Issuu on Google+

PAOLO NOBILE

VIAGGIO ALL’INTERNO


PAOLO NOBILE +39 347 0700447

Via Massimiano 25 20134

be@wannabee.it www.wannabee.it

Progetto grafico: Matteo Cirenei

by appointment

Testi di: Silvia Pettinicchio, Claudio Monnini

VIAGGIO ALL’INTERNO

Traduzioni: Silvia Pettinicchio Stampa a cura di MAD Print © All right reserved

© All right reserved Stampa a cura di MAD Print Traduzioni: Silvia Pettinicchio

by appointment

+39 347 0700447

Testi di: Silvia Pettinicchio, Claudio Monnini

Via Massimiano 25 20134

Progetto grafico: Matteo Cirenei

be@wannabee.it www.wannabee.it


Mostre: 2013 Fiera “MIA” (Milan Image Art Fair), mostra personale, Superstudio Più, Milano. 1997 Paolo Nobile “Nuovi Autori per la Fotografia”, mostra personale, Galleria Modena 55 Arte Contemporanea, Torino 1995 Paolo Nobile “Il dono oscuro”, mostra personale, Spazio Foto San Fedele, Milano 1995 “La pienezza dello sguardo. Il Paradiso in fotografia: illusioni, visioni, allusioni”, Spazio Foto San Fedele, Milano 1994 “Viaggio intorno la mia tavola”, Fondazione Giacomo Costa, Genova

Exhibitions: 2013 Fiera “MIA” (Milan Image Art Fair), solo show, Superstudio Più, Milan. 1997 Paolo Nobile “Nuovi Autori per la Fotografia”, solo show, Galleria Modena 55 Arte Contemporanea, Turin. 1995 Paolo Nobile “Il dono oscuro”, solo show, Spazio Foto San Fedele, Milan. 1995 “La pienezza dello sguardo. Il Paradiso in fotografia: illusioni, visioni, allusioni”, Spazio Foto San Fedele, Milan. 1994 “Viaggio intorno la mia tavola”, Fondazione Giacomo Costa, Genoa.

Frequenta Ingegneria al Politecnico di Torino dove decide di dedicarsi totalmente alla fotografia, passione acquisita alcuni anni prima. Si forma come still lifer presso diversi studi di fotografi pubblicitari dove perfeziona le tecniche di ripresa nel grande formato. Matura un proprio percorso artistico oltre la fotografia commerciale e inizia ad esporre negli anni ‘90 con mostre personali e collettive a Torino, Genova e Milano dove si trasferisce nel 1996. Dal 2009, dopo una pausa nella produzione artistica, riprende con vigore una nuova serie di progetti personali.

He attends engineering at Turin Polytechnic University where he decides to dedicate himself totally to photography, a passion he had discovered some years back. He studies as a still lifer with numerous advertising photographers with whom he perfections the techniques of shooting large formats. He develops also an artistic career, together with his commercial profession and starts exhibiting in the 90s in solo and group shows in Turin, Genoa and Milan where he eventually moves in 1996. Since 2009, after a pause in his artistic production, he begins a new series of personal art projects.


PAOLO NOBILE


Untitled 0039 (2013) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


Untitled 0041 (2013) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


Untitled 0045 (2013) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


Untitled 4590 (2012) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


Untitled 4585 (2012) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


Untitled 7184/5 (2011) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 100, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


Untitled 9680 (2011) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


Untitled 9685 (2011) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


Untitled 9662 (2011) stampa fine art giclĂŠe su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 7 esemplari + 1 ap


DE RERUM ESSENTIA Silvia Pettinicchio When more than 5 years ago I saw Matteo Cirenei’s photographs for the first time a famous scene came to my mind: the opening of 2001: A Space Odyssey, a movie full of important metaphors that I saw when I was only a child. In that scene a hominid learns to use the bones of a dead animal as a club suggesting that major changes will derive from this. For a moment a dark and imposing parallelepipedon replaces the primitive landscape while the sun’s rays cleave its corners and the ears of the viewer are filled with the notes from Strauss Zarathustra. There, in that frame is contained the essence of all things, of intelligence (Human? Superhuman ?) condensed into the precise shapes and edges of the concrete monolith.

In front of the fractalic geometries of Cirenei I hear the same music or rather a continuous note of that symphony which bouncing on those solid surfaces reaches pure and clear the ears witnessing the genius, the perfect order and the spark of intuition all crystallized in those architectural forms. But also the fact that real art involves you synesthestically. And indeed it was my synesthesia to suggest me the encounter of Cirenei with Paolo Nobile: in fact even with the works of the latter I had a reaction involving my hearing. Paolo photographs still life, which I like to translate as natura immobile and not as we would say in Italian natura morta (dead nature). In his shots he freezes a precise moment of a long and continuous evolution as a representation of Heraclitus panta rhei (i.e. everything flows),

but unlike the withered fruit in the seventeenth-century vanitas which alluded to the pessimistic view of memento mori (i.e. thou shall die), Nobile rehabilitates the decay in an aesthetical and perhaps ethical manner. The quince or dried banana on the verge of rotting imply a story, an entire experience, and because they do not represent the final shot of the tale we expect them to continue their journey. Hidden in the dark backgrounds of Paolo’s photos I hear dozens and dozens of voices, whispering, of course, because nothing is shouted there. They are the voices of the experiences of the subjects which have been photographed. The noise of the passing of time, the steps of things and people whose presence has been recorded as the object is alive.

In this regard I reckon an interview to Barbara Bush in which a journalist asked her why she did not dye her hair and had not given in to the blandishments of plastic surgery. She replied calmly saying that every wrinkle furrowing her face was the sign of thousands of smiles she had given away or tears she had shed. Her only concern was not erasing them but making sure that those directed upwards outnumbered those directed downwards. Therefore this is the essence of Noble’s work: an agreeable vanitas which is pleased with itself.


A JOURNEY WITHIN “I do not seek, I found.” (Pablo Picasso) Claudio Monnini Art has always questioned itself about the responsibility of inspiration. Talents seem to be the key to the “artistic” result i.e. that tool of the mind which allows you to translate an object trouvé , indeed the inspiration, into a poetic solution. In the long run, talent is nothing but the ability to “tòrre” (as they say in dialectal Italian) that is to take away and therefore record and highlight aesthetic presences concealed within known contexts . If this is true for painting, which has the possibility of not starting from reality, and thus of exploring a direct and abstract language to build an archetypal semantics, or of stylizing and transforming reality with respect to viewing, in photography it is an exercise which requires a special rigor of thought, because the eye of the photographer will simply choose or cause a series of “surrounding conditions“ which are the object of the shot, through an instrument, the lens, which we will call “ the objective.” This is true at least for photographers such as Paolo Nobile and Matteo Cirenei, who choose to limit the scope of the a posteriori intervention on the shot to a strictly philological work to remove any burrs, in order to respect the “true” nature. In this context, the virtuosity of the photographer is the maximum prediction of an “a priori” result. There are however two areas which are worth focusing on: the choice of the subject, the way to “cut “ it in its dynamic and tectonic lines; the anatomy of the composition, as Rudolph Arnheim1 would say, i.e. the implicative aspect which seems to show the what but in reality, since these are “abstract” photos as we shall see, it is the how; and finally the poetic and metaphorical aspect, which concerns our inside “structures”2, which is precisely the what. Not always what we are looking describes what we are discussing, we continuously deal with our symbolic apparatus, light, shape, color, matter are the instruments of a symphony which produces a liminal wind. This separates the world of perceptions from the one of mnemonic experiences, and produces that emotional disturbance which gives meaning to our lyrical artistic experience. R. Arnheim, La dinamica della forma architettonica, 1994, Feltrinelli I am referring to our cultural context as the limits of anthropological structuralism have been highlighted by Umberto Eco in La struttura assente, 2002,Bompiani

I make this clarification because it is immediately clear that an architectural subject photographed by Cirenei is not, for example, Potsdamer Platz, or the Holocaust monument in Berlin, it is not a picture of architecture, strictly speaking, but rather a state of mind, the rhythm of breath during contemplation, the clarity of thought. Similarly, a withered fruit by Nobile is not a still life, but a reflection on the nature of beauty, the boundaries defining the beautiful, the universal idea of time and the idea of ​​“experience” through bare contemplation of the becoming into existence. I want to underline this because both photographers have a parallel life as professional ‘commercial’ photographers, the first as an architect, the second as a still lifer. They apply to their commercial work that same talent, that same professional competence but submit it to an indicative narration - architecture or food instrumental to something quite different from “a journey within.” Matteo Cirenei, talking about both his own and Paolo Nobile’s work, made​​ reference to the fathers of American photography, to show that his and Noble’s work adheres to a form of abstractionist pictorialism, with reference to Paul Strand and Edward Weston. Claudio Marra3 cites: “[...] The novelty , the difference may arise precisely from the photographic eye being “ dead “ [...] able to bring out special forms and structures. Because in the end, for Strand [...] : “ The shapes of the objects, their color tones, structures and lines, these are the instruments, strictly photographic of our orchestra” [ ...] Pictorialism did not die [... ] with the advent of straight photography [...], rather it simply changed sponsors, from tutelage by impressionists to that by abstractists (but it would be better to say, for the sake of precision, neoplastic - constructivist) [...] . The possibilities of the camera lens, according to Weston, must be addressed by especially highlighting the structure of things, [...] its abstractions on the landscape, on the human body or still life (the famous peppers and shells ) always tend to overcome the referentiality and exaltation of formal qualities ( line, texture , tone and structure ) of each person.“ In fact, the above citation only confirms, beyond what we have already learned, that every artist collects, indeed finds, in the words of Pablo Picasso, insights beginning with the work of artists who preceded him, or even, as in this case, gave the first stroke of the pickaxe to the path which everyone else would then have to plow through. Even Gabriele Basilico, who recently passed away, essential to anyone photographing architecture, could proba-

1

3

2

4

Claudio Marra, Fotografia e Pittura nel Novecento (e oltre), 2012, Bruno Mondadori, Milano-Torino P. Strand, Il movente artistico in fotografia, in N. Lyons (a c. di), Fotografi sulla fotografia, 1990, Agorà, Torino

bly not ignore Strand, coming however, to very different conclusions from those of Cirenei: the first being more choral and figurative, the second more synthetic and concretist But it is interesting that in this “finding“ often the chance intervenes, together with a reflective and fatalistic attitude - I would say zen - which transforms, as I stated in the incipit, found objects into a poetic solution . Paolo Nobile said on the matter: “I have accidentally discovered a quince left in a corner of my studio after a photo shoot . Many weeks or perhaps months must have passed, and the decomposition process had altered the appearance of the fruit to the point of not being recognizable as the original ( I knew it because it could be none than “that” piece of fruit) . The quince had turned into something much more interesting than the original : it had lost color, but had gained texture and depth thanks to an unexpected asymmetry somehow generated . It had lost its edibility, but had gained however this unpredictable beauty in the eyes of those who, like me, are used to photographing “perfect” or assumedly perfect products of nature. Discovering beauty in a piece of fruit which should have generated discomfort or repulsion because of its decomposed appearance, associated with its having been “before” an edible fruit was also a reaction to what is usually asked of me : pictures of fresh products, rich in color and attractive.“ In Nobile and Cirenei’s shooting and printing there is a strict and selective discipline, a method which requires patience and waiting for the right moment. It is the creation of those “surrounding conditions” mentioned earlier, the maturation of the subject, the weather and seasonal conditions, the optimum light. The preparation is manic and monastic. It is about being “abstract artists“ with a medium, analogs photography, which involves not only the virtual world of the film but also the reality of the subject, and ultimately the support insomuch as qualifying matter and tonal mood . But how do the subjects of these photos appear, what is it that makes me recognize the stylistics of their authors, in addition to the choice of an apparent monochrome, the quality of detail and accuracy, and the execution? What catches the eye is the fact that we are looking at shots animated by a “dynamic action “, from the contemplation of matter in an apparent static rigor, which “moves “ within the frame not because it is in motion, but because it has power. So these images speak the language of the dynamics of form4, in the Gestalt sense, and the consequences that this tension in space

creates on the “ structures of thought.”5  There is a similar approach to abstract concretist art - in Cirenei’s case, a pure - visibilist or abstract informal one– in Noble’s case, expressionist . For this reason the light, used by Cirenei as a means of graphic contrast, in Nobile’s photos is often at the limit of perception: his deep darks increase the visual tension. The retina must get used to the image just as you get used to the pace of a novel in order to dive into it and absorb its story . From this syntax the connotative aspect emerges, the activation of the emotional reaction to the works . The inner and human nature does not reveal itself, as we have seen, through a figurative description of man, but through an emotional field evoked by “archetypal “ and primitive forms or subliminal metaphors . One might say, for example, that Cirenei’s photos are analogous to the sculptures of Giuseppe Uncini , i.e. extrapolations of semantic and meaningful elements from the language of a far more complex linguistic structure. These two ways of shooting contain a “primary” intention in the sense of a “trip back to origin” , to the essence of things . As if they wanted to unveil an inner layer which can be as much a geometric and architectural perspective as a recession of matter. With regards to the mission of art, the fact that they are photographs, poetry or sculpture does not change the nature of the poetic approach other than for technique and medium; they are actually windows, openings in the wall and pointing inward for those who contemplate them . In fact, maybe we are nearly wrong and we are watching music; molded with light, animated by emotional disturbances, composed over the scores of matter and masterfully played . A manic execution that makes a debut of every single print.

R. Arnheim - idem U.Eco -idem ma anche E.Panowsky, La prospettiva come forma simbolica, 1987 , Feltrinelli 7 F.Caroli, Storia della fisiognomica. Arte e psicologia da Leonardo a Freud, 2012, Mondadori Electa

5 6


VIAGGIO ALL’INTERNO “Io non cerco, trovo.” (Pablo Picasso) Claudio Monnini L’arte si interroga da sempre sulla responsabilità dell’ispirazione. Il talento sembra essere la chiave del risultato “artistico”, vale a dire quel tool della mente che permette di tradurre un object trouvé, l’ispirazione appunto, in una soluzione poetica. A conti fatti, il talento non è che la capacità di “tòrre” (come si direbbe in volgare antico) cioè di togliere per prendere. Quindi di notare, e di mettere in evidenza, presenze estetiche mimetizzate all’interno di contesti noti. Se questo è vero per la pittura, che ha comunque la possibilità di non partire dal dato reale, e quindi di esplorare un linguaggio direttamente astratto per costruire una semantica archetipa, oppure di stilizzare e mutare il dato reale rispetto all’esperienza visiva, per la fotografia si tratta di un esercizio che richiede uno speciale rigore del pensiero, perché l’occhio del fotografo si limita a scegliere o a provocare una serie di “condizioni al contorno” che sono l’oggetto dello scatto, attraverso uno strumento, la lente, che chiamiamo per l’appunto “obiettivo”. Questo vale almeno per quei fotografi, come Paolo Nobile e Matteo Cirenei, che scelgono di limitare l’intervento a posteriori sullo scatto a un intervento filologico, per pulirne le eventuali sbavature, a volerne rispettare la natura di “vero”. In quest’ottica il virtuosismo del fotografo sta nella massima previsione del risultato “a priori”. Esistono in ogni caso due aree che vale la pena di mettere a fuoco: la scelta del soggetto, il modo di “tagliarlo” nelle sue linee dinamiche e tettoniche; l’anatomia della composizione, come direbbe Rudolph Arnheim1, cioè l’aspetto denotativo che sembra indicare il cosa ma in realtà, trattandosi di foto “astratte”, come vedremo, è il come; infine l’aspetto poetico, metaforico, che riguarda le nostre “strutture”2 interiori, che è proprio il cosa. Non sempre ciò che stiamo guardando descrive ciò di cui si parla, facciamo i conti con i nostri apparati simbolici in continuazione, luce, forma, colore, materia sono gli strumenti di una sinfonia che produce un vento liminare, questo separa il mondo delle percezioni da quello delle esperienze mnemoniche, e produce quella perturbazione emotiva che dà un senso lirico alla R. Arnheim, La dinamica della forma architettonica, 1994, Feltrinelli mi riferisco al nostro contesto culturale poiché i limiti antropologici dello strutturalismo sono stati evidenziati da Umberto Eco in La struttura assente, 2002,Bompiani

nostra esperienza artistica. Faccio questa precisazione perché sia subito chiaro che un’architettura fotografata da Cirenei non rappresenta, ad esempio, Postdamer Platz, o il monumento all’Olocausto di Berlino, non è cioè una foto di architettura, in senso stretto, ma rappresenta uno stato d’animo, il ritmo del respiro durante una condizione contemplativa, il nitore del pensiero. Allo stesso modo, un frutto avvizzito di Nobile non è una natura morta, ma una riflessione sulla natura della bellezza, sui confini che definiscono il bello, sull’idea universale del tempo e sull’idea stessa di “esperienza” attraverso la nuda contemplazione del divenire. Mi preme dirlo dato che entrambi i fotografi hanno una parallela vita professionale come fotografi “commerciali”; architetto il primo, still lifer il secondo. Applicano nel lavoro commerciale quello stesso talento, quella stessa competenza professionale, ma li sottomettono a una narrazione denotativa - prodotto architettonico o food - strumentale a tutt’altra cosa che “un viaggio all’interno”. Matteo Cirenei, parlando dei rispettivi lavori suoi e di Paolo Nobile, ha fatto riferimento ai padri della fotografia americana, in particolare per dimostrare che i propri lavori e quelli di Nobile aderiscono ad una forma di pittorialismo astrattista, con riferimento a Paul Strand e a Edward Weston; cita Claudio Marra3 : “[...] la novità, il diverso possono scaturire proprio dal quell’essere “morto” dell’occhio fotografico […] in grado di far risaltare forme e strutture particolari. Perché alla fine, per Strand […]: «Le forme degli oggetti, le tonalità di colore relative, le strutture e le linee, questi sono gli strumenti, strettamente fotografici della nostra orchestra »4 […] Il pittorialismo non muore […] con l’avvento della straight photography […], ma cambia solo sponsor, dalla tutela impressionista a quella astrattista (ma meglio sarebbe dire, per essere più precisi, neoplastica-costruttivista) […]. Le possibilità dell’obiettivo fotografico, secondo Weston, devono essere soprattutto indirizzate all’evidenziazione della struttura delle cose, […] le sue astrazioni sul paesaggio, sul corpo umano o sullo still life (i celebri peperoni e conchiglie) tendono sempre al superamento della referenzialità e all’esaltazione delle qualità formali (di linea, di texture, di tono e di struttura) di ogni singolo soggetto.” In realtà la citazione conferma soltanto, al di là di quanto avevamo già colto, che ogni artista raccoglie, anzi trova, come diceva Pablo Picasso, spunti

1

3

2

4

Claudio Marra, Fotografia e Pittura nel Novecento (e oltre), 2012, Bruno Mondadori, Milano-Torino P. Strand, Il movente artistico in fotografia, in N. Lyons (a c. di), Fotografi sulla fotografia, 1990, Agorà, Torino

di riflessione e di partenza dal lavoro degli artisti che lo hanno preceduto o che addirittura, come in questo caso, hanno dato i primi colpi di piccone al sentiero che tutti gli altri avrebbero poi dovuto solcare. Lo stesso Gabriele Basilico, recentissimanente scomparso, imprescindibile per chiunque fotografi architettura, non ha potuto probabilmente ignorare Strand, giungendo però a conclusioni molto differenti da Cirenei: più corale e figurale il primo, più sintetico e concretista il secondo. Ma è interessante come in questo “trovare” spesso intervenga il caso, ed un atteggiamento riflessivo e fatalista - direi zen - che trasforma, come dicevo nell’incipit, un object trouvé in una soluzione poetica. Dice appunto Paolo Nobile: “Ho scoperto per caso una mela cotogna dimenticata in un angolo del mio studio dopo un servizio fotografico. Dovevano essere passate molte settimane o forse mesi e il processo di decomposizione aveva modificato l’aspetto del frutto a tal punto da non poter immaginare quello originale (io lo sapevo perché non poteva essere che “quel” frutto). La mela cotogna si era trasformata in qualcosa di molto più interessante dell’originale: aveva perso colore ma aveva acquistato texture e profondità grazie anche ad un’inaspettata asimmetria generatasi chissà come. Persa l’edibilità, aveva però guadagnato una sua imprevedibile bellezza agli occhi di chi, come me, è abituato a fotografare prodotti della natura “perfetti”, o presunti tali. Scoprendo la bellezza in un frutto che a rigor di logica avrebbe dovuto suscitare fastidio o repulsione a causa del suo aspetto decomposto associato al suo essere “prima” un frutto edibile. Una reazione, anche, a ciò che mi viene abitualmente chiesto: immagini di prodotti freschi, ricchi di colore e appetibili.” C’è, nei modi di scattare e di stampare, di Nobile e di Cirenei, l’assunzione di una disciplina rigorosa e selettiva, un metodo che richiede la pazienza e l’attesa del momento. Si tratta della creazione delle “condizioni al contorno” cui accennavo prima, della maturazione del soggetto, della condizione meteorologica e stagionale, della luce ottimale; c’è nella preparazione, un approccio maniacale e monacale. Si tratta di essere “astrattisti” con un mezzo, la fotografia analogica, che coinvolge non solo il mondo virtuale della pellicola, ma anche quello reale del soggetto, e infine il supporto, per come qualifica la materia e il timbro tonale. Ma come ci appaiono i soggetti di queste foto, quale cifra stilistica mi fa riconoscere i loro autori, oltre alla scelta di una apparente monocromia, alla qualità del dettaglio, al rigore, all’esecu-

zione? Quello che salta agli occhi è che siamo di fronte a scatti animati da “azioni dinamiche”, dalla contemplazione della materia nell’apparente rigore statico, che “si muove” nell’inquadratura non perché sia in movimento, ma perché ha tensione. Quindi queste immagini parlano il linguaggio della dinamica della forma5, in senso gestaltico, e delle conseguenze che questa tensione dello spazio genera sulle “strutture del pensiero”6. Vi è un approccio analogo all’arte astratta concreta - nel caso di Cirenei, più puro-visibilista - o astratta informale - nel caso di Nobile, più espressionista7. Per questo ad esempio la luce, usata da Cirenei come mezzo grafico di contrasto, è nelle foto di Nobile, spesso, al limite della percezione: i suoi scuri profondi aumentano la tensione visiva: bisogna abituare la retina all’immagine come ci si abitua al ritmo di un romanzo per potervisi immergere e assorbirne il racconto. Da questa sintassi affiora la parte connotativa, l’attivazione della reazione emotiva alle opere. La natura interiore e umana non emerge, come abbiamo visto, attraverso la descrizione figurata dell’uomo ma attraverso un campo emotivo evocato da forme “archetipe” primitive o da metafore subliminali. Verrebbe da dire, per esempio, che le foto di Cirenei sono degli analoghi delle sculture di Giuseppe Uncini; cioè delle estrapolazioni di elementi semantici e significanti dal linguaggio di un edificio linguistico molto più complesso. I due modi di lavorare contengono un’intenzione “primaria” nel modo di scattare, nel senso di un “viaggio alle origini”, all’essenza delle cose. Come se volessero disvelarne uno strato interiore che può essere contenuto tanto in uno scorcio geometrico-architettonico quanto nella recessione della materia. Rispetto alla missione dell’arte, infatti, il fatto che siano fotografie, poesia o scultura non cambia la natura poetica dell’approccio se non per un dato tecnico e strumentale; in realtà sono finestre, tanto aperte sulla parete quanto rivolte verso l’interno di chi le contempla. Infatti, forse, ci siamo proprio sbagliati e stiamo guardando brani musicali; plasmati con la luce, animati da perturbazioni emotive, composti sulle partiture della materia infine eseguiti magistralmente. Un’esecuzione maniacale che fa di ogni singola stampa un’opera prima. R. Arnheim - idem U.Eco -idem ma anche E.Panowsky, La prospettiva come forma simbolica, 1987 , Feltrinelli 7 F.Caroli, Storia della fisiognomica. Arte e psicologia da Leonardo a Freud, 2012, Mondadori Electa 5 6


DE RERUM ESSENTIA Silvia Pettinicchio La prima volta, più di 5 anni fa, che ho visto gli scatti di Matteo Cirenei mi è venuta in mente la famosissima scena iniziale di 2001: Odissea nello spazio, film che ho visto da bambina, denso di metafore importanti. Un ominide impara ad utilizzare come una clava le ossa di un animale morto facendo intendere che grandi cambiamenti ne scaturiranno. Per un attimo un parallelepipedo scuro e imponente si sostituisce al panorama primitivo mentre i raggi del sole ne fendono gli angoli e le orecchie dello spettatore si riempiono delle note dello Zarathustra di Strauss. Lì, in quel fotogramma è contenuta l’essenza di tutte le cose, della intelligenza (Umana? Superiore?) condensata nelle forme precise, concrete e taglienti del monolite. Davanti alle geometrie frattaliche di Cirenei odo la stessa musica o meglio una nota continua di quella sinfonia che rimbalzando sulle superfici solide

arriva all’orecchio pura e limpida a testimoniare il genio, la regola perfetta e la scintilla dell’intuizione cristallizzata nelle forme architettoniche. Ma anche il fatto che davanti alla vera arte i sensi vengano coinvolti in maniera sinestesitica Ed è stata la mia stessa sinestesia a suggerirmi l’incontro di Cirenei con Paolo Nobile: infatti anche davanti alle opere di quest’ultimo ho avuto una reazione che ha coinvolto l’udito. Paolo fotografa still life, che mi piace tradurre con vita immobile e non come invece diremmo noi italiani nature morte. Immobilizza nello scatto un istante preciso di un lungo e continuo divenire a rappresentazione del panta rhei eraclideo, ma a differenza della frutta avvizzita delle vanitas seicentesche

che alludeva alla visione pessimistica del memento mori, Nobile riabilita esteticamente e forse eticamente il decadimento. La melacotogna appassita o la banana sul punto di marcire vogliono sottintendere un trascorso, un intero vissuto, e poiché non rappresentano il final shot della storia ci aspettiamo che il loro viaggio continui. Dai fondi scuri delle foto di Paolo sento emergere decine e decine di voci, sussurrate, certamente, perché nulla è gridato in quegli scatti. Sono le voci delle esperienze dei soggetti fotografati. I rumori dello scorrere del tempo, i passaggi di cose e persone la cui presenza è stata registrata dall’oggetto in quanto vivo. A questo proposito ricordo un’intervista all’anziana Barbara Bush cui una giornalista chiedeva come mai non si tingesse i capelli e non avesse ceduto

alle lusinghe della chirurgia plastica. Lei rispose serenamente dicendo che ogni ruga che le solcava il volto era il segno di migliaia di sorrisi regalati o di lacrime versate. L’unica sua preoccupazione non era cancellarle ma fare in modo che prevalessero quelle dirette verso l’alto rispetto a quelle dirette verso il basso. E’ questa quindi l’essenza delle opere di Nobile: una vanitas che si compiace e che piace.


Rock #2, Antelope Canyon, Page, 1992 stampa fine art giclĂŠe al carboncino su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 80 x 80, ed. 6 esemplari + 2 ap


#06100211, Edificio in via Valtellina, Milano, 2006 stampa fine art giclĂŠe al carboncino su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 100 x 100, ed. 6 esemplari + 2 ap


#09020604, Edificio in via Valtellina, Milano, 2009 stampa fine art giclĂŠe al carboncino su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 6 esemplari + 2 ap


#11030513, Monumento ai caduti, Como, 2011 stampa fine art giclĂŠe al carboncino su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 6 esemplari + 2 ap


#11080309, Jewish Museum, Berlino, 2011 stampa fine art giclĂŠe al carboncino su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 25 x 25, ed. 5 esemplari + 2 ap


#1108, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, Berlino, 2011 stampa fine art giclĂŠe al carboncino su carta baritata platinum gel cm 25 x 25, trittico, ed. 5 esemplari + 2 ap


#11080902, Potsdamer Platz Metro Station, Berlino, 2011 stampa fine art giclĂŠe al carboncino su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 5 esemplari + 2 ap


#11081011, Bauhaus Archive, Berlino, 2011 stampa fine art giclĂŠe al carboncino su carta cotone hahnemĂźhle photo rag cm 50 x 50, ed. 5 esemplari + 2 ap


MATTEO CIRENEI


Exhibitions: 2013 “Premio Celeste 2013”, PAN, Naples. 2013 “Se una notte d’estate un viaggiatore”, Wannabee Gallery, Milan. 2013 International Photography Awards “One shot: Spaces” exhibition, The Loft at Liz’s Gallery, Los Angeles. 2013 “Prima Visione 2012, I fotografi e Milano”, Bel Vedere Gallery, Milan. 2012 Auction “Scatti per bene” 9th edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2012 Fair “AAF” (Affordable Art Fair) with Glauco Cavaciuti Gallery, Superstudio Più, Milan. 2011 Auction “Scatti per bene” 8th edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2011 Fair “MIA” (Milan Image Art Fair), mostra personale, Superstudio Più, Milan. 2011 “Open Your Eyes” PH Neutro Gallery, Verona. 2011 Auction Award “Arte in Volo”, Circolo Filologico Milanese, Milan. 2010 Auction “Scatti per bene”, 7th edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2010 “Fotografie contro la leucemia | con Mario De Stefanis” Bel Vedere Gallery, Milan. 2010 “Specchi Inesistenti”, solo show, Knoll International showroom, Milan. 2009 Auction “Scatti per bene”, 6th edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2009 “Diaframmi Visuali”, duo show, Minotti Cucine showroom, Milan. 2008 Auction “Scatti per bene”, 5th edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2008 “2 edifici milanesi Anni ’50 a confronto”, solo show, Galli & Orizzonti showroom, Paris. 2008 “Milano, geometrie d’autore in bianco e nero”, solo show, showroom Bredaquaranta, Sesto S. Giovanni (Milan). 2007 Auction “Scatti per bene”, 4th edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2007 “Milano, Milano”, duo show, Scoglio di Quarto Gallery, Milan. 2007 “L’Arte italiana del vivere”, solo show, Galli & Orizzonti showroom, Paris.

2007 “Pittura vs Fotografia. Coppie di artisti allo specchio”, Wannabee Gallery, Milan. 2007 “La Città nell’arte”, Wannabee Gallery Milan. 2006 Auction “Scatti per bene”, 3rd edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2005 Auction “Scatti per bene”, 2nd edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2004 Auction “Scatti per bene”, 1st edition, Sotheby’s, Milan. 2002 “Per parlare di pace non bastano le parole”, L’Affiche Gallery, Milan. 2001 in occasion of Milan Design Week, solo show, “ le Biciclette”, Milan. 1998 “21 x 21 x 21”, Mercurio Cinematografica, Milan and Rome. 1997 “Young Italian Photographers and a master: Maria Mulas”, Hands Gallery, New York. Awards: 2013 “Premio Celeste 2013”, second prize in the Photography & Digital Graphics contest. 2013 Honorable Mention at IPA (International Photography Awards). 2012 Nominee at the Black & White Spider Awards, 7th Edition. 2011 Nominee at the Black & White Spider Awards, 6th Edition.2011 Second classified at “Arte in Volo” Art Award, Il Volo Onlus. 2009 Nominee at the “Premio Fotografico 2009” of the Italian Professional Photographers National Association TAU Visual. 2001 Third classified at the Ermanno Casoli Interational Art Award.

Mostre: 2013 “Premio Celeste 2013”, PAN, Napoli. 2013 “Se una notte d’estate un viaggiatore”, Wannabee Gallery, Milano. 2013 International Photography Awards “One shot: Spaces” exhibition, The Loft at Liz’s Gallery, Los Angeles 2013 “Prima Visione 2012, I fotografi e Milano”, Galleria Bel Vedere, Milano. 2012 Asta “Scatti per bene” 9a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2012 Fiera “AAF” (Affordable Art Fair) con Galleria Glauco Cavaciuti, Superstudio Più, Milano. 2011 Asta “Scatti per bene” 8a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2011 Fiera “MIA” (Milan Image Art Fair), mostra personale, Superstudio Più, Milano. 2011 “Open Your Eyes” Galleria PH Neutro, Verona. 2011 Asta Premio “Arte in Volo”, Circolo Filologico Milanese, Milano 2010 Asta “Scatti per bene”, 7a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2010 “Fotografie contro la leucemia | con Mario De Stefanis” Galleria Bel Vedere, Milano. 2010 “Specchi Inesistenti”, mostra personale, showroom Knoll International, Milano. 2009 Asta “Scatti per bene”, 6a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2009 “Diaframmi Visuali”, mostra bi-personale, showroom Minotti Cucine, Milano. 2008 Asta “Scatti per bene”, 5a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2008 “2 edifici milanesi Anni ’50 a confronto”, mostra personale, showroom Galli & Orizzonti, Parigi. 2008 “Milano, geometrie d’autore in bianco e nero”, mostra personale, showroom Bredaquaranta, Sesto S. Giovanni.

2007 Asta “Scatti per bene”, 4a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2007 “Milano, Milano”, mostra bi-personale, Galleria Scoglio di Quarto, Milano. 2007 “L’Arte italiana del vivere”, mostra personale, showroom Galli & Orizzonti, Parigi. 2007 “Pittura vs Fotografia. Coppie di artisti allo specchio”, Wannabee Gallery, Milano. 2007 “La Città nell’arte”, Wannabee Gallery Milano. 2006 Asta “Scatti per bene”, 3a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2005 Asta “Scatti per bene”, 2a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2004 Asta “Scatti per bene”, 1a edizione, Sotheby’s, Milano 2002 “Per parlare di pace non bastano le parole”, Galleria L’Affiche, Milano. 2001 in occasione del Salone del Mobile, mostra personale, locale “ le Biciclette”, Milano. 1998 “21 x 21 x 21”, Mercurio Cinematografica, Milano e Roma. 1997 “Young Italian Photographers and a master: Maria Mulas”, Hands Gallery, New York. Premi: 2013 “Premio Celeste 2013”, 2° classificato sezione Fotografia & Grafica Digitale. 2013 Menzione d’onore all’IPA (International Photography Awards). 2012 Autore Segnalato al Black & White Spider Awards, 7° Edizione. 2011 Autore Segnalato al Black & White Spider Awards, 6° Edizione. 2011 Premio “Arte in Volo”: secondo classificato, Il Volo Onlus, Milano. 2009 Autore Segnalato al Premio Fotografico dell’Associazione Nazionale Fotografi Professionisti TAU Visual. 2001 Premio internazionale d’arte Ermanno Casoli: terzo classificato.


Matteo Cirenei was born in Schio in 1965 and has been living since 1967 in Milan, where he obtained his Degree in Architecture at the Polytechnic Institute of Engineering and Architecture. In the Faculty he is fascinated by the images created in black and white by photographers of the twentieth century ( such as E. Stoller, J. Shulman, B. Korab, O. Savio, etc.), in order to describe the work of the great architects in books and magazines, the object of study. At that time, the early ‘90s, he began his photographic research in black and white on Architecture, while shooting outstanding buildings in Milan and other European capitals boasting famous architectural works of art.

The evolution of this research leads, at the end of the first decade of the millennium, in an aesthetic approach that eliminates the overall vision of the building, re-creates an equilibrium of form in a new composition that comes from the combination of architectural elements and games of light and shade, plastic acts purely figurative. Matteo Cirenei operates in the architecture and lifestyle photography field in addition to design and furniture communication and corporate identity design. He collaborates with Casabella, Domus, and Interni magazines.

Matteo Cirenei nasce a Schio nel 1965 e vive dal 1967 a Milano, dove si laurea in Architettura al Politecnico di Milano. In Facoltà subisce il fascino delle immagini realizzate in bianco e nero dai fotografi del novecento (E. Stoller, J. Shulman, B. Korab, O. Savio, etc.), per descrivere il lavoro dei grandi architetti nei libri e sulle riviste oggetto di studio. E’ in quel periodo, primi anni ’90, che inizia la sua ricerca fotografica in bianco e nero sull’architettura, fotografando gli edifici più salienti di Milano e di alcune città europee sedi di architetture famose. L’evoluzione di questa ricerca sfocia, alla fine della prima decade degli

anni duemila, in un approccio estetico che annulla la visione complessiva dell’edificio, ricrea un’equilibrio di forme in una nuova composizione che scaturisce dall’accostamento di elementi architettonici e giochi di luce ed ombra, atti plastici puramente figurativi. Matteo Cirenei si occupa di fotografia di architettura e lifestyle, di comunicazione nel settore dell’arredamento e design, e di corporate identity design. Collabora con le riviste Casabella, Domus, Interni.


MATTEO CIRENEI

by appointment

+39 347 0700447

Testi di: Silvia Pettinicchio, Claudio Monnini

Via Massimiano 25 20134

Progetto grafico: Matteo Cirenei

be@wannabee.it www.wannabee.it

VIAGGIO ALL’INTERNO

Traduzioni: Silvia Pettinicchio Stampa a cura di MAD Print © All right reserved

© All right reserved Stampa a cura di MAD Print Traduzioni: Silvia Pettinicchio

+39 347 0700447

by appointment

Via Massimiano 25 20134

be@wannabee.it www.wannabee.it

Progetto grafico: Matteo Cirenei Testi di: Silvia Pettinicchio, Claudio Monnini


MATTEO CIRENEI

VIAGGIO ALL’INTERNO


Viaggio All'Interno • A Journey Within