay tribute to our country and display the citizenship values cadets learn in the movement.” The cadets have been such a hit, they’ve been asked to return this season. E

35

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 36

Solutions from unexpected sources By Capt Beverley Deck

A

round the water cooler, it was evident that Pacific Region cadet staff had mixed feelings about an upcoming renewal workshop. Some referred to the three-day event as a ‘hug-fest’, while others had a more optimistic view of possible gains from it.

“We must not be afraid to look critically at ourselves, our organization and the way things are now. If we don’t, we are condemning ourselves to a future without hope of change and without a vision of the way things can be.” – Capt Linda Hildebrandt, directing staff, Regional Cadet Instructor School, Pacific Region.

36

Proud To Be

Volume 8

The first morning, we left behind our day-to-day tasks and filed into a conference room at a local hotel. Some of us were full of reservations, some had our guard up, while others were enthusiastic and positive. It didn’t matter what department we came from or what rank or position we held, we were all there to participate and contribute our ideas. “I believe the workshop was to bring together staff that you might not deal with on a daily basis and to bring ideas on how to solve problems in the workplace,” said MCpl Linda Burke, regional cadet music advisor clerk. Over the next three days, we made a list of concerns about our organization and our jobs — and there were many. In the end, we focused on the top seven concerns. Facilitated by Leo Kelly and Maj Serge Dube of the Way-Ahead coordination cell, we did some teamwork exercises, shared ideas, explored barriers to change, identified our stakeholders, looked at trends in society and in the end, put together an action plan to tackle issues we raised. “I was amazed at how much we accomplished in such a short period of time,” said WO Phil Garvin, administration clerk. “I don’t think we would have succeeded if rank wasn’t thrown out of the room on the first day. It allowed us to look at each other as equal contributors to the tasks assigned.” One valuable lesson we learned was that an answer can sometimes come from an unexpected source and we all have great ideas to contribute when given the opportunity. Many solutions came from members who have never been asked for suggestions.

Spring

2000

The process wasn’t always easy. We fluctuated between moments of tension and frustration and moments of laughter. There were conflicting points of view and there were times when we couldn’t reach consensus. Interestingly enough, there were also times when we were pleasantly surprised by the similarity of our opinions. The communication process was often difficult but always valuable. We talked with people we don’t interact with normally and learned about them in new ways. The workshop concluded with a list of issues to examine further and the intention to form a team of interested members to action the list. We also left with a clear list of what needs to be done to make our organization more functional and more effective in our role of supporting Pacific Region corps and squadrons. “I think the workshop was an important step in recognizing the work that lies ahead of us to make sure that the Pacific Region cadet program serves the needs of officers and cadets in our corps and squadrons,” said Capt Linda Hildebrandt, directing staff at the Regional Cadet Instructor School. “After all, they are our bottom line.” Keeping up with daily issues and demands often doesn’t leave much time to change or renew our way of doing business. The process will be ongoing and will take some patience and hard work. Effective change and renewal also requires a focus on what is important. For us, the most important consideration is how our work affects cadets in our region. “We saw that we must focus on


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 37

A Future Founded in Renewal

“The workshop refocussed staff to their very important role in the cadet organization … many of us received a much needed tune- up.” –

the future of the cadet movement and ensure that we keep up with the fast pace of our youth,” said Sgt Kim Arnold, area cadet adviser (army). Lt(N) Jean Cyr, staff officer administration (sea), felt the workshop re-focussed Pacific Region staff to their very important role in the cadet organization. “In some instances,

Lt(N) Jean Cyr, staff officer administration (sea), Pacific Region the learning curve was pretty steep and many of us received a much needed ‘tune up’,” she said. “Maintenance will be required however, to ensure that progress made is not lost.” Putting ideas in place, developing new processes, improving the organization — this is what we hope to accomplish. We

need to focus on lessons learned in the workshop and take action. We need to listen and be open to change. Sometimes we will not be successful, but the successes that do come will be well worth the effort. – Capt Deck is the Way-Ahead coordinator for Pacific Region. E

Letters to the editor Impressed I have been involved with cadets for 16 years, first as a cadet and then as a cadet instructor cadre (CIC) officer. I’ve served in all positions at local headquarters and have spent the past five summers as a company officer commanding at Air Cadet Summer Training Centre Blackdown. I represented Central Region during the recent redesign of the Army Star Program. I have watched the development of the WayAhead program and Proud To Be with some mild interest over the past few years. Like many of my peer group I had seen such pie in the sky proposals in the past and had filled out all the questionnaires only to wonder what happened to the results. I participated in ‘the Way-Behind program’ jokes and despite publications and presentations at my regional summer training centre, I really didn’t see this program ever getting off the ground or

37

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

going anywhere. I hate to admit it, but it seems I may have been mistaken. The most recent issue of Proud To Be proves to me that there is something behind the WayAhead program. Finally someone is addressing in an organized way some of the long-standing issues that a lot of CIC have tried to address in the past. I can honestly say I’m impressed with the quality of the material in Proud To Be. In a system that isn’t too quick to give praise I think you and your staff deserve some. Should you feel that there is somewhere in the Way-Ahead program that I can be of assistance feel free to have someone contact me. – Thanks for all your work. Capt Rick Butson, 2814 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Hamilton, ON


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 38

Letters to the editor

(cont‘d)

Sea cadet uniforms Thanks for the latest issue of Proud to Be. I think you folks are doing a terrific job. I did notice in this issue that in three out of four pictures of sea cadets, they were wearing the traditional seaman’s (square rig, blues, whites, etc.) uniform. I was wondering if any of the action teams are considering ‘clothing’-type questions, because I see a couple of different issues arising from the uniforms the cadets wear: a morale issue — sea cadets everywhere seem to want to wear the traditional uniform; and a public image issue — the square rig uniforms that some units still hold are 30 years old, are becoming somewhat ragged, with a hodge-podge of adapted and out-of-date badges and do not present an image consistent with a high standard of dress. – SLt Geoff Kneller Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Calgary Editor: The resources action team is working closely with Capt Chris DeMerchant, the logistics officer with directorate of cadets responsible for clothing cadets. I would like to bring forward a concern I have with respect to individual ‘portrait-style’ photos of sea cadets that have been used in some current cadet/Canadian Forces publications (Maple Leaf and Proud to Be). In these two publications there are individual photos of two cadets with one in the Maple Leaf (Nov 17, page 16) wearing the ‘old traditional’ blue uniform and in the Proud to Be (Fall 99, pages 13 and 20) wearing the ‘old traditional’ white uniform.

38

Proud To Be

Volume 8

Spring

2000

When I joined cadets in 1978, I was issued the ‘traditional’ blue uniform, as it was the uniform of the day for sea cadets. Then in 1979, I went to the green uniform, which in the late 1980s changed to the current black cadet uniform. The point I am trying to make is that sea cadets are issued the black cadet uniform which identifies them as a sea cadet. They are not issued the ‘traditional’ uniform for day-to-day wear. The Cadet Administrative and Training Order on sea cadet dress states that the traditional uniform is to be worn only on special ceremonial occasions with the permission of the regional cadet officer for such events like Battle of Atlantic parades. I feel that by publishing ‘portrait-type’ photographs of cadets in the traditional uniform (not part of a ceremonial occasion) is sending the wrong message to both the public and the Canadian Forces. However much we may want to hold onto traditions, we should be sending out the right message and following our own national uniform policies. I would like to request that in the future, photos be viewed to ensure that cadets are wearing the correct and current uniform and that when photos of a cadet are requested, they be informed that it be in the current uniform, not any traditional uniforms. – Lt(N) Paul Fraser Former special projects officer, summer training (sea), directorate of cadets, Ottawa


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 39

A Future Founded in Renewal

Suggestions

At the moment, I’m only a cadet sergeant, but as I have more experience than some other cadets I was thinking of some things you could carry in Proud to Be. You could have a section called, “What’s your beef?”, where cadets can have their say about anything in Cadets. (You teach us to speak our mind. No offence.) You could also have a section for cadet suggestions for change because we are the ones in cadets and some cadets around Canada might have REALLY good ideas. And what about a real national cadet kit shop section, with almost anything you can buy at camp and a whole lot more, and at the end of that page, a place where cadets may suggest products? – Cdt Sgt J.R.K. Bergeron Gatineau, QC

Spinning off from a Vancouver millennium project, Portrait V2K, the cadet movement should consider a column in Proud to Be where members are invited to share their relevant stories and photographs to present a portrait/image of who we are today, our memories of the past and our hope for the future. This would help achieve the thrust of the Winter 99 edition — Making ‘Cadets’ a household word. – Capt Don Lim Administration officer 2501 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps Dartmouth, NS Editor: Capt Lim submitted a story for the first column; the story will be printed in our summer issue.

Editor: We have started “What’s your beef?” as a voice for cadets and others in the movement. Suggestions for change are always welcome. Unfortunately, we cannot carry a kit shop section.

Credits update As an update to an article by Capt Linda Hildebrandt on high school credits for training, I would like to give you some information from our province. The Newfoundland and Labrador Division’s proposal to the Department of Education approving sea cadet courses and programs for credit towards high school graduation was approved in early October 1999. If you plan another update on this issue, I would appreciate if (the approved programs and courses) could be included in the article.

39

The Official Publication of the Way-Ahead Process

Your magazine is professional, informative and educational. Congratulations! I look forward to reading future issues. – Brenda Pinto Secretary, Newfoundland Division Navy League of Canada Editor: For details of the approved programs and courses, turn to Capt Hildebrandt’s update on page 28. E


EM2900 DND Cadets Epub(spring)

5/9/00 11:23

Page 40

New bilingualism action team

A

Way-Ahead action team is being created to look at bilingualism in the cadet movement. “Endeavouring to provide more training in both official languages,” was a key activity of the miscellaneous training action team. However, the strategic team decided in February to close down the team. (The leagues will take over the team’s other key activity of promoting recognition of cadet training as optional credits towards graduation in high school.) The miscellaneous training action team conducted a survey last year in cadet summer training centres and found that bilingualism problems do exist, including a lack of bilingual instructors, a lack of documentation in both official languages and extra work for bilingual instructors.

40

Proud To Be

Volume 8

The strategic team’s consensus was that the cadet movement has commitments through the Official Languages Act and must strive to comply as much as possible with them — particularly as they relate to documents. “But there’s a lot more to bilingualism than putting things into two languages,” says Col Rick Hardy, director of cadets. “We need to refocus now.” The new action team will focus on enhancing the bilingual culture in the movement. “Bilingualism should be part of the citizenship program and ingrained in the cadet culture,” says Col Hardy. The new team will look at the practical issues of translation, administration, documentation and ensuring that the

Spring

2000

movement follows the Official Languages act. But it will also identify where francophone and anglophone cadet interaction can be increased in the movement. This could be done through cadet summer training centre activities, inter-provincial cadet exchanges and other cross-cultural cadet activities. Multilingualism in the cadet movement was another topic of discussion for the strategic team. “We can’t ignore it — we’re a community-based program,” said LCol Sam Marcotte, regional cadet officer (Prairie). “If we get bilingualism right, then it gives us the roadmap for multilingualism,” concluded Dave Boudreau, the army league’s national executive director. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 1

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Volume 8, Printemps 2000

Biathlon 2000 Nouveau logo de Cadets Canada Chaussures et chapeaux « cool » Un sondage révèle qu’on connaît peu les cadets

Article vedette :

Le dinosaure des systèmes d’administration

De cadet à premier ministre


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 2

Proud To Be Fiers d’être The official publication La officielle du ofpublication the Way-Ahead Process

processus Choix d’avenir Volume 8 Spring 2000 Volume 8 Printemps 2000

Reconnaissez-vous ce cadet? C’est l’ancien C/cpl Brian Tobin rencontrant le premier ministre Gerald Regan de la Nouvelle-Écosse alors que celui-ci fait l’inspection annuelle du Centre d’instruction d’été des cadets de Greenwood (N.-É.), en 1970. L’ancien cadet est devenu lui-même premier ministre – de Terre-Neuve et du Labrador.

SUR LA COUVERTURE : Le cadet Becky Barton, du Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2137 Calgary Highlanders et un autre cadet (derrière) participent à la compétition féminine de patrouille par équipe au cours du championnat national de biathlon Cadets 2000. Cent huit biathlètes ont pris part aux compétitions qui se sont tenues à Valcartier (Qc), en mars. Les compétiteurs sont normalement au nombre de 116, mais les cadets de la région du Nord ne se sont pas déplacés à cause des Jeux d’hiver de l’Arctique. Outre les cadets, 32 entraîneurs, quelque 60 cadets-cadres de partout au Canada et 60 membres du personnel administratif et de soutien se sont rassemblés pour l’événement.

Dates de tombée des prochains numéros Été 2000 – 5 mai

Automne 2000 – 28 juillet Hiver 2001 – 20 octobre

2

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000

This publication is produced on behalf Cette est produite au of thepublication Canadian Cadet Movement nom du Mouvement des cadets du including Cadets, Cadet Instructor Canada (MCC) incluant les cadets, Cadre, League members, civilian les officiers du CIC, les membres des instructors, sponsors, Regular Ligues des parents, cadets, les instructeurs civils, les les répondants, les Force andparents, Reservists, and other intermembres de laItForce régulière les ested parties. is published byetthe réservistes ainsi que tous les autres Way-Ahead co-ordination cell under membres intéressés. Elle est produite the of the strategic team. par authority la cellule de coordination du Proud To Choix Be serves all individuals processus d’avenir, sous l’autorité de l’équipe stratégique. Fiers interested in change and renewal d’être est untooutil les personnes in relation the pour Canadian Cadet intéressées au changement et au Movement and the Canadian Forces. renouveau au sein du Mouvement Views expressed hereinetdodes notForces necesdes cadets du Canada sarily reflect official opinion policy. canadiennes. Les points deorvue présentés ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions Proud To Be is published four times officielles les politiques. a year. We et welcome submissions of no more than words, as well Fiers d’être est750 publié quatre fois as par photos. We reserve the les right to edit année. Nous acceptons textes de 750submissions mots ou moins, de même les all for length andque style. photographies. Nous nous réservons le droit de modifier la longueur For further information, please et le style des textes. contact the Editor — Marsha Scott. Internet ghscott@netcom.ca Pour plusE-mail: d’information, communiquez avec la rédactrice en chef – Editor, Proud To Be Marsha Scott. Way-Ahead ghscott@netcom.ca Courriel Internet :Process Directorate of Cadets Fiers d’être MGen Pearkes Bldg, NDHQ processus Choix d’avenir 101 Colonel By Dr. DirectionON desK1A cadets Ottawa, 0K2 Édifice Mgén Pearkes, QGDN 101, Promenade Colonel By Toll-free: 1-800-627-0828 Ottawa, ON K1A 0K2 Fax: (613) 992-8956 E-Mail: Téléphonez sans frais : 1-800-627-0828 ad612@issc.debbs.ndhq.dnd.ca Téléc : (613) 992-8956 Courrier Visit our électronique Web site at : ad612@issc.debbs.ndhq.dnd.ca www.vcds.dnd.ca/visioncadets Visitez notre site Internet à : Art Direction: www.vcds.dnd.ca/visioncadets DGPA Creative Services 99CS-0503 Direction artistique : DGAP Services créatifs 99CS-0799


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 3

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Le mot de la rédaction

N

ous sommes en retard! Toutes nos excuses à notre lectorat. Nous avions le choix de publier comme prévu à la fin mars et vous faire attendre à l’été pour traiter de toutes les actualités qui se sont produites en février, ou de retarder la publication jusqu’à la fin avril et vous donner les nouvelles les plus à jour de ce qui s’est passé en février. Cela comprend l’atelier de formation sur le renouveau d’une semaine pour les entraîneurs du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets de partout au pays, la première rencontre de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications et

une rencontre de mise à jour de l’équipe de la stratégie de Choix d’avenir. Au cours de cette rencontre, l’équipe a analysé le rendement des deux dernières années de chaque équipe d’intervention. Ce numéro couvre la progression de chacune des équipes d’intervention de Choix d’avenir. Ce numéro contient tellement d’actualité que nous avons dû remettre la publication de certains articles. C’est le plus gros numéro que nous ayons produit à ce jour et les contributions continuent de pleuvoir. Rappelez-vous toutefois que les articles que vous nous faites parvenir doivent traiter des changements et du

renouveau du Mouvement. Quoique la publication de ce numéro ait été retardée, celle du prochain se fera à la fin juin comme prévu et sera distribuée aux centres d’instruction d’été des cadets. Nous aimerions saisir cette occasion pour remercier Brian Tobin, le premier ministre de Terre-Neuve et du Labrador, pour avoir accepté d’être interviewé malgré un calendrier chargé. Il est un modèle pour tout cadet (ou aspirant cadet) de ce pays. Il affiche les qualités de leadership et de civisme hautement reconnues par le Mouvement des cadets du Canada. E

Dans ce numéro Article vedette Un cadet devenu premier ministre – Brian Tobin, premier ministre de Terre-Neuve et du Labrador, a déjà été cadet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Nouvelles de Choix d’avenir Mot de la direction : Faire bouger l’éléphant . . . . . . . 8 Le dinosaure des systèmes d’administration. . . . . . . . 13 Renouveau en matière de formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Adieu à l’équipe d’intervention responsable du système d’information électronique. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

À vous la parole : Les cadets – la génération des Pokemon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Échos du milieu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Quoi de neuf? Nouveau logo de Cadets Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 La grande priorité : réduire le fardeau administratif . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Notes au sujet du site Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Réunion mémorable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Vivement l’équipe responsable du partenariat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Site Web des cadets de la région des Prairies gagnant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Mesurer le rendement des équipes d’intervention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Un sondage révèle qu’on connaît peu les cadets . . . . 29

Sources inattendues de solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Nouvelle équipe d’intervention sur le bilinguisme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Nouvelles des Ligues Améliorations impressionnantes, mais déconcertantes (Ligue des cadets de l’Air du Canada) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Assurer l’avenir (Ligue navale du Canada) . . . . . . . . . 24

3

Opinions Qu’est-ce qui vous tracasse? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Une solution efficace à 80 p. 100? (La nouvelle Direction des cadets) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Affaires de cadets Chaussures de basket « cool » et chapeaux genre Tilley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Coin des cadets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Nouveaux crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Civisme et football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

Un

5/9/00 10:36

Page 4

cadet

devenu

par Marsha Scott

L

e nom de Brian Tobin peut évoquer bien des choses. Certains y voient le premier ministre de Terre-Neuve et du Labrador qui, avec d’autres premiers ministres, lutte pour préserver le système de santé du Canada. Pour d’autres, ce nom évoque celui de l’ancien ministre fédéral des Pêches et des Océans qui s’est attiré des louanges partout au pays à l’occasion d’un différend entre le Canada et l’Espagne au sujet de la pêche au flétan noir juste au-delà de la limite des eaux territoriales. Certains se rappelleront même l’homme qui a été élu à la Chambre des communes à l’âge de 25 ans. Rares sont ceux, toutefois, qui penseront à l’ancien cadet Brian Tobin. Pourtant le premier ministre Tobin a été cadet. En fait, il pense que son action aujourd’hui a en partie été modelée par son passage dans le Mouvement des cadets. Malgré un horaire très chargé, le premier ministre Tobin a consenti à donner une entrevue à Fiers d’être parce qu’il croit que les cadets offrent une expérience de premier ordre. L’entrevue initiale a dû être reportée à cause d’une manifestation de camionneurs à Terre-Neuve, mais le premier ministre a trouvé le temps deux jours plus tard – alors qu’il attendait le dévoilement du budget fédéral à Ottawa – de nous appeler et de nous dire ce qu’il pense du Mouvement.

choses que j’ai apprises chez les cadets », explique-t-il. Il admet cependant qu’il ne fait plus son lit, ce qui est malheureux, croit-il, parce que les normes des hôtels ne sont pas à la hauteur de celles des cadets. Pour parler plus sérieusement, M. Tobin est un leader et un citoyen hors du commun – un modèle pour les cadets d’aujourd’hui. « Les jeunes du Canada devraient prendre conscience des possibilités fantastiques qui s’offrent à eux et en profiter au maximum, affirme le premier ministre. Les cadets ne sont pas une organisation militaire – remarquez que je n’ai rien contre les militaires. Les cadets visent seulement à aider les jeunes à développer pleinement leur potentiel et à devenir de bons citoyens. »

Quelques minutes avant d’appeler, a-t-il déclaré, il finissait de repasser la chemise qu’il allait porter pour la présentation du budget. « Quand je voyage, je n’ai pas perdu l’habitude de repasser moi-même mes chemises et je fais encore des

4

Printemps

Volume 8

redevable non seulement envers mon escadron, mais aussi envers toute la collectivité. » « Les cadets visent seule-

Brian Tobin a découvert les cadets quand il avait 14 ans et qu’il résidait à Goose Bay (Labrador). Son père travaillait comme employé civil pour la U.S. Air Force, à Happy Valley – l’endroit où se fait actuellement l’entraînement aux vols à basse altitude de membres de forces aériennes de tous les coins du monde. Il a été recruté dans l’Escadron (réactivé) des Cadets de l’Air 764, à Happy Valley, par son nouveau commandant (NOM). Brian est resté près de trois ans dans les cadets. L’un des événements marquants de cette période a été son séjour au camp des cadets de Greenwood (N.-É.). « Ce fut une occasion formidable de voyager, de rencontrer des jeunes de tout le pays et de faire partie d’une équipe, dans un milieu discipliné, explique M. Tobin. Il est important

Fiers d’être

« J’ai appris que j’étais

2000

ment à aider les jeunes à développer pleinement leur potentiel et à devenir de bons citoyens. »

– Brian Tobin,premier ministre de Terre-Neuve et du Labrador. (photo de Greg Locke)


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 5

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

premier ministre d’apprendre et de se développer dans une atmosphère d’autodiscipline – en ce qui me concerne, c’est la chose la plus importante que j’ai retenue des cadets ». M. Tobin ne garde pas vraiment de mauvais souvenirs de son expérience comme cadet, si ce n’est qu’il a dû s’habituer – comme bien des cadets – à être loin de sa famille quand il allait au camp d’été. Pourtant, il se rappelle avoir senti un vide à son retour à la maison. « La structure, le fait qu’on me dise quoi faire et, en particulier, la camaraderie me manquaient. »

à sa deuxième année dans l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 515, à St. John’s (T.-N.).

Selon son père, Jack est entré dans les cadets de l’Air de son plein gré, après être allé voir ce qu’il en était avec un ami. « Il est probablement un meilleur cadet que je ne l’étais moi-même. Jack et un autre cadet ont été choisis comme meilleurs cadets de première année. » « Comme moi, il est plein d’énergie et d’enthousiasme, et il prend son expérience à cœur, indique le premier

ministre. Il fait partie de l’équipe de drill et il adore cela. C’est une merveilleuse occasion pour lui d’apprendre l’autodiscipline dans une organisation disciplinée et cohérente. Ce sera pour lui une occasion formidable de s’épanouir et d’apprendre. » Si, comme le déclare M. Tobin, les cadets « aident les jeunes à développer pleinement leur potentiel et à devenir de bons citoyens », Jack est sur la bonne voie. Peut-être deviendra-t-il comme son père un cadet qui fera parler de lui. E

Le civisme et le leadership occupaient une place aussi importante dans le programme des cadets qu’aujourd’hui. « On m’a poussé à jouer des rôles de commandement assez tôt, et j’ai appris que le fait de commander ne faisait pas de moi un leader, déclare le premier ministre Tobin. J’ai dû faire preuve de leadership – et être prêt à penser à mon équipe avant moi-même – pour que mon équipe excelle. Ce fut une expérience très révélatrice dont les leçons me profitent encore aujourd’hui. » En obéissant aux autorités, en montant en grade et en faisant ce qu’on attendait de lui, il a compris le principe du mérite. « J’ai appris que, dans la vie, il faut gagner ses galons. J’ai appris que les choses ne tombent pas du ciel et qu’on récolte autant qu’on a semé. » Il a aussi appris qu’il était redevable non seulement envers son escadron, mais aussi envers toute la collectivité – ce dont le Canada peut lui être reconnaissant aujourd’hui. Le fils du premier ministre Tobin est aussi un cadet. Jack, 13 ans, en est

5

Le premier ministre Tobin inspecte l’Escadron des Cadets de l’Air 515 North Atlantic – l’escadron dont fait partie son fils Jack.

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 6

Nouveau logo de Cadets Canada

V

ous savez tous ce qu’est un produit de marque. Mais vous êtes-vous déjà interrogé sur ce qui vous pousse à acheter des produits de marque? Toute l’affaire se résume à une question de marketing et d’image.

Et le nouveau logo du Mouvement des cadets du Canada (MCC) est précisément une affaire d’image. Nous commencerons à mettre en valeur une toute nouvelle image des cadets pour le nouveau millénaire parce que nous voulons que les Canadiens se rallient au MCC et y voient le grand mouvement de jeunesse national qu’il est. Le nouveau logo est un aspect important du « conditionnement » qui, nous l’espérons, aidera à rendre familier le terme « Cadets » partout au Canada. D’ailleurs, l’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications et la cellule des communications de la Direction des cadets commenceront bientôt à « vendre » le nouveau logo. Le logo sera utilisé sur des autocollants et dans des sites Web, des expositions et une foule de moyens de communication généraux.

D’où le nouveau logo vient-il donc? Pourquoi a-t-on créé un nouveau logo alors que les divers partenaires du MCC ont déjà à leur disposition une dizaine d’emblèmes et de logos? En fait, c’est vous qui l’avez demandé. En 1997, Choix d’avenir a recommandé qu’on adopte un emblème ou un logo unique pour dissiper toute confusion quant à l’image des cadets. Tous se sont entendus pour dire qu’il y avait trop d’emblèmes et de logos en circulation et que cela embrouillait les choses. Jusqu’ici, les emblèmes des ligues, du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets, des FC et d’autres organisations ainsi que les logos de Cadets du Canada à l’œuvre, du Programme Initiatives Jeunesse et du Millénaire se sont disputés l’attention des Canadiens, et l’on a fini par perdre de vue l’image du MCC. Nous avons donc un nouveau logo « Cadets Canada » qui témoigne de l’unité du Mouvement et nous espérons que les Canadiens le garderont en mémoire. Le nouveau logo ne se substituera pas aux autres emblèmes et logos en usage. Parfois, on l’utilisera en même

Le nouveau logo de Cadets Canada sera visible partout, à partir des autocollants et des sites Web jusqu’aux nouvelles chaussures de basket. (Photo par le lt Stéphanie Sirois)

6

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000

temps que ceux-ci. Toutefois, le nouveau logo dominera dans les communications nationales et les campagnes de promotion sur les cadets en général, alors que les autres emblèmes domineront dans les communications relatives à des éléments particuliers des cadets. « Nous espérons que le logo plaira à tous les membres du MCC et nous en encouragerons l’utilisation », déclare Stéphane Ippersiel, responsable des communications de la Direction des cadets. « Nous ne pouvons cependant obliger personne à l’utiliser. » Pourquoi les cadets n’ont-ils pas contribué à la conception du logo? Ce qui plaît à des personnes de l’intérieur du Mouvement ne plaît pas nécessairement au grand public. Par exemple, les symboles héraldiques peuvent être fort évocateurs pour les membres du MCC, mais dénués de sens pour le grand public. De plus, le logo devait satisfaire à des exigences techniques strictes auxquelles seuls des spécialistes du design étaient en mesure de satisfaire. Le dessin final


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 7

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

est net et précis, et les termes « Cadets » et « Canada » indiquent clairement ce qu’il représente. Le processus de sélection d’un logo a commencé en juillet par des consultations internes; ces consultations ont été suivies d’un concours de design. À la mi-août, quatre bureaux de design avaient présenté au total 27 logos (il y avait en fait 15 modèles distincts accompagnés de termes différents). Les quelques semaines qui ont suivi ont été consacrées à une consultation de la Direction des cadets, des ligues, du personnel régional et de quelques équipes d’intervention de Choix d’avenir. Les logos ont en même temps été diffusés sur le site Web national pour faire l’objet d’un vote. Six cents votes ont été exprimés, et l’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications de Choix d’avenir a retenu trois finalistes. Restait le test décisif. Les trois meilleurs logos ont alors été soumis à

7

six groupes cibles de Montréal et Toronto. Dans chaque ville, on a formé un groupe d’adultes, un groupe de jeunes et un groupe de cadets. À la fin de ce processus transparent, le Mouvement disposait d’un logo simple qui, de l’avis des groupes cibles, associe les cadets à une organisation nationale jeune, vivante, dynamique et tournée vers l’avenir. En octobre dernier, l’équipe de la stratégie de Choix d’avenir a approuvé le logo et l’appellation « Cadets Canada ». Cette décision s’appuyait sur les votes recueillis dans le processus de sélection du logo et sur des recherches ultérieures qui ont montré que « Cadets Canada » est mieux accepté et mieux compris que l’appellation

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

« Mouvement des cadets du Canada », plus lourde. La nouvelle appellation présente aussi l’avantage d’être bilingue. Il ne reste plus qu’à faire connaître le nouveau logo. Le bureau de design gagnant a préparé à cette fin des directives d’utilisation du logo qui seront réunies dans un guide de présentation graphique. Le guide est disponible sur le site Web national; on y trouvera des renseignements sur les critères et les conditions d’utilisation du logo, les choses à éviter, les tailles à employer, les couleurs, etc. Le site Web présente aussi le logo sous divers formats électroniques dans divers modèles et exemples de documents – y compris des documents qui portent l’emblème de chacun des éléments. – Ne manquez pas le nouveau logo national : bientôt dans une unité près de chez vous! E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 8

Mot de la direction

Faire bouger l’éléphant par le col Rick Hardy

E

ssayer de faire changer une organisation aussi considérable, diverse et étendue que le Mouvement des cadets du Canada, c’est un peu comme tenter de faire bouger un éléphant. Cela demande beaucoup d’énergie, d’efforts et de travail en équipe; mais une fois que l’animal est en marche, rien ne peut l’arrêter. Avons-nous réussi à faire bouger l’éléphant? Avant de répondre, j’aimerais faire quelques remerciements.

L’avenir de Choix d’avenir Un seul mot suffit à résumer la voie de l’avenir : l’engagement. Nous poursuivrons notre programme de renouveau parce que la politique de défense prévoit que toute organisation doit se donner un programme de changement et de renouveau. Nous poursuivrons surtout notre programme de changement parce que nous changerons de toute façon. Nous pouvons diriger le changement ou nous le faire imposer. Le programme des cadets a ceci de remarquable que nous avons décidé d’orienter nous-mêmes le changement.

J’aimerais tout d’abord remercier les membres de l’équipe de la stratégie de Choix d’avenir, qui ont travaillé ferme pour s’attaquer au renouvellement d’un programme aussi « Choix d’avenir considérable – qui dépasse tout ce qu’on nous a aussi donné connaît au Canada, si la possibilité de l’on songe à la taille du Mouvement des cadets, parler au nom d’un à sa diversité et à sa disgrand nombre. » persion géographique.

Diriger nous-mêmes le changement Conscient de sa stagnation et des problèmes qui s’étaient accumulés au fil des ans, le Mouvement a résolument cherché à s’améliorer. L’étude

J’aimerais aussi remercier les membres – anciens et actuels – de l’équipe de coordination pour les efforts colossaux qu’ils ont faits pour relever des défis incroyables.

du Service d’examen de 1995, le processus Choix d’avenir de 1997, les Initiatives jeunesse de 1998, l’étude de Price Waterhouse Cooper de 1999 et, plus récemment, l’Examen de la modernisation de la gestion et de la fonction de contrôleur en témoignent. (Voir l’article de la page 12.) Nous avons d’ailleurs dressé une liste d’études, de rapports et d’environ 200 recommandations sur notre site Web national, sachant que nous devions faire quelque chose.

Mesure du rendement Fin février, Choix d’avenir a mesuré son rendement après plus de deux ans d’existence au cours desquelles on y a consacré des centaines de milliers de dollars et des milliers d’heures de travail. Selon moi, Choix d’avenir est une réussite. Ce que nous avons accompli sur le plan stratégique – et que je peux constater et apprécier quotidiennement – est difficile à expliquer à des personnes sur le terrain qui n’ont pas encore vu concrètement ce qui s’est produit. Je suis néanmoins prêt à démontrer à n’importe quel auditoire que nous avons réussi. Et j’entrevois notre avenir avec enthousiasme.

Un climat de changement Je sais que nous faisons souvent preuve de pessimisme envers notre pays; pourtant, nous vivons dans le meilleur pays du monde. De la même manière, nous ne savons pas apprécier

J’aimerais par-dessus tout remercier les équipes d’intervention, qui se sont engagées physiquement, financièrement et émotivement à résoudre des questions d’une telle complexité. Transmettez mes remerciements à tous les intervenants qui ont manifesté leur soutien et leur intérêt, fût-ce parfois par des critiques. Essayer de faire changer une organisation aussi considérable, diverse et étendue que le Mouvement des cadets du Canada, c’est un peu comme tenter de faire bouger un éléphant.

8

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 9

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

« Nous avons apporté des améliorations spectaculaires et nous avons fait plus en un an et demi qu’au cours de la décennie qui vient de s’écouler. » le caractère formidable de l’Organisation des cadets. À mon avis, Choix d’avenir a suscité un climat d’acceptation du changement au sein du Mouvement. Nous sommes maintenant prêts à envisager de faire les choses différemment. Nous sommes maintenant enthousiasmés à la perspective d’avancer de nouvelles idées. Je ne crois pas qu’il en était ainsi il y a trois ans. Choix d’avenir a joué un rôle catalyseur, et bien des choses se sont réalisées – au-delà du programme même. Dans un climat différent, des choses comme la présentation de trois exposés devant le Conseil des Forces armées, la création d’une cellule des communications au sein de la Direction des cadets et l’examen du comité de l’infrastructure, pour ne donner que quelques exemples, ne se seraient jamais réalisées.

Une voix qui se fait entendre Choix d’avenir nous a aussi donné la possibilité de parler au nom d’un grand nombre. Il m’a permis de représenter les 60 000 membres en uniformes du Mouvement, ainsi qu’au 500 000 bénévoles, membres de comités de parents, membres de comités de commanditaires, mères, pères, frères, sœurs, tantes et oncles. Quand il m’a été donné d’expliquer au Conseil des Forces armées que nous avions besoin d’un plus grand soutien des FC, j’ai pu dire que je parlais au nom d’un demi-million de Canadiens, et ma voix a été entendue.

9

Nous avons apporté des améliorations spectaculaires et lancé de nombreux projets. Il est maintenant presque banal de dire que nous avons fait plus en un an et demi qu’au cours de la décennie qui vient de s’écouler. Cela tient à l’existence d’un climat de changement et d’une voix qui se fait entendre.

Tests décisifs À mon avis, deux tests décisifs peuvent nous permettre de mesurer le succès de Choix d’avenir. Le premier consiste à nous poser la question suivante : « Si des membres du Mouvement des cadets se réunissaient aujourd’hui pour la première fois et essayaient de dresser une liste de problèmes de longue date nécessitant des changements, combien subsisteraitil de questions parmi les 113 recensées à l’origine en 1997? ». Le second consiste à nous demander si nous avons réussi à devenir une organisation intelligente et capable de s’autorenouveler continuellement. • Pouvons-nous apprendre autant – voire davantage – de nos échecs que de nos succès? • Avons-nous oublié l’adage selon lequel il ne faut pas tenter de réparer ce qui n’est pas brisé? Réexaminonsnous périodiquement nos systèmes, nos pratiques et nos procédures pour voir s’ils remplissent toujours bien leur rôle? • Avons-nous appris à travailler en équipe afin que les membres de notre organisation puissent échanger et mettre en commun des connaissances? Avons-nous appris l’art de poser des questions?

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

• Savons-nous faire circuler les connaissances d’un secteur à l’autre de l’organisation? • Savons-nous chercher des connaissances à l’extérieur de notre propre secteur? En appliquant ces indicateurs, il est facile de constater que Choix d’avenir a été une réussite. Quand l’équipe de la stratégie s’est réunie à la fin de février, nous avons fait un bilan du travail accompli, de ce qui a marché, de ce qui n’a pas marché et des possibilités de réussite de certaines des tâches que nous avions confiées aux membres des équipes d’intervention. À mon avis, il n’y a pas eu d’échecs. Seuls échouent ceux qui n’apprennent pas ou qui n’essaient pas d’apprendre. Il nous reste maintenant à tirer parti des leçons retenues et à nous occuper de ce qui reste à faire. Dans la prochaine étape, la cellule de coordination de Choix d’avenir sera intégrée à la Direction des cadets. Fiers d’être continuera de paraître. Certaines équipes d’intervention seront dissoutes, mais de nouvelles seront créées. Et l’équipe de la stratégie s’analysera attentivement pour s’assurer que sa composition répond bien aux besoins de l’année qui vient. Au moment de définir des possibilités d’avenir, la seule certitude que nous avons est notre engagement inconditionnel envers le changement et le renouveau. Dans l’année qui vient, nous continuerons de tirer des leçons de ce qui a marché et de ce qui n’a pas marché et de faire les changements voulus pour que Choix d’avenir soit véritablement la voie de l’avenir. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 10

A m é l i o r a t i o n s i m p re s s i o n n a n t e s , mais déconcertantes — Point de vue d’un membre d’une ligue par le mgén (retraité) Lionel Bourgeois de prévention du harcèlement et de l’abus des cadets, recrutement des cadets, amélioration de l’image du Mouvement et application des technologies de l’information. Les améliorations et l’activité qui résultent de Choix d’avenir ont été impressionnantes; pour certains membres de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air, elles ont aussi été déconcertantes. En quoi? Le mgén (retraité) Lionel Bourgeois.

É

tant membre depuis deux ans de l’équipe de la stratégie et m’étant récemment joint au groupe de travail sur les communications nationales des cadets, j’ai pu constater que Choix d’avenir avait eu de bons et de mauvais effets.

Dans l’ensemble, on a pris de très bonnes mesures pour améliorer l’image et les activités du Mouvement des cadets. Malheureusement, certaines de ces mesures obligeront peut-être les ligues à renoncer à des responsabilités de vieille date, et d’autres ont été adoptées sans avoir été bien communiquées aux ligues.

Les communications ont parfois laissé à désirer, principalement à cause d’un manque de connaissance de la structure et des centres de décision de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air. Ainsi, il est souvent arrivé que des équipes d’intervention mettent en application des décisions sans que certaines autorités de la Ligue aient donné leur approbation et même en aient été informées.

Choix d’avenir est arrivé à un bon moment pour le ministère de la Défense nationale (MDN). Le programme Initiatives jeunesse et d’autres programmes disposaient d’assez d’argent pour payer les déplacements et les réunions nécessaires, et l’on a trouvé l’argent voulu pour donner suite à de nombreux projets. Choix d’avenir a aussi coïncidé avec d’importants changements dans divers domaines : recrutement des officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC), création du programme

L’adoption du nouveau logo des Cadets en fournit un bon exemple. Il s’agit là d’un projet formidable, et le produit final est très satisfaisant. Le problème est qu’il a pris par surprise de nombreux membres de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air qui avaient des réserves à formuler au sujet de son utilisation et de son incidence éventuelle sur la campagne de financement, le recrutement et l’image de la Ligue. Il sera tenu compte de ces préoccupations dans les directives sur l’utilisation du logo; on aurait pu toutefois éviter un refus initial en prévoyant de meilleures communications et en tenant compte du fait que les ligues sont constituées de 34 sociétés sans but lucratif qui n’ont pas de liens hiérarchiques. Il faut beaucoup de temps et d’efforts

10

Printemps

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

2000

pour bien informer des organismes bénévoles aussi disparates qui ne se rencontrent que de temps en temps. Pour ce qui est de la réduction des responsabilités des ligues, le MDN consacre actuellement temps et argent à améliorer le recrutement et l’image des Cadets, ainsi que les relations publiques et la publicité payée. Même si cette mesure est nécessaire, elle risque de faire perdre en permanence aux ligues des responsabilités qu’elles ont toujours eues – le partenariat penchant encore davantage du côté du MDN. À une époque où les mouvements bénévoles du Canada ont tous de la difficulté à recruter des adultes, cette réduction des responsabilités de la Ligue risque d’en diminuer encore l’intérêt pour les membres actuels et d’éventuels candidats. Malgré tout, je crois que Choix d’avenir a amorcé un processus de consultation dynamique qui donnera lieu à de grandes améliorations dans le domaine des technologies de l’information, des communications, de l’instruction et de la politique relative au CIC et aux instructeurs civils. Restent à venir la réduction du fardeau administratif, l’amélioration de la structure, du commandement et du contrôle et, par-dessus tout, la création d’un meilleur partenariat. Oui, je suis « fier d’être » associé à Choix d’avenir. – M. Bourgeois coordonne les relations publiques de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 11

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Chaussures de basket « cool » e t c h a p e a u x g e n r e Ti l l e y «

S

’il nous faut des vêtements Roots ou Gap, nous en achèterons », déclare le capt Chris DeMerchant, officier de la logistique de la Direction des cadets responsable de l’habillement des cadets. « Nos vêtements doivent répondre à nos besoins en matière d’instruction, mais ils doivent aussi attirer les jeunes. Heureusement, quand il s’agit d’habiller 55 000 cadets, nous pouvons obtenir de bons prix. »

Le capt DeMerchant est membre du groupe de travail chargé de repenser l’habillement et l’équipement des cadets. Formé d’officiers de la logistique, de responsables de l’instruction de la Direction des cadets, d’experts techniques et de personnes responsables de la politique d’habillement et d’équipement des FC, le groupe s’est réuni en mars pour échanger des idées sur l’habillement des cadets de demain et planifier son travail de l’année. Les membres du groupe de travail recueilleront des renseignements auprès de cadets et d’officiers et feront rapport au conseil d’examen (le Directeur des cadets, des officiers régionaux des cadets et des représentants des ligues) au début de l’an prochain. Dans l’intervalle, le programme d’habillement des cadets avance. Le financement du programme a été approuvé, et la prochaine étape – l’achat de manteaux toutes saisons – a été autorisée. Même si le feu vert final doit être donné par le conseil de gestion du projet, le capt DeMerchant prévoit que les cadets porteront tous le nouveau manteau – qui remplacera la gabardine actuelle – cette année ou l’an prochain.

11

Mais cela n’est pas tout. Les cadets recevront un nouveau chapeau à bord large genre Tilley en remplacement de la casquette de base-ball. Les commandants d’unité pourront commander les chapeaux pendant la prochaine année d’instruction, avec les autres articles qui font partie de la tenue d’instruction standard des cadets. Les cadets recevront aussi des chaussures de basket tout à fait « cool » dans les centres d’instruction cet été et dans les unités locales par la suite. Comme les nouveaux t-shirts et les nouveaux shorts d’athlétisme distribués l’an dernier, les nouvelles chaussures feront partie de l’habillement réglementaire. « Nous prévoyons beaucoup de changements dans la façon d’habiller les cadets, affirme le capt DeMerchant. Dans les années qui viennent, la distribution des vêtements ne se fera plus dans les centres d’instruction d’été, mais dans les unités locales. Nous avons fini de stocker des vêtements. » Le programme d’habillement des cadets prévoit aussi le remplacement des vêtements opérationnels des cadets (l’uniforme adapté). « Pour l’instant, nous en sommes seulement à l’étape d’élaboration du

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

projet, soutient le capt DeMerchant. Nous prévoyons cependant faire porter les nouveaux modèles d’uniforme à un certain nombre de cadets dans divers centres d’instruction d’été pour recueillir des commentaires à leur sujet, dès cet été. « Le point de vue des cadets est important, explique-t-il. Nous voulons que des cadets parlent à des cadets. » Le groupe de travail doit aussi mener une enquête auprès des cadets pour se renseigner sur leurs besoins en matière de vêtements opérationnels. « Nous comptons beaucoup sur leur participation, indique le capt DeMerchant. Nous voulons avoir la certitude qu’ils obtiennent les vêtements qui conviennent. » E

Les casquettes de base-ball seront remplacées par des chapeaux genre Tilley, comme celui-ci, porté par un cadet au centre d’instruction d’été de Cochrane (Alb.), l’été dernier.

Le cadet de l’Air de 1re classe Éric Lavoie, de l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 832 Ottawa-Twillick, à Ottawa, essaie les nouvelles chaussures de basket « super cool » qui seront distribuées dans les centres d’instruction d’été des cadets cette année. (Photo du lt Stéphanie Sirois)


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:36

Page 12

La grande priorité : réduire le fardeau administratif

S

elon les responsables de l’Examen de la modernisation de la gestion et de la fonction de contrôleur du programme des cadets, « la grande priorité du programme des cadets devrait consister à réduire le fardeau administratif, de façon que le personnel du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) puisse consacrer plus de temps à l’exécution du programme ». Le col Rick Hardy, directeur des Cadets à Ottawa, abonde dans le même sens. « Cela est absolument essentiel. Le fardeau administratif que nous avons imposé à nos corps et à nos escadrons est inacceptable, et nous allons le réduire! » La réduction du fardeau administratif est évoquée depuis si longtemps que beaucoup croient qu’elle ne se fera jamais. Selon le col Hardy, toutefois, elle se concrétisera. L’élément déclencheur a été l’examen dont les résultats ont été communiqués en mars. Le vam Gary Garnett, vice-chef d’état-major de la Défense, a commandé l’étude en octobre dernier, pour faire évaluer l’efficacité des pratiques de gestion et de la fonction de contrôleur dans l’Organisation des cadets. L’objectif consistait à recommander des moyens de réduire le fardeau administratif des corps sans porter préjudice au principe de la diligence raisonnable. Formée d’experts des activités des cadets, des ressources humaines, du matériel, des finances et des politiques connexes, l’équipe d’examen a consulté des groupes de discussion dans cinq régions avant de formuler ses recommandations qui ont été endossées par l’état-major de la Défense. Les personnes chargées de concrétiser les changements doivent préparer des plans d’action d’ici le 15 mai.

12

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Pour prendre connaissance des recommandations, consultez le site Web national du CIC. Une annexe de 12 pages au rapport décrit les conséquences administratives d’une foule de facteurs allant de la pénurie d’officiers du CIC aux exigences de formation qui leur sont imposées. Des solutions à chaque problème sont proposées. Par exemple, pour accélérer le recrutement d’officiers du CIC, il est proposé que l’on ait recours aux Centres de recrutement des FC là où cela serait avantageux. Le rapport recommande aussi qu’on fasse une étude pour reconnaître les obstructions. « Il y a trop de documents de référence au niveau des QG locaux » et, pour résoudre le problème, le rapport recommande que les Ordonnances sur l’administration et l’instruction des cadets (OAIC) soient réservées aux directives d’orientation et qu’on y ajoute – au besoin seulement – des ordonnances régionales qui serviront de directives d’application. Ces documents pourraient tous être réunis dans un seul ouvrage de référence, les ordonnances régionales venant après les OAIC utiles. Pour alléger le fardeau administratif que représente la rémunération des officiers du CIC, l’équipe d’examen a recommandé différentes méthodes de rémunération comme une rétribution mensuelle ou annuelle. Les conséquences juridiques d’une telle décision restent à être confirmées. L’équipe d’examen a aussi fait les recommandations suivantes : • La Direction des cadets devrait, en collaboration avec les régions, accélérer l’informatisation de l’administration des unités. (À l’heure

Printemps

2000

actuelle, l’informatisation est faite dans les bureaux régionaux et les détachements, mais le processus est plus lent dans les unités. L’informatisation est pour ainsi dire terminée dans la région du Centre.) • Les régions devraient former tous les ans des groupes de discussion du CIC pour trouver des moyens de réduire le fardeau administratif des unités sans compromettre le respect du principe de la diligence raisonnable. (Les problèmes qui relèvent de la compétence des régions pourraient être réglés immédiatement, et les autres pourraient être soumis à l’attention de la Direction des cadets.) • La question de la réduction du fardeau administratif des unités (dans le respect du principe de la diligence raisonnable) devrait toujours être inscrite à l’ordre du jour de la conférence nationale des officiers des cadets des régions. (Les suggestions des groupes de discussion et de la Direction des cadets pourraient être examinées pendant la conférence.) Selon le col Hardy, le travail de l’équipe d’intervention responsable de la rationalisation des pratiques administratives de Choix d’avenir cadre parfaitement avec l’examen. L’équipe d’intervention n’a pas à trouver de solutions aux problèmes. Selon l’un des membres de l’équipe responsable de la stratégie, toutefois, l’équipe d’intervention devrait jouer un rôle consultatif qui contribuera à améliorer le système administratif. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 13

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Le dinosaure des systèmes d’administration

L

e co-chef de l’équipe d’intervention responsable de la rationalisation des pratiques administratives, le capc Brent Newsome arborait un large sourire à la fin de la réunion de l’équipe de la stratégie, en février dernier.

Pourquoi? Parce que le Mouvement des cadets s’oriente vers un système d’administration unique des unités locales. Les corps/escadrons utiliseront les mêmes formules, où qu’ils se trouvent et quel que soit leur élément d’appartenance – Marine, Armée ou Air. Il s’agit là pour l’équipe d’une grande victoire. « Si les officiers régionaux des cadets ne s’étaient pas entendus sur l’unification des pratiques administratives des unités, nous n’aurions rien pu uniformiser, affirme le capc Newsome. L’obstacle était de taille. Notre équipe n’aurait jamais pu aller de l’avant sans cette décision. » Selon le chef de l’équipe d’intervention, il existe six systèmes d’administration régionaux différents, et chaque détachement régional a sa propre façon de faire. « Les répétitions et les chevauchements de toute nature accroissent la charge de travail des unités », ajoute-t-il. Il admet que la question de la réduction du fardeau administratif est plus qu’éléphantesque. « Qu’est-ce qui est plus gros qu’un éléphant? demande-t-il. Un dinosaure. S’agissant du système d’administration du Mouvement, l’analogie est bonne. » La tâche de l’équipe consistera maintenant à commenter les recommandations de l’Examen de la modernisation de la gestion et de la fonction de contrôleur, dont les résultats ont été diffusés en mars. « Nous examinerons les retombées de ces recommandations sur les corps et les

13

Le C/sgt Stephen Wellsby (à gauche) et le C/adj 2 Max Burke, de l’Escadron des cadets de l’Air 692 Air Canada, à Richmond (C.-B.) se familiarisent avec CADETNET, le réseau Internet des cadets. Des formules électroniques communes à toutes les unités seront bientôt disponibles sur le réseau. (Photo par le maj Steve Deschamps)

escadrons, déclare le capc Newsome. Il se peut même que nous fassions des recommandations qui iront plus loin encore. » L’équipe d’intervention continuera de déterminer les besoins administratifs communs des unités locales. Quand ces besoins auront été définis, des formules standard seront diffusées sous forme électronique sur le CADETNET – le réseau Internet des cadets. L’équipe est aussi à définir les attributions des officiers d’administration des unités. Lors de la réunion de l’équipe de la stratégie, la Direction des cadets s’est engagée à soutenir plus étroitement l’équipe d’intervention responsable de la rationalisation des pratiques administratives. Les membres des ligues seront aussi invités à travailler avec l’équipe, puisque les exigences administratives des ligues augmentent le fardeau administratif des unités locales.

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

L’équipe de la stratégie a établi que les régions et le niveau national ne devaient plus imposer de travaux d’écriture aux corps et aux escadrons. « Nous nous sommes déchargés trop longtemps de certains travaux d’écriture sur les corps et les escadrons », a déclaré le lcol Sam Marcotte, officier régional des cadets (Prairies). « Cela doit cesser. »

« Nous devons nous demander si nous avons vraiment besoin d’autant de contrôles et de vérifications. Nous devons supprimer les sources de ralentissement. Nous ne voulons pas de paperasserie administrative », ajoute le capf Murray Wylie, officier régional des cadets (Atlantique) E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 14

Notes au sujet du site Web

S

i vous n’avez pas récemment consulté le site Web national des cadets (www.cadets.dnd.ca), une surprise vous attend. Le maj Guy Peterson, ancien responsable du site, y a ajouté plusieurs nouveaux « outils » intéressants. Ces outils sont un bottin national des unités de cadets ainsi que des liens à divers forums qui permettent aux cadets, aux officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) et à d’autres de bavarder ou d’échanger des renseignements en ligne. Le nouveau bottin a connu un énorme succès. « C’est un outil fantastique », selon le maj Peterson, à qui l’on vient de confier le nouveau poste de coordonnateur de la gestion de l’information et des technologies de l’information de la Direction des cadets, à Ottawa. « Les gens l’utilisent et nous écrivent pour nous remercier. Le bottin a répondu à un réel besoin. Nous y travaillions depuis quelque temps déjà, et les utilisateurs sont satisfaits des résultats. »

Pour avoir accès au bottin, il suffit de cliquer sur le bouton Bottin national du site Web. « Les visiteurs peuvent faire une recherche par province et par ville,

14

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

explique le maj Peterson. Nous avons préféré cette façon de faire à l’utilisation du nom et du numéro de l’unité, afin que les recrues éventuelles puissent facilement trouver l’unité de cadets la plus proche. » Les visiteurs qui connaissent le numéro d’un corps peuvent chercher les renseignements dont ils ont besoin dans une autre fenêtre de recherche. Le bottin donne l’adresse Le capt Al Harland, coordonnateur de la formation par postale, l’adresse d’instruction l’aventure de la région du Pacifique, consulte une OAIC (si celle-ci diffère de l’adresse en ligne sur le site Web national de Cadre des instrucpostale) ainsi que le numéro teurs de cadets (www.vcds.dnd.ca/cic). de téléphone de chaque unité. Bientôt, il y aura aussi un lien ressources voulues pour gérer un forum avec les sites Web des corps/escadrons national. Il a donc opté pour la meilleure qui ont été officiellement approuvés solution qui restait : offrir des liens avec par les QG régionaux et leur adresse des forums en ligne qui sont bien admiélectronique. nistrés par des membres du Mouvement des cadets. À l’heure actuelle, le site Web Le bottin attire beaucoup de jeunes qui national fournit un lien avec Cadet World essaient de trouver le nom et le numéro Forums, dont s’occupe le slt Ryan Sales, d’unités locales. D’autres l’utilisent aussi. officier du CIC à Edmonton. (Pour en « Je reçois quotidiennement des courriels savoir plus, voir l’article de la page 25.) de commandants qui essaient de garder les renseignements à jour », affirme le maj Autre nouveauté, le personnel des corps/ Peterson. Le bottin est en liaison directe escadrons peut maintenant consulter les avec la base de données ANSTATS (statisOAIC (Ordonnances sur l’administration tiques annuelles) des QG régionaux; cela et l’instruction des cadets) en ligne, sur en fait la source de renseignele site Web national du CIC, récemment ments la plus à jour de toutes. réaménagé. Pour consulter le site, cliquez sur le bouton CIC dans le site Web Pour une bonne discussion national des cadets ou allez à l’adresse rendez-vous au site Forums. www.vcds.dnd.ca/cic. « J’ai reçu plusieurs demandes de cadets et d’officiers qui NDLR : le maj Peterson a été souhaitaient qu’on ajoute au remplacé comme responsable site Web national un forum/ du site Web national par le groupe de discussion/groupe capt Ian Lambert. E de nouvelles », explique le maj Peterson. L’idée était bonne, mais le responsable du site Web n’avait pas les

Printemps

2000


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 15

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Formation sur le renouveau

Le terme « bizkit » vous dit-il quelque chose? par le maj Jim Greenough

E

n février, l’officier d’administration, trois instructeurs de l’École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (ERIC) de la région des Prairies et moi-même avons assisté à un séminaire de formation à Cornwall (Ont.). Nos attentes étaient grandes à l’idée de voir réuni le personnel régional des ERIC. Cette réunion était la première en son genre, et nous nous réjouissions d’avoir enfin l’occasion de rencontrer nos homologues après des années de courriels impersonnels. Une quarantaine d’entre nous avons parlé du renouveau de l’instruction des officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC). D’après mon expérience, si un séminaire commence par un test de connaissances générales, cela signifie que les ennuis s’en viennent. Alan Leschied, professeur agrégé à la faculté d’éducation de l’Université de Western Ontario (London), nous a fait passer un test de connaissances du jargon des jeunes. Des termes comme « bizkit », « fuzzé », « KoRn » ou « collection de midis » vous disent-ils quelque chose? Inutile d’ajouter que seuls les plus in parmi nous en connaissaient la signification. M. Leschied nous a ensuite fait remarquer qu’il y a longtemps que les adultes voient les jeunes d’un mauvais œil. Voici l’une des meilleures citations portées à notre attention : « Je n’aurai pas d’espoir en l’avenir si nous devons compter un jour sur une jeunesse aussi futile que la nôtre, car l’insouciance des jeunes est inqualifiable. Comment se fait-il que, de mon temps, on nous montrait à faire preuve

15

de réserve et à respecter les aînés, mais que les jeunes d’aujourd’hui soient aussi insolents et aient si peu de retenue. » – Socrate, IIIe siècle av. J.-C. Cela vous dit-il quelque chose? Nous avons passé le reste de la matinée à écouter attentivement ce qu’il en est vraiment des jeunes d’aujourd’hui! L’exercice suivant a consisté en une séance de remue-méninges unique en son genre. Nous nous sommes intéressés à ce qui ne marchait pas dans le système d’instruction du CIC. Ce fut toute une expérience. Quand le calme est revenu, nous avons dressé une liste d’environ 70 questions, problèmes et sujets de préoccupation. Nous avons ensuite déterminé par vote nos cinq grandes priorités. Nous avons constaté que la grande préoccupation des officiers du CIC de tous les coins du pays était de faire en sorte que le programme d’instruction du CIC réponde aux besoins du programme d’instruction des cadets. Cela voulait tout dire puisque nous nous sommes rappelé que la raison d’être du Mouvement était les cadets eux-mêmes! Nous savions alors que nous étions sur la bonne voie. Le jour suivant, Mary Anne Robblee nous a parlé d’apprentissage et de stratégies d’apprentissage. Nous avons commencé par en apprendre un peu sur nous-mêmes en traçant des portraits de notre mode d’apprentissage et de notre mode de vie. Le bourdonnement perceptible après que nous nous soyons remis de nos émotions a cédé la place à des propositions comme : « montre-moi ton ‘cerf-volant’ et ton

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Du personnel des Écoles régionales d’instructeurs de cadets (ERIC), des commandants de corps/escadrons et d’autre membres du Mouvement de partout au Canada ont participé au séminaire de formation sur le renouveau. Le contingent de la région des Prairies : à partir de la gauche, le ltv Barbara Cross, commandant du Corps des cadets de la Marine Jervis Bay; le maj Jim Greenough; les capts Jack White, Bob Bogovics et Deborah Smart, instructeurs à l’ERIC; et le capt Kerrie Johnston, officier d’administration. (Photo par le maj François Dornier)

‘circonflexe’ et je te laisse voir les miens ». Croyez-moi, ce fut productif! Nous avons consacré le reste de la séance à tracer un plan d’action en vue de changer nos façons de faire et de mieux former les officiers du CIC pour que le Mouvement des cadets demeure le meilleur programme jeunesse du Canada. Le nouveau directeur du développement des programmes de la direction des Cadets à Ottawa, le lcol Michel Lefebvre, a fait une allocution de clôture très motivante. Il a dit en substance que la balle était maintenant dans notre camp et que la réussite dépendait des mesures qu’allait prendre le groupe. Nous avons enfin remercié le capc Peter Kay, qui a lancé l’idée de l’atelier sur le renouveau de l’instruction des officiers du CIC et qui l’a mené à terme. Chapeau Peter! – Le maj Greenough est le commandant de l’ERIC (région des Prairies). E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 16

Formation sur le renouveau

Personnellement et professionnellement enrichie par le lt Stella Mylonakis

A

vant d’assister à la conférence sur le renouvellement de l’instruction, je ne savais pas à quoi m’attendre. Je peux maintenant dire que ce fut un événement intéressant et inoubliable. Il est remarquable que les responsables aient pu réunir des officiers de tous les coins du Canada et de tous les horizons ayant une expérience aussi diverse. Nous avons quitté la conférence avec un plan d’action et la ferme résolution d’y donner suite. La conférence a été enrichissante, tant du point de vue professionnel que sur le plan personnel.

J’ai appris beaucoup au contact de personnes qui font partie du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) depuis de nombreuses années. Au départ, je craignais qu’il serait intimidant et difficile de travailler avec des personnes qui avaient tant d’expérience. Je croyais qu’on ne prendrait pas au sérieux les vues et les idées d’officiers moins expérimentés. J’étais dans l’erreur! Tous étaient sur un pied d’égalité. Nous avons échangé idées, réflexions, inquiétudes, déceptions, et l’opinion de chacun était respectée et prise en compte. Nous partagions un idéal : nous étions réunis pour les cadets. Au départ, le processus m’a paru long; certains d’entre nous souhaitaient s’attaquer tout de suite au travail à faire. Les animateurs avaient autre chose en tête. Après coup, j’ai compris comment chaque activité nous conduisait à notre objectif final : améliorer le programme d’instruction du CIC. À la fin, nous avons défini un plan d’action – ce qui, à mon avis, est l’étape la plus facile. Il nous faut

16

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

maintenant concrétiser les changements sur lesquels nous nous sommes entendus. Il serait malheureux d’abandonner le plan d’action et de perdre ainsi l’occasion d’évoluer. La conférence m’a donné l’impression que nous pouvions véritablement améliorer le programme d’instruction du CIC, mais que cela dépendait de nous. L’exercice de développement personnel s’est révélé enrichissant. On nous a demandé de tracer un portrait de notre mode de vie. Cet outil d’autoévaluation favorise le changement et l’amélioration en aidant la personne à comprendre sa façon de penser et son comportement. Cette activité a été le point culminant de la semaine; la franchise de l’exercice et les résultats ont frappé de nombreux autres participants. En tant que chefs dans les FC et meneurs de jeunes dans le Mouvement des cadets, nous oublions parfois que notre personnalité – notre façon de voir le monde et la place que nous y occupons – agit sur nos rapports avec les autres et notre façon de penser. Le portrait de notre mode de vie nous a aidé à relativiser les choses. L’exercice vise à renforcer l’organisation par l’efficacité de chacun, et je crois qu’il a atteint son but. Je souhaiterais que chacun des officiers du CIC ait la chance de faire cette autoévaluation parce que nous avons la force de notre maillon le plus faible. En ma qualité de jeune officier, j’ai été heureuse de voir que tant de personnes s’occupent des besoins et de l’instruction des officiers du CIC. Le plus difficile reste cependant à faire. Nous devons tous « mettre les mains à la pâte » si nous

Printemps

2000

« Nous oublions parfois que notre personnalité – notre façon de voir le monde et la place que nous y occupons – agit sur nos rapports avec les autres et sur notre façon de penser. » – Lt Stella Mylonakis voulons que le programme d’instruction du CIC continue de changer, de s’adapter et de répondre aux besoins des responsables du Mouvement. Comme on le dit, nous pouvons faire partie du problème ou contribuer à sa solution. À chacun de choisir! – Le lt Mylonakis est l’officier d’instruction du Corps des Cadets de l’Armée 2808 à Montréal et instructrice à l’École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (Est). E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 17

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Avez-vous apprécié autant que moi? « La semaine que j’ai passée à Cornwall en qualité de représentante d’une unité de la région des Prairies m’a donné un aperçu fascinant de l’avenir de l’instruction des officiers du CIC au Canada. Des officiers de tous les niveaux de l’Organisation des cadets ont uni leurs efforts, d’égal à égal, pour énoncer une vision nationale, uniforme et progressive de l’instruction du CIC. En tant qu’officier d’un corps de cadets, j’ai la conviction que les cours du CIC à l’intention des officiers d’unité nous fourniront dorénavant les moyens d’offrir aux cadets un programme axé sur la jeunesse, captivant, dynamique et amusant! » – Ltv Barbara Cross Commandant, Corps des Cadets de la Marine 45, Jervis Bay (Sask.) « J’ai trouvé à la fois attristant et réjouissant de constater que l’atelier a probablement permis de réunir pour la première fois en à peu près 25 ans tous les intervenants du milieu de l’instruction des officiers du CIC au Canada. Nous avons dressé une liste de près de 100 aspects du travail des écoles régionales d’instructeurs de cadets susceptibles d’être améliorés. Nous avons ramené ce chiffre à 37 questions qui ont été réunies dans un plan d’action provisoire. La responsabilité des questions

17

ayant été confiée aux régions en vertu du plan, celles-ci ont maintenant la tâche de les mener à terme. Ayant passé mes 20 dernières années au sein du Mouvement des cadets, dont les 13 dernières comme officier du CIC, je suis fier d’avoir participé à cette première étape mémorable. Nous devons garder à l’esprit qu’il s’agit seulement d’une première étape. Il nous faudra réexaminer, développer et adapter nos stratégies pour nous assurer qu’elles répondent aux besoins des officiers du CIC et des cadets. – Maj Mike Anglin Commandant, Détachement d’instruction, London (Ont.) « Je ne savais pas au juste dans quoi je m’embarquais, mais cela allait être le tour de montagnes russes de ma vie. Certains des 45 participants étaient des inconnus, d’autres, des collègues dont nous ne connaissions que la voix et auxquels nous avons enfin pu associer un visage. L’atmosphère est demeurée détendue jusqu’à ce que nous entrions dans le vif du sujet : l’engagement. Il est bien beau de lancer des idées et de les coucher sur papier, mais la vraie tâche consiste à les concrétiser. Je vais certes faire de mon mieux pour appliquer le plan d’action et j’espère que tous ceux qui ont participé à la réunion aspirent à faire de même. Le tour de montagnes russes n’est pas encore terminé! » – Capt Joan Eager Officier d’administration École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (Atlantique)

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Vous êtes-vous déjà demandé pourquoi le cours élémentaire d’officier dure 10 jours? Non? Alors peut-être savezvous pourquoi la plupart des autres cours obligatoires ont une durée de 8 jours? Même le personnel des cinq écoles régionales d’instructeurs de cadets réunis en février dernier n’auraient pu répondre à ces questions. En fait ils ont eu à se poser des questions beaucoup plus importantes et essentielles comme « Quelles nouvelles orientations devraient prendre la formation des cadres des instructeurs de cadets au cours des 10 prochaines années. » Avant même de commencer le travail d’équipe que requiert un tel défi, il faut former une équipe. Les trois premières journées de cette rencontre ont été consacrées à créer un climat favorable aux échanges et au travail d’équipe. Au cours des deux dernières journées, les préoccupations ont été présentées, discutées, arguées, triées, cataloguées. Une longue liste qui, en bout de ligne, a servi de base à la rédaction de 20 initiatives qui changeront comme jamais auparavant l’ensemble du programme d’instruction des CIC partout au pays. Vous êtes curieux, non? Soyez patient, je vous en reparlerai dans le prochain numéro. – Maj François Dornier Commandant-adjoint École régionales d’instructeurs de cadets (Est) E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 18

Coin des cadets

Le terme « Cadets » est déjà familier chez les Read « e puis vous assurer que le terme ‘Cadets’ est déjà familier chez nous », affirme Malcolm Read, faisant allusion à un article paru dans le dernier numéro. Il en est ainsi depuis que son fils aîné, Jonathon, est revenu à la maison avec un uniforme de cadet. Aujourd’hui, Malcolm et Gail Read sont les fiers parents de trois garçons et d’une fille qui ont TOUS atteint le niveau Étoile d’or et le grade de C/ajuc ou C/adjum au sein du Corps des Cadets de l’Armée 1442, à River Hebert (N.-É.).

J

Jonathon est devenu un cadet parce que son père le lui a permis et qu’il n’est pas revenu sur le passé. Il en a été de même pour ses deux frères et sa sœur. Tous ont travaillé ferme, ont été nommés meilleurs cadets de première année et ont obtenu des dizaines de prix. Le mercredi soir chez les Read était le soir des cadets. Même si tous étaient de la partie, la famille n’a jamais été débordée. Chacun s’occupant d’apprêter son uniforme et de faire son travail pendant

la semaine, la famille Read était fin prête quand arrivait le mercredi – ou toute autre activité des Cadets. Les quatre cadets Read ont obtenu le certificat de maître-cadet. Jonathon, Julie et Chris sont devenus adjudants-chefs et sergents-majors régimentaires. Justin est devenu adjudant-maître et sergent-major de compagnie. Jonathon, Justin et Julie ont été cadets-cadres au Centre d’instruction d’été des cadets Argonaut de Gagetown (N.-B.). Jonathon et Justin

« C’est comme si quatre membres d’une même famille atteignaient le grade de général dans les FC », affirme M. Read, ancien officier du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC). Seul le plus jeune, Chris, est encore membre actif. Il fut cependant un temps où les quatre enfants de la famille Read appartenaient au même corps de cadets. Tout a commencé quand Jonathon a demandé à son père s’il pouvait entrer dans l’équipe de soccer de l’école. Son père a dû refuser parce que les Read vivent à la campagne et qu’il aurait été difficile d’aller chercher Jonathon après l’entraînement. Jonathon s’est fait servir la même réponse quand il a demandé à son père s’il pouvait jouer au basketball et suivre des leçons de musique. M. Read a cependant compris qu’il devait laisser son garçon s’engager dans quelque chose. Quand Jonathon lui a demandé s’il pouvait se joindre aux Cadets de l’Armée, il a donc consenti.

De gauche à droite : Christopher, Jonathon, Julie et Justin Read ainsi que les nombreux trophées et prix qu’ils ont remportés comme cadets. (Photo de Georgie Seguin, Breezy Acres Photography)

18

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 19

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

ont participé à des échanges qui les ont menés au pays de Galles; Chris a de son côté participé à un échange qui lui a fait découvrir l’Écosse; Julie, enfin, est allée à Vernon (C.-B.) dans le cadre d’un échange. Jonathon a remporté la médaille d’excellence des cadets et le biathlon. Julie a remporté la médaille Lord Strathcona d’excellence militaire et de condition physique et a porté le drapeau de la Nouvelle-Écosse au tattoo international de Halifax, en 1998. Chris a joué un rôle clé dans la construction du parcours de développement de la confiance en soi des cadets. Jonathon, 22 ans et étudiant au Computer Training Institute de Saint John (N.-B.) et Justin, 19 ans et technicien en informatique à Amherst (N.-É.) ont quitté le milieu des cadets faute de temps à y consacrer. Julie, 18 ans, se spécialise en biologie à l’Université Acadia et a demandé à être officier du CIC cet été au camp Argonaut. Chris, 17 ans, espère être admis au Collège militaire royal de Kingston (Ont.) et entrer dans les Forces.

C’est pour cette raison que Justin aimerait qu’on fasse plus de place encore à la discipline dans le Mouvement. En tant qu’ancien instructeur au camp Argonaut, il sait que « les cadets qui écoutent les instructeurs finissent par apprendre davantage ». Les Cadets lui ont notamment montré à respecter les aînés, l’expérience et la planète. Julie, de son côté, a appris à assumer des responsabilités de chef et à dialoguer. Elle s’accorde avec ses frères pour dire qu’il est amusant de faire partie des cadets. Avec un père qui était officier du CIC, une mère qui était instructrice civile ainsi que deux frères et une sœur qui appartenaient au corps de cadets, Chris devait accompagner de toute façon la famille les soirs de cadets; il est donc entré dans les Cadets. « C’était mieux que de jouer avec mes camions dans le bureau », explique-t-il.

Chris a exprimé des réserves au sujet du Programme de prévention du harcèlement et de l’abus des cadets lancé l’an dernier. « Il est facile d’aller un peu trop loin avec le PHAC : les règles elles-mêmes peuvent donner lieu à des abus, explique-t-il. J’espère que le Mouvement s’assurera que cela n’arrive pas. » Par ailleurs, il apprécie que l’État ait mis plus d’argent dans le programme des cadets pour le rendre plus intéressant encore. À son avis, le Mouvement « n’est pas loin d’être parfait ». « Pour une raison ou une autre, l’adhésion de la famille au Mouvement a été un bon coup. Tout le monde s’est mis de la partie, et personne n’a lâché », avoue M. Read. Pour les Read, le terme « Cadets » est certes familier! E

Les Read sont si satisfaits des cadets qu’ils voient difficilement en quoi on pourrait améliorer le Mouvement. Justin souhaiterait qu’on insiste davantage sur le recrutement parce que, selon lui, il n’y aura jamais trop de cadets. « La plupart de mes camarades à l’école ne voulaient pas entrer dans les Cadets parce que tout ce qu’ils y voient, ce sont des ordres criés à tue-tête et du drill, déclare-t-il. Mais les Cadets sont bien davantage que cela – ils offrent une occasion d’apprendre. »

19

Le terme « Cadets » est familier chez les Read. De gauche à droite, Jonathon, Justin, Julie et Christopher Read. (Photo de Georgie Seguin, Breezy Acres Photography)

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 20

Adieu à l’équipe d’intervention responsable du système d’information électronique des technologies de l’information (GI/TI) de la Direction des cadets, le maj Guy Peterson, devrait travailler de concert avec les services GI du MDN pour planifier le cycle de vie du matériel informatique du Mouvement.

T

rois fois bravo à l’équipe d’intervention responsable du système d’information électronique! L’équipe a terminé son travail, mais ses membres continueront de donner des avis sur des questions techniques aux autres équipes. « Je crois que cette équipe a très bien réussi et qu’elle a été très bien accueillie sur le terrain », a déclaré Lionel Bourgeois, membre de l’équipe de la stratégie, lors de la réunion de mesure du rendement de février. « Je recommande que l’équipe soit dissoute, mais je souhaiterais qu’elle aille rencontrer les ligues pour expliquer ses réalisations. » Selon son chef, le maj Michael Zeitoun, le succès de l’équipe revient en grande partie à la Direction des cadets. « Sans le soutien moral et les ressources financières de la Direction, jamais nous n’y serions parvenus », a-t-il déclaré. Quand cette équipe a été créée, elle avait comme mission d’équiper les unités de cadets en ordinateurs, de fournir un accès à Internet aux organisations des cadets, de créer un répertoire national d’adresses électroniques et de créer un site Web national grâce auquel on pourrait consulter en direct les Ordonnances sur l’administration et l’instruction des cadets (OAIC) et obtenir d’autres renseignements courants.

Les C/sgt s Thomas Wan, à gauche, et Mike Beasley consultent des plans de leçons sur le site Web de la région du Pacifique. Tous deux appartiennent à l’Escadron des Cadets de l’Aviation 692 à Richmond (C.-B.). Les unités de cadets de tout le pays ont maintenant accès gratuitement à l’Internet grâce au programme CADETNET. (Photo du maj Steve Deschamps) officier des systèmes d’information de la région du Pacifique. « Dans notre région, nous avons distribué des Pentium II. Dans les mois qui viennent, nous prévoyons ajouter de l’équipement Pentium III et des imprimantes couleur au matériel qui a déjà été distribué, et je sais que nous ne sommes pas la seule région à le faire. »

Les corps sont maintenant tous dotés d’ordinateurs. « L’époque où l’on distribuait du matériel de seconde main du ministère de la Défense nationale (MDN) est révolue! », déclare le maj Steven Deschamps, co-chef de l’équipe et

Lors de la réunion de l’équipe de la stratégie, il a été discuté que les unités ne devraient pas être responsables de la gestion du cycle de vie des ordinateurs personnels – maintenance et remplacement. Il a été suggéré que le nouveau coordonnateur de la gestion de l’information et

20

Printemps

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

2000

Le CADETNET – accès à Internet des unités de cadets et d’autres niveaux – est maintenant une réalité. Quatre régions l’utilisent déjà (Pacifique, Centre, Atlantique et Nord). Celles des Prairies et de l’Est envisagent l’utiliser dans un avenir rapproché. Le répertoire national d’adresses électroniques, les OAIC et d’autres renseignements récents peuvent tous être consultés sur le site Web national des cadets. Cela a pu être réalisé grâce à l’ancien responsable du site Web des cadets, le maj Peterson. Par ailleurs, des sites Web régionaux contiennent maintenant des ordonnances et des directives locales ainsi qu’une multitude de plans de leçons et de possibilités d’apprentissage assisté par ordinateur. Par exemple, les cadets de la région du Pacifique ont

Le matc Peter Oke (à g.) et le m 2 Robert Gale font l’inventaire des micro-imprimantes destinées aux corps/escadrons de la région du Pacifique. (Photo du maj Steve Deschamps)


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 21

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

mis sur le réseau Boatswain Pipes ainsi que 70 autres morceaux de musique militaire qui peuvent s’écouter en ligne (www.cadets.bc.ca) et dont on peut imprimer la partition. La dernière tâche de l’équipe responsable du système d’information électronique – fournir aux unités de cadets un logiciel comprenant une base de données et des formules électroniques standard – a été confiée à l’équipe responsable de la rationalisation des pratiques administratives. Avant de passer à cette étape, toutefois, il faudra adopter un ensemble de produits logiciels standard et conformes aux normes du MDN. Les unités de cadets peuvent s’attendre à avoir accès au même progiciel de bureau que les autres utilisateurs du MDN (Microsoft Word, par exemple).

La Direction des cadets a donné 30 000 $ à l’équipe pour que celle-ci valide le principe d’un système d’administration des unités de cadets. « Nous voulions savoir s’il était techniquement possible de créer un programme accessible sur Internet qui permettrait de stocker les données dans des serveurs centraux », explique le maj Deschamps. Le système permettrait à une unité de suivre le parcours d’un cadet de son enrôlement jusqu’à la fin de ses études. Selon le maj Zeitoun, le rapport de validation sera remis au coordonnateur national de GI/TI et aux régions, qui y donneront suite. Les moyens techniques existent, et son équipe a créé le prototype. « Le nouveau rôle du maj Peterson consistera à amener six régions différentes

à adopter une approche commune de la GI/TI », ajoute le maj Zeitoun. Pour conclure son exposé, le maj Zeitoun a fait part à l’équipe de la stratégie de la réflexion suivante : « Acquérir une technologie est relativement facile – il s’agit d’avoir l’argent qu’il faut. Former et habituer des gens à l’utiliser, par contre, est une question d’orientation et de gestion du changement. » NDLR : Merci au maj Zeitoun, au maj Deschamps, au co-chef de l’équipe, le C/adjum Ghislain Thibault, et à tous les autres membres de l’équipe d’intervention responsable du système d’information électronique pour leur contribution à Choix d’avenir. E

Vivement l’équipe responsable du partenariat

L

’équipe de la stratégie a encore une fois encouragé chaleureusement l’équipe d’intervention responsable du partenariat à se mettre au travail.

dans le cadre de l’Examen de la modernisation de la gestion et de la fonction de contrôleur.

La composition de l’équipe a été fixée l’an dernier par l’équipe de la stratégie. Les ligues ont été invitées à désigner trois représentants régionaux et locaux; les détachements de cadets ont aussi été priés de donner trois noms (un représentant au niveau du détachement et deux au niveau local). Une équipe d’intervention responsable du partenariat comprenant une quinzaine de personnes (dont un représentant de la région du Nord) a été formée à partir de cette liste. L’équipe ne s’est toutefois pas encore réunie.

Diffusé en mars, le rapport d’examen recommande que les responsabilités des ligues, du ministère de la Défense nationale (MDN) et des FC soient examinées et adaptées aux réalités actuelles du programme et de l’évolution des conditions. « Le nouveau partenariat devrait laisser assez de latitude à chacun; ainsi, les ligues pourraient peut-être continuer d’assumer la responsabilité des locaux des unités, mais les FC pourraient les aider (pas nécessairement financièrement) quand elles ont de la difficulté à trouver des installations adéquates. »

L’équipe se penchera sur les huit domaines d’activité clés qui ont au départ été assimilés à des sujets de préoccupation. Elle examinera aussi les recommandations qui ont été faites au sujet du partenariat

Le rapport d’examen recommande aussi que les ligues, le MDN et les FC cherchent activement à créer des partenariats stratégiques avec des organisations aux vues similaires (ministères

21

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

provinciaux de l’éducation, Héritage Canada, entreprises commanditaires) qui voudraient faire connaître et appuyer le Mouvement. L’équipe de la stratégie a évoqué la possibilité que l’équipe d’intervention soit coprésidée par un représentant d’une ligue et un représentant du MDN, ce qui est en soi une forme de partenariat. Certains se sont demandés si l’équipe d’intervention devait relever de l’équipe de la stratégie ou du Groupe consultatif national des cadets (GCNC), qui comprend le vice-chef d’état-major de la Défense et des représentants de haut niveau des ligues. L’équipe de la stratégie est toutefois arrivée à la conclusion que les recommandations devaient être acceptées par l’équipe de la stratégie avant d’être soumises au GCNC ou à un comité spécial des ligues formé pour étudier des recommandations de Choix d’avenir. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 22

Réunion mémorable

L

a première réunion du groupe de travail sur les communications nationales des cadets à Ottawa, en février, demeurera mémorable. Des gens de tous les coins du pays se sont réunis pour la première fois afin d’étudier les communications des cadets d’un point de vue national. Le nouveau groupe de travail comprend les coordonnateurs des relations publiques et les directeurs exécutifs nationaux des trois ligues; des officiers des affaires publiques des régions; des coordon-

nateurs régionaux du programme des Initiatives jeunesse et de Choix d’avenir; un représentant de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications de Choix d’avenir; des représentants de la cellule des communications de la Direction des cadets; et le responsable du site Web national des Cadets. La première réunion a permis aux participants d’échanger des renseignements et de définir le mandat et le rôle des responsables des communications du Mouvement, aux niveaux local, régional et national.

Le mandat du nouveau groupe de travail consiste à définir un plan national de communications stratégiques qui sera approuvé par la haute direction et qui visera à faire mieux connaître aux Canadiens le Mouvement des cadets du Canada et ses valeurs. Le groupe a étudié l’état des communications du Mouvement en échangeant des points de vue personnels sur ce qui va bien et ce qui ne va pas. Les Ligues – qui ont été dans une large mesure responsables des communications des cadets dans le passé – ont précisé leur position. Vu le manque de fonds et de bénévoles, elles ont apprécié la participation de la Direction des cadets à ce chapitre. Elles aussi ont cependant des inquiétudes quant à son engagement à long terme. « Devrons-nous combler les lacunes encore une fois quand le financement du ministère de la Défense se tarira? » a demandé Lionel Bourgeois, coordonnateur des relations publiques de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Air. Les Ligues voient d’un bon œil les orientations stratégiques du niveau national et les outils de communication qui peuvent être utilisés au niveau local. Les représentants des Ligues ont déclaré qu’ils ne pouvaient pas prendre de décisions au nom des Ligues et qu’ils devaient consulter leurs comités à divers niveaux. « Il ne faudrait pas que vous soyez surpris que nous ayons à nous rencontrer de nouveau », a expliqué Dave Boudreau, directeur exécutif de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée.

Considérer les communications sous une perspective nationale peut aboutir à des brochures de renseignements sur les cadets des trois éléments comme celles-ci. Elles affichent une présentation uniforme tout en préservant le caractère unique des éléments terre, mer et air du Mouvement des cadets du Canada.

22

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 23

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Les responsables régionaux des communications se sont réjouis à l’idée d’obtenir un point de vue national sur les communications grâce au groupe de travail. « Nous n’avions jamais eu encore la possibilité d’échanger des renseignements et de parler d’une stratégie nationale de communications », a reconnu le capc Rick Powell, coordonnateur des Initiatives jeunesse dans la région de l’Atlantique et représentant de Choix d’avenir. « À mes yeux, il s’agit là d’un progrès notable. » De toute évidence, les communications des cadets sont plus efficaces dans les régions qui ont formé des officiers aux affaires publiques. Pour l’instant, quatre régions en ont. Le groupe de travail a convenu que la formation des officiers du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) aux relations publiques devait être une priorité dans le domaine des communications. Parmi les autres priorités du groupe de travail figurent la gestion des communications à l’appui du recrutement et du maintien à l’effectif des officiers du CIC; l’accroissement de la visibilité du Mouvement et la gestion des communications à l’appui du maintien à l’effectif et du recrutement des cadets. Stéphane Ippersiel, responsable des communications de la Direction des cadets, a profité de la réunion pour présenter aux participants les résultats du sondage d’opinion CROP/Environics sur l’attitude des Canadiens à l’égard du programme des cadets (voir l’article de la page 29); pour parler des normes d’utilisation du nouveau logo de Cadets Canada; pour donner aux participants des renseignements sur la Journée des réservistes en uniforme (3 mai); et pour parler des exigences du Programme de coordination de l’image de marque.

23

Les participants ont été informés des ressources de la Direction générale des affaires publiques (DGAP) que les responsables des communications des cadets pourraient utiliser, et plus particulièrement des services de formation et de soutien en matière de communications qu’ils pourront obtenir des bureaux régionaux de relations externes récemment créés par le MDN. La possibilité d’adapter l’instruction aux affaires publiques aux besoins des officiers du CIC a été examinée avec le maj John Blakeley, de la cellule de l’instruction de la DGAP. La création de relations de travail avec les bureaux régionaux de relations externes du MDN a été abordée par le maj Tony White, officier des relations avec les

médias. La tâche de ces bureaux consiste à faire connaître les FC à la population en s’adressant aux médias, aux associations et aux parlementaires ethniques. Selon M. Ippersiel, les cadets pourraient devenir des « clients » des bureaux de relations externes et profiter des nombreuses possibilités de communications qu’ils offrent. Les bureaux peuvent aussi servir de points de diffusion des communications des cadets. En trois jours seulement, le groupe de travail a orienté les communications de l’avenir du Mouvement des cadets. Selon le col Rick Hardy, directeur des cadets, « Il n’a jamais été aussi important de savoir ce qui se passe et d’uniformiser les communications. Votre seule présence ici suffit à faire de cette réunion une réussite! » E

Concours de photos pour cadets

2000 V

ous avez sans doute reçu les affiches du deuxième concours national de photos pour cadets; sinon, vous les aurez bientôt. Consultez l’affiche pour obtenir des renseignements sur le concours de cette année et armez-vous de votre appareil pour prendre des photos gagnantes! La date limite de présentation des photos est le 1er novembre 2000.

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Recyclez-moi! Après m’avoir lu, passez-moi à quelqu’un d’autre. Merci!


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 24

Assurer l’avenir Ligue navale du Canada par Kevin Guérin

E

n 1995, la Ligue navale a organisé une série d’ateliers pour évaluer ses besoins dans un, trois et cinq ans. L’exercice a révélé qu’il faudrait accroître les recettes au niveau national pour améliorer et développer des programmes. Le président du comité de financement et de sensibilisation du public, John MacKillop, a proposé la mise sur pied d’une campagne nationale de financement; sa proposition a été approuvée par le conseil national en février 1996. Une évaluation des besoins a été faite à l’été de 1997, et plus de 130 représentants des divisions et des branches de la Ligue navale, des corps de cadets et du milieu des affaires ont été rejoints. Ils ont exprimé leurs vues sur la situation et l’avenir de la Ligue navale et de ses programmes jeunesse, sur les cadets de la Ligue navale et sur les cadets de la Marine royale canadienne. Le conseil national a ensuite accepté en principe de lancer, en janvier 1998, une campagne nationale de financement de 5 millions de dollars auprès des entreprises de la Ligue navale, en poursuivant les objectifs suivants : • Aider les divisions à appuyer les branches et les corps dans les efforts déployés pour offrir un programme jeunesse de premier ordre.

• Donner plus de visibilité aux cadets et à la Ligue dans les collectivités et dans les médias locaux et nationaux. • Améliorer les communications et les échanges de renseignements entre le bureau régional, les divisions, les branches et les corps. • Mettre davantage l’accent sur l’instruction, à tous les niveaux. S’intéresser notamment aux programmes d’instruction à l’intention L’un des objectifs de la campagne nationale de financedes officiers des cadets ment est d’accroître les fonds destinés aux programmes de la Ligue, des cadets de d’instruction des cadets de la Marine. la Ligue, des bénévoles et des responsables de la campagne l’année. L’équipe responsable de la camde financement dans les collectivités. pagne – des bénévoles et des membres Apporter aussi des améliorations du bureau national – suit l’évolution de au programme d’instruction des la campagne, mais a besoin de votre officiers des cadets de la Marine aide. Si vous connaissez une personne ou (en consultation avec le ministère une entreprise intéressée à appuyer l’un de la Défense) et à la deuxième ou l’autre de nos programmes nautiques, partie du programme d’instruction faites-le nous savoir; nous pouvons abordes cadets de la Marine. der professionnellement le milieu des Jusqu’ici, la Ligue a recueilli 473 000 $ : 208 000 $ en promesses de dons (96 p. 100 des dons seront faits pendant le premier trimestre de la présente année), 85 000 $ en espèces et 180 000 $ en « contributions en nature », matériel et équipement pour la campagne compris.

• Renforcer les corps actuels. • Faire passer de 14 000 à 18 000 l’effectif total des cadets de la Ligue et de la Marine. • Approcher de nouvelles collectivités en vue d’accroître le nombre de branches et de corps.

24

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Grâce à ces premiers dons, la Ligue peut commencer à concrétiser certains projets du plan de développement quinquennal. Divers projets ont été étudiés, et tous ceux à qui ils s’adressent devraient en apprécier les résultats au niveau des branches et des corps d’ici la fin de

Printemps

2000

affaires. Pour plus de renseignements ou pour faire un don, communiquez avec Kevin Guérin (1-800-375-6289 ou kguerin@navyleague.ca) ou consultez le site Web de la Ligue (www.navyleague.ca). – Kevin Guérin est l’administrateur de la campagne de financement au bureau national de la Ligue navale du Canada. Il a déjà été cadet dans le Corps des Cadets de la Marine 106 Drake et il commandait récemment encore le CRCCM 33 St-Lawrence. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 25

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Discussions en ligne «

L

es forums de CadetWorld permettent à des gens du Mouvement des cadets du Canada – et d’ailleurs – de partager idées et réflexions ou simplement de se faire des amis », explique le slt Ryan Sales d’Edmonton, gestionnaire du site des forums sur l’Internet. « C’est l’un des rares endroits où l’on peut obtenir des commentaires de tous les éléments de toutes les organisations de cadets du monde. » Le slt Sales a créé ce site Web parce qu’il regrettait que les cadets du Canada ne puissent pas communiquer facilement entre eux ou avec des cadets de l’étranger. « Il y a un an, nous avons commencé par offrir de l’espace gratuit à des groupes et à des personnes, pour tout ce qui concernait les cadets », explique l’ancien cadet de l’Escadron des Cadets de l’Aviation 539 High Prairie. Depuis que le slt Sales a ajouté des forums au site CadetWorld en août dernier, les inscriptions et la participation depuis le Canada, les Étas-Unis, l’Australie, la Nouvelle-Zélande, l’Angleterre et Hong Kong n’ont jamais fléchi. Quand le site a été lié au site Web national des cadets, il a pris un second envol, terme auquel e slt Sales, instructeur de vol à voile du CIC, s’associe facilement. Les discussions en ligne peuvent aussi bien porter sur le corps qui a la meilleure musique que sur la qualité des aliments dans les camps d’été. Il y a même un forum sur les ordinateurs Pentium qu’on installe dans les escadrons et les corps de cadets. « Faites-nous savoir ce que vous en pensez », a demandé le maj Steve Deschamps, chef de l’équipe d’intervention responsable du

25

Le slt Ryan Sales, gestionnaire du site des forums de CadetWorld. système d’information électronique de Choix d’avenir. Et il reçoit depuis des commentaires intéressants. Des liens sont offerts avec des sujets d’actualité, des questions internationales ou d’autres forums de Cadets de la Marine, de l’Armée et de l’Air. L’un des forums permet aux cadets d’aborder toutes les questions dont ils souhaitent parler – dans des limites raisonnables. Les règles du site interdisent le langage vulgaire, le harcèlement et les sujets qui ne sont pas convenables. « Si la teneur des échanges atteint un point qui ne convient plus à un auditoire général, nous y mettons fin très rapidement, explique le slt Sales. Nous devons être très prudents, car notre auditoire peut avoir de 12 à 60 ans ». Sa façon de voir est simple : « Si c’est une question que vous n’hésiteriez pas à aborder avec

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

votre mère, nous ne voyons pas d’inconvénient à ce que vous en parliez ici ». Le slt Sales est convaincu que les gens peuvent faire valoir leurs idées et communiquer sans blasphémer. Il n’y a eu que quelques cas d’agressivité. « Nous avons adopté une politique à trois paliers : un avertissement, une suspension d’une semaine et un retrait permanent du forum quand la personne continue d’enfreindre les règles », explique le slt Sales. Le personnel du site fait des vérifications des forums pour s’assurer que les participants se conduisent bien. Le personnel comprend le slt Sales, un cadet, trois anciens cadets et une personne neutre. Chacun s’occupe du site dans ses temps libres. Le site est financé par un commanditaire privé et un peu de publicité. Les forums de CadetWorld ont été réaménagés en mars, pour marquer le premier anniversaire du site. « Nous améliorons les services et ajoutons des prix, conclut le slt Sale. C’est formidable! » E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 26

Qu’est-ce qui vous tracasse?

Qu’est-ce qui vous tracasse? «

Q

u’est-ce qui vous tracasse? » est une nouvelle rubrique de Fiers d’être qui nous a été suggérée par le C/sgt J.R.K. Bergeron de Gatineau (Qc). Elle permettra aux cadets – et aux autres membres du Mouvement – de soulever des questions au sujet du changement (ou du manque de changement). On pourra aussi y trouver des réponses.

Le C/m 1 Katie Dyson (du Corps des Cadets de la Marine Howe 112, à Peterborough (Ont.) est mécontente de ce que les cheveux teints et le perçage corporel ne soient pas admis dans les Cadets. Je suis préoccupée par la question des cheveux teints et du perçage corporel, notamment du point de vue des personnes que nous voulons attirer dans le Mouvement. Comme les cadets sont

soumis aux règles de tenue des FC, les tatouages, le perçage corporel et les cheveux de couleurs non naturelles leur sont interdits.

qui a changé est que le bouton a pris la couleur de la peau. Cela donnerait à penser que ce sont les traditions qui sont en cause et non la sécurité.

Je comprends que les Cadets sont considérés comme une branche civile des militaires et qu’on leur applique par conséquent les mêmes règlements. Mais nous sommes aussi une organisation de jeunes. La réalité est que le perçage corporel et les cheveux teints sont en vogue et qu’en empêchant les cadets de suivre la mode, nous nous privons de nombreuses recrues éventuelles. Je comprends la grande importance de l’uniformité militaire, mais il n’y a pas grand mal à porter un petit bouton de narine.

Depuis cinq ans, j’ai été un cadet sérieux, mais on n’a pas arrêté de m’embêter au sujet de mon bouton tant que je ne l’ai pas retiré. Il ne me semble pas normal qu’on fasse tout un plat au sujet d’un petit bouton, surtout si l’on considère le soin que j’ai mis à le dissimuler. Les jeunes recourent à toutes sortes de moyens pour s’exprimer, et les cheveux teints et le perçage corporel en font partie. Après tout, un cadet n’est qu’un civil en uniforme. On ne change pas les gens en les obligeant à se conformer à un modèle, car ils vont aller voir ailleurs. Si nous voulons attirer plus de jeunes dans le Mouvement, nous devrons essayer de nous défaire de l’image conventionnelle que nous véhiculons. Je crois que les Cadets ont beaucoup à offrir; il nous faut néanmoins reconnaître que les temps changent, et les jeunes aussi. Si nous n’acceptons pas le changement, l’effectif va chuter.

Évidemment, avoir des anneaux qui sortent un peu partout peut présenter des risques sur le plan de la sécurité. Les boutons, par contre, n’ont rien de bien inquiétant, surtout quand ils se portent à la langue et qu’ils sont invisibles, si ce n’est quand on dirige le drill. On nous demande de mettre un Band-Aid sur tout perçage externe, ce qui contribue seulement à attirer l’attention et à donner un air ridicule. Mon bouton de narine m’a donné bien du fil à retordre auprès de mes supérieurs. J’ai choisi une solution plus discrète qui consiste à le dissimuler avec du maquillage; cela me donne un air moins stupide, mais la seule chose

Le C/m 1 Katie Dyson

26

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000

Le Mouvement des cadets n’a pas pour objectif de transformer des jeunes en une bande de petits soldats tous pareils, comme beaucoup de jeunes le croient. Il vise à révéler le potentiel de leadership de chacun; évidemment, il offre aussi des occasions de s’amuser et d’apprendre. L’apparence n’a rien à voir là-dedans.


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 27

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Réponse du capt Andrea Onchulenko, développement des programmes des Cadets de l’Air à la Direction des cadets : Ces questions ne relèvent pas des règlements relatifs à la tenue de l’Organisation des cadets. Il en a résulté deux attitudes : « comme aucune règle ne m’en empêche, je peux donc le faire » et « comme aucune règle ne m’y autorise, je ne peux donc pas le faire ». Les règlements relatifs à la tenue des cadets des trois éléments sont énoncés dans les Ordonnances sur l’administration et l’instruction des cadets. Les OAIC 3501 (Marine), 46-01 (Armée) et 55-04 (Air) énoncent les normes qui s’appliquent aux cheveux et aux bijoux. Alors que les cadets de sexe féminin (de la Marine et de l’Air, puisque les Cadets de l’Armée n’ont pas de politique à ce sujet) ne sont pas autorisés à avoir de cheveux « teints en vert, rouge vif, orange, violet, ou d’autres couleurs bizarres », il n’est pas fait mention de la teinture des cheveux dans le cas des cadets de sexe masculin. Il n’y a pas encore d’OAIC sur le perçage corporel (si ce n’est en ce qui concerne les oreilles percées des cadets de sexe féminin). L’Organisation des cadets s’inspire généralement des FC en matière de politique, et, en novembre 1999, le message CANFORGEN 103/99 a interdit aux militaires canadiens, hommes et femmes, toute forme de perçage corporel visible ou non (si ce n’est pour les boucles d’oreilles des femmes).

27

Nous savons que des cadets des deux sexes ont des tatouages, se teignent les cheveux et sont des adeptes du perçage corporel; de toute évidence, l’Organisation des cadets doit s’occuper de ces questions. La solution des BandAids ne règle pas plus les préoccupations des cadets que celles de la direction. Nous devrions examiner ces questions en faisant appel à des groupes de discussion, puis énoncer une politique pertinente. Le C/sgt s Chris Wonnacott, de l’Escadron des Cadets de l’Aviation 60 Confederation, à Charlottetown (Î.-P.-É.), voudrait qu’on reprenne la formation en cours d’emploi dans le cadre des cours de contrôle de la circulation aérienne (CCA). En qualité d’adjudant de mon escadron, j’entends régulièrement mon commandant et d’autres officiers parler des nouveaux fonds qui seront mis à la disposition des Cadets et des programmes formidables qui sont offerts. S’il en est ainsi, pourquoi élimine-t-on de bons programmes? Cet été, je comptais parmi un groupe de 24 cadets venus de tous les coins du pays pour suivre le cours de CCA à Trenton (Ont.). À notre arrivée, nous étions fiers de compter parmi ceux à qui l’on offrait la possibilité de suivre un cours aussi prestigieux. Deux jours plus tard, cependant, on nous a appris que, contrairement à ce qui se faisait avant, il n’y aurait pas de formation en cours d’emploi. Auparavant,

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

les cadets qui avaient suivi le cours de CCA pendant cinq semaines étaient envoyés dans différentes bases aériennes du pays pour y suivre une formation pratique en CCA. L’été dernier, cette formation a été abandonnée, et rien n’a été prévu pour la remplacer. On nous a expliqué que le programme avait été éliminé faute de fonds. Qu’on ne se méprenne pas! Les moments que j’ai passés l’été dernier à suivre le cours de CCA comptent parmi mes meilleurs souvenirs chez les cadets, et rien ne pourrait les remplacer. Je me demande néanmoins pourquoi on renonce à certains de nos meilleurs cours malgré tous les nouveaux fonds disponibles. Réponse du lcol Gary Merritt de la Direction des cadets (Air) Le cours de CCA fait l’objet d’une importante révision dans le cadre de laquelle les normes et le plan de cours seront repensés. Nous profiterons de l’occasion pour augmenter le nombre de cadets admis à suivre le cours et utiliser davantage les simulateurs dans la formation en cours d’emploi. Nous espérons que les premiers changements prendront forme dès cet été et que nous pourrons utiliser davantage les installations de CCA du Centre d’instruction de Nav Canada à Cornwall (Ont.) et de la BFC Trenton (Ont.). E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 28

S i t e We b g a g n a n t

V

ous connaissez peut-être les prix Golden Globe, mais il se peut que vous n’ayez jamais entendu parler du prix Golden Web. Le prix Golden Web est un prix international de créativité et d’excellence sur le Web.

Et le site Web des cadets de la région des Prairies l’a remporté! Le site a reçu le prix Golden Web 1999 de la International Association of Web Masters and Designers. Le site a été conçu par l’élof Jan Macauley, ancien instructeur civil et élève-officier du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets depuis novembre dernier. Il a déjà été cadet et pilote de planeur au centre de vol à voile de Gimli (Man.).

« J’ai travaillé avec des ordinateurs toute ma vie, explique-t-il. Je suis maintenant un technicien en informatique accrédité, mais j’ai appris par moi-même à concevoir des sites Web ». L’élof Macauley a occupé un poste à plein temps au QG de la région des Prairies jusqu’en janvier 2000, travaillant à la conception et à la mise à jour du site Web.

région que des instructions de ralliement des centres d’instruction d’été des cadets de la région. De 100 à 125 personnes le consultent chaque jour. Félicitations à l’élof Macauley et aux cadets de la région des Prairies! E

« Ce prix signifie beaucoup pour moi, car il n’est pas remis à n’importe qui, exprime-t-il. Je suis très fier que mon site ait gagné. » Le site Web des cadets de la région des Prairies contient aussi bien des renseignements sur les activités prochaines dans la

Nouveaux crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets par le capt Linda Hildebrandt

D

epuis la parution de notre article dans le dernier numéro de Fiers d’être, nous avons appris que les cadets peuvent obtenir d’autres crédits d’études secondaires dans diverses parties du Canada. Brenda Pinto, de la division de TerreNeuve et du Labrador de la Ligue navale, a communiqué avec nous. Depuis octobre dernier, le ministère de l’éducation de la province accepte que les cours et les programmes des cadets de la Marine soient crédités au niveau secondaire. Les cadets de la Marine peuvent maintenant recevoir des crédits pour les phases quatre et cinq de l’instruction ainsi que les cours d’une durée d’au moins six semaines, ce qui est le cas, par exemple, des cours de manœuvrier, de musicien, de cadet-cadre, d’adjoint médical et de mécanique de machines marines.

28

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Eddie Mathews, de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée de la Saskatchewan, nous a envoyé des renseignements très utiles sur cette province où les cadets peuvent obtenir un crédit de projet spécial pour des activités parascolaires. Pour être admissibles, ils doivent s’inscrire, indiquer leur intention d’utiliser l’instruction des cadets comme crédit optionnel spécial et obtenir l’approbation de leur école. Il importe de se rappeler que les cadets doivent indiquer leur intention d’utiliser l’instruction des cadets pour obtenir un crédit avant de commencer l’instruction à l’unité ou des cours de cadets. Nous tenons à remercier Brenda Pinto et Eddie Mathews de nous avoir communiqué ces renseignements; nous les ajoutons à notre dossier sur les crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction

Printemps

2000

des cadets au Canada. Notre objectif serait évidemment que les conseils scolaires des provinces et des territoires reconnaissent, partout au Canada, la valeur de l’instruction des cadets. Il est encourageant de voir comment les choses ont progressé à Terre-Neuve et au Labrador en si peu de temps. Maintenant que l’instruction des Cadets de l’Air et des Cadets de la Marine a été approuvée dans cette province, on peut espérer que l’instruction des Cadets de l’Armée y sera aussi créditée dans un proche avenir. – Le capt Hildebrandt était co-chef de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des questions diverses d’instruction jusqu’à ce que celleci soit dissoute à la fin de février. Ce sont les ligues qui s’occuperont dorénavant de cette question. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 29

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Un sondage révèle qu’on connaît peu les cadets

V

ous avez peut-être pensé que les cadets étaient le secret le mieux gardé du Canada. Sachez maintenant que cela est le cas!

Une maison d’études de marché et de sondages d’opinion – CROP – a fait un sondage auprès d’adultes et d’ados canadiens afin de déterminer comment ils voyaient les cadets. Le sondage a montré que vous aviez raison : seulement 4 % des adultes et des ados ont déclaré d’emblée connaître le Mouvement des cadets. Vous trouverez peut-être consolant de savoir cependant que ce pourcentage est le même dans le cas du mouvement des Scouts du Canada. Il est réjouissant de voir que les Canadiens (86 % des ados et 83 % des adultes interrogés) ont une image d’ensemble très favorable des cadets. Par ailleurs, les adolescents estiment que le Mouvement des cadets est formateur (84 %), qu’il véhicule des idées modernes (68 %), qu’il est dynamique (65 %) et qu’il est « cool » (52 %).

Maintenant, tenez-vous bien! Il y avait plus d’adolescents contre l’idée d’entrer dans les cadets qu’en faveur. Les plus jeunes étaient néanmoins ceux qui se montraient les plus intéressés à se joindre au Mouvement : 26 % des jeunes interrogés ont déclaré qu’ils avaient déjà envisagé d’entrer dans les cadets.

Les inconvénients présumés seraient : • exige trop de temps (ados 29 %, adultes 8 %) • discipline (ados 8 %, adultes 7 %) • caractère trop militaire (ados 2 %, adultes 5 %) • mauvaise influence (ados 1 %, adultes 2 %)

Les ados interrogés ont principalement entendu parler des cadets dans leur famille. Un petit nombre en ont entendu parler à l’école.

Le sondage a été mené pour la cellule des communications de la Direction des cadets; il fournira de précieux renseignements pour la planification des communications du Mouvement des cadets du Canada.

Selon les répondants, voici les avantages que procure le Mouvement : • discipline (ados 28 %, adultes 49 %) • aptitudes sociales (ados 12 %, adultes 11 %) • responsabilités (ados 8 %, adultes 14 %) • esprit d’équipe (ados 4 %, adultes 12 %) • sens du respect (ados 3 %, adultes 11 %) • aptitudes techniques (ados 15 %, adultes 6 %)

Pour comparer les opinions et les perceptions des adultes (plus de 18 ans) et des adolescents (12 à 17 ans), CROP a fait 1616 interviews téléphoniques dans les deux langues officielles, d’un bout à l’autre du pays, du 19 novembre au 5 décembre 1999. E

Dans l’ensemble, comment les Canadiens perçoivent-ils le Mouvement des cadets? • 92 % des ados interrogés croient que les cadets se distinguent par leur personnalité et leur sens du leadership; • 80 % croient que le Mouvement cherche à promouvoir la fierté d’être Canadien et l’identité canadienne; • 76 % trouvent que la participation au Mouvement demande trop de temps; • 56 % croient que les cadets préparent les jeunes à l’armée.

29

Cinquante-six pour cent croient que les cadets préparent les jeunes à l’armée! Cette perception provient du fait que les cadets portent des vêtements militaires et s’adonnent à des choses de type militaire – comme ces cadets d’une garnison de cadets du Ontario Regiment au cours d’un exercice d’hiver à la Base des FC Borden (Ont.), en janvier. Quelque 140 cadets des Corps de cadets de l’Armée Oshawa, Pickering, Port Perry et Uxbridge ont testé leur habileté de survie au cours d’une fin de semaine. (Photo par Ken Globe, un bénévole civil de la garnison.)

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 30

Mesurer le rendement des équipes d’intervention «

M

esurer le rendement » était le nom du jeu auquel se sont livrés ceux qui ont participé à la réunion de l’équipe de la stratégie de Choix d’avenir à la fin de février. L’heure était venue en effet pour les équipes d’intervention de faire le point sur les progrès accomplis depuis le lancement de Choix d’avenir. Comment le bulletin final se présente-t-il? Certaines équipes ont progressé plus que d’autres. Certaines activités clés ont été menées à bien – souvent avec le concours de la Direction des cadets. D’autres ont été intégrées à des activités en cours. Le travail se poursuit dans bien des domaines clés, et de nouvelles activités voient le jour à mesure que les équipes d’intervention avancent leurs travaux. Bref, beaucoup de travail a été accompli, mais il reste beaucoup à faire.

Les équipes d’intervention ont toutes indiqué que la réussite passait par l’établissement de liens plus étroits avec la Direction des cadets (D Cad). Beaucoup ont indiqué qu’elles n’avaient tout simplement pas assez de temps ou de ressources pour faire tout ce qu’on attend d’elles.

L’équipe de la stratégie a décidé que les équipes d’intervention responsables du système d’information électronique et des questions diverses d’instruction devaient être dissoutes. La première avait terminé ses activités. La seconde s’occupait de deux activités dont l’une sera prise en charge par les ligues, et l’autre, par la nouvelle équipe d’intervention responsable du bilinguisme, qui a été créée pour promouvoir le bilinguisme au sein du Mouvement. Le col Rick Hardy, Directeur des cadets, a déclaré qu’il n’appuyait pas pour l’instant l’idée de créer une équipe d’intervention responsable du commandement et du contrôle. « Nous sommes en train de donner forme à la recommandation du Conseil des Forces armées de mettre en place une structure de commandement et de contrôle en vertu de laquelle la mise en œuvre du programme des cadets serait la responsabilité des commandants régionaux. Il serait donc prématuré de recueillir des commentaires du milieu à ce sujet. » Il n’est par contre pas prématuré pour l’équipe d’intervention responsable du partenariat d’entrer en action. L’équipe de la stratégie espère que l’équipe d’intervention se mettra à la tâche dès que possible et elle lui a d’ailleurs confié d’autres travaux. (Voir l’article de la page 21)

30

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000

« Les réponses reçues (à la suite • L’équipe d’intervend’un sondage de l’équipe d’intervention tion responsable de responsable de la structure demandant l’instruction contiaux corps/escadrons locaux si les organinuera de s’occuper sations des cadets nationale, régionale de plusieurs actiet locale rencontraient leurs besoins) vités en étroite représentent un précieux apport collaboration avec du milieu. » la D Cad et de deux – Maj Roman Ciecwierz, activités clés de co-chef d’équipe concert avec les ligues. Elle a reçu le feu vert pour faire une nouvelle enquête sur l’instruction dans chacun des éléments. • L’équipe d’intervention responsable de l’instruction du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) et des ligues établira elle aussi des liens plus étroits avec la D Cad et peut-être fusionner certaines de ses activités pour accélérer les choses. Les représentants des ligues au sein de l’équipe s’occuperont de faire circuler les idées parmi les ligues afin de parvenir à des consensus avant que les recommandations soient soumises à l’équipe de la stratégie; celle-ci en facilitera l’application. • L’équipe d’intervention responsable des communications doit notamment sa réussite à ses étroites relations de travail avec la cellule des communications de la D Cad. Elle doit néanmoins consulter plus étroitement les ligues avant de faire des


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 31

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

recommandations à l’équipe de la stratégie. Elle a mené à terme six de ses activités clés (des articles y ont d’ailleurs été consacrés dans des numéros antérieurs de Fiers d’être). Les autres activités se poursuivront. L’équipe continuera de faire écho aux observations du milieu. • En sa qualité d’organe consultatif, l’équipe d’intervention responsable des ressources continuera de servir de lien entre un groupe de travail de la D Cad et les régions dans l’examen des ressources régionales. Le co-chef de l’équipe, le maj Claude Duquette, est déjà membre du groupe de travail. La principale activité – obtenir de l’aide de l’extérieur en matière d’instruction – a été confiée à une équipe responsable de l’instruction. La « définition d’un plan de financement » a été confiée à l’équipe responsable du partenariat.

un précieux apport du milieu », a expliqué le chef de l’équipe, le maj Roman Ciecwierz. Les données de l’enquête seront dépouillées en mai. L’équipe continuera de s’intéresser aux questions qui relèvent du groupe consultatif de la branche. Certains ont émis l’idée qu’elle pourrait même aller encore plus loin. • Selon le col Hardy, l’équipe d’intervention responsable des valeurs et de la diversité doit rester. « La diversité est probablement la question la plus difficile à laquelle nous devons faire face. Nous essayons d’appliquer la même règle à tous, mais nous devons continuer de viser juste chaque fois que nous entreprenons quelque chose et être plus sensibles à la diversité. » L’équipe continuera de sensibiliser le Mouvement à la question de la diversité qui sera d’ailleurs inscrite dans les orientations stratégiques de l’Organisation. E

• L’équipe d’intervention responsable des changements de la politique relative au CIC et aux IC poursuivra son travail. Selon l’équipe de la stratégie, toute nouvelle politique devra au préalable avoir été examinée avec cette équipe. L’équipe travaillera de concert avec un représentant de la D Cad. Trois des activités de l’équipe seront prises en charge dans le cadre de la création d’un groupe professionnel militaire (GPM) pour les officiers du CIC. • Les questions confiées à l’équipe d’intervention responsable de la structure ont dans bien des cas été examinées par le Conseil des Forces armées. D’autres le seront dans le cadre de la création du GPM. Le rôle de l’équipe consistera dorénavant à recueillir des commentaires du milieu sur des questions de structure. L’équipe a obtenu un très bon taux de réponse à une enquête dans le cadre de laquelle on a demandé aux corps et aux escadrons locaux de dire si les détachements et les organismes régionaux et nationaux répondaient à leurs besoins. « Les réponses reçues représentent

31

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Le maj Ken Fells est co-chef de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des valeurs et de la diversité qui continuera de sensibiliser les questions de diversité au sein du Mouvement des cadets.


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:37

Page 32

À vous la parole

Les cadets : la génération des Pokémons? par le capc David Kirby

J

’ai récemment lu un article intéressant dans The London Free Press où des experts parlaient de la société de l’avenir. Ils m’ont amené à réfléchir au programme des cadets d’aujourd’hui et de demain. Marty Puterman, professeur à l’Université British Columbia, a déclaré en substance

que la génération X serait remplacée par une population de Pokémons qui ont passé leur jeunesse à résoudre des jeux d’aventure complexes et à naviguer sur le Net et qui réagissent beaucoup plus vite. Selon Puterman, le monde de demain sera marqué par une telle accélération du changement que les compétences

que nous acquérons aujourd’hui n’auront pas une très longue durée de vie. Frank Ogden, futurologue de Vancouver, s’inquiète des conséquences d’une telle situation. Selon lui, l’ère industrielle a créé deux mondes – les nantis et les démunis –, et l’avenir pourrait créer un nouveau fossé entre ceux qui ont le savoir et les autres. Les nouveaux membres du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC) font partie de la génération X. Ils sont non seulement habitués au changement, ils s’y attendent et ils s’adaptent rapidement à de nouvelles façons de faire. La réalité pour eux est ce qu’ils viennent tout juste de télécharger par Internet. Ils obtiennent les systèmes d’exploitation et les navigateurs les plus récents pour leur ordinateur et ils n’ont pas besoin d’un cours sur la façon de les utiliser. Le changement fait partie de leurs valeurs; c’est un élément positif de leur attitude.

Nos cadets sont en train de devenir la génération des Pokémons. Leur économie et leurs valeurs sociales exigeront des changements constants. (Photo par le sgt Christian Coulombe)

32

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000

Nos cadets sont en train de devenir la génération des Pokémons. Leur économie et leurs valeurs sociales exigeront des changements constants. Ce qu’ils téléchargent par Internet entre instantanément dans l’histoire. Un fait deviendra dorénavant un élément nécessaire pour passer au fait temporaire suivant, à la manière des niveaux de compétence qu’exigent les jeux informatiques étudiés par Marty Puterman. Le changement deviendra un impératif éthique, une règle de conduite. Refuser le changement sera considéré comme antisocial.


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:38

Page 33

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Cette façon de voir est totalement étrangère à ma génération, celle du baby-boom. Les membres de ma génération ont un mode de vie marqué par la diversité, mais ils n’ont pas adhéré au changement. Pour nous, les faits se trouvent dans les livres. Nous avons suivi des cours pour savoir comment utiliser nos nouveaux ordinateurs. Nous nous sommes plaints quand Windows a vu le jour, mais nous avons suivi un cours de recyclage. Pour nous, le changement est quelque chose qui doit être expliqué, organisé et géré. Notre système économique fondée sur la consommation encourage le changement, mais notre société valorise la tradition et la permanence. Le changement peut être très lent ou se faire par paliers, un état stable faisant suite à un changement important. Selon Puterman et Ogden, toutefois, le monde évolue de plus en plus vite, et il n’y aura plus d’états stables. Si nous refusons de changer constamment, nous serons relégués parmi ceux qui n’ont pas le savoir, dans les pages poussiéreuses de l’histoire. Pourquoi avons-nous tant de mal à changer le programme des cadets? Je crois que c’est parce que nous essayons d’arranger un système de la génération du baby-boom avec des outils de la génération X pour la génération des Pokémons. Nous essayons de rafistoler un vieux système. Nous n’avons cependant pas besoin d’un nouveau système qui devra être changé encore et encore. Nous devrions plutôt mettre en place un non-système fondé sur la permanence du changement.

33

Quelle est ma vision du programme des cadets? À vrai dire, ma façon de voir est tributaire de mes antécédents : j’appartiens à la génération du baby-boom. Je pense que les objectifs que poursuivent les cadets – le leadership, le civisme, la condition physique et l’intérêt pour les FC – demeurent valables. J’ai tendance à être en faveur d’une structure pyramidale à filière hiérarchique bien définie. J’accorde de la valeur à la tradition, mais non aux habitudes. Je crois toutefois que le programme des cadets devrait se rallier au rythme de changement que permettent les communications modernes. Il ne devrait plus y avoir de manuels de règles, mais un endroit où les règles peuvent être consultées au besoin. Les programmes locaux devront naviguer entre d’autres structures – d’autres programmes publics susceptibles d’appuyer certains de nos buts, par exemple. Quand ces structures ne nous aideront plus, nous les laisserons tomber. Les autorités de tout niveau auront la latitude voulue pour atteindre les objectifs du programme. Il nous faudra comprendre et accepter que ce qui est arrivé l’an dernier ou la semaine dernière n’a pas à dicter notre conduite aujourd’hui et ne pourra pas dicter notre conduite de demain. Nous devons surtout accepter le fait que le changement donnera à certains de nos efforts des allures d’échecs. Que conseillerais-je au programme des cadets? Commençons tout de suite à changer. Si cela ne marche pas, changeons les choses de nouveau. Si cela marche, soyons prêts à changer encore de toute façon. Les jeunes officiers du CIC sont prêts, et les cadets en ont besoin. Le reste d’entre nous pouvons essayer de nous adapter… ou suivre un cours! E

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

« Nous essayons d’arranger un système de la génération du baby-boom avec des outils de la génération X pour la génération des Pokémons. » – Capc David Kirby officier régional des cadets (Nord)


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:38

Page 34

Une solution efficace à 80 p. 100? La nouvelle Direction des cadets par le capf Jurgen Duewel

E

n octobre dernier, le col Rick Hardy, directeur des Cadets, m’a demandé de diriger une équipe chargée d’étudier la réorganisation de la Direction. Depuis plusieurs années, l’organisation des Cadets a fait l’objet d’examens qui ont tous abouti à la même conclusion générale : les réorganisations antérieures ne tenaient pas suffisamment compte de la planification stratégique à long terme et elles ont surtout entraîné un accroissement de l’effectif, sans que celui-ci ait reçu la formation voulue. On a par ailleurs constaté qu’il y avait un manque évident de communications claires et d’orientation cohérente, tant à l’interne qu’à l’externe. La Direction était ainsi structurée que seul le Directeur en avait une vue d’ensemble. Cela a entraîné deux effets indésirables. D’une part, le Directeur s’est trouvé obligé de faire de la microgestion et de s’occuper de détails insignifiants. D’autre part, tout travail sérieux se trouvait interrompu en son absence. De plus, il n’y avait ni section responsable des grands besoins du Mouvement, ni cellule responsable de la stratégie (de l’avenir). En fait, l’organisation était cloisonnée par éléments, et il n’y avait pas de coordination entre les sections. Résultat : des programmes d’instruction commune comme la musique, le conditionnement physique et le tir de précision étaient abordés différemment d’un élément à l’autre (Marine, Armée ou Air). La tâche de notre équipe consistait à examiner la structure proposée afin de voir si elle contribuait à simplifier

34

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

et à améliorer la coordination, à obtenir un maximum d’efficience et à éliminer les chevauchements en matière d’administration et de planification. On nous a demandé de récrire les attributions de tous les membres du personnel pour faire en sorte que les nouveaux postes soient confiés aux personnes les mieux qualifiées et les mieux formées. En outre, la nouvelle organisation devait permettre au Mouvement des cadets de faire preuve d’innovation et de vision stratégique. Le col Hardy nous a demandé de trouver une solution qui serait efficace à 80 p. 100 en moins de six semaines! Le col Hardy m’a laissé carte blanche quant à la formation de l’équipe. J’ai choisi des gens qui avaient occupé des postes de haute direction au QG de la Défense et qui devaient par conséquent connaître la réflexion stratégique. L’équipe comprenait le capf (retraité) Gerry Gadd, ancien commandant du NCSM Fraser et aujourd’hui vice-président de la Ligue navale de la Colombie-Britannique; le maj Rick Trute, commandant de détachement au QG de la région du Centre du Secteur de l’Ouest, anciennement du Bataillon des services; le capc Rick Powell, officier de marine et officier des projets spéciaux du Centre régional de cadets (Atlantique); le capt (retraité) Rick Peters, ancien officier d’infanterie, père d’un cadet de l’Armée et instructeur de vol dans le cadre du programme de bourses des Cadets de l’Air; et le maj Jim Greenough, pilote et commandant de l’École régionale d’instructeurs de cadets (Prairies).

Printemps

2000

Nous avons disséqué, remis en question et examiné l’organisation et nous avons recensé les fonctions à remplir. Nous avons aussi essayé de définir et de quantifier les compétences des futurs titulaires des postes. Nous avons interrogé le plus grand nombre possible de protagonistes dans l’espoir de saisir chacune des tâches et des fonctions. Cela fait, nous avons reconstitué l’organisation, sous trois nouvelles divisions : planification de la stratégie (vision stratégique et gestion du changement); développement des programmes (élaboration et rédaction des programmes d’instruction); et coordination (administration courante des quartiers généraux locaux et des centres d’instruction d’été des cadets). Nous avons en outre prévu trois sections internes : les services généraux, les finances et les communications. Avons-nous obtenu une solution efficace à 80 p. 100? Je crois que oui. Je pense que nous avons remis au Directeur un cadre d’organisation adapté à l’avenir. Reste à savoir si le personnel pourra relever les défis de l’avenir et faire preuve du leadership voulu pour servir le Mouvement dans sa totalité. Il y aura bien sûr des modifications à faire, mais je crois que nous sommes maintenant sur la bonne voie. – Le capf Duewel est le commandant du NCSM Ontario. Diplômé du Collège militaire royal, il prépare actuellement une maîtrise sur la conduite de la guerre. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:38

Page 35

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Civisme et football

S

e rapprocher de leur communauté – et de leur pays – est l’un des aspects du civisme auquel les cadets de tout le Canada accordent beaucoup d’importance. Les cadets de la région du Pacifique en ont fait la démonstration devant des centaines de milliers de Canadiens, l’automne dernier, quand ils ont déployé le drapeau du Canada à l’occasion de la Coupe Grey de 1999, à Hamilton (Ont.). Comment en sont-ils arrivés là? Les cadets du Lower Mainland et de l’île de Vancouver se sont associés à l’équipe de football de leur province, les BC Lions Football Club, l’an dernier, et déployé un drapeau du Canada de 40 mètres par 20 à l’ouverture de chacune des parties à domicile. Tenu par 70 à 100 cadets de la Marine, de l’Armée et de l’Air, le drapeau occupait la moitié du terrain. Ils ont fait de même à la Coupe Grey de 1999. Leur affiliation avec l’équipe de football constitue la première association des cadets à une équipe de football professionnelle pour toute une saison, selon le capt Judith-Anne Jarrett, officier des cadets de secteur (Air) de la région du Pacifique. « Nous encouragerons les associations de cette nature avec des équipes professionnelles dans d’autres villes. Elles contribuent à donner une grande visibilité aux Cadets des trois éléments et elles fournissent une bonne occasion de rendre hommage à notre pays et de manifester le sens civique que les cadets apprennent dans le Mouvement. » Le succès a été tel qu’on leur a demandé de revenir pour la prochaine saison. E

35

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:38

Page 36

Sources inattendues de solutions par le capt Beverley Deck

L

e personnel du centre de cadets de la région du Pacifique réuni à côté du distributeur d’eau avait manifestement des sentiments partagés au sujet de l’atelier sur le renouveau auquel il s’apprêtait à participer. Certains craignaient que l’atelier de trois jours ne se transforme en séance de félicitations, alors que d’autres, plus optimistes, croyaient qu’il pourrait en ressortir quelque chose.

« Nous ne devons pas craindre de nous remettre en cause et de critiquer notre Organisation et nos façons de faire. Autrement, nous nous condamnons à un avenir sans espoir de changement et sans vision

Le premier matin, nous avons laissé de côté nos affaires courantes pour nous rassembler dans la salle de conférence d’un hôtel local. Certains étaient sceptiques, d’autres se tenaient sur leurs gardes, et d’autres encore se montraient plein d’enthousiasme. Quel que soit notre service, notre grade ou notre titre, nous n’avions qu’un seul but : participer à l’exercice et avancer des idées. « Je crois que l’atelier visait à rassembler des membres du personnel qui ne se rencontrent pas nécessairement tous les jours pour trouver des solutions à des problèmes de travail », se rappelle le cplc Linda Burke, commis du conseiller régional de la Musique des cadets. Dans les trois jours qui ont suivi, nous avons dressé une longue liste de sujets de préoccupation relatifs à notre organisation et à notre travail. Nous nous sommes finalement concentrés sur les sept principaux d’entre eux. Grâce aux animateurs de la cellule de coordination de Choix d’avenir – Leo Kelly et le maj Serge Dubé -, nous avons fait des exercices de travail en équipe, échangé des idées, examiné des obstacles au changement, recensé nos partenaires, analysé des tendances sociales et, au bout du compte, défini un plan d’action pour nous attaquer aux problèmes soulevés.

de ce à quoi on pourrait arriver. »

– Le capt Linda Hildebrandt, membre du personnel de direction de l’École régionale des instructeurs de cadets, région du Pacifique

36

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

« J’ai été étonné de voir que nous avions accompli tant de choses en si peu de temps, indique l’adj Phil Garvin, commis d’administration. Je ne crois pas que nous aurions pu réussir si nous n’avions pas réglé la question des grades dès le premier jour. Cela nous a permis de nous considérer les uns les autres sur un pied d’égalité, tous étant attelés à la même tâche. » L’atelier nous a permis de constater que les solutions viennent parfois de sources inattendues et que nous pouvons tous avoir de bonnes idées quand on nous laisse la possibilité de

Printemps

2000

les exprimer. Bien des solutions sont venues de participants à qui l’on avait jamais demandé de suggestions. Les choses n’ont pas toujours été faciles, cependant. Il y a eu des moments de tension et de déception et des moments joyeux. Il y a eu des divergences de vues et des moments où il était impossible de nous entendre. Il s’est aussi présenté des moments où nous avons eu l’agréable surprise de voir que nous étions tous du même avis. Les échanges ont souvent été difficiles, mais toujours précieux. Nous avons parlé avec des gens avec qui nous ne nous entretenons pas normalement et avons appris à les connaître. Pour conclure l’atelier, nous avons établi une liste de questions méritant d’être approfondies et décidé de former une équipe de personnes intéressées à s’en occuper. Chacun a quitté avec une liste claire de choses à faire pour que notre organisation puisse appuyer les corps et les escadrons de la région du Pacifique d’une manière plus fonctionnelle et plus efficace encore. « Je pense que l’atelier nous a aidés à préciser le travail qui reste à faire pour obtenir que le programme des cadets de la région du Pacifique réponde bien aux besoins des officiers et des cadets des corps et des escadrons de notre région », a déclaré le capt Linda Hildebrandt, membre du personnel de direction de l’École régionale des instructeurs de cadets. « Après tout, ils sont notre raison d’être. » Nos tâches quotidiennes ne nous laissent pas beaucoup de temps pour changer ou renouveler nos pratiques. Cela doit se faire en permanence et demande de la persévérance et des efforts. Pour que le changement et le renouveau soient efficaces, il faut aussi se concentrer


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:38

Page 37

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

sur ce qui est important. Dans notre cas, le facteur le plus important est l’incidence de notre travail sur les cadets de la région. « Nous avons vu que nous devions penser avant tout à l’avenir du Mouvement des cadets et suivre le rythme de nos jeunes », a énoncé le sgt Kim Arnold, conseiller des cadets du secteur (Armée). Le ltv Jean Cyr, officier d’état-major – administration (Mer), a trouvé que

l’atelier avait permis de recentrer le personnel du centre de cadets de la région du Pacifique sur le rôle extrêmement important qu’il doit jouer dans l’Organisation des cadets. « À certains moments, la courbe d’apprentissage s’est révélée plutôt raide, et beaucoup d’entre nous avons profité d’une ‘mise au point’ bienvenue. Il restera néanmoins à maintenir nos acquis si nous ne voulons pas que les progrès accomplis se perdent. »

Nous espérons lancer des idées, définir de nouvelles pratiques et améliorer l’Organisation. Nous devons à cette fin mettre à profit les leçons de l’atelier et agir. Nous devons écouter et être ouverts au changement. Nous ne réussirons pas à tout coup, mais les succès obtenus vaudront certainement les efforts consentis. – Le capt Deck est coordonnatrice de Choix d’avenir pour la région du Pacifique. E

« L’atelier a permis de recentrer le personnel sur le très important rôle qu’il doit jouer dans l’Organisation de cadets » –

Le ltv Jean Cyr, officier d’état-major – administration (Mer) région du Pacifique

Échos du milieu Impressionné J’ai été associé au Mouvement, comme cadet, puis comme officier du Cadre des instructeurs de cadets (CIC), depuis 16 ans. J’ai occupé tous les postes à l’unité et j’ai commandé une compagnie au Centre d’instruction d’été des Cadets de l’Air de Blackdown, au cours des cinq dernières années. J’ai représenté la région du Centre dans le cadre de la redéfinition récente du Programme d’étoiles de l’Armée. J’ai suivi l’évolution de Choix d’avenir et de Fiers d’être avec un intérêt mitigé depuis quelques années. Comme bien d’autres de mon milieu, j’ai entendu beaucoup de belles promesses dans le passé et j’ai rempli tous les questionnaires imaginables en me demandant ce qui allait advenir des résultats. Je me suis associé aux blagues sur le processus « choix du passé » et en dépit des publications et des exposés auxquels j’ai assisté au centre régional d’instruction d’été, je n’avais pas l’impression

37

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

que le programme allait démarrer ou mener à quelque chose. Je suis obligé d’admettre que j’étais dans l’erreur. Le dernier numéro de Fiers d’être m’a montré hors de tout doute qu’il y a quelque chose derrière Choix d’avenir. Enfin, quelqu’un s’occupe d’une manière structurée de certains des problèmes que beaucoup de membres du CIC essaient de résoudre depuis longtemps. Franchement, je suis impressionné par la qualité du contenu de Fiers d’être. Notre système est avare de compliments, mais je crois que vous méritez nos félicitations. Si vous pensez que je peux jouer un rôle utile dans Choix d’avenir, n’hésitez pas à me contacter. Merci de vos efforts. – Capt Rick Butson, Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2814, Hamilton (Ont.)


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:38

Échos du milieu

Page 38

(suite)

Uniforme des cadets de la Marine

Merci pour le dernier numéro de Fiers d’être. Vous faites-là un travail formidable. J’ai remarqué que les cadets de la Marine représentés dans trois ou quatre photos portaient l’uniforme traditionnel des matelots. Je me demande si l’une des équipes d’intervention s’intéresse à la question de la tenue, car l’uniforme des cadets soulève à mon avis différentes questions : une question de morale – les cadets de la Marine veulent apparemment tous porter l’uniforme traditionnel – et une question d’image publique – les uniformes traditionnels de certaines unités servent depuis 30 ans, ils commencent à tomber en lambeaux, ils ont un méli-mélo d’insignes adaptés ou périmés, et ils ne donnent pas l’impression d’une tenue soignée. – Slt Geoff Kneller Corps des cadets de la Marine, Calgary NDLR : L’équipe d’intervention responsable des ressources travaille en étroite collaboration avec le capt Chris DeMerchant, officier de la logistique de la Direction des cadets responsable de l’habillement des cadets. J’aimerais soulever une question au sujet des photos des cadets de la Marine qui ont été utilisées récemment dans deux publications des cadets et des FC. Ces publications présentent des photos de cadets portant l’uniforme bleu traditionnel (La Feuille d’érable, 17 novembre 1999, page 16) et l’uniforme blanc traditionnel (Fiers d’être, automne 1999, pages 13 et 20).

38

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

Printemps

2000

Quand je suis entré dans les cadets, en 1978, on m’a remis l’uniforme bleu traditionnel, qui était l’uniforme des cadets de la Marine de l’époque. En 1979, nous sommes passés à l’uniforme vert, et celui-ci a été remplacé par l’uniforme noir actuel à la fin des années 1980. À mon avis, l’uniforme noir que l’on remet aux cadets de la Marine les fait reconnaître comme tels. On ne demande pas aux cadets de porter tous les jours l’uniforme traditionnel. Selon les Ordonnances sur l’administration et l’instruction des cadets relatives à la tenue des cadets de la Marine, l’uniforme traditionnel ne peut se porté qu’à l’occasion de cérémonies spéciales (les rassemblements commémorant la bataille de l’Atlantique, par exemple), avec la permission de l’officier régional des cadets. Selon moi, nous induisons en erreur la population et les FC en publiant des photos de cadets en uniforme traditionnel (en dehors des cérémonies). Même si les traditions nous tiennent à cœur, nous devrions véhiculer un message clair et suivre nos propres politiques nationales en matière d’uniforme. Je recommanderais que, à l’avenir, on examine les photos à l’avance pour voir si les cadets portent le bon uniforme et que, chaque fois qu’on demande des photos à des cadets, on leur explique qu’ils doivent porter l’uniforme actuel et non un uniforme traditionnel. – Ltv Paul Fraser Ancien officier des projets spéciaux, instruction d’été (marine), Direction des cadets


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:38

Page 39

L’avenir axé sur le renouveau

Suggestions Je ne suis qu’un simple cadet-sergent, mais comme j’ai un peu plus d’expérience que d’autres cadets, j’ai pensé vous faire part de quelques suggestions pour Fiers d’être. Vous pourriez avoir une nouvelle rubrique intitulée « Qu’est-ce qui vous tracasse ? » où les cadets pourraient dire ce qu’ils pensent sur tout ce qui touche les Cadets. (Vous nous montrez bien à nous exprimer. Sans rancune!) Vous pourriez aussi consacrer une rubrique aux suggestions de changement des cadets; après tout, c’est nous qui sommes au cœur du Mouvement, et certains des cadets du Canada pourraient avoir de VRAIES bonnes idées. Que diriez-vous, enfin, d’une rubrique sur tout ce que les cadets du pays peuvent acheter dans les magasins de fourniment des camps? On pourrait prévoir au bas de la rubrique un espace où les cadets pourraient suggérer des produits. – C/sgt J.R.K. Bergeron Gatineau (Qc) NDLR : Nous lançons dans ce numéro la rubrique « Qu’est-ce qui vous tracasse? » où les cadets et

les autres membres du Mouvement pourront s’exprimer. Les suggestions de changement sont toujours bienvenues. Malheureusement, il n’est pas possible d’ajouter au bulletin une rubrique consacrée au fourniment. S’inspirant d’un projet du millénaire de Vancouver, Portrait V2K, le Mouvement des cadets devrait envisager d’ajouter au bulletin Fiers d’être une rubrique où les membres seraient invités à publier des articles et des photos qui donnent une image de nous aujourd’hui, de nos souvenirs et de nos espoirs. Cela irait dans le sens de l’objectif du bulletin de l’hiver 1999 : rendre familier le terme « Cadets ». – Capt Don Lim Officier d’administration Corps des cadets de l’Armée 2501 Dartmouth (N.-É.) NDLR : Le capt Lim a présenté un article pour la première parution de la rubrique; son article sera publié cet été.

Mise à jour au sujet des crédits À la suite de l’article du capt Linda Hildebrandt sur les crédits d’études secondaires pour l’instruction des cadets, j’aimerais vous donner quelques renseignements au sujet de notre province. La Division de Terre-Neuve et du Labrador a demandé au ministère de l’éducation de reconnaître les cours et les programmes des cadets de la Marine et de les créditer au secondaire. Cette proposition a été approuvée au début d’octobre 1999. Si vous prévoyez faire le point sur cette question, j’apprécierais que vous signaliez les programmes et les cours qui ont été approuvés dans notre province.

39

La publication officielle du processus Choix d’avenir

Votre bulletin est sérieux, informatif et formateur. Félicitations! J’ai hâte d’en lire les prochains numéros. – Brenda Pinto Secrétaire, Division de Terre-Neuve Ligue navale du Canada NDLR : Voir les précisions sur les programmes et les cours approuvés dans l’article du capt Hildebrandt à la page 28. E


EM2900 ferpdfCadetsFpub(spring)

5/9/00 10:38

Page 40

Nouvelle équipe d’intervention sur le bilinguisme

C

hoix d’avenir met sur pied une équipe d’intervention qui s’intéressera à la question du bilinguisme dans le Mouvement des cadets.

L’une des principales tâches de l’équipe d’intervention responsable des questions diverses d’instruction consistait à « s’efforcer d’offrir davantage d’instruction dans les deux langues officielles ». L’équipe de la stratégie a néanmoins décidé de dissoudre cette équipe d’intervention en février. (Les ligues prendront à leur charge l’autre activité clé de l’équipe : promouvoir la reconnaissance de l’instruction des cadets et obtenir des crédits de cours facultatifs au niveau secondaire.)

dans les deux langues officielles et surcroît de travail pour les instructeurs bilingues, notamment. Les membres de l’équipe de la stratégie conviennent que la Loi sur les langues officielles confèrent des responsabilités au Mouvement des cadets et que celui-ci doit s’efforcer de s’en acquitter du mieux possible – particulièrement en ce qui concerne les documents. « Mais le bilinguisme ne consiste pas uniquement à fournir des documents dans les deux langues officielles », a déclaré le col Rick Hardy, directeur des Cadets. « Nous devons repenser cette question. »

L’équipe d’intervention responsable des questions diverses d’instruction a mené une enquête l’an dernier dans les centres d’instruction d’été des cadets et constaté que la question du bilinguisme soulève des problèmes : manque d’instructeurs bilingues, manque de documentation

La nouvelle équipe d’intervention s’attachera à valoriser le bilinguisme dans le Mouvement. Selon le col Hardy, « le bilinguisme devrait faire partie du programme de civisme et être enraciné dans la culture des cadets ».

40

Printemps

Fiers d’être

Volume 8

2000

La nouvelle équipe s’intéressera à des questions concrètes comme la traduction, l’administration et la documentation pour s’assurer que le Mouvement se conforme aux dispositions de la Loi sur les langues officielles. Elle cherchera aussi à voir où les relations entre les cadets francophones et anglophones pourraient être développées. Cela pourrait se faire dans le cadre des activités des centres d’instruction d’été, d’échanges interprovinciaux de cadets et d’autres activités interculturelles. L’équipe de la stratégie s’est aussi penchée sur la question du multilinguisme. « Nous ne pouvons pas ignorer cette question dans un programme communautaire comme celui des cadets », a déclaré le lcol Sam Marcotte, officier des cadets de la région (Prairies). Si nos efforts en matière de bilinguisme donnent de bons résultats, nous saurons alors quoi faire au sujet du multilinguisme », a conclu Dave Boudreau, directeur exécutif national de la Ligue des Cadets de l’Armée. E


00 spr