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Bird is the word Far from retiring, meet the couple excited to make Trangie an internationally recognised destination for bird-watchers. PAGE 12

NEWS

INITIATIVE

COMMENT

BUSINESS

Testing times for teachers

Boys to men: tour offers valuable experience

Debate proves not all courage is created equal

Selling the souls of our sports grounds


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CONTENTS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

FROM THE EDITOR

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 Tales from the Trails

FEATURED

Meet the couple excited to make Trangie an internationally recognised destination for bird-watchers

Jen Cowley editor@dubboweekender.com.au facebook.com/WeekenderDubbo Twitter @DubboWeekender

PAGE 12

Good grief Bridging the gap between how adults talk about losses, like death, and what children actually need to hear PAGE 16

Initiative Boys to men: tour offers valuable experience PAGE 22

2x2

PEOPLE

The new project from Sally Hopkins and Robert Salt PAGE 20

Memorable or marketable?

BUSINESS

Selling the souls of our sports grounds PAGE 32

Kate Wright

LIFESTYLE

Chicken soup for the soul PAGE 38

The Arts Insights and Improvisations: a rare treat for music lovers PAGE 46

REGULARS

LIFE+STYLE

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38 42 44 48 51 75

Tony Webber Helicopter View Sally Bryant The Soapbox Hear, See, Do, Etc. Open Weekender

Food Travel Entertainment Books The Social Pages Play: Puzzles & Stars

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CONTACTS & CREDITS | Email feedback@dubboweekender.com.au | Online www.dubboweekender.com.au | www.twitter.com/DubboWeekender | www.facebook.com/WeekenderDubbo | Published by Panscott Media Pty Ltd ABN 94 080 152 021 | Managing Director Tim Pankhurst Editor Jen Cowley News Editor Natalie Holmes Design Sarah Head Photography Kaitlyn Rennie, Connor Coman-Sargent, Steve Cowley Reception Leanne Ryan General disclaimer: The publisher accepts no responsibility for letters, notices and other material contributed for publication. The submitter accepts full responsibility for material, warrants that it is accurate, and indemnifies the publisher against any claim or action. All advertisers, including those placing display, classified or advertorial material, warrant that such material is true and accurate and meets all applicable laws and indemnifies the publisher against all liabilities that may arise from the publication of such material. Whilst every care is taken in preparing this publication, we cannot be held responsible for errors or omissions. Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. The editor, Jen Cowley, accepts responsibility for election comment. Articles contain information of a general nature – readers should always seek professional advice relevant to their particular circumstances. Corrections and comments: Panscott Media has a policy of correcting mistakes promptly. If you have a complaint about published material, contact us in writing. If the matter remains unresolved, you may wish to contact the Australian Press Council. © Copyright 2015 Panscott Media Pty Ltd. Copyright in all material – including editorial, photographs and advertising material – is held by Panscott Media Pty Ltd or its providers and must not be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from the Publisher.

True equality lies somewhere over the rainbow T seems the whole world has been chasing rainbows this week and it’s made for a nice, albeit fleeting, diversion from the usual pursuit of geopolitics, foreign debt bail-outs and black clad terrorists. Amid the multi-hued glow from social network feeds – as more than 26 million Facebook users across the world jumped aboard the bandwagon with rainbow filtered profile pics in support of marriage equality – one image managed to raise its voice above the cacophony of calls for Australia to follow the US lead by legalising same-sex marriage. It showed two elderly gentlemen – George Harris, 82 and Jack Evans, 85 – celebrating as the first same sex couple to marry in Dallas, Texas. They waited 54 years to say “I do” but they weren’t waiting a second longer (and at their age, good call) – they wed just hours after the US Supreme Court’s landmark decision to legalise same-sex marriage nationwide. Fifty four years? I know straight people who haven’t been able to maintain a relationship beyond 54 days, let alone more than half a century. An argument trotted out with teeth grinding monotony by some who oppose same sex marriage is that it makes a mockery of “traditional” marriage. In the case of these two gentlemen, yes indeedy it does. It mocks those who take love lightly; it mocks those for whom marriage means six bridesmaids, a $20K piss up and a dress whose price tag could put Greece back in the black. It mocks those who bail out when the going gets tough; who think divorce is the default position or that children are effective weapons in the marital armoury. It mocks marriages of convenience; it mocks the bloke who’s spent his whole married life flogging the bejeezus out of the woman he promised “unto God” to love and protect. I looked at the picture of George and Jack and my heart nearly broke. I think of all those people who have been forced, through a lack of understanding and acceptance, to live – and in far too many cases to go to their graves – having never been able to publicly and openly acknowledge, declare, celebrate or to even find love. I think of a long dead uncle, whose homosexuality stayed firmly behind the closet door for the duration of his long and otherwise fulfilled and successful life. He fought for his country, he worked tirelessly for his community, he cared for and loved his extended family. But thanks to the misfortune of being born gay in a vehemently (hypocritically, no doubt)

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“straight” society, he was never able – publicly at least – to share the one thing we adults most crave and need: the love and companionship of a recognised partnership. I think of my great childhood friend – a gentle giant of a man who gave such a polished performance in hiding his homosexuality no-one really knew until it was all but too late. From the blokey halls of an elite boarding school to the machismosoaked reaches of rural Australia, where it would have been safer to be outed as a “greenie” than a “poofter” – this outwardly placid man bound his secret tight to his chest. Both his mind and his arms bear the scars of near fatal wounds inflicted by a lifetime of denial and what I can mercifully only imagine is the inescapable torment of believing death preferable to living the truth. This just in: homosexuality isn’t a new trend. Men have been attracted to men, and women to women, since we crawled out of the primordial soup. But as old as homosexuality itself is the resistance to and discrimination against it. Herein lies a dilemma. The flick of a prime ministerial pen, as welcome as that would be, will do little to remove the stain of discrimination if we don’t acknowledge that it takes time to change centuries old mindsets. And in acknowledging this reality, we should also be mindful of the hypocrisy of espousing the #lovewins mantra while denying and decrying the deeply held beliefs of those for whom homosexuality is still a “sin” in the eyes of their faith. It’s a fundamentally flawed belief, as far as I’m concerned, but for the remaining 30 per cent of Australians who oppose same-sex marriage it’s going to take time to come around. They will – but in the meantime, if we’re really committed to equality, let’s those of us who are in the majority take the high ground by acknowledging others’ right to their opinions, and give them their space. We can’t have it both ways. We can’t holler for the right to express our true beliefs, to exercise our right to freedom of speech and to call for equality only when that equality fits with our own belief structure. I applaud those who have the courage of their convictions, and the resolve their depth of faith gives them, to swim against the tide of public opinion. I don’t have to agree with them. I don’t even have to like them. But I can’t in all conscience deny them the right to express their beliefs or to stay true to themselves while I’m wringing my hands over the denial of that right for others.

From the blokey halls of an elite boarding school to the machismosoaked reaches of rural Australia, where it would have been safer to be outed as a “greenie” than a “poofter” – this outwardly placid man bound his secret tight to his chest.


NEWS.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

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Making space for creative collaboration BY KIM V. GOLDSMITH JOURNALIST

UBLIC spaces where people can gather to invent, learn and create are rare in our modern world, particularly in Dubbo. What has been of even greater rarity is finding a place in regional areas where the arts, technology and science might come together to investigate and create things that haven’t yet been imagined. Following a presentation and workshop in Dubbo last week this looks sure to change, with regional arts board, Orana Arts keen to establish a makers’ space in the region. Orana Arts recently hosted representatives from screen and media organisation, dLux Media Arts, and Three Farm, a social design enterprise based in Sydney, to talk with interested community members about the use of technologies in learning and creating, and how community driven ideas can come to life in such places. Program manager with dLux Media Arts, Alexia Estrellado says her organisation has been in conversation with the Dubbo community through their dLab learning programs over the past couple of years, in which time they’ve identified the city as a “real hub of activity”. “So, when we were thinking about what location we should be working with, Dubbo seemed like a good fit. “People sometimes look to the big cities for innovative ideas but you have a lot of open people with a lot of great skills and increasingly working in regional locations becomes a more viable option to be experimental, to be innovative and to have a lasting impact on the community.” Estrellado says the recent trip to Dubbo was to get a feel for what was happening, who is active within the community, and what are the interest areas. However, she stresses it is the communities that have to drive the initiatives. “If we’re not listening to what’s happening on the ground it becomes even harder to work (these programs). “The outcome from our presentation was to really get an understanding of the lay of the land, and to hear some of the ideas people have been thinking about and stewing over, and making connections between different community members who previously didn’t know each other but had similar interests. “How do those connections become something meaningful?” From this point, Estrellado says it becomes a collaboration between those involved in her organisation, their partners, and the community. She explains dLab is a facilitator for different programs to evolve, with a network of established artists and practitioners interested in working in regional locations.

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Alexia Estrellado, dLux Media Arts program manager PHOTO: KIM V. GOLDSMITH

“Ownership has to come from the community though, because who’s going to run it and how are you going to make it something viable if there’s no co-investment? “Otherwise we just become a service provider and we’re not about that...it’s working collaboratively, building partnerships and showing the potential of what the internet and technology can offer for a national network.” The makers’ space concept may become just one of the options the local community wants to back. There was certainly keen interest in some of the 3D printing technology and applications used by Three Farm and shown in the temporary makers’ space at the Fire Station Arts Centre during the afternoon workshop session; something that’s become a feature of some makers’ spaces and of growing interest world-wide. “The reason we partnered with Three Farm is because they have a really interesting model as a social enterprise in that they’re using design methodologies and technology to really empower the community so that they’re not just consumers, so they

also become producers of everyday products. “Where it fits with us is we also need to look at how do we make a social enterprise and how do we build community so that the art practice itself extends into an economic value? “Makers’ spaces aren’t a trend but an evolution – look at the popularity of men’s sheds and tip shops; they’re all makers spaces. “They’ve just identified a particular market where people are interested in customising and reusing technologies for their own projects and driving change from that grassroots, community level.” Estrellado says she’ll be picking up on conversations had in Dubbo and looking at how dLab might contribute to that, helping develop resourcing strategies that will deliver some real outcomes that have occurred from community workshops. “It won’t happen overnight and it does require evaluation at each step and level to see where we’re heading using a collaborative process. “It’s now really important that we develop good partnerships in an open way.” „


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NEWS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Testing times for teachers From next month, aspiring teachers will face a new national literacy and numeracy test to ensure their readiness for the classroom, under a trial program announced this week by Federal Education Minister Christopher Pyne. Designed to reverse what the government says is a decline in standards across university teaching courses, passing the test will from next year be a mandatory requirement for those wanting to graduate. Complaints surrounding the practice of universities accepting teaching degree students with ATARs of less than 50 have prompted the plant to impose the test, which is one of the key recommendations from the Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group. Here’s what some of those close to the debate had to say. AS TOLD TO Jen Cowley Mark Coulton – Federal Member for Parkes HERE’S been a discussion happening for some time now about the standard of literacy and numeracy throughout our education system. The Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group has driven this discussion, but it’s one I’ve been hearing across the board – from parents to business people – about people coming through the education system with standards of particularly literacy, that just aren’t up to scratch. In the past few years we’ve begun to see the standard for teachers beginning to lift. Some time back, teaching was seen to be a second-tier choice. The idea is that we have people entering the profession who are of a very high standard, so that it becomes a first tier choice and teaching as a profession is where it should be – and that’s as one of the most highly regarded professions one can choose. From my own observations, and going back quite some time, there seemed to be less of a focus (in training teachers) on literacy and numeracy and it for a while there it was all about esteem and expression and that sort of thing. They are all important, but without the basic building blocks of communication, it’s very hard to reach the levels of professionalism we need. Some might criticise a focus on literacy and numeracy when there are other issues facing our education system, but being able to construct a sentence properly and to be able to express yourself is vital. Written communication enables you to express your thoughts as clearly and precisely as you’d like, and you can’t do that if you don’t have that ability.

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` This is not making an assumption that someone who can pass this test will necessarily be a good teacher – this test is an indication that you are at a certain level to enrol in a degree to become me a teacher. – Markk Coulton

I’m surrounded by teachers – my mother was a teacher, my wife was a teacher for 30 years and my daughter is a teacher so I have great respect for the profession. And I know from them that there’s an enormous pressure on teachers to do a whole range of things that are basically the responsibility of the family and the parents, many of whom are increasingly pushing those responsibilities on to schools. This is not making an assumption that someone who can pass this test will necessarily be a good teacher – this test is an indication that you are at a certain level to enrol in a degree to become a teacher. It’s lifting the bar of that starting point. It’s to encourage a certain level of teacher into that field. The Australian Council for Educational Research will implement the test – and my understanding is that there will be two tests – 60 literacy questions and 60 numeracy questions, with a combination of multiple choice and constructed response questions. How would politicians go with the test? Well, that will depend on the age of the politician! I had a teacher once who was pedantic about grammar and I had a deep dislike of him – but I now realise I owe him a debt of gratitude. For the first 30 years of my working life, my written communication skills weren’t necessary, but now as I need to explain my thoughts in a written form, it’s very important to have a good understanding of how to construct a thought and convey it in written form. I used my numeracy skills quite a bit during my years as a farmer, but I’ve had to brush up on my literacy because if you don’t get punctuation right you can change the whole meaning, and nuance of what you’re trying to say. But I would like to see journalists, particularly the young ones, brush up on their literacy skills! And that also goes for some of the people working in government offices. This is only a fairly new announcement, so I haven’t had much feedback from constituents but I think parents will be happy. That said, it depends on the parent – because it’s ultimately their primary responsibility to oversee their children’s education. It might be the teachers delivering the classes, but it’s up to parents to make sure the children attend school, do their homework and to make sure they’re keeping up. I imagine parents should be pleased these standards will be put in place. It’s a trial at this stage, and the agreement is that it comes into play in a compulsory nature in 2016. The trial is to see how it goes and to see if there are any “bugs” in the delivery of the system. But it will also give a good indication of where young people who aspire to be teachers are currently situated. Education is going to be one of our key exports in the future, particularly with the free trade agreements we’ve signed in the past 12 months. If we don’t keep our standards at a certain level, international students

will go elsewhere. I don’t think we have any universities now that are in the top 20 in the world, whereas China already has a couple. If we’re going to compete on the world’s educational stage, we really need to pull our socks up. But we also owe it to our own students to be educating them to a level that’s giving them the best chance in what is a shrinking global marketplace. They’re no longer just competing against the kids in the classroom alongside them, they’re actually competing against students all over the world.

Duncan McDonald – Dubbobased NSW Teachers’ Federation organiser HAT the Federation believes is that we should have very high standards for qualifications for teachers – a one-off test won’t really meet that requirement. We think the focus should really be on the entire course teachers undertake, with literacy and numeracy as part of that. Our focus is not just on the training of new teachers. We’ve been campaigning for a long time on getting higher standards of accreditation in place and in fact this year, we now have a new performance and development framework that’s being implemented and it’s certainly focussed on getting teachers to meet the Australian professional teaching standards – all teachers, not just beginning teachers, and it’s an annual review. As a union, we’ve been campaigning for some time about what we’ve seen as the declining standard in terms of the entry requirements for teacher training courses and we hear reports of quite low ATAR requirements. We’d like to see that turned around so that we have much higher requirements because we think our kids deserve professionals with the highest standards possible. The announcement is just for a one-off test – there’s much more to teaching than just those areas of literacy and numeracy that will be tested. When you look at the professional teaching standards, there’s seven areas that teachers need to show proficiency in – it goes well beyond a simple test for literacy and numeracy. We’ve been trying to protect the high standards that have been in place in the past and it’s a worry that elsewhere in the world, those standards are being eroded very quickly. For instance, it appears that in the UK, a person can be employed to teach in a public school without even a diploma. That’s a real concern. Now, in NSW that can’t happen because we’ve been campaigning hard to have accreditation put in place and in 2018, all teachers in NSW will be required to be accredited at proficient level and that will be an annual process. The government’s measure really doesn’t go far enough. The public perception of declining standards

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NEWS.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

` The ability to communicate with students, to diffuse behaviour issues es – those things are re more important.” t.” – Graeme Andrewss may be driving this – but when you look at NSW the evidence is quite to the contrary. Even in the private/ independent sector they require teachers to have qualifications, where not so many years ago that wasn’t the case. Teaching is a four year university degree but we’re saying it should be a five year degree. For many years it used to be a two year degree – then it went to three years, now it’s four and we’re arguing for more. We’ve always been focussed on raising standards – not just of the entry into a teacher training qualification, but the standards of that teacher training itself need to increase, and once teachers are in the profession we also think annual accreditation is really important.

Graeme Andrews – graduating this year with a Bachelor of Primary Education WON’T be directly affected in that I’ll be graduating before the trial comes in, it may affect me as a teacher later on down the track. I haven’t seen the test, obviously, so I can’t speculate as to how I’d go if I did have to sit for it, but I did relatively well in both English and Maths during the HSC. At Charles Sturt University there are courses called Lit-101 and Maths-100 which, while not compulsory, many people choose to undertake those courses to help lift their levels of literacy and numeracy – so the option is there for those who need it. The issue I have is with the shifting of the goal posts. You go through the HSC knowing what you need to get to enrol in teaching at Uni, and then at Uni you know what you need to do in order to graduate – and then the goal posts move again. I feel the government just wants to be seen to be doing something about educational standards. There are more important factors than literacy and numeracy, or the results of a standardised test, in determining how effective a teacher is going to be once they graduate and actually go into a classroom. The ability to communicate with students, to diffuse behaviour issues – those things are more important as far as I’m concerned. That said, teachers should have good basic English and Maths skills – but I don’t think a standardised test will make any difference to the effectiveness of teachers in a classroom. We need to be looking more at how teachers are performing in the classroom. Targeting university graduates who, I’d argue, are

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probably more up to speed with literacy and numeracy, isn’t fair. It would be better to target teachers who are actually the profession now – there are a lot of teachers I’ve met who have been teaching for decades who don’t have such great literacy and numeracy skills. These are the teachers who should be subject to this kind of benchmarking.

Samantha Eddy – teacher and parent of three school-aged boys ACTUALLY did something similar to this test when I was at university (which was a long time ago!) – dictation, spelling and maths – but that no longer happens, and that’s both good and bad. But with the volume of technology available to us these days, I wonder if the ability to pass a literacy/numeracy test is really a defining moment in becoming a teacher. From a parent’s point of view, when I think about what I want for my boys is a teacher who’s going to nurture their intellect rather than be pedantic about things like grammar. It’s important, obviously, for teachers to have good literacy and numeracy skills themselves, but it’s not the be-all and end-all. The things that make a good teacher can’t be taught – the management, the discipline and your teaching style has to evolve with individual teachers, as they learn themselves in the classroom. Certain teaching styles elicit a different response in certain situations and with different individuals. I think about the young teachers with whom I work and who teach my children, and I do get frustrated when I see basic literacy and numeracy mistakes. But I make mistakes too – everyone does! The problem is that it’s hard enough as it is to encourage young people to go into the profession – if we start criticising them before they even get into a classroom, it’s going to be even harder to attract quality people to become teachers. Most of the feedback I get is along the lines of grudging respect for teachers. I’m concerned with certain aspects of how education is viewed by policy makers, but I think people still respect teachers but they simply don’t want to do the job themselves. The expectations people have on teachers is vastly different now than it was when I first started teaching. Teachers have to be all things to all people – we’re expected to take on a socialisation role with students and that adds to the pressure. As a parent, the connection my boys make with their teacher is far more important than where a comma is placed.

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Tanya Nicholls – Secondary school English teacher CAN only comment in relation to high school teachers, but the government is right to be concerned with literacy and numeracy rates in graduating teachers. However, these graduates are coming through a school system that has an overly cluttered curriculum. They then attend a University where they enrol in courses aimed at furthering their knowledge in their particular subject area. These students also have subjects involved with the pedagogy of teaching. Literacy and

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numeracy doesn’t seem to be a focus at the university level. How can the government then expect these graduates to be prepared to teach basic literacy and numeracy skills to their students, although I don’t believe passing a test as they graduate necessarily equips teachers to teach these skills. Shouldn’t any testing of literacy and numeracy skills be administered at the start of their degree rather than after four years at university? Prospective teaching students could then attend bridging courses as needed rather than find out their deficiencies at the end of a degree that doesn’t adequately address the teaching of these skills. In the school system there is also the problem with the expectation that all literacy and numeracy teaching is the responsibility of English and Mathematics teachers. Until there is an overall plan to free up space in the curriculum, basic skills will continue to be assumed knowledge that students pick up via osmosis. Without a change in the way literacy and numeracy is taught across secondary and tertiary levels, testing at a postgraduate level seems punitive. Governments need to stop with the sound bites and media spin and address the problems at a grass roots level and this starts with the curriculum. The teaching profession is hard. We are trying to engage 21st century learners who see no point in learning spelling and punctuation when they are consumed by an online world which values neither. You only have to look at any social media platform to see how little spelling and grammar is valued. Students today, at least anecdotally, have shorter attention spans and need to be entertained as well as educated. If you cannot engage them with a dynamic lesson you can see eyes glazing over and fingers reaching for phones and iPads. A majority of students are more concerned with how many “likes” their photo or witty comment receives than how to apply spelling rules. Thus, the problem of teaching basic literacy and numeracy skills is not going to be solved with graduate teachers being able to pass a multiple choice test at the conclusion of their degree. The problem is vast and needs a multifaceted approach not a band-aid solution to one area. „

` From a parent’s point of view, when I think about what I want for my boys iss a teacher who who’ss going to nurture ure their intellectt rather than be e ut pedantic about things like grammar.” – Samantha Eddy y

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NEWS & ANALYSIS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Registering the need for nurses BY YVETTE AUBUSSONFOLEY JOURNALIST

NDIVIDUALS and community groups across the state are campaigning against changes to legislation to remove a mandatory requirement that registered nurses in aged care facilities be on duty at all times where residents have high-care needs. NSW is the only state or territory in Australia to adopt this ruling, introduced by state Health Minister, Jillian Skinner in the Public Health Act of 2010. A steering committee was to report on July 1, but in response to a 10,000-strong signature petition presented by the NSW Nurses and Midwives’ Association, an Upper House enquiry has since begun inviting submissions from the public with a Thursday, July 23 deadline. “The enquiry was originally focusing on industry, and wasn’t including the general public. At least now the general public can have their say about whether or not this stipulation should stay,” said Dr Maree Bernoth, senior lecturer, school of nursing, midwifery and indigenous health, Charles Sturt University. Bernoth has more than 25 years’ experience working in metropolitan and regional age care facilities. “The loudest voice is coming from industry, and from my perspective, the focus is on profit, not people. I’m concerned that’s where industry’s focus is, and industry has the ear of government, because aged care is a big industry. Industry is a powerful lobby group, but we need to have our say as well,” she said. Rising costs of residential aged care and increasing copayments for people entering aged care facilities has raised questions about paying for and expecting quality care. “If we’re paying for this care, aren’t we then concerned we have the highest quality of care? We have frail, older people with multiple, complex chronic conditions going into aged care facilities. “We have older people requiring palliative care which is a specialty. We have younger people with disabilities and people with dementia. They’re all very specialised areas and we need the registered nurses there to guarantee quality care is being given.” Charmaine Crowe from the Combined

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Pensioners and Superannuants Association said the clinical care of highneeds residents would be at risk if the state government chose to abandon the requirement. “If there is no registered nurse on duty, many nursing home residents are often sent to hospital emergency departments for treatment because other care staff are unable to provide the high-skilled care they need onsite,” Ms Crowe said. “Despite 95 per cent of Australia’s aged care facilities being fully accredited, research shows many nursing home residents are dying prematurely from falls, choking, suicide or medication mistakes.” Bernoth argues that an industry proposal to remove registered nurses from staff at night creates added risks for the health of residents. “People who have pain find it worse during the night. People who are poten-

tially depressed – that becomes worse during the night. People with dementia have issues with sleeping at regular hours so that becomes an issue at night. So, 24-hours a day I contend that someone with the skills and knowledge of a registered nurse is required in an aged care facility.” LSO under consideration is the need for further regulation and a minimum standards measure for assistants in nursing (AINs) and other employees or carers. Registered nurses train for three years plus an internship and AINs for 6-12 months. “Registered nurses should not be sitting in offices doing paperwork. “Registered nurses should be on the floor continually supporting the care workers. I’m not talking about keeping people alive longer, it’s quality of life for the length of life people have,” said Bernoth. “(RNs) should be on the floor in clini-

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Registered nurses should be on the floor oor in clinical practice. I’d even contend that at registered nurses working in aged care e ey should be nurse practitioner level. They nd skills. should have specialised knowledge and – Dr Maree Bernoth, senior lecturer, school chool of nursing, midwifery and indigenous health at Charles Sturt University.

cal practice. I’d even contend that registered nurses working in aged care should be nurse practitioner level. They should have specialised knowledge and skills. “Older people present with physical illnesses differently compared to a younger adult so a registered nurse needs to be aware how physical illnesses present in an older person. “The AINs need clinical supervision, they need someone there assisting them to making their decision making. They give the care but it should be the registered nurse who prioritising care.” Care workers are also not legally accountable. “Registered nurses need to be legally accountable. Care workers are not registered there’s no ‘body’ overseeing their work, there’s no one who is monitoring their performance apart from the managers of individual facilities. Someone who is giving care can go from one facility to another without a record. “There are excellent care workers out there, but it doesn’t matter how good their care is, they still don’t have the knowledge to make decisions about the changing care needs of this frail population.” Bernoth is adamant the issue is a whole of community concern. “I don’t think you have had to have someone in aged care to make a submission. We will at some stage have someone that we know and love in an aged care facility and we have a right to speak up we’re expected to pay for this care so I think we have the right as a society to say that we want people with the right qualifications caring for us when we’re extremely frail. We want to know that we’re going to receive skilled palliative care when we’re dying so we don’t have people in pain or suffering unnecessarily toward the end of their life.” Change to legislation is a certainty but for Bernoth, not all will be unwelcome. “I am in favour of change and the change is to increase the skills of the registered nurses to increase the number of registered nurses in aged care and to have more nurse practitioners in aged care, not dumb it down.” The closing date for submissions is Thursday 23 July 2015. For more information on how to make a submission, go to www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/ gpsc3, or call the committee secretariat on (02) 9230 3081.

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Grandpa’s Hat is a children’s book written by Jen Cowley and illustrated by Mark Horton – and developed as a resource for the National Association for loss and Grief NSW Inc. (NALAG) with the support ofthe combined Rotary Clubs of Dubbo and Coonabarabran. Proceeds from the sale of the book and from the launch will go to support the work of NALAG in helping those who are grieving. Tickets are $50 per head and are available through http://www.nalag.org.au/grandpashat.htm whereyou can also pre-order a copy of the book or make a donation.


NEWS.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

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Seven Days: In brief New rules tell smokers to butt out The week’s top stories from around the region

MOKERS are being told to butt out, with all commercial outdoor dining areas across the state going completely smoke-free from Monday. Under the Smoke-free Environment Act 2000, the ban on all forms of smoking – including cigarettes, pipes and water pipes – will apply to all dining area of hotels, clubs, restaurants and cafes. Western NSW LHD Health Promotion Manager Lyndal O’Leary said that there is a high level of public support for making outdoor dining areas smoke-free. “Our research shows that four out of five people are strongly behind smokefree commercial outdoor dining areas, together with a ban on smoking within four metres of an entrance to a hospitality venue.” Ms O’Leary says many businesses have already voluntarily banned smoking in their outdoor dining areas, with positive results. From Monday, smoking will be banned in seated outdoor dining areas while food is being served, with NSW Health Authorised Inspectors able to issue on the spot fines of $300 for individuals and penalties of up to $5500 for occupiers who ignore the ban. Since the beginning of 2013, smoking has been banned in a number of outdoor public places including all NSW public transport stops and stations, within 10m of children’s playgrounds, at spectator areas of sporting grounds, at public swimming pools and within 4m of a pedestrian entrance to or exit from a public building.

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Dubbo death adds to disappointing month on state’s roads THE death of a young Dubbo man at Estella on June 13 is among the tragedies to have added to what police say has been a disappointing month on the state’s roads. Traffic and Highway Patrol Commander, Assistant Commissioner John Hartley, this week said the fact that 12 people had been killed on NSW roads in the previous 11 days was an indication that drivers are continuing to take risks and disobey road rules. The figure, Hartley says, is a reflection of “irresponsible behaviour” that often has heartbreaking consequences. “We have repeatedly urged and appealed to all road users to stay safe on the roads, drive to the conditions and obey all rules. Clearly, that message remains elusive to some drivers,” Hartley said. “Driving is a privilege and a responsibility. The tragic loss of 12 lives in 11 days shows that there are some out there who take neither seriously.” Speeding, drink-driving, non-compliance to seat belt or helmet use, distraction and fatigue all contribute to crashes that could end up in tragedy. A split-second decision could mean the difference between life and death and the impact is felt not just by those involved in the crash but by entire communities.” Operation Saturation – a month-long high visibility campaign by police aimed at lowering the road toll – will wind up on Monday. But Hartley says police will continue to focus on safe driving and will have “more officers in more locations more often” to enforce

road rules and try to keep all road users safe.

Hermidale homicide accused charged DUBBO Local Court this week formally denied bail for the man accused of the murder of two people at Hermidale near Nyngan on June 26. The 61 year old Hermidale man, Allan Geoffrey O’Connor, was arrested by police three days after the bodies of 28 year old Jacob Cumberland and that of a 36 year old woman were discovered on a property on Laroo Road at Hermidale. Both had suffered gunshot wounds. A member of the public found the 28 year old’s body in the driveway of the property and alerted police, who then discovered the woman’s body inside the property. A third body, believed to be that of 59 year old Stephen Cumberland, father of Jacob, was discovered nearby in a burnt-out caravan. A post-mortem is being conducted to determine the cause of the 59 year old’s death. O’Connor was remanded in custody and the matter adjourned, to be heard in Bourke Local Court on August 20.

Five finalists to fly Dubbo tourism flag FIVE Dubbo tourism operations have been named as finalists in the 2015 Travel In Inland Tourism Awards, with winners to be announced later this month. Old Dubbo Gaol, Manera Heights Apartments, Trike Adventures, Dubbo Stampede Running Festival and the Dubbo Visitors’ Information Centre are among the 20 finalists for the awards, which are held annually to acknowledge excellence in tourism in the four regional tourism areas of Central, Inland, Murray and Riverina. Chair of the awards committee, Jane Barnes this week said it had been a record breaking year for the awards, with 51 operations competing in 19 categories across the four inland tourism regions. “The judges have commented on the high standard of professionalism and innovation the finalists have shown in their field. This year we also have five previous INTA winners being inducted into the INTA Hall of Fame”, Ms Barnes said. The five worthy Dubbo finalists will fly the flag for the city at a “Pricilla” themed gala dinner in Broken Hill on July 25.

Eugowra songstress turns heads, and chairs EUGOWRA songstress Cath Adams has turned heads, and chairs, with her appearance this week on TV’s wildly popular The Voice. The young teacher’s performance of Beyonce’s Work it Out had three of the four judges turning their chairs during this week’s round of “blind” auditions, with coaches Jessie-J, Delta Goodrem and the Madden brothers, Joel and Benji, all vying for the talented singer to join their teams. Audiences were in for a treat when both Jessie-J and Delta Goodrem joined Cath

on stage for an impromptu encore that had the appreciative crowd on its feet. Cath ultimately went with Jessie-J as her coach, and supporters throughout the Central West will be watching with interest as she progresses to the next round of The Voice.

On track for cycleway extension DUBBO CITY COUNCIL’S Works and Services Committee has recommended the planned route for a 2.6 kilometre extension of the Tracker Riley cycleway through Regand Park be approved by council to commence construction of the first element of the Regand Park Master Plan. Committee chair, Lyn Griffiths said the shared pathway will follow the Macquarie River for most of its distance complementing the existing pathway which is one of Dubbo’s most popular areas. “The Macquarie River is one of Dubbo’s greatest assets and is a focal point for public recreation. The proposed Regand Park trail will be a shared pathway that walkers, joggers, social cyclists and families can all use.” Cr Griffiths said the project was made possible through community support with the Titan Macquarie Mud Run Inc contributing $13,000 and the NSW Government contributing $20,000 to the total project cost of $154, 526. The recommended proposal will also improve safety for families by avoiding approximately 1.6 kilometres of on-road cycleway on Macquarie Street between Margaret Crescent and Tamworth Street and by closing Regand Park to vehicles.

Council commits to capital expenditure DUBBO City Council this week endorsed the 2015/16 Operational Plan and Budget, committing $62.76m to capital expenditure from a total budget of $160m. Mayor Mathew Dickerson said the budget is about making the “best decisions now” to prepare the City’s infrastructure, roads, water supply and essential services for future generations. A number of major projects will be finalised in 2015/2016 including the upgrade of the Dubbo Sewage Treatment Plant, the remediation of the South Dubbo Weir and extension of the General Aviation Apron/Foxtrot taxiway at the Dubbo City Regional Airport. A total of 79 submissions were received on the draft plan prompting council to adopt a range of new actions in conjunction with the 2015/2016 Operational Plan and Budget. The bulk of those submissions – 69 – were in support of the DREAM festival,

prompting council to request the festival’s committee to submit a business case for further funding along with the acquittal report required following the staging of the 2015 DREAM Festival. The 2015/2016 Operational Plan and Budget along with the 2013-2017 Delivery Program and the Dubbo 2036 Community Strategic Plan are all publicly available on council’s website.

Broadband rollout continues across state A FURTHER 53,000 premises across the state have been added to the National Broadband Network (NBN) rollout, with the NBN this week releasing its quarterly construction plan update. While Parkes is the only area from the central west to be included in the new plan, the NBN says it’s adopting a “new, flexible multi-technology approach” which is an important step towards connecting eight million premises by 2020. The construction plan provides an indicative schedule of work to commence before quarter-end December 2016, and now covers more than 620,000 New South Wales homes and businesses. Spokesperson Kelly Stevens said NSW still has the largest rollout footprint in the country, with more than 280,000 families and businesses across New South Wales are already able to connect.

Boost for regional jobseekers JOBSEEKERS across the region will get a leg-up to employment with the start of the federal government’s new $6.8 million employment service jobactive. Member for Parkes, Mark Coulton, says the new initiative will help local job seekers prepare a resume, look for work, prepare for interviews and undertake training and work experience that will improve their chances of finding a job. Local employers are also set to benefit from the new jobactive system through the new $1.2 billion wage subsidy pool. Employers will be able to receive a wage subsidy from the day an eligible job seeker commences in a job, with the subsidy being paid on a fortnightly basis. Coulton also welcomed the roll out of Work for the Dole, which he says helps job seekers gain new skills and remain active and engaged while looking for work. jobactive services will be delivered by a number of organisations across the region including Sureway Employment and Training, BEST Employment Limited and Mission Providence. „


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NEWS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

C O M I C R E L I E F | PAU L D O R I N

THE WATERCOOLER

BY JENNA MCKEOWN N

Unhealthy trend UNLESS you have been residing under a rock, you’re likely well aware of the “wellness” movement, responsible for pushing green smoothies, kale and spelt products onto your plate, and dairy and pasta off it. At the helm of this movement are Wellness Bloggers, responsible for some of the best selling cookbooks in recent times. But buyer beware. As Had-

ley Freeman recently reported, these bloggers have little to no nutritional training to support their recipes (cauliflower and strawberry salad, anyone?) or assertions of what will help you live a healthier life. Disgraced blogger and “wellness” advocate Belle Gibson may be the extreme end of this movement for clear skin, healthy organs and shiny hair, but let her be a lesson to us all; experts have redesigned the food pyramid. Not 20-somethings with a blog.

Doing our lollies ARE you feeling the need to get outraged today, but don’t know quite where to direct said wrath? TTP? Nah, too complex and mysterious. The implosion of yet another celebrity marriage (Bennifer 2.0, we’ll miss ya)? Nah, too banal. Ah! Lollies! According to multiple news sources, mainstream and

otherwise, Aussies were fuming upon hearing that Green Frogs and Spearmint Leaves had been ruthlessly cut from the production line at Allen’s factories. Would anyone really get upset about the loss of green confectionary? They’re the WORST! I smell a PR campaign to remind consumers how delicious Red Frogs are. Mmm.

Equality in entertainment EARLIER in the year, in her Oscar acceptance speech, Patricia Arquette called for greater equality in Hollywood. Since then, actors and actresses have been working to highlight the different treatment the two genders receive in the entertainment industry, from #AskHerMore, to calling out toy makers for excluding female characters. Rose McGowan recently made headlines for Tweeting the audition wardrobe re-

quests from Adam Sandler. The note asked for “form fitting” clothes, with “push up bras encouraged”. Because of this, McGowan lost her agent. Meanwhile, as blogger Lainey Lui pointed out, Charlie Sheen kept both his agent and his job while making vile threats towards women. Inequality strikes again but maybe the more it’s talked about, the less it will occur.

Australia’s rainbow warriors DESPITE Abbott’s proclamations that Australia doesn’t need to follow America’s every move (except in military movements, perhaps) it does appear Australia may be moving towards marriage equity. A bill will be introduced into Australia’s house of representatives on August 11. Perhaps we will see more rainbow profile pictures all over social media before too long.

Your feedback welcome – online + hard copy DUBBO WEEKENDER encourages online readers (via www.dubboweekender. com.au) to comment as a selection may be published each week. Email addresses must be supplied for verification purposes only, not publication, and destructive personal or offensive comments will not be published online or in hard copy. Dubbo Weekender supports constructive debate and opinion. Letters to the editor are welcome via email feedback@dubboweekender.com.au, fax 6885 4434, or post to 89 Wingewarra Street Dubbo NSW 2830. Letters should generally be 250 words or less, and may be edited for space, clarity or legal reasons. To be considered for publication, letters should include the writer’s name and daytime contact details.


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OPINION & ANALYSIS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Tony Webber

Tony Webber is a Dubbo resident and father of two.

Two year old tyrant bringing disorder and orders in equal dosage EADERS often say to me that my self-absorbed columns are the worst. They say the tediously repetitive ones mercifully don’t need re-reading, the harping depressing ones make them feel better about themselves, and the attempts at humour are pitifully laughable which is sort of funny in itself. But there seems to be the broadest consensus that my self-indulgent blather about the kids, dog, household chores or some half-arsed, thrown together exercise in cloying domesticity all suck royally. As one nice, churchy lady said as she vandalised my car: “I’ve stepped in things more imaginative than you.” Which brings me to our son’s second birthday last Sunday, or as it’s become known: Enter the Dragon. You see, as a baby the child was never exactly easy to live with, being largely nocturnal and with a tendency towards erratic ill-temper when he wasn’t being destructive and raucous. If his fine motor skills were up to it I have no doubt he would be playing with matches and scrawling what passes for obscenities in the mind of a toddler, on household surfaces, breast feeding being a likely theme presumably. He gets teeth the size of a lumberjack’s fist, and his bowels swing between chronic, mood-blackening inaction and some of the most explosive and spectacular flows since lava built Hawaii. But he’s really finding his character now that he’s hit the age of two. Unfortunately that character seems to bear some similarity to Caligula, and if the infamous Roman Emperor ever screamed for an ice-block only to throw it on the ground in disgust upon receiving it then the likeness moves in the direction of uncanny. And we’re talking scream. I know what’s in your mind: a rabbit yelping for more carrot or a canary singing slightly off key while rowdy wind chimes tinkle nearby and autumn leaves crunch. This kid has a scream that has moved houses in the street from their footings. Mirrors explode. People’s ears prick interstate.

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As it lifts beyond the pain threshold it evolves into a confronting guttural wail, part Inuit throat-singing, part The Omen. The toll it takes on his voice-box leaves him sounding like Tom Raudonikis and Darren Lockyer inhaling helium at Echo Point. It would not be so bad if he used his power for good, but his verbal might is generally harnessed issuing orders, like a baritone sergeant major rousing fleeing conscripts during an artillery barrage. He also puts it to good use during his dream phase on the rare occasion he does nod off between 11pm and 5am,

shrieking to a pitch that leaves rudely awakened fellow house members thinking the pilot who just flew a fighter jet down the hallway must have leant out of the cockpit to slap our faces on the way past. Toddlers are renowned for their flashes of anger, the little areas of their brains charged with emotional control being underdeveloped and, apparently, somewhat prone to demonic possession in some cases. These early years can therefore be characterised by hitting or otherwise striking out, especially in those children destined for prison time later in life.

This kid has a scream that has moved houses in the street from their footings. Mirrors explode. People’s ears prick interstate.

But our fella sets the bar when it comes to violence: creative, merciless and with a level of heartfelt delight normally only witnessed in tribal warfare, ALP factions or an Abbott minister going after a human rights advocate. The little treasure has long been a biter – there are meat-eaters on the African savannah with less enthusiasm for flesh. But coming into the terrible twos he’s developed a thoroughly medieval repertoire which includes the fingernail gum gouge. This involves smiling sweetly until the victim smiles back then lashing out at the exposed gums using one hooked and fetid finger, tipped with a nail so putrid that death is almost certain, and, if it’s the middle of the freaking night, almost preferable. Like any torment, the terrible twos will pass, and lacerated gums will heal, but cloying domesticity never dies. Suck it up.

Heat is ‘messing with the sex of Australian lizards’

2015 REPTILE LIFE

WASHINGTON: Hotter temperatures are messing with the gender of Australia’s bearded dragon lizards, a new study finds. Dragons that are genetically male hatch as females and give birth to other lizards. And the way the lizards’ gender is determined is getting changed so much that the female sex chromosome may eventually disappear entirely, say the authors of the Australian study. “This is the first time we have proved that sex reversal happens in the wild in any reptile at all,” said Clare Holleley of the University of Canberra, lead author of the

study in the journal Nature on Wednesday. The study, she said, “is showing that climate extremes can very rapidly fundamentally alter the biology of an organism.” Some reptiles, like alligators and some turtles, have their genders determined not by sex chromosomes, like humans and other mammals, but by temperature during incubation. In the past, scientists have shown in the lab that hot temperatures can switch the natural chromosome-based gender. Holleley and colleagues examined the genetic sex markers of 131 wild-caught

bearded dragons in Queensland. The genetic-male-intofemale dragons not only laid eggs, but in a way were better mothers than genetically determined females, laying more eggs, said study co-author Arthur Georges, chief scientist for the Institute for Applied Ecology at the University of Canberra. The team also found that the offspring of these dragons no longer have their gender determined by chromosomes, but by temperature. AAP


NEWS.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

11

SEXI plan on Rhiannon’s radar BY JOHN RYAN JOURNALIST

EE RHIANNON sees a bright future for western NSW. The federal Greens’ senator, who spent years in the NSW upper house before moving to Canberra, has been a long-time advocate for renewable energy. She’s a huge fan of well-known local Greens’ spokesperson Matt Parmeter’s Solar Energy eXchange Initiative (SEXI), with the federal senate earlier this year unanimously passing the Greens’ motion to support the project – that means this potential energy and job creating idea now has backing from federal, state and local governments. In Dubbo this week, Senator Rhiannon toured potential SEXI sites and spoke to would-be participants such as Local Aboriginal Lands Councils. “There are a lot of people in government who don’t realise renewables can be viable on a large scale across the country,” she said. “The industry would have so many benefits for regional economies. “We’ve spoken to Aboriginal Lands councils and there’s huge enthusiasm for the employment prospects for Aboriginal people.” Matt Parmeter, a Dubbo engineer, has spent the past decade campaigning as a Greens’ candidate in both state and federal elections, with solar power the bedrock of his personal policy platform. “This proposal is about kickstarting a future multi-billion dollar industry for inland NSW, that will eventually supply solar electricity to Sydney and Melbourne,” he told Weekender. “The Solar Energy eXchange Initiative will be a win-win for councils and their communities – local economies will receive a boost and household bills will stabilise an reduce in the long term. “With the price of solar technologies falling, now is the time for Australia to move to a low-carbon, jobs-rich future and this project will help western NSW lead the way.” Despite the region’s potential, Rhiannon warns there are moves afoot that could cripple Australian agriculture, such as the push for Australia to sign the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), which many critics claim has been designed by Wall Street bankers to further enrich US corporations at the expense of almost everyone else. Other commentators see the TPP as a last ditch effort by Wall Street to shore up profits as China rises as an economic power which will challenge the US. “It will be a disaster for Australian society and Australian farming communities will lose out big time,” Rhiannon

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The Baker’s Dozen Trivia Test

Senator Lee Rhiannon with Friends of the Earth campaigners in Dubbo this week. PHOTO: KRIS STEVENS

said. “Export contracts could be cut out from underneath farmers and agri-business, which is controlled by these corporations, will benefit. “If agribusiness says they’re losing profits because of our OH&S regulations, our environmental regulations or in other areas, they can sue the Australian government and win.” The fact everything is so secret has the Greens concerned. “It will mean massive changes such as the end of family farms, and family-owned rural and regional businesses will also suffer,” Rhiannon said. “The Greens have common ground here with the Nationals – we need MPs from Barnaby Joyce (federal agriculture minister) down to say they won’t back the liberals if the party backs the TPP. “If the Nationals break ranks with the Liberals it would really open up Australian politics.” While the nationals maintain their independence, Senator Rhiannon says she’s seen party members talk tough in the bush about how they’ll stand up to the senior coalition partner, but once back in Canberra they’ll vote as a stolid coalition block. “They’ll yield to the Libs and vote against the best interests of the rural sector’, she said. While in Dubbo senator Rhiannon attended the public meeting held by The Friends of the Earth, a forum for locals

1. ADVERTISEMENTS: Who was the grey-haired personality who once faced the Cadbury’s TV commercials, telling us that each block contained “a glass and a half of full-cream milk”? 2. RELIGION: Where in the New Testament can the full version of the Lord’s Prayer be found? 3. TELEVISION: Where did the astronaut Tony Nelson live in “I Dream of Jeannie”? 4. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Cambodia? 5. TITLES: What is an MP in Great

to express concerns about the potential of uranium being mined at Alkane’s Toongi Rare Earths project, a mine which has just received state planning approval. “It’s a credit to the Friends of the Earth tour, they’re interested in the health of people and the environment and there were nearly 60 people there,” the Senator told Weekender. “I’m not saying we’re opposed to the Toongi mine; we need rare earths for today’s high tech industries, but we do need to ensure the operations are put under close scrutiny.” If uranium wasn’t involved she said there’d be much less cause for concern, however she questions if the mine should be in a relatively populated area with concerns raised about water table contamination and the extra 70 large trucks which would be passing through Dubbo every day. “Alkane’s general manager (Mike Sutherland) was there and he said they won’t be using the uranium once it’s mined, but it will be coming out and we have major concerns about water pollution and transport,” Rhiannon said. “There are deposits of rare earths in Western Australia and a large supply in China, so looking at it in terms of justification and the track record of mining companies I’m not confident. “When breaches of conditions are reported to governments they’re likely to change the rules instead of imposing

Britain? 6. ARCHITECTURE: Who designed St Paul’s Cathedral in London (right)? 7. MUSIC: What is the means of conveyance in the Christmas song “Jingle Bells”? 8. MOVIES: In “Forrest Gump”, what was the nickname of Forrest’s best friend in the Army? 9. ASTRONOMY: What is the next planet beyond Saturn in our solar system? 10. MEASUREMENTS: What does the

penalties and the penalties themselves are so small they’re petty cash to mining companies,” she said. Alkane general manager Mike Sutherland has spent many years living in Dubbo and raising awareness about the Dubbo Zirconia Project (DZP). He says the company is perplexed by environmental advocates who on one hand demand renewable energy, and on the other criticise the DZP. “This is addressed in the DZP Environmental Impact Statement and was considered by the Planning Assessment Committee (PAC) in making its decision to approved the DZP,” Sutherland said. “Alkane will not be producing nor exporting any uranium from the Dubbo Zirconia Project – It is illegal to mine uranium in NSW. The uranium is contained with other wastes as a by-product of the mineral processing proposed at the Dubbo Zirconia Project. “The uranium will be contained with other neutralised production wastes in an engineered waste storage facility on site,” he said. He said the PAC approved the whole project on May 28 this year subject to a “raft of stringent consent conditions”. The company has also committed to massively upgrade the Obley Road with works to include straightening and widening as well as the installation of bridges and culverts to accommodate BDouble transport.

Saffir-Simpson scale measure? 11. POP MUSIC: Name Norman Greenbaum’s one big hit. 12. SPORT: When was the last time before 2014 that Algeria’s men’s soccer team won a game at the World Cup? 13. LYRICS: Name the song that contains this lyric: “It’s the heart afraid of breaking that never learns to dance. It’s the dream afraid of waking that never takes the chance.” ANSWERS: SEE THE PLAY PAGES.


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TALES FROM THE TRAILS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Weekender regular Lisa Minner continues with a weekly series highlighting some of the faces, places and hidden gems along our own beautiful stretch of the Macquarie River.

BIRD IS THE WORD For some people, retiring means taking a holiday, returning home then preparing to slow down in the years ahead. Not so for Deb and Andrew Cayzer who waved good-bye to their home, their kids and their former life, jumped in their caravan and ended up the owners of a caravan park in Trangie. Far from retiring, the couple is excited to make Trangie an internationally recognised destination for bird-watchers. WORDS and PHOTOGRAPHY Lisa Minner NDREW and Deb Cayzer arrived in the small central west township of Trangie for the first time last year when they were flirting with idea of purchasing a caravan park. They looked around at the township – population 850 – for the first time and had to consider whether this was a place they could unhitch their van and permanently call home. The answer was a resounding yes. Since then the couple has been nothing short of a whirlwind of activity and inspiration to everyone who lives there. Joining the Trangie Action Group and bringing their can-do approach to the table has reinvigorated the community. Their desire to see Trangie “on-the-map” has led to interesting discoveries and number of brainstorming sessions with long-term residents of the area, who think the arrival of both Andrew and Deb has been a breath of fresh air. As the new owners of the Trangie Caravan Park, Andrew believes the town may be small but it packs a punch. With sheep, agriculture (namely cotton) at its backbone, the town has a lot in its favour. Trangie’s connection to the cotton industry and its proximity to the local cotton gins, makes for a fascinating corner of the world. For anyone who hasn’t seen the trail of white cotton tufts lining the Mitchell Highway during harvest season and the seemingly endless rows of massive round cotton bales sitting in the paddocks, that spectacle in itself is worth a drive. It’s certainly not a sight you see in just any country town. The town’s popular race days attract attendees from all over the state and increasingly, Trangie is seeing more and more bird watchers exploring the waterways and local habitat. Twitchers, as they’re often called, are committed bird-watchers who travel long distances to see a new species to add to their

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birdwatching achievements which could include a “life list”, a “year list” or other specific lists. Trangie has abundant birdlife. It’s less than 20 km from Gin Gin Weir which is situated on the Macquarie River, and the Goan Water hole which is around a kilometre long and right in the heart of town. It’s the perfect environment to attract a variety of birdlife. The town is also reasonably close to the world-famous Ramsar-listed Macquarie Marshes. The marshes are located on the other side of Warren and are a primary location for woodland birds and wetland species like Grey-crowned Babblers, Hooded Robins, Speckled Warblers, the cryptic Painted Snipe, Brolgas and a variety of Egret species. Andrew and Deb plan to make Trangie an established and appealing destination for birdwatchers as they make their way to Warren and the marshes for more well-known wetlands.

There’s a lot happening – you just need to be part of the community to find out about it.


Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

TALES FROM THE TRAILS. Deb and Andrew Cayzer at the Goan water hole in Trangie.

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TALES FROM THE TRAILS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Deb and Andrew outside on the verandah of one off their new cabins.

And with the recent upgrade of their caravan park, including new cabins, the expression “build it and they will come” holds a lot of hope for the Cayzers. RIOR to their tree-change, Andrew was employed for many years with Woolworths and Deb was a registered nurse. Once their children were grown and launched and at just over 55 years of age, the couple decided to go out and enjoy some of their new found freedom. And they didn’t do it in half-measures. “We sold everything, including the house, put the money in the bank and just went travelling!” Andrew says. Their initial sojourn included four months in Tasmania, a month in Agnes Waters in the Gladstone region, then to Winton, Rockhampton and back to Gladstone where their plans changed when Deb broke her ankle. Sitting for long hours in their truck was difficult and painful for Deb, and slowed them down considerably. But before leaving home, the couple had joined a website that listed businesses for sale and lease. They were open to ideas. “We knew we wanted to do something but we weren’t quite sure what that would be- possibly the caravan park industry.” So they continued the trip with the intention of changing course if they were approached to manage a caravan park or similar business if the opportunity arose. The Trangie Caravan park listing came through on the website last year. Andrew says there wasn’t much in-

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formation on either it or the town of Trangie for that matter but it was on the market for a great price. With their interest piqued, the pair started making their way in the van to Trangie. “We stopped in Warren and then drove over to check out the park. We could see the potential straight away, it really grabbed our attention. “Nothing had been damaged; it was just overrun but we could see through all that so we called an electrician to check out a few things and five minutes later he was here. Who ever heard of an electrician turning up in five minutes?” Andrew adds, laughing. It all came up trumps so the couple decided to make a “silly offer” and within a short space of time found themselves the new owners of a freehold caravan park. “We saw it in the morning and owned it by the afternoon,” Deb says. Since that time the couple has invested a lot of money into the business by upgrading all the existing facilities and installing four of what could possibly be the quirkiest cabins in the central west. The cabins have gone over a treat, especially with young international backpackers who work out on the cotton gins each year. While they were busy building up their new business, Andrew and Deb

were also trying to think of ways to get Trangie on the radar as a destination worthy of an overnight stay. Andrew says there was not a lot of talk on the internet about their new town, other than it being somewhere you pass through on the way to somewhere else. “We wanted to make it a worthy destination; we have the weir, the waterhole and the race days and some great local businesses, but other than that it didn’t appear that we had a lot to offer, but there’s a lot happening – you just need to be part of the community to find out about it.” So they asked around and spoke with a few of the locals about activities in the area. One local woman, who is a bird lover and former teacher, said there were always birdwatchers coming to visit the area. Andrew says the bird watching clubs all knew about the area and deemed it worthy, with Trangie regularly attracting both national and international bird watchers, according to those in the know. According to Andrew, the cotton farms and their large dams which attract hundreds of different birds every year make the area particularly attractive for twitchers. Having recently collaborated with two local cotton farmers, Andrew has established five excellent spots on their

We sold everything, including the house, put the money in the bank and just went travelling!

properties where he can take visitors to see what’s on offer. With accommodation sorted and prime bird-watching destinations in place, the couple has contacted various birdwatching groups around Australia to advise they’re ready for visitation and more than happy to accommodate the twitchers and their needs. With the cabins now installed and plenty of powered sites ready to fill, Andrew and Deb are looking forward to word-of-mouth doing its job for Trangie’s hospitality and bird watchingfriendly tours. The couple admits they’re a bit green on bird watching at the moment but they’re keen to learn more and they’re looking forward to their guests sharing stories with them around their communal kitchen. Deb said she’s heard there are definitely brolgas out on one of the nearby properties and is keen to discover which other species of birds are calling Trangie home. “We welcome people to Trangie; it’s such a great town, the people have welcomed us, they’ve been so friendly, helpful and caring so we direct our customers through to the local businesses like the hotels, the club and the bakery,” Deb says. “You have to go to the local bakery for the best apple turnovers in Australia – those turn overs alone are worth the drive!” For more detailed information on birdwatching along the Macquarie River, check out: www.rivertrails.com.au/ trail/bird-watching/ „


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PROFILE.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

The launch date of children’s book, Grandpa’s Hat, falls on the first day of Grief Awareness Month, August 1 – for good reason. Bridging the gap between how adults talk about losses, like death, and what children actually need to hear – the story of a little girl, Jennywren, whose grandfather has died, draws from deeply personal experiences of author Jen Cowley. It’s the expression of a journey to understand her own grief, under the watchful guidance of NALAG (the National Association for Loss and Grief). WORDS Yvette Aubusson-Foley T was meant to be – I thought – a typical editorial meeting about the next edition of Dubbo Weekender over a coffee at the Grapevine. My privilege to sit, yack and plan content with Jen Cowley who, among many talents, is well known in this town and beyond, for the excellence of her writing. The meeting’s over ... but there’s one more thing. Cowley reaches into a bag and pulls out prints on paper of watercolour paintings, which are illustrations from a children’s book called Grandpa’s Hat, written five years ago. And she’s ready to launch. I sit and listen, a knot in my throat, as she unravels the personal stories and tragic losses that form the basis for her book. She explains how collaborations with NALAG and the combined Rotary clubs of Dubbo and Coonabarabran have made Grandpa’s Hat a community project to create a purposeful tool with relevance to anyone who grieves with a child by their side. “I wrote Grandpa’s Hat as part of the counselling process I went through after my brother Ross died in 2009. He and I were very close and we’d been through a lot as children with the death of our father and our little brother, and the ongoing care of our chronically ill older brother. “We were very close. When he died, I just couldn’t find my way out of the fog. I was surprised at how hard it hit me and how difficult I was finding it to cope, because my default position had always been the whole stiff upper lip thing. I was supposed to be a strong, capable woman,” Cowley says. “I knew of NALAG through having done stories on them but I was driving to work one day and was feeling pretty desperate and I just wheeled in there and poured myself through the door. “They helped to put the pieces back together, and as part of that counselling process over the course of six months or so, they helped me realise I had a lot of unresolved grief from my childhood and the conversation often turned to how we tend to isolate or insulate children from the process of death and dying, and from grief. “So the suggestion came up that as a lasting tribute I could write down my thoughts which took the form of a little children’s book, told through the eyes of a child. It was really a therapeutic thing for me and it was never really intended for publication as far as I

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Grandpa’s Hat launch A selection of the original watercolour paintings have been framed and will be for auction at the launch of Grandpa’s Hat. Deputy Premier and Member for Dubbo Troy Grant will launch both the book and Grief Awareness Month on the night. » 6pm, Saturday, August 1 » Lazy River Estate » Bookings for the launch, and pre-orders for copies of the book can be made online at the NALAG website: www.nalag.org.au

was concerned.” HILE it’s cliché to say that every cloud has a silver lining and Grandpa’s Hat does stem from Cowley’s darkest hours, the end result is anything but bleak. Cowley talks me through the story of the little girl, Jennywren, who seeks the counsel of animals around her parent’s farm to understand where her grandfather, who has died, has actually gone. She lifts each draft page carefully. The warm and gently coloured illustrations to complement her words have been created by family friend and talented artist, Mark Horton. Each picture is actually a painting, some of which will be auctioned at the Grandpa’s Hat launch, with proceeds – like all sales of the book – going directly to NALAG. “Mark Horton and his illustrations are beyond words. He’s been like part of the family so he under-

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stands where this book has come from and he also is quite an accomplished artist, although he won’t tell you that. He’s very humble about his talents, but they are extraordinary. “He looked at some photographs of me as a child and my own family and loosely based some of his illustrations on those. There are lots of little quirky references from my childhood and my memories throughout the text and the illustrations. The way he was able to work those into the paintings is astonishing. The illustrations really bring the text alive. And we’re both Rotarians, so it’s sort of a nice fit.” Rotary has played an enormous part in bringing the project to fruition. The combined clubs of Dubbo and Coonabarabran, where Cowley hails from, have funded the project, so that enables all the proceeds in their entirety to go to NALAG. Cowley is quick to say that publishing the book is not for her benefit, although the writing of it, five years ago, was beneficial in her healing process. “To see it in print will be lovely, because it is a lasting tribute, but NALAG does such an extraordinary job and by virtue of the nature of what they do, they fly under the radar a little bit, and it’s not until you need their services, that you know they exist. “That’s made it very hard for them to get continued funding because a lot of the work they do is very private in nature. So getting recurrent funding and surety of funding is very difficult. I’m also hoping Grandpa’s Hat will raise awareness for what NALAG does – it’s not just bereavement counselling, it’s helping whole communities to work through issues. They do a lot of programs with mental health, they work with individual families and communities and they’ve been doing that for many years on a shoestring. It’s my way of saying thank you but it’s also hopefully a resource that will help others.” UST as Cowley once needed help as a 12 year-old child, farewelling a father she was not allowed to see in the last weeks leading up to his death. “What I wish I’d had was a bit more trust from adults, that we as children should have been included in that process. I understand it was very well intentioned, to try to insulate us from the hurt, because as parents, and I know, I’m a parent myself, the thing we do is try to shield our children from harm. “Ultimately it’s a very fraught position to take. I wish

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Jen Cowley, author, Grandpa’s Hat. PHOTO: STEVE COWLEY


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PROFILE.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

somebody had had the courage to tell me my father was dying. I knew he was dying, but I wanted to hear it. I wanted to talk to him. I wanted to ask him questions. I wanted to say things to him.” When her younger brother was killed in a farm accident just five years later, the then-teenage Cowley was better equipped to cope with the shock, but the default position to “stiff upper lip” again meant swallowing her grief and “just getting on with things”. Cowley falters here, trembling her words as she wrestles grief back into its box. “You learn to live with grief. It isn’t finite, there’s no end date. this is one of the problems we have in society – we subcontract our grief out. We like the whole death and dying thing to be sanitised, and homogenised, and clean and explainable. “When you lose somebody close to you, or even when a situation changes, there are all kinds of loss and grief. It becomes a new reality. Things don’t ever don’t go back to normal. You learn to operate in a new reality. “I realised that for 30 years I hadn’t given myself permission to grieve. We mark anniversaries; we mark birthdays. There are times we put aside for feeling sad. It’s perfectly acceptable to feel sad at Christmas time and on the anniversary of a death. “But grief can sneak up on you when you least expect it. Once, when I was in the supermarket, I saw a stand of sweets that were my brother’s favourite, and I used to buy him a big jar of them every Christmas. Just a silly little thing, but that brought me completely undone. “And that’s perfectly normal, but society tells me that’s an indication I’m not coping – that the unexpected bursts of emotion are something to, if not exactly be ashamed of, then certainly pitied. “So we shouldn’t confine those feelings – we should give ourselves permission to grieve any time. That’s not to say we should wander around wearing widow’s weeds and being terribly maudlin, but there are times when...” Cowley’s grief joins us again. She holds her breath, pausing to permit not just the words she wants to say, but the pain they conjure, to come forward. It’s a courageous alliance. “There’s not a day goes past, when I don’t miss my brother... horribly, and in a way it gets worse not better, because you have a fear that you’re going to forget. That’s normal. But we’re so conditioned to feel like we should be strong, and that we’re letting the side down if we’re not. “I think over the years if I’d had more insight and had more information and been able to work through the grief at the time, it would have made these losses later in life perhaps easier to bear.” T’S been the recent death of her sister-in-law that finally pushed Cowley to turning the story she wrote for self-healing into a book for anyone. “I never really seriously considered doing anything with Grandpa’s Hat, until my husband’s sister, George, was diagnosed with cancer and waged an ultimately losing but brutal battle with that cancer, during which time I spent quite a bit of time with her three and five year-old daughters. Cowley says it was during this time with the girls, to whom Grandpa’s Hat is dedicated, that her discussions with NALAG finally clicked into place. “It became quite apparent that all the things we’d been talking about – the need to guide children and be open and age appropriately honest about death and dying – were really important. “I thought maybe fate had a hand in my procrastination, and that now the universe was trying to tell me something – that my experience and the little book might help others. With NALAG’s blessing, that’s how it came to be and I wanted to do it as a fund raiser and an awareness raiser and a resource for others.” If the feedback Cowley received already is a sign, it’s a resource people need. “I didn’t realise how much of a chord it would strike with people. Almost without exception, every time I talk about it somebody will come to me and say this is happening to me, or somebody I know. “They say, this would be valuable in my classroom or my work, in my sphere of operation. In a way it’s comforting to know that grief is such a shared experience – one so many hat a lot of people go through. I’ve been blown away by the response to the need for this book,” she says.

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LTIMATELY when it does reach the hands of a small person, Mark Horton’s illustrations and Jen Cowley’s words, will guide them and the adults in their life, along a path of understanding and

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Jen Cowley with a portrait of her brother, Ross, done by Mark Horton. PHOTO: CONNOR COMAN-SARGENT

discovery, just like Jennywren. “The thing I hope with Grandpa’s Hat is that parents and carers will acknowledge that children are resilient little things; that they are very concrete thinkers, and we don’t give them enough credit for their resilience and intelligence. “I’m not saying you need to explain in very gory detail, but age appropriately we need to include children in the process of grief and explaining death and dying. It’s all around us and it happens to everyone, from the loss of a pet to the loss of a parent or changes in circumstances. It’s a conversation we need to have. “I hope Grandpa’s Hat will help people to understand that the use of euphemisms, while it makes it easy for

You learn to live with grief. It isn’t finite, there’s no end date. This is one of the problems we have in society – we subcontract our grief out. We like the whole death and dying thing to be sanitised and homogenised, and clean and explainable.

adults to explain, can be very confusing for children. Terms like “passed away”, “went to sleep” – we euphemise it because it’s sanitising death and dying, and that’s natural. “We need to give children credit for being able to understand concrete terms. They also think very literally. Explaining gently and clearly stops children from making their own assumptions. A lot of children, if it’s not explained properly, can somehow think a death is their fault because, particularly with smaller children, their entire world revolves around themselves. “If Grandpa went to sleep and doesn’t come back, they think, what happens if I go to sleep? There are all kinds of ways children manifest an inability to cope or work through grief through not having the right information. And that can come out a week later, a month later...30 years later as it did in my experience. “The difficulty is that when you have to explain death to a child, you’re going through grief as well. So you have to work through you’re own grief to be able to help children, but it’s ultimately very beneficial to include kids. “I’m hoping not only will Grandpa’s Hat be another part of the legacy my sister-in-law and brother leave, but perhaps it might help parents to have that conversation and even to work through their own grief. “It’s ironic because I wish both Ross and George were here to see it – they would have been so proud, but if they were here it wouldn’t exist, so it’s bitter sweet.” „


Mark Horton, illustrator, Grandpa’s Hat


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2X2.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Sally Hopkins and Robert Salt Sally Hopkins has drawn inspiration from a tragic family story to create a film script called The Station, being filmed in Dubbo in August. For advice on Aboriginal culture and language – both key to the story – she need look no further than one of the lead actors in the production, Robert Salt. AS TOLD TO Yvette Aubusson-Foley PHOTOGRAPHY Connor Coman-Sargent Sally Hopkins: FIRST met Robert when I went to an exhibition of his. He’s an artist and a writer. Actually when we did our auditions for The Station, he wrote a poem especially for the audition, so he’s quite a talented man. He is playing the part of my father in the film and he’s our indigenous consultant. He’s helping with some of the language because we have four or five sentences of an indigenous language which we’re excited be to taking all around the world. There’s not many people left that know the indigenous languages and they could be lost very, very quickly. Its something we’d like to see taught in our schools, for everybody to know, even a greeting. Whenever I see Robert he says to me “Yama”. It’s something that with our population in Dubbo, we all should know, whether we’re indigenous or not, because in this town we have such a huge population and it would be nice if we did know something.

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Ken, who plays my grandfather in the film – he and Robert get on very well – they’re the ones at the end of the movie set in modern day who have this conversation in the Aboriginal language. Even Ken, who is nearing his 60s, can remember his father speaking (language) but he himself doesn’t know any words. We’re talking about that a lot; we have a lot of documentaries to make! I’m from the Warriegah tribe but we’ll be using the tribe from Brewarrina. The story is about my grandfather. He was left at the train station in Bourke, and his father passed away. He was an Aboriginal man, and – without giving away too much of the story – his mother was a white lady and when her husband passed away her parents married her to a white man two days later, and they left her children behind at the railway station. It happened at Bourke but we’re filming in Dubbo for logistical reasons. It’s a really beautiful station. It turned out to be a really happy story. It’s a story of

resilience, and just how tragedy can happen to people but they can over come it, and they don’t need to let hurt just carry on over generations and let it destroy lives; they can deal with what’s happened to them and make it stop with them. It’s what my grandfather did and we want to encourage people to do that today. We have tied it into the film to encourage people who do need help put their hands up. If you are young or old and you just can’t cope. A lot of the grief groups we contacted said “we have the resources but a lot of people just don’t contact us”. Robert has a real connection to the story. His connection to his family is so strong. Whenever you give him a call he’s always doing something with his family. Everything is about his family. He really knows the days that he has left. You feel he just knows how precious the days are and he’s counting them down. Every day since I’ve met Robert I think, “what have I done with my mum and dad, or my family?” because


Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

he really appreciates his family. It’s been wonderful knowing him.

Robert Salt N the past two and a half years I’ve been doing a bit of my own screen writing and a bit of acting on stage. I didn’t have that opportunity growing up in Brewarrina; it was a small town and there just wasn’t the opportunity. I’ve always been interested in reading and writing and the next progression was acting. I’ve only met Sally briefly in the past four months. She needed someone with Aboriginal cultural knowledge and who’d done some acting and someone referred my name to her. She rang me and we got together and had a yarn about the movie and the script. She thought I could probably give some advice for the script because I come from Brewarrina, and the story’s set around the Bourke area, which is the next small town over.

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Growing up with both white and Aboriginal ancestry, I’ve been able to identify with the script. My father was a white older gentleman, a lot older than Mum and it would have been hard for him to raise a young boy in the 70s in Brewarrina when everyone else was out doing manly stuff. My father’s white Australian with French ancestry and my mother’s Aboriginal with some Wiradjuri connection here, but also Muwarri which is an Aboriginal language group out near Brewarrina and Cunnamulla, Queensland. The person who plays my father is a darker skinned Aboriginal person. I’m a fairer skin person. We are sort of extremes. I do know a lot about Aboriginal language from my grandfather. He recorded his language in 1972. As I explained to Sally and the other cast, it’s a story based around Bourke and as I know the local Aboriginal language I told Sally I need to think about it from a cultural perspective; what’s appropriate because we’re filming on someone else’s country

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language group but the story’s based on another language. Sally’s only new to acting and script writing although she’s written poetry and other stories for a number of years. It would be nice if it does get picked up around the world. Different people from different countries will be able to identify with it; it’s about people reconnecting to identity and with family. It’s a universal story, nothing unique to us. I’ve seen films picked up and given huge amounts of budget. If Sally ever gets to that point it would be nice if she keeps me in mind for one of the lead characters again, instead of all famous actors, and remember us (joking) who toiled for free; catering and holding the microphone and acting! Sally spoke to us about a couple of film festivals, like the Berlin Film Festival. She’s aiming for around the 40-minute mark. Once we’ve wrapped up hopefully she will help me with some of my projects.


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FEATURE.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

BOYS TO MEN: TOUR OFFERS VALUABLE EXPERIENCE BY JEN COWLEY EDITOR

T’S a long way from the parched plains of western NSW to the green fields of France, but it’s more than just miles that separate a group of rising young Rugby League stars from their European counterparts. There’s a world of cultural difference between these country lads and the people they’ll meet as part of the NSW Indigenous Young Achievers U16 side’s tour of France and Italy in November this year – and they can’t wait. Still dripping sweat from a victory over rivals at Walgett last weekend, Bourke boys Clynton Edwards, Jalen Rose and Connor Elwood still manage to muster enough energy to express their excitement at the coming adventure. None has been overseas before, and they’re looking forward to seeing the big wide world. While they still need to raise the necessary $5000 apiece to join the tour, the boys say it’s an opportunity they don’t want to miss – and they’ll be working hard to ensure they’re on that plane come November 8. The squad comprises 40 young Aboriginal players from all over NSW, including from across the western region – all of whom have been chosen not just for their sporting ability, but for their commitment to making good choices. “It’s exciting,” says Edwards, speaking for the trio. “The footy will be good, but it’s also going to be good to see other countries and to meet different people.” All talented players, they’re keen to further their careers in Rugby League and they know it’s a privilege to be offered this opportunity. Ronny “Rambo” Gibbs – a legend of the game who now works as Aboriginal development officer with Country Rugby League (CRL) – is someone who knows all about opportunity, and having chaperoned this particular tour in the past, says it’s a valuable exercise for those who have worked hard enough to gain a position in the squad. “It’s not just all about football. It’s also about discipline and respect and making good choices. Football is a good vehicle for these messages – healthy living, staying focussed, having social interaction; that’s the really important part.” Gibbs says many of the boys have had some significant disadvantage in their lives – “Hopefully, this program will help them to overcome some of those difficulties and get the start they need in life as young men.”

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HE tour will take the boys first to Abu Dhabi, and then on to France, where they’ll spend the bulk of their nearly three weeks abroad. They’ll take in all the sights of Paris before going to a commemoration service on Remembrance Day at the site of the Somme

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battlefields. Between training and playing matches with local representative sides throughout France and Italy, the boys will also visit Euro-Disney and a day trip to Barcelona in Spain is also planned. The tour will then move through other French cities, then to Nice, Monte Carlo, Milan and Vatican City, and will conclude with the sights of Rome before the boys head home to the plains of western NSW in late November. Gibbs toured with the squad last year, and says one of the undisputed highlights of the trip is the visit to the WWI Battle of the Somme site in France. “This year, being the ANZAC centenary year, it’s going to be very special. When you’re standing there, it really brings an added edge of respect for what those blokes who fought there went through, and why they were fighting. It’s not just a history lesson – and you learn far more through being there than you’d ever learn out of a history book or from reading a computer screen.” The trip, he says, will be a “huge” eyeopener for these country kids. “Most of them haven’t been overseas before – and many haven’t even been on a plane before. So it will definitely be an experience to open their eyes and see how big the world is. “I’ve been very fortunate in my life to travel overseas, including playing football overseas, and it still strikes me how big the world really is. To have the opportunity to do this at the age of 17 is unbelievable – it wasn’t an opportunity that was around in my day, but I’m glad these boys can have a crack at it. “It’s important for them to see that there’s another world outside their own communities. It’s a great learning tool for them.” While the boys have been chosen for their footballing prowess, Gibbs says it’s not just athleticism selectors were looking for. “The criteria is that you must be going to school, or enrolled in a TAFE course or equivalent. You must be in a junior Rugby League competition, playing and competing. If you’re not doing both those things, you’re not on the team. “Just like in life, being good at football doesn’t guarantee you a place.” Gibbs says the tour is far from a “free ride” for the boys. “They each have to come up with $5000 to participate in the tour. We need to teach them they can’t just sit back and wait for someone to hand them the money – they have to be out there trying to help themselves. And that’s the only way the community is going to support them – if they’re seen to be out there doing something to help themselves. “It isn’t a “free ride” tour – you have to be doing the right things at school and in your community. You have to be out there showing people that you’re willing to help yourself.” LSO taking his first trip away from Australian shores will be Dubbobased NRL Development Officer

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FEATURE.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

23

Clayton Edwards, Jalen Rose and Connor Elwood, with CRL’s Ronny Gibbs and the NRL’s Daniel Swan. PHOTOS: JEN COWLEY

Daniel Swan, who will travel with the squad and is almost as excited as his young charges. “I can’t wait either,” he laughs. “It’ll be great to see something of the world, and doing it in the name of Rugby League, and with these kids, is a real privilege.” The tour is the brainchild of former Walgett local, Steve “Bear” Hall, who now works with NSW Rugby League, but who retains close working ties with the western area. “He’s now based in Sydney, but he’s done a lot of work with rugby league in Western NSW,” says Swan. “He does a lot with Ronny (Gibbs) and with the kids in the western region, helping them develop ways to further their football careers. “Being from the area, he knows what

some of the challenges are that some of these kids face.” Swan says the boys have made their way onto the tour by being good footballers, but it’s just as much about them growing as men as it is about the sport. “Getting out there and experiencing the world is a great opportunity for these boys – and football is a good vehicle for giving them that opportunity. Some of the boys have had a difficult start in life, and growing up in rural and remote communities comes with its own challenges, so rugby league can be a tool for them to use to access experience of the wider world and through that, become better men.” Swan has worked closely with the three Bourke lads and with another of their team-mates, Jeffrey Flick from

Collarenebri, who will also join them on the tour. “They’re good athletes, but they’re also good kids. They’ve all been involved with rep football, and I’m confident they’ll really embrace this opportunity and take it all in. They’re all pretty shy, but this will help give them a great confidence boost.” » The boys each have to raise $5000 in order to participate in the tour – they’re doing that through local fundraisers, through part-time work, and by helping out in a voluntary capacity in return for community support. If you, or your organisation, feel you could help out in any way, contact us at Weekender by emailing feedback@dubboweekender.com.au or by phoning our office on 6885 4433 and we’ll put you in touch with Ronny “Rambo” Gibbs.

It isn’t a “free ride” tour – you have to be doing the right things at school and in your community. You have to be out there showing people that you’re willing to help yourself.” – Ronny Gibbs, Aboriginal Development Officer with Country Rugby League


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OPINION & ANALYSIS.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

25

The Love Boat: The Lost Years â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Part 2 This week, we continue our series chronicling the outlandish adventures of an ocean liner adrift in tropicall seas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in which Andrew G gives Weekender readers an exclusive behind the scenes glimpse at what really happened on The Love Boat â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when Tony met Billy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an unlikely â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and wholly fictional â&#x20AC;&#x201C; love story... mander Kevin turned to face the sun; finally becoming outright chants of rebellion when Pan Galactic Emperor Kevin had his image burnt into every sailorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s morning toast. His replacement however, when that change finally came, fared even more badly. The mutiny was instant. Kevin supporters would drill holes in the bottom of their trusty ship and then run to Captain Julia to complain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What am I meant to do about that, you plonkers?â&#x20AC;? sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d strine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lord Yaweh Kevin would have filled this hole with his prodigious phallus, but you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have one do you? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your fault not ours,â&#x20AC;? was the typical reply. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fill a worm hole â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all blow no show that guy,â&#x20AC;? Captain Julia would mutter but it was pointless. Without Kevin they were Rudd(erless) and more and more holes appeared until the ship simply sank without trace. Barna-

In our last episode the HMAS Love Boat was being threatened by infamous pirate Barnacle Bill. The story continues...

F

IRST Officer Pyne looked on enviously as Captain Tony thrust his long pole into the face of Barnacle

Bill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The people have spoken,â&#x20AC;? Tony was saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;And what they have said is that they do not want Barnacle Bill aboard this ship. This is what the people said and this is a captain that listens to the people.â&#x20AC;? Barnacle Bill swayed uneasily in his leaky tub. The tub had seen better days, in fact it had seen better decades. Hewn from ironbark at the end of the 1800s, it had sailed the Sea of Democracy, crossed the Gulf of Inclusion and navigated the Straits of Equality with barely a scratch. All that changed in 2007 when Captain Kevin took control. Within weeks mutiny broke out as beleaguered sailors had trouble keeping up with a captain, now calling himself an admiral, whose only instruction was to â&#x20AC;&#x153;steer a course that puts me at the centre of everythingâ&#x20AC;?. It began slowly: the odd snort as Vice Admiral Kevin walked past; gales of laughter whenever High Lord Com-

cle Bill had rescued that boat, plugged the holes with excess union contributions from large construction firms, and set sail in pursuit of the Love Boat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Listen Tony,â&#x20AC;? Bill was saying as he transferred money from one trouser pocket to the other to keep the tub from listing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I agree the people have spoken and what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard them say is that Tony is tone-y deaf.â&#x20AC;? He paused, grinning manically. Somehow, 350 miles offshore, a cricket chirped. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time for this,â&#x20AC;? said Tony, dropping his poker onto the deck with a clatter (First Officer Pyne squealed in dismay). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get me the Doc.â&#x20AC;? Lean, bespectacled, educated and an absolute charmer, Malcolm â&#x20AC;&#x153;Docâ&#x20AC;? Turnbull was summoned forth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ah, Captain. Not that I want to cause any disruption but there are rules about exactly who is allowed to wave a stick on the open seas. Strictly speaking only

Without Kevin they were Rudd(erless) and more and more holes appeared until the ship simply sank without trace.

a delegated officer of the brig can wave anything larger than a ruler and that stick is certainly longer than that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My oath it is,â&#x20AC;? Captain Tony boasted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had to hold onto anything less than a foot long since I was in high school. Why, the stick I have now needs two hands to hold up and requires a fair bit of stamina to control once it gets swaying from side to side, let me tell you.â&#x20AC;? The slight thud behind Captain Tony was First Officer Pyne fainting to the polished timber deck. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure you know best, Captain,â&#x20AC;? said the Doc and, with a slight bow, turned and walked back towards his cabin. Astute observers might have noticed that as he did, he gave a slight wink to Barnacle Bill, and that Barnacle Bill winked back. Captain Tony was many things but astute observer was not one of them. First Officer Pyne was, but he was unconscious. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on between Doc and Barnacle? Will High Lord Kevin return? Will First Officer Pyne develop a second dimension or is he strictly a one-gag character? To be continued...

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26

OPINION & ANALYSIS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

HELICOPTER VIEW

Cr Mathew Dickerson

Mayor Mathew Dickerson was born and bred in Dubbo and is married with four children.

How benchmarks can miss a measure of success OUNCILS across the state had to submit their Fit for the Future submissions this week. With our submission alone consisting of 111 pages, and with 152 Councils across the state preparing documents of a similar size, the NSW Government would have received close to 17,000 pages this week, at an incredible cost to local government. There is no doubt that the Fit for the Future reform process is the most significant change since 1993 when our former State Member, Gerry Peacocke, was the Minister for Local Government. The overall process has been designed to help councils demonstrate to our communities that we are financially sound, operating efficiently and in a strong position to guide growth and deliver services into the future. The seven benchmarks, as set out by the IPART methodology, were: Operating Performance Ratio; Own Source Revenue; Building and Infrastructure Asset Renewal; Infrastructure Backlog Ratio; Asset Maintenance Ratio; Debt Service Ratio and Real Operating Expenditure per Capita. These are all logical and sensible benchmarks that can be adjudged against black and white parameters and an answer can pop out at the other end. While I don’t vehemently disagree with the overall process and benchmarks, I do question one other factor which is a difficult one to measure –

C

but is worth much more than the seven benchmarks previously outlined. I remember very early in my burgeoning business career, I had a meeting with my bank manager. He informed me that, after they had crunched the numbers on my business and analysed the data, they were going to increase my overdraft rate because my numbers didn’t measure up well against the benchmarks that had probably been designed by a University professor who had never spent a day in a real business. I asked a simple question of the bank manager (looking back now it was probably an arrogant question) – to show me where in the numbers it accounted for determination, attitude, ideas, skill, entrepreneurship and an absolute driven will to succeed. He looked at me blankly. He asked how a bank could possibly measure all of that. I told the bank manager that if he couldn’t see those attributes in me and in my business, then per-

haps this wasn’t the right bank for me. For the first and last time in my business career, I changed banks. Several months later when we won a major business award, the first bank contacted me to try to bring me back as a customer on a lower overdraft rate than we initially had. Of course I didn’t go. I would say something similar to the state government. I can’t see a measure in the benchmarks for a committed group of councillors who are 100 per cent dedicated to the best outcome for a local government area. I can’t see how they measure the skill and excellence of a management team. I can’t see that they are measuring the engagement of the local community and the community’s absolute desire to see council – and the city – succeed. I don’t remember any mentions of the commitment of the staff of a council. I can’t see anywhere in all of these ratios and criteria that it measures whether or not a council will actu-

I can’t see a measure in the benchmarks for a committed group of councillors who are 100 per cent dedicated to the best outcome for a local government area.

ally be successful. I realise that it is hard for a committee to measure all of these intangibles based on a paper submission. With submissions, it is often the skill of the submission writer – rather than the actual content – that is the difference between a good and a great submission. My suggestion would be a time-consuming one. Perhaps IPART – or whoever the state government abrogates their responsibility to – has a representative spend some time in a community. Talk to councillors; talk with management teams; find out what people in a community think about the way forward for a local government area. Find out what is really happening “on the ground” in a community. In the 111 page submission from Dubbo City Council, we demonstrate clearly how we hit all of the seven defined benchmarks three years ahead of schedule and so can be called Fit for the Future. In terms of commitment, skill and a desire to succeed from councillors, staff and the community in Dubbo, if there were defined benchmarks measuring those attributes, we would be smashing those numbers out of the ground right now. And in my mind, forget about the seven IPART benchmarks – the intangible attributes are much more important to the success of Dubbo City Council and our city.

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Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

Sally Bryant

OPINION & ANALYSIS.

27

Weekender regular Sally Bryant was born with her nose in a book and if no book is available, she finds herself reading Cornflakes packets, road signs and instruction manuals for microwaves. All that information has to go somewhere...

In my book, which I’ve lost in the move... ’VE just moved house again, from the house with the view to an even lovelier house with other views, not far down the road. The move was accomplished with a team of willing helpers and a fleet of utes and trailers, a bit of swearing and some considerable angst. Halfway through the day of the Big Move, we sat down to the biggest box of hot chips I’ve ever seen and that remains the high point of the entire experience. My father once told me I took up more room in the back of his notebook than any of the other three Graces, due to my predilection for relocating. I guess for those who live in one place for much of their lives, it can be hard to understand, this constant shifting from kipsy to kipsy. But for us renters, it can be the simple reality of life. There are any number of reasons you move from one rental property to another; whatever the reason, the move itself is always stressful and expensive. I do understand the imperative to buy. I have owned a property, meself, but that was some years ago. (I had a farm in Aaaafrica...) I bought a weatherboard cottage in Bourke for the princely sum of $35,000. Well, me and the bank went into the deal together. And I loved that little house. I ripped up the ugliest carpet in the world and exposed the concrete underneath (which I painted). I ripped off the fibro lining in some of the rooms and exposed beautiful timber panelling. I changed the taps in the bathroom, weeded and watered the garden and, hey presto, it was simply delightful. I did live in the place for three full years before I painted over the Darrell Lea pink of the walls. The thing that prompted me to do that was the need to find a good tenant and it was clear that no-one in their right mind would live in rooms that colour. It was really quite lovely once it was all tidied up. I had to rent it out because I was moving back to Sydney for a new job. And herein lies the rub. If you have the sort of career I’ve had, it can be hard to say for sure where you will be living in 12 months’ time. You may very well live in the same place for 10 years, or alternatively, something could come up and you might find yourself somewhere else entirely. Unencumbered with

I

husband and children and inquisitive of mind, I’m just as likely to decide to up and off in search of something new, and owning a property can complicate things. Thus it was with the little house in Bourke. I bought it, full of the nesting instinct and very sure I would still be roosting there in my dotage. My dotage may have come and gone but I’ve moved on and the house has long been sold. The theory was to rent it out while I was off doing grand things in Sydney. I contacted the agent, who had sold me the house full of assurances that the rental return on the property market in Bourke was ridunculously lucrative and that I’d be a millionaire landlord in no time. And off I went. What I hadn’t factored into the equation was that not all tenants are as...ahem... exemplary as I am. If I’m living somewhere, then it’s my home and I treat it as though I own it. I look after the garden and make it as neat and attractive as I can. I keep the house spruce and clean; I take care not to damage it and I live in it as though I did in fact own it. To my sadness, it quickly became apparent that not only were the tenants less than I could have wished for, so was the agent. They’re like importunate lovers; they’ll woo you and woo you and the moment you are signed up with them, they revert to type and display blatant disregard for your wishes, and your property. And your bank balance. For this reason I do not understand why so many Australians are buying investment properties to rent out and leave the management in the hands of leas-

ing agents. If I had all my savings tied up in a house or flat, the last thing I would do is to put it in the hands of a real estate agent to manage on my behalf. Not if I valued the investment. (Well, as it turns out, that WAS the first thing I did, but that’s the first thing I did which I will never do again.) Your most valuable resource is left in the hands of an overworked, underpaid member of staff who is at the bottom of the office pecking order. The pressure is on them from the owner and from the tenant; the leasing staff are the ham in the sandwich and the agency takes the cream. I don’t get it, I don’t. I do not understand why investment properties are all the go. I’m a great tenant, but there’s only one of me. I don’t think we as a nation understand how property leasing can work when it’s done properly and respectfully. If you look at the situation in European cities where many people never own a property, but rent all their lives, they have a much better way of dealing with the situation. Renters are not looked down upon, as second class citizens. It’s perfectly reasonable to be a tenant all your life and not tie your capital up in the property market. And you treat the landlord with respect and he treats you the same way. (That’s it. I’m moving to Europe.) Just kidding. There’s no way I’m ever moving again. And the move to Europe is out of the question, tempting though Greece may be this week. I can’t find my passport.

They’re like importunate lovers; they’ll woo you and woo you and the moment you are signed up with them, they revert to type and display blatant disregard for your wishes, and your property. And your bank balance.

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28

OPINION & ANALYSIS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Debate proves not all courage is created equal HE marriage equality debate in recent weeks has me pondering the nature of courage. The courage to do what you think is right; the courage to publicly admit why you think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right and the courage to publicly admit who and what you are. Nic Steepe, a young community activist, showed this courage in spades when he fronted Dubbo City Council last week. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not easy to turn up at council and address the assembled councillors and staff in those impressive surrounds, especially when you know most of them arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t well disposed to what you want to say. (I know because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done it). It canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be anything other than terrifying to bare your personal history on matters related to sexuality. Nic is a courageous young man. Some of the councillors showed less courage. Apparently of the view that marriage equality is â&#x20AC;&#x153;outside of councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s controlâ&#x20AC;?, some donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t agree council should even debate the issue of lending its support to marriage reform as a matter of â&#x20AC;&#x153;social inclusivityâ&#x20AC;?. (Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one to tell the grandkids for sure â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;How I defended councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proper jurisdiction in the dying days of marriage discriminationâ&#x20AC;?.) Next time council strays into matters beyond its strict control will we hear protests from the same councillors? I suspect it will depend on what their ultimate view is on the issue, or perhaps the politics of the issue. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recall similar opposition when the mayor appointed himself roving commentator on criminal sentencing and the magistracy. Others havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bothered to even respond to young Nicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s communications. Shame on them. Local government is much maligned but it must be said some councillors donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help their own cause. They should be responsive and forthright and have the courage to do what they think is right and say why they think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty simple. At least Councillor Rod Towney spoke from the heart. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t agree with marriage equality, but he knows of self-

T

Comment by STEPHEN LAWRENCE Stephen Lawrence is a barrister and was the Labor candidate for Dubbo in the recent state election. He isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t married, but that could change...one day.

harm and discrimination from his own community. Plaudits to him for his directness. Although, I know more than a few gay Aboriginal people who suffer a double whammy of discrimination, so perhaps these issues arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t entirely separate. Tina Reynolds is courageous for publicly stating she will support it, and put a motion to council next month. In America the Supreme Court legalised marriage for everyone last week. The case is called Obergefell v Hodges and it is now unlawful for a state government to withhold a marriage license from someone based on their gender. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold your breath waiting for our High Court to do the same. The decision was based on the interpretation of the 14th amendment to the US Constitution, which states, â&#x20AC;&#x153;No state shall deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the lawsâ&#x20AC;?. Simply put, the court held that â&#x20AC;&#x153;libertyâ&#x20AC;? includes the liberty to marry, and discriminatory marriage laws interfere with that liberty for no good reason. The court also held the discriminatory marriage laws offend â&#x20AC;&#x153;central precepts

of equalityâ&#x20AC;? and were thus invalid under the equal protection guarantee. We have no similar constitutional protection; our change will come via the national parliament if it is to come. But back to courage. James Obergefell started the case because he wanted his dead husband to be recognised as his lawful husband on a death certificate. The couple had legally married in Maryland (where same sex marriage has been lawful since 2013) but lived in Ohio (where same sex marriage was unlawful). Mr Arthur died in Ohio in 2013 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the disease in aid of which we were all doing the water bucket challenge recently. Ohioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s refusal to recognise the marriage denied his husband a modest pension, but more importantly, the dignity he deserved after nursing his partner of 21 years until the end. That is how a real estate broker, with no history of political activism, was able to transform the legal rights of millions of Americans. He stuck by his husband until the end and then took on the government and wrote

Many MPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have been timid; their belated yes votes will be right, but not politically courageous. Former Prime Minister Gillard will not be remembered well on this issue.

his death into the history books. That takes courage. (You often see it in gay people by the way â&#x20AC;&#x201C; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve grown up copping a lot and they can be very tough indeed). I hope the federal parliament will before the end of the year pass laws to enact marriage equality. Some MPs have shown real courage on this issue. Warren Entsch, a North Queensland conservative MP, has been campaigning on this issue for years, from a time when it did require political courage. Many MPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have been timid; their belated yes votes will be right, but not politically courageous. Former Prime Minister Gillard will not be remembered well on this issue. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to share a funny, and true, story. During the recent state election (in which I was a candidate) a campaign worker for a conservative party (NOT the Nationals) approached one of my campaign workers at the pre-poll in Talbragar Street and asked bluntly, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is your candidate living a homosexual lifestyle?â&#x20AC;? My bemused worker (a true country gentleman) muttered something about â&#x20AC;&#x153;not really discussing such mattersâ&#x20AC;?. This unpleasant fellow responded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, I will be asking him tonight at the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; forumâ&#x20AC;?. I sat on the stage that night at the RSL and waited as every questioner got to their feet. This man never rose to his, however, so the question was never asked. Not enough courage perhaps?

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11 Rosulyn Street Dubbo

    

1300-854-727 www.massecurity.com.au

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Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

THE SOAPBOX.

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Political posturing a diversion from priorities AST week I happened upon a link to the official government website outlining some facts about asylum seekers and refugees. Given I have huge problems with both Liberal/National Party (LNP) and Labor policy in this area I thought I’d take a look and I must admit I was rather surprised at what I found – no gloss or sugar coating, but plain facts. For instance, it even dispels those widely held myths that claim asylum seekers are illegal queue jumpers who get more social security benefits than Australian citizens. Since then we’ve been bombarded with melodrama to rival Peyton Place as politics provided a veritable shitstorm of distractors to get us away from the reality of what’s up with dear old Oz, and the inescapable fact our government isn’t really dealing with it all that well. Heaven forbid we put our elected representatives under the microscope about our largest trade deficit ever, an economy that’s slowed to a crawl, sky rocketing unemployment and poverty levels, or all the other nasties our government doesn’t want us to dwell on. It seems those boats hadn’t really stopped after all. How deplorable was it to learn that our government’s been caught paying people smugglers to take the boats back presumably to whatever hell hole they came from? It seems there really was a genuine need for secrecy

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Comment by NARELLE GRANT Narelle Grant is a well known educator and passionate union activist. A grandmother and long-time resident of Dubbo.

about operational matters – just not for the reasons our government would have us believe. It seems the noble rhetoric was just that, and our elected leaders don’t really give a rats about saving lives when they can save the votes of that section of the electorate they’ve spent decades cultivating. Move on to the citizenship-stripping debacle. Whose brain snap led our government to even consider it was okay for one person to be able to do this by the stroke of a pen and without the rule of law? Next thing we know Zaky Mallah gave the government a free kick via a knee jerk reaction to Steven Ciobo’s goading on ABC’s QandA program. Yes Zaky has said and done some unsavoury things in the past, but a terrorist he isn’t. Those of us who do our homework know he is in fact a very active and vocal anti-terrorist crusader, albeit not a very articulate one. I don’t get why his awkward comments caused such uproar. A bit close

to the bone perhaps? He only put voice to what many of us were already thinking. Nekminnit he was Satan incarnate. Were his comments really as bad as when the same Steven Ciobo said Julia Gillard “should have her throat slit”, and Graham Morris said she “should be beaten to death” on the same program? While I acknowledge the dangers of terrorism and concede we need measures, the current hype is ridiculous. It’s not “be alert not alarmed”, but be alarmed and keep being alarmed, while at the same time alienating those in our society common sense tells us we should be building bridges with. As Tony Windsor says it’s as if Abbott is wishing for a terrorist attack to justify the hype. Far more people are killed by white supremacists in the US than by any so called terrorist. Closer to home the death toll of domestic violence has reached epidemic proportions – around fifty so far this year – yet funding and services continue to be cut, while antiterrorism has a blank cheque. Imagine if that many people had died of something like Ebola. Then there are the flags. No press conference these days is without a phalanx of them; the number seems to grow by the day. I’m not sure what purpose they serve but the look is a cross between Cronulla Riot Bogan and Third Reich. Next thing we know the good old US

of A puts the cat among the pigeons by deciding to endorse gay marriage across every state and yet again we’ve been shown up as the backward looking nation we’ve allowed ourselves to become. Hats off by the way to those who’ve taken this debate to our local council, and also to (former local member) John Mason who’s shown what it really means to be Liberal. As if all that wasn’t enough from July 1, teachers, doctors, nurses, lawyers, social workers and all other professionals can be gaoled for speaking out about the conditions endured by those in our detention centres. Why? What’s to hide? Why do we have mandatory reporting on the mainland, but not in those awful gaols we euphemistically call detention centres? I fervently hope our government takes up the challenge of those forty plus professionals who have asked to be charged under this legislation so their concerns can be examined under the spotlight of the court process. Oh dear, I doubt the legislators saw that coming. Poor fellow my country, what have we become? If you have read this far I’m probably preaching to the converted, but if not you may like to take a peek at this link. http://www.aph.gov. au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_ Departments/Parliamentary _Library/ pubs/rp/rp1415/AsylumFacts


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Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Business

Chinese partnership makes good economic sense BY ROSS MCCARTHY DUBBO CITY COUNCIL’S CITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM LEADER DER

AST month, Dubbo hosted a Chinese delegation led by the Vice Governor of the Peoples Government of Donghai County, Jiangsu Province which is one of China’s strongest agricultural areas. Located in between Shanghai and Beijing, the population of the province is 79 million and it is reported as being in the top two highest GDPs of all Chinese provinces. The delegation included the Vice Governor and other senior government officials, a Chinese businessman, general manager Sino-Aus Dubbo Donghai Agricultural and Livestock Development Co Ltd, and their Australian hosts, a delegation of eight. Dubbo City Council was represented by our Deputy Mayor Ben Shields, who coincidently has a strong interest in China, and senior council staff including General Manager Mark Riley. The province’s County Governor, in combination with their state-level government, has applied to create the first Agricultural Economic Development Zone in China. The Australian host advised this is yet to be approved by Beijing, although he has been there and seen the land of several thousand acres of land Beijing has ear-marked for them. The Australian host advised that basically every initiative over there starts government to government.They don’t quite fathom our free-enterprise system. Nevertheless it does work for them. They are seeking to set up government contacts, first to prove to the next level of government that they have strong momentum in the Agricultural Zone enterprise. They know they have to modernise their agriculture and are seeking partnerships with Australian operators to do this. They are looking for protein to feed their population, which we have, and they have money so I’m sure a deal can be done.

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BUSINESS IN BRIEF

5 steps to buff up your finances It’s time to get fiscal and pump up your financial wellbeing. The new financial year is a great opportunity to boost financial fitness – and it doesn’t involve working up a sweat. The money experts at industry super fund-owned bank, ME, recommend the following five-point fitness regime to get your money matters looking trim, taut and terrific for the 12 months ahead.

Our Chinese friends where very interested in the Dubbo Regional Saleyards, the abattoir and availability of milk in the region and also the Warrumbungle Region in general. It seems important to them that they are 33 degrees north of the Equator and we are 32 degrees south. So why is the visit so important? The day after the Dubbo visit, Australia signed a landmark Free Trade Agreement with China, our largest trading partner, with total trade worth almost $160 billion in 2013-14, and a growing source of investment. The China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA) will lock in existing trade and provide the catalyst for future growth across a range of areas including goods, services, and investment, including agriculture. The agreement secures better market access for Australia to the world’s second largest economy, improves our competitive position in a rapidly growing market, promotes increased two-way investment and reduces import costs. It is a win for households and businesses alike. On day one of the ChAFTA, more than 85 per cent of Australian goods exports will be tariff free, rising to 95 per cent on full implementation. Australia’s agricultural sector will be able to capitalise on its well-deserved reputation as a clean, green producer of premium food and beverage products. Tariffs will be progressively abolished for Australia’s $13 billion dairy industry. Australia’s beef and sheep farmers will also gain from the phased abolition of tariffs ranging from 12-25 per cent and all tariffs on

Australian horticulture will be eliminated. ChAFTA completes an historic trifecta of trade agreements with our top three export markets, accounting for more than 55 per cent of our total goods and services exports. Together, these agreements will enhance our vital trade and investment relationships in the region, assist the process of reform, and foster greater prosperity. Our FTAs with Korea and Japan are only months old and we are already seeing increased exports compared to a year ago – like a 26 per cent increase in frozen beef prime cuts to Korea and a massive 84 per cent increase in the same product to Japan. Macadamia exports to Korea have more than doubled, and Japan is importing 82 per cent more of our rolled or flaked oats. Increases have also been seen in wine, lamb, horticulture and many other products, and we look forward to further positive outcomes once ChAFTA comes into force. This recent visit was all about building relationships. To use a favourite phase of mine, “people buy people before product”. Hopefully we continue to build these relationships to ensure we have strong trading partners for the region to continue to grow and prosper. Something that we found of value is an app call Google Translate. Grab a coffee after you have finished reading Weekender and you can download at https://appsto.re/au/kT-Ty.i have a play with converting speech from one language to another, you can even photograph text with your smart phone (or tablet) and it will convert to English (but not Australian).

The agreement secures better market access for Australia to the world’s second largest economy, improves our competitive position in a rapidly growing market, promotes increased two-way investment and reduces import costs. It is a win for households and businesses alike.

Check your financial pulse: LET’S start with a quick check of your vital signs. Is your credit card debt under control; are you growing regular savings; do you have a pool of emergency funds to fall back on? What about your home loan – are you sure it’s competitively priced, and are you making additional payments to get ahead with the loan? Are you juicing your finances too much? Overspending is seriously bad for your financial health, and an early warning sign can be a bloated credit card balance. To get cash under control, you need to know exactly what your spending habits look like. The government’s free TrackMySpend app is useful for recording daily spending, or simply maintain a handwritten spending diary for a month. When you know where your money is going, draw up a budget. ME’s online budget planner lets you compare total outgoings to household income. Visit www.mebank.com.au and click on ‘Calculators’.

Your budget will also highlight areas where you can cut back spending to free up cash for saving or investing. Detox your finances – whittle away debt: Your overall debt is important but some types of debt are worse for your financial health than others. In particular, relying on high interest debt to pay for items of no lasting value is the fiscal equivalent of carrying unwanted kilos. Detox your finances by aiming to clear high interest debt – like credit card or store card balances, with extra repayments. Or consider switching to a low rate card. Savings on interest charges make it easier to clear the debt sooner. Tone your savings: Personal savings is one muscle group none of us can afford to overlook. Savings are the foundation of wealth and can provide a financial lifeline when

unexpected expenses crop up. Your budget will show how much you can set aside in regular savings. Now make it happen by organising an automatic funds transfer from your everyday bank account to a high interest savings account. Time the transfer to coincide with paydays to be sure you give savings (rather than spending) top priority. Aim for a personal best: Debt under control? Check. Action taken to grow savings? Check. All that remains is to set some financial goals to work towards. Make your goals realistic and achievable, and share them with your other half so you encourage one another to stay on track. No matter whether you’re aiming to buy a first home, give your kids a quality education or build funds for retirement, the goals you set today could set you up for your best financial year ever.

Debt under control? Check. Action taken to grow savings? Check. All that remains is to set some financial goals to work towards.


RURAL BUSINESS.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

Look out, mice about

ADVERTORIAL

Business in changing times with Phil Comerford, Scolari Comerford Dubbo

Writing a business plan

BY NATALIE HOLMES S JOURNALIST

IGILANCE against rodent activity in winter crops has entered a new phase, with the release of a new phone application and website to record on-farm observations. MouseAlert, which has been funded by the Grains Research and Development Corporation, is aimed at encouraging a rapid response to increases in mice activity. CSIRO research officer Steve Henry said it’s important for growers and advisers to record their observations. “We need to know where the mice are and where they aren’t so we can develop a better picture of their distribution and monitor any changes in populations,” he said. “Through MouseAlert, growers can also easily see what is happening in their local areas in real time, enabling them to be on the front foot with their mouse management programs.” MouseAlert was used to record mouse activity on properties during the nation’s inaugural Mouse Census Week in April which aimed to provide farmers, the grains industry and researchers with an unprecedented bank of data about mice in agricultural areas. The census was initiated by the Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre (IACRC) with the support of the GRDC. “We collected about 150 records during the census – information that we would not have otherwise been able to achieve in such a short time,” Henry said. “It was a good starting point to receive that number of entries, but we need more. If we can establish a good ongoing dataset it will help us to develop better models to predict mouse outbreaks.” Local Land Services invasive species and plant health team leader Lisa Thomas agreed that both monitoring and active use of the data to address the issue was a positive step towards mice control. “It’s really great news if there is a database,” she said. “It (mice monitoring) is something we have been following at our organisation, and we have been preparing mouse bait accordingly.” Thomas said observation of higher than normal mice activity is something that was started 12 months ago in the Wellington area, and further west to a lesser extent at this stage. “It was on the radar here and we are certainly getting more reports and requests for bait,” she said. Thomas said that mice will follow the fenceline so a walk or motorbike ride along them to search for mice holes or other activity was certainly advisable, particularly at this stage of early crop growth. “Anyone with crops in should be monitoring now, particularly in crops like canola.

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T may sound like a daunting assignment, but evidence suggests a wellwritten business plan contributes to a successful business.

I

Why?

Mallala grain grower and GRDC Southern Regional Panel member Richard Konzag using the MouseAlert app. PHOTO: GRDC

“We want to prevent the spread,” she said. “Once the crop starts to grow, it becomes more difficult to see because of the crop canopy.” Thomas said it was good to see a collaborative approach being taking to pest control of this nature. “It’s great if you are all on the same page, and any technology that can be used is fantastic as long as they’re getting a response and meeting landholder requirements with further advice and productivity.” Because mouse populations can change rapidly, growers in all parts of the southern cropping region are advised to remain vigilant during the coming months. According to Animal Control Technologies (Australia), factors contributing to high mouse populations include: • Changes in farming practices and continuous cropping; • High yields leaving more feed available from harvesting losses; • Crop irrigation and raised planting beds; • Minimum tillage/direct seeding with reduced cultivation; • Increase in stubble retention and reduced grazing; • Larger holdings requiring faster and sometimes less complete harvesting rates. Crop damage is often unnoticed until it is severe. Sometimes mouse damage is misdiagnosed as snail or slug damage, or the effect of moisture stress or disease. Signs of mouse activity include chewed stems, damage to seed heads and/or debris at the base of the plant. In cereal crops such as wheat, mice chew the growing stems of the plant to feed on sap, stopping development of the head or causing the stem to collapse. Mice can drop seed heads by chewing through the top node at flowering and also attack the maturing heads. This can cause losses of up to 50 per cent at pre-harvest stage. For further information about mice infestation and control, visit mousealert.org.au or pestsmart. org.au

BUILDING a business from scratch can be challenging, therefore, creating a business plan compels you to systematically think through every aspect of your business and develop a solid blueprint to follow. A business plan will help you map your business strategy for the future and motivate you to reach your goals. It will help you anticipate obstacles and work out solutions for overcoming them, thereby reducing anxiety and stress. Additionally, the process of writing a business plan will likely reveal the level of commitment you need to devote to your business.

What your business plan should include YOUR plan should have a professional appearance and be clear and concise. Some of the essential elements to cover in a business plan are: z Executive summary – an overview z Description of the business z Product/service design & development z Industry analysis z Market analysis z Marketing plan z Management team & business structure z Operations plan z Legal and risk management plan z Financial projections Writing a plan covering all these areas may take substantial time and effort, but when your plan is complete, how much will you have learned in the process? How thoroughly will you know

your business? How much more confidence will you have when you actually launch your business? For these reasons, it is best to write the business plan yourself (or at least make an attempt), rather than employ someone to write it for you. Besides, you’ll feel a sense of excitement and fulfilment when you actually put your

ideas and visions down in writing. Of course, assistance in the form of books, websites and consultants is always available.

Other benefits A business plan is usually required by banks and lenders when considering an application for a business loan. Approaching a lender without a plan, or with one that has been thrown together in haste, will likely make a poor impression. A business plan also serves as a reference for monitoring the progress of your business against your objectives and performance standards. Preparing a plan may reveal that your idea is not feasible. While this may be unfortunate, it is better to fail on paper rather than to start your business and realise the same thing!

Your action plan COLLATE your information and have a go at writing a business plan! If you run into any trouble, feel free to contact our office. The Scolari Comerford team will be more than happy to assist you.

We or it success u business o ners o is to en nce t eir i est e b 5ŝŶĐƌĞĂƐŝŶŐƚŚĞŝƌƉƌŽĮƚƐ͖ 5ŝŵƉƌŽǀŝŶŐƚŚĞŝƌĐĂƐŚŇŽǁ͖ 5ĨŽĐƵƐŝŶŐŽŶŐƌŽǁƚŚ͖ 5ƉƌŽƚĞĐƟŶŐƚŚĞŝƌĂƐƐĞƚƐ͖ĂŶĚ 5 preparing their business for maximum sale.

Ask us how.

ƐĐŽůĂƌŝĐŽŵĞƌĨŽƌĚ͘ĐŽŵ͘ĂƵ Area 6, Level 1, 188 Macquarie St, Dubbo KĸĐĞ͗ 1300 852 980 &Ădž͗1300 852 981


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BUSINESS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Memorable or marketable? Selling the souls of our sports grounds Sporting venues being named after local athletes or historic moments appears to be a thing of the past, with big business now calling the shots on the field. WORDS Natalie Holmes

HEN it comes to corporate naming rights of sporting fields, there’s a fine line between preservation of the past and cashing in on a commercial future. The cycle of big business sponsorship in metropolitan areas has become commonplace, but in regions such as Dubbo it still remains a tad more personal with community members weighing in on councilowned facilities and the right to name their grounds accordingly. Once upon a time, sporting heroes who graced these hallowed fields and their past achievements were remembered for eternity by having their names etched

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above goalposts and grandstands across the nation. These days, however, with local councils looking to cement sponsorship deals in order to keep these same grounds operational, are looking further afield than mere sentiment. In this city, Dubbo City Council’s acceptance of a three-year corporate sponsorship package meant local sporting field Apex Oval became more widely known as Caltex Park, although its official name stands as Dubbo Apex Club’s Caltex Park. Acceptance of a similar package for Barden Park means that Dubbo City Locksmiths and Security now has the naming rights for DCL Park for the duration


Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

of the contract. Both venues have been signed over to $150,000 three-year deals with their respective sponsors, ensuring a reliable funding source for ground maintenance, marketing and special projects including homage to their history. Former Dubbo Apex Club president Harvey Rowe believes Dubbo City Council was right to accept the sponsorship for the football field which his now defunct club helped to develop from a rubbish dump to a first-class facility. Interpretative signage under the grandstand pays tribute to the club’s place in the ground’s history and

the stand also bears the name of one of its members, Bruce Neads, who was a vital playmaker for the Apexians and their goals. Rowe himself has also been honoured on a plaque at the ground. “Naming it the Bruce Neads Memorial Grandstand – we felt that was appropriate. “Council did the naming and they thought it was great.” As for the grounds, Rowe says it came as no surprise that council sought outside financial support to maintain the venue’s future needs. “From the very beginning, we’ve always know there was going to be corporate sponsorship,” he points out. “Maintaining Apex Oval was costing a lot of money.

BUSINESS.

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We had handballed the job of looking after it back to council. They asked us if we’d mind if it was renamed and they started looking at getting sponsorship.” As such, they sealed the deal with Caltex. In terms of paying homage to history, Rowe is well pleased with the way the Apex Club has been commemorated. “They’ve done an absolutely brilliant display in the grandstand explaining what Apex did. “Council were on board (with what we wanted) for a long time – guys like Murray (Wood) knew it was important. “It was all positive for us Apex boys and it’s probably


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BUSINESS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

It was all positive for us Apex boys and it’s probably one of the best football ovals we’ll ever see.” – former Apex president Harvey Rowe on Dubbo Apex Club’s Caltex Park one of the best football ovals we’ll ever see.” Fellow former Apexian Barry Joseph agrees the organisation had been pleased with the final outcome. “As with Bruce Neads Grandstand and the Apex Oval, Dubbo City Council was only too happy to work with us and find a solution. But it took passion and perseverance of several old Dubbo Apexians for this to happen.” Dubbo sports commentator Geoff Mann agrees that progress needs to keep moving but should never come at the cost of history. “I am a great believer in tradition but I am also realistic enough to recognise the need for capital input and sponsorship to enable growth and development of our facilities but not at the expense of our heritage,” he says. “If you are a regular reader of my sports column, you will know I always refer to Dubbo Apex Club’s Caltex Field. The emphasis for me is on the thousands of hours of ‘sponsorship’ donated by men (and women) who enabled the transformation of an old tip into a world-class sporting arena.” Dubbo Mayor Mathew Dickerson says the “re-naming of sporting facilities through corporate partnership agreements is a well-established practice at other high profile venues, particularly for ovals that cater for the dominant codes of football like AFL and rugby league”. Such sponsorship deals keep the dollars rolling and the gates open. “By entering into partnerships such as these, council can continue to provide Dubbo with first-class sporting facilities which cater for a wide range of local, regional

and state sporting events and opportunities,” he says. HIS year, after a multi-million dollar makeover, it was Barden Park’s turn for a new name. Despite more than one public call for long-time coach Ross Poulton to have the grounds named after him, council has entered into a corporate partnership with Dubbo City Locksmiths and Security.

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The re-naming of sporting facilities through g corporate p partnership p agreementss is a well-established ished practice in other high profile e venues. – Dubbo ubbo Mayor Mathew hew Dickerson

As such, the Barden Park Regional Centre of Excellence for Athletics will be known as DCL Park for the duration of the sponsorship. “Council undertook a publicly advertised expression of interest process in regards to a corporate partner sponsorship package for the complex, which contained an option for naming rights,” Mayor Dickerson says. “In return, council will receive an additional income stream for the Regional Centre of Excellence for Athletics over a three-year period. “Should there be no naming rights in place, the facility will revert to Barden Park out of respect for former Mayor John Barden.” Barden was the 16th Mayor of Dubbo and the reserve was gazetted for recreation in 1927 during his second term of office. The terms of office and the timing of the dedication of the reserve would suggest a link between the mayor’s name and the park name. Barden also served Council in 1915-16 and 1929-30. Joseph says it’s difficult to agree with the name change for Barden Park, even though council has acquired a corporate sponsorship. “The park was named after John Barden for his contribution to Dubbo as an alderman for a quarter of a century, holding office as mayor four times over that period. It has been reported that “no man loved Dubbo more than he did”. “Barden Park has a history and a story behind it and obviously council, when naming it considered it important to use the name Barden. “We should honour those who contribute greatly to our city, and we should respect those who showed this


Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

by naming the field as Barden Park. I understand the valuable contribution of sponsorship, but it’s extremely important for present council to retain our history as well as emotional connection to our past and combine both. So those who feel passionate about their “Barden Park” must now work with council if they want to retain the name.” Mann believes the same sentiment can be expressed for both Barden Park and Apex Oval. “The history flows through the old established recreational ground,” he says. “Apex Oval and Barden Park were named for a reason. The sponsorship dollars that are now flowing in should not be to the detriment of their unique stories. “Certainly there needs to be recognition of major sponsors but I believe there are opportunities to do this outside of exclusive naming rights.” ATHURST Mayor Gary Rush, whose city’s iconic event the Bathurst 1000 has given exclusive naming rights to retail outlet Supercheap Auto, said it’s a different story for events and local landmarks. “Our event is a little bit different,” he points out. “We are a partner with the V8 Supercars and when we have the major sporting event, that is what it’s called. It’s part of the commercial ownership. “When it’s over, Mt Panorama is still Mt Panorama (or its Wiradjuri name of Wahluu).” It’s a commercial arrangement that benefits both parties. If it was Machattie Park, it would be a different story, Rush says. The local amenity in Bathurst’s heartland is wellknown to the extent that it’s an important cultural icon in its own right, along with the city’s famous mountain. “I think it would be a brave and potentially foolish council that changed its name as part of a commercial deal.”

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Over 100 years of history is wrapped up in the most famous domestic cricket competition in the world but for a period of time, the powers that be sold their soul to a mpany milk company ody and nobody knew what at tators commentators king were talking about. – Sports commentator ntator Geoff Mann nn

That said, Rush says each council has the right to raise revenue in whatever way is appropriate for that area. “Every council is different. “We have built up this event but we still maintain the name of the space. It’s part of the commercial arrangement. Renaming the event is different than renaming a park or oval.” Either way, it’s a tricky tightrope act of fiscal facing up to sentimental. “It’s the balance between looking at how to expand revenue and maintain the high level of infrastructure,

Watch us grow Three lion cubs are growing up fast at Taronga Western Plains Zoo. Visit them this winter and take advantage of special rates for Dubbo residents, including an annual pass for just $37* per person! Plus with four newly-arrived Asian Elephants and a rare Black Rhino calf, there’s never been a better time to visit your local zoo. Visit taronga.org.au/locals to find out more. * Proof of residency in postcode 2818, 2820, 2821, 2827, 2830, 2831, 2842, 2868, 2869 must be shown at time of purchase. Offer valid to 31 December 2015. **$37 rate applies to Adult, Child and Concession memberships only. One off $20 joining fee applies per membership group. All other Zoo Friends Terms and Conditions apply.

BUSINESS.

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service and amenities,” Rush says. At Apex Oval, council’s parks and landcare director Murray Wood says part of the first year’s revenue stream was used to pay for the signage which marks the contribution of its former custodians. “Twenty thousand dollars of the original sponsorship money was used for the interpretive signage to tell the story of Bruce Neads and the Apexians,” he tells Weekender. It’s a catch-22 as to whether commercial advantage outweighs historic significance. Mann says there are other ways to celebrate sponsorship than by an ever-changing turnstile of funding ownership garnered through corporate naming rights. “Banners around the ground, press releases acknowledging the commitment commercial operators have made to sport in our city and events can be named in their honour. Please do not make our ovals an ever-changing advertisement!” Mann uses the well-known Sheffield Shield cricketing competition as an example of cheapening the names of our sporting grounds. “Who can remember the Pura Milk Cup? No? Try the Sheffield Shield. Over 100 of history wrapped up in the most famous domestic cricket competition in the world, but for a period of time, the powers that be sold their soul to a milk company and nobody knew what commentators were talking about. “Thankfully, the magnificent trophy donated by Lord Sheffield has regained its prestige and the name synonymous with Bradman, Miller, Harvey, the Chappell brothers, Lillee, Thompson, Glenn McGrath and Michael Clark is back on its mantle and once again ABC Grandstand goes around the grounds for updates from the Sheffield Shield! “The Melbourne Cup, the SCG, the MCG stand on their own despite massive inundation of commercial capital. The names are sacred. “My point, some things are above commercialisation.”


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THE BIG PICTURE.

Macquarie Street at 2am wrapped up in a -2 degrees winter fog. PHOTO: NATHAN SHOOTER/THRIVE MEDIA

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender


Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

THE BIG PICTURE.

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Lifestyle Health Fashion Food

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Chicken soup for the soul BY KATE WRIGHT INSPIREDMOOD.COM

OR a winter wonder food you can’t beat a simple and healthy chicken soup. This is a no frills chicken soup recipe that never fails to hit the spot. It’s always the simple recipes that taste the best and that’s especially true when it comes to chicken soup. The simple recipes are also often the healthiest because there’s nothing in them but real, whole foods. During winter, it’s more important than ever to stick to hearty whole foods to strengthen and protect your immune system. A good old fashioned chicken soup is just the trick!

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Travel HEALTH IN BRIEF Exercise a licence to print chocolate DUBBO’S chocolate lovers rejoice! A researcher from RMIT (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology) has found what he says is the sweetest way in the world to encourage people to exercise. Rohit Ashok Khot will reward users with chocolate treats made on a 3D food printer and the more they exercise – the smoother the chocolate they get to eat. RMIT researchers will be the first in the world to equip Melbourne homes with 3D food printers capable of churning out chocolate in a unique experiment to test if people engage in more exercise when rewarded with food treats. Ten families will be chosen for the landmark study and their homes equipped with the latest 3D food printers worth $6000

Chicken Soup Ingredients: 1 whole organic chicken 4 cloves garlic 4 cm piece of turmeric 2 small red chilies 1 leek, sliced 2 carrots, chopped 4 stalks celery, chopped 1 cup sweet potato, peeled and diced 1 cup broccoli 1 small bunch of kale Salt and pepper, to taste Method: Place chicken in a cast iron pot (or similar) and cover with water. Bring to the boil then reduce heat to a simmer. Add all remaining ingredients except broccoli, kale and salt and pepper. Cook, covered, for two hours. Remove chicken and tear flesh away from the carcass. Place shredded chicken back in the pot and add broccoli. Cook until broccoli a tender then add kale. Serve, seasoned with salt and pepper.

each for the duration of the trial. Participants will be hooked up to heart monitors that measure their physical exertion and then transform and deliver the equivalent amount of energy as chocolate piped out of the 3D food printer. “The more they exercise, the better the quality of chocolate will be printed out which they get to enjoy as a reflective reward of their physical activity,’’ Khot said. “Participants will be able to see their chocolate printed out after they exercise and we will study if this new edible mode of representation is enough to make exercise more engaging and enjoyable.” The printed chocolate will be personalised to their activity and will take shape of their name, smiley faces, flowers and hearts. Only antioxidant-rich dark chocolate will be used in the study and participants will be restricted to 30mls, or about two small blocks from a 200g block of chocolate. Khot said it is not a given that people will suddenly become more physically active if rewarded with food and he is keen to test his latest research. He said chocolate had been chosen as the reward because 3D food print-

ing is a new science and it is one of the few foods already successfully found to print out. Khot has recruited chocolate-loving participants over the age of 18 to his trial.

Boost for region’s cancer patients’ treatment THE region’s breast and lung cancer sufferers and their families have received some rare good news this week, with the announcement of more affordable access to life-saving treatments. From July 1, patients will pay just $6.10 (concessional) or $37.70 (general) for breakthrough lung cancer medicine Crizotinib and breast cancer treatments Perjeta, Herceptin and Kadcyla as a result of these medications’ official listing on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). These medicines would normally have cost up to $80,000. Federal health minister Sussan Ley said taxpayers would invest over a quarterof-a-billion dollars in listing the new drugs. She says the listing of new medications on the PBS is vital in helping Australians beat

life-threatening diseases such as cancer, as well as overcoming chronic and degenerative conditions that can rob them of their independence. One in every six dollars out of the $10 billion taxpayers invest in the PBS harmaceutical every year is now spent on cancer treatments. Ms Ley said Perjeta, Herceptin and Kadcyla were used to treat HER2-positive metastic breast cancer and would benefit 590 patients per year. Kadcyla provides an additional line of therapy where the disease has progressed despite previous treatment, while the combination of Perjeta and Herceptin would provide a more effective treatment option for this cancer than Herceptin alone. Crizotinib (Xalkori®) is used to treat anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer and would benefit approximately 154 patients with the rare life-threatening disease. Without taxpayer subsidisation, breast cancer drugs Perjeta, Herceptin and Kadcyla and lung cancer drug Crizotinib (Xalkori®) would cost $80,000 and $82,000 per patient respectively.


DUBBO TOUCH JUNIOR

COMPETITION

DUBBO TOUCH RUNS A SUMMER JUNIOR TOUCH COMPETITION ON MONDAY AFTERNOONS. THE COMPETITION RUNS FROM AUGUST TO DECEMBER FROM 4PM AT THE RIVERBANK TOUCH OVALS. TEAM NOMINATIONS AND PLAYER REGISTRATIONS ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE FROM 29 JUNE – 24 JULY 2015. INFORMATION SESSIONS WILL BE HELD ON MONDAY 6 JULY FROM 4PM – 6PM AT THE DUBBO TOUCH CLUBHOUSE.

TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL PLAYERS ARE WELCOME. COST IS $50 PER PLAYER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT REGISTRATION CONTACT DONNA CURTIS ON 0407 669 580 OR VISIT WWW.DUBBOTOUCH.COM.

Want To Give Back To Your Community In A Meaningful Way That Will Also Develop Lasting Friendships? BaptistCare is looking for volunteers to help our clients get out and about in their community, helping with things like grocery shopping and taking them to social groups.

For further information please contact Janice 5804 7300 JTrumper@baptistcare.org.au


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FOOD.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Vegging out BY JEANANNE CRAIG HE fridge has been cleared of meat and fish, my kitchen is now better stocked than our local greengrocer's, and I've had my 'last supper' – a steak that probably weighs as much as a small child. As challenges go, temporarily turning veggie is hardly up there with trekking the Great Wall Of China. As a lover of all things meaty, however, it's a task that fills me with some trepidation. Not least when, just hours into the seven-day experiment, I'm confronted with a platter of glistening, honey-roasted cocktail sausages at a party (I managed to resist, but only just). Adopting a meat-free diet brings plenty of benefits to animals and the environment, not to mention your bank balance, once you've taken costly meat and fish off the shopping list. But will veggie food give me all the nourishment and flavour I need, or will I be reaching for a Big Mac by day three?

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Nutritionist Anita Bean.

and the goat's cheese and tomato frittata. What's more, they're surprisingly filling. It's all about getting the balance right, according to Bean – ensuring you get enough protein, iron, vitamin B12 (from eggs, dairy products and fortified breakfast cereals), omega-3 (try chia, pumpkin and flax seeds and dark green leafy veg), and vitamin D. "Vitamin D can be a problem if you don't get much sun exposure or consume oily fish. The best vegetarian sources are egg yolk and fortified margarine, plant milk and breakfast cereals," says Bean. She adds: "Make vegetarian versions of your favourite meals: replace the meat in stews, curries and casseroles with tinned beans, lentils or tofu." If you're missing your meat fix, you might like to try meat substitutes such as seitan (a gluten used in stir fries and Chinese dishes) and Quorn meat-free chicken fillets. According to international survey company Mintel, the number of vegetarian food and drink product launches doubled globally between 2009 to 2013, so there's more choice than ever. By the end of my week, I'm feeling great – healthy, clearskinned and with more energy than usual. I've been getting about seven portions of fruit and veg a day, and from now on, I'll definitely be more imaginative when it comes to planning meals, looking into veggie options instead of using meat as the focal point. I must admit though, I did miss the taste of meat once or twice. Which is why, the morning after my challenge finished, I started my day with a juicy bacon sandwich. Naughty, yes, but very nice. Want to try out some vegetarian dishes? Here are three tasty meat-free recipes to try at home from Ocado and Anita Bean.

Luckily, I have a foolproof meal plan devised by an online supermarket and nutritionist Anita Bean, to see me through the week and ensure I get a balanced and varied diet. I sometimes struggle to come up with exciting dishes when cooking for veggie friends, but there are a wide range of tastes and textures in Bean's recipes, from the supersimple bean and quinoa salad to the gnocchi, pesto and roasted veg, A Beets, Squash & Feta SuperBowl.

In defence of okra BY ANGELA SHELF MEDEARIS

THE KITCHEN DIVA

THE words “slimy,” “gelatinous” or “mushy” aren’t associated with very many vegetables... except when one is discussing okra. Okra was introduced to the Western world via African slave ships and was commonly known as gumbo, which means okra in some African dialects. African captives planted and prepared okra dishes in America from their native land and combined them with vegetables that already grew in the USA. Today, okra is also prepared in Indian and Mid-

BEAN AND QUINOA SALAD WITH POMEGRANATE SEEDS AND FETA.

TOFU AND NOODLE STIR-FRY.

dle Eastern cuisines. Because okra thrives in hot climates and requires full sun, it stores a thick, watery liquid inside its pod. This flavourful, gelatinous liquid is the perfect thickener for soups and stews. Okra is a rich source of dietary fibre and is a good source of vitamins and minerals. These include vitamin A, B, C and K, as well as zinc, copper, potassium, manganese and magnesium. Okra is at its most flavourful when its pods are small, tender and slender. For roasting, frying or grilling, select pods that are 2.5 to 10cm long. Longer pods tend to be tough, and should

ing methods be used only for long stewing os. like soups, stews and gumbos. Choose okra pods that are fresh, bright-coloured, firm and have a bit of fuzz. The stem ends turn brown quickly, and this is normal; however, there shouldn’t be brown spots or wrinkling on the pods. Okra should be stored loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator and used within a few days. To avoid the slimy texturee that’s often associated with okra, follow these simple


FOOD.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

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FRESH GNOCCHI WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES AND PESTO.

BEAN AND QUINOA SALAD WITH POMEGRANATE SEEDS AND FETA (Serves one) 125g ready to eat quinoa 1/2 tin (200g) mixed beans (drained) 4 baby plum tomatoes, halved 1/4 yellow pepper, deseeded and chopped 5cm cucumber, sliced 50g feta cheese, crumbled 1tbsp pomegranate seeds Juice of 1/2 lemon 1tbsp olive oil To make it: Combine the ready to eat quinoa (or boil and simmer for around 15-20 minutes if not using ready-made), beans, tomatoes, pepper, cucumber, feta and pomegranate seeds. Dress with a splash of olive oil and a dash of lemon juice.

tips: • Wash and dry the pods thoroughly before using; • Use the whole pod, or wait to cut the okra until immediately before using; • Use the whole pod for quick cooking methods – grilling, roasting, frying – to reduce slime; • Don’t crowd the okra, as it promotes steaming and extracts the liquid inside; • Adding acid (citrus, tomatoes, vinegar, etc.) to okra reduces the interior liquid and adds flavour. My recipe for okra roasted in a cast-

iron skillet is a simple technique that beautifully showcases okra in a warm salad in all of its summer glory.

SKILLET-ROASTED OKRA AND PRAWN SALAD Serves 4 450g peeled, large (26-30 count) raw prawns, deveined 3 1/2 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 225g fresh okra, rinsed and dried thoroughly 1/2 litre grape tomatoes 1 tablespoon Balsamic or apple-cider

TOFU AND NOODLE STIR-FRY (Serves one) 1tsp light olive oil or rapeseed oil 1/2 onion, sliced 1 garlic clove, crushed 1/2tsp grated fresh ginger 1/4 red pepper, chopped 1/2 courgette, sliced 50g green beans cut into 2cm lengths 2tsp tamari soy sauce 125ml water 100g tofu 150g fresh egg noodles Handful fresh coriander 2tsp sesame seeds To make it: Heat the oil in a wok and stirfry the onion, garlic and ginger on a medium to high heat for two minutes. Add the pepper, courgette and green beans and stir-fry for another two minutes. Add the tamari and water, cook for another two minutes then add the sliced tofu and noodles. Leave to cook for two minutes and take off the heat, and then gently stir in the coriander and sesame seeds.

vinegar 1/4 teaspoon sugar 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or flatleaf parsley 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 cups chopped Romaine lettuce 2 cups arugula To make it: 1. Place prawns/shrimp in small bowl and sprinkle with 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper and 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes. Combine well and set aside. 2. Heat a large, cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat for 1-2 minutes. Cut okra

FRESH GNOCCHI WITH ROASTED VEGETABLES AND PESTO (Serves one) 1/2 red pepper, sliced 1/2 courgette, sliced 1/2 small onion, sliced 50g cherry tomatoes whole 1tbsp olive oil 1 garlic clove, crushed 200g potato gnocchi 1tbsp pesto To make it: Pre-heat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas mark 6. Place the chopped vegetables and whole tomatoes in a large roasting tin with the garlic. Toss lightly in olive oil so that the vegetables are well coated, and roast in the oven for about 20 minutes. Cook the gnocchi in boiling water for three minutes, drain and return to the pan. Add the pesto and warm through for a further minute. Combine the cooked gnocchi and pesto, mix with the roasted vegetables and serve. :: Recipes courtesy of www.ocado.com/vegetarian

pods in half, lengthwise. Add 2 tablespoons olive oil to skillet. Add okra, remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper, and red pepper flakes, and sauté over medium-high heat 3 minutes. Add tomatoes, vinegar and sugar, and sauté 3 minutes or until skins begin to burst. Transfer okra mixture to a large bowl. 3. Add shrimp to skillet. Sauté 2-3 minutes or just until the shrimp turns pink. Add garlic and sauté 30 seconds. Stir in okra mixture, and sauté for 1-2 minutes or until hot. Stir in the basil or parsley. Sprinkle with lemon juice. 4. Place Romaine and arugula into individual salad bowls or on a large serving platter. Spoon prawns and okra mixture on top of lettuce. Serve with wedge of lemon.


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TRAVEL.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Explore a world of volcanoes in Kamchatka

Tourists Watching The Eruption Of A Tolbachik Volcano, Ejecting Lava, Ash, Steam And Gas. Kamchatka

BY ULF MAUDER HOSE wanting the niceties of civilisation are best warned to keep their distance from the Tolbachik volcanic complex, a landmark on the Kamchatka Peninsula in east Russia. With an eruptive history dating back thousands of years, the complex’s most recent eruption started in 2012 and is still continuing. Yet, though the roads into the Kluchevskoy Nature Park leading to this unique volcanic landscape are arduous, the journey to view Tolbachik and its countless mini volcanoes is well worth the trouble. Arriving at a high plateau requires at the minimum cutting across country in an off-road vehicle, and traversing dried river beds, flowing streams and muddy forest trails. The scene upon arrival is like something from a lunar landscape where fiery lava flows glow as dusk approaches.

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“A lot of people come here in a helicopter for a very quick tour,” says tour guide Valeri, who takes his groups on a three-day camping trip through the park. It is almost impossible to avoid the Kamchatka bear on any trip to the region, as the peninsula is home to Russia’s bear population. There are camping areas throughout the park although it advisable to pack warm clothing as the nights are cold, even in summer. Some of the villages in the peninsula’s lowland area offer very rudimentary accommodation as well as the chance to experience a banja – a Russian steam bath. There is very little life to be seen in the volcano park itself as all plant life in a radius of 400 square kilometres was wiped out following a massive eruption in 1975. Situated on Russia’s Pacific coast, the Kamchatka Peninsula was a virtual no-go zone

`The unpredictable and untamed Kamchatka wilderness brings with it many dangers. Every year, numerous Russians pay for underestimating its risks with their lives... a for strangers during the Soviet era, with access permitted only by special permission of the KGB. However, the area has become a popular tourist destination since the collapse of communism, especially for Japanese visitors. About 10 per cent of the 300 larger volcanoes are active, a unique concentration, not surprisingly making the peninsula with its rich plant and animal life a UNESCO heritage site. The rivers of Kamchatka boast 11 different species of salmon, more than anywhere else on the planet, and the locally sourced red caviar is a much sought after delicacy across the whole of Russia. The unpredictable and untamed Kamchatka wilderness

brings with it many dangers. Every year, numerous Russians pay for underestimating its risks with their lives. Any form of help is often far away and since mobile phone signals are extremely unreliable in the wilderness, tour guides generally carry satellite phones. Even a picnic carries dangers as the smell of food can attract hungry brown bears, found throughout the peninsula. They normally live on a diet of fish, mushrooms and berries. Kamchatka’s tourism infrastructure has developed only over the past two decades and flight prices are still high, but visitors accept this to enjoy the region’s thermal baths. Flight prices are much lower in winter when tour operators offer ski and sled tours.

Western Sydney airport consultation ends

TRAVEL BRIEFS

CANBERRA: Options for a new airport in Sydney’s west will become more concrete after a federal government consultation wrapped up. There have been consultations over the past nine months with the Sydney Airport Group on a full range of issues affecting the western Sydney airport at Badgerys Creek. The government would now review which options best met the city’s aviation needs and hoped to release a final proposal by the end of 2015, Transport Minister Warren Truss said in a statement on

Thursday. “We have afforded the owners of Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport the first opportunity to develop and operate a second major airport in the Sydney region as part of the terms of the 2002 sale agreement for Sydney Airport,” Mr Truss said. “We will now work through the issues and review the range of options for an airport proposal that will meet Sydney’s aviation capacity needs and deliver the best possible outcomes for the people of western Sydney and the nation.” The end of the consultation

phase completed the first element of the Commonwealth’s contractual obligations under the right of first refusal process, Mr Truss said. The government is aiming to put a proposal setting out the government’s terms, specifications and a construction timetable to the Sydney Airport Group by the end of the year. A draft environmental impact statement examining the Badgery’s Creek site will be open for public consultation later this year. The plan is to have an operational airport by mid-2020.

A female Kamchatka bear. The species is the second largest brown bear in the world after a Kodiak bear.

The route back to civilisation involves travelling through the Taiga before finally taking a ferry across the Kamchatka, the peninsula’s largest river. Standing on the river’s sandy bank it is possible to cast one last glance at the snow-covered volcanic peaks in the Kluchevskoy Nature Park. DPA

US probes airlines for collusion WASHINGTON: The US Justice Department says it is investigating some airlines over “possible unlawful coordination.” There was no mention of which airlines were covered in the probe in Wednesday’s announcement, but reports of it sent the shares of major US carriers tumbling on Wall Street by more than two per cent. The investigation came after a period in which domestic flight ticket prices have steadily risen despite the plunge in fuel prices, a major cost to airlines.


TRAVEL.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

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Iceberg (Ship) by artist John Kelly which is part of the Beyond Woop Woop exhibition on display now at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. PHOTO: AAP/JOHN KELLY/DARK MOFO

Artist delivers taste of Antarctica BY ANDREW DRUMMOND OR even the most seasoned global traveller, stepping foot on to the white wonderland of Antarctica remains a pipe dream. But not for artist John Kelly, who spent three months on the frozen continent after being selected from among 50 eager applicants for the Australian Antarctic Arts Fellowship. The result? A series of Antarctic-inspired canvas oil paintings which have gone on show for the first time in Hobart in an exhibition aptly titled Beyond Woop Woop. “What the Australian Antarctic Division wanted from the artist was to try and bring their work in the Antarctic back to the broader community,” Kelly told AAP of the fellowship. “It’s such a hostile place. We live in this goldilocks environment in Australia and then there is this extremely hostile

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Ban lifted on White House photos WASHINGTON: The White House has lifted

a 40-year ban on visitors taking photos, and much-prized selfies, on tours of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Tourists to “the People’s House” on Wednesday were greeted with a changed sign saying “Photography is Encouraged”. The First Lady Michelle Obama announced the decision to the broader public on her instagram account, ceremoniously ripping up the previous “No Photos” sign. But there are a few catches: Flashes and video recording or streaming is still prohibited.

place which will remain another world for more people.” Kelly’s forward journey out of Hobart on the icebreaker Aurora Australis was due to take 11 days, but after three weeks, including almost a fortnight stuck in ice, he reached his destination, before taking a helicopter to Australia’s Mawson Station. “From the first moment you step on the boat it is a unique experience: crossing the Southern Ocean, which started with a massive storm front coming through the Australian Bight and creating a rollercoaster effect,” he said. “It’s the most unique artist residency in the world.” The first piece in Kelly’s exhibition is a landscape of Mawson Station, painted from within the protection of a nearby, specially placed sea container. “It was secured by these massive steel pins driven into the ice, but that didn’t help when the blizzard hit.”

Knowing bad weather was on the way a scientist from the station brought Kelly back to base. Once the 130-knot winds had passed, the sea container was found 3km away from where it had been tethered. “A couple of days later a scientist found my battered little painting,” Kelly said. That work now sits in a display cabinet in the centre of the exhibition, clearly a little worse for wear. z London-born Kelly, 50, grew up in Melbourne and now lives in West Cork, Ireland. z The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery is open Tuesday to Sunday, 10am to 4pm. z Beyond Woop Woop opened as part of The Museum of Old and New Art’s winter festival, Dark Mofo. It runs until September 20.

Reef not endangered, but UNESCO to monitor BRISBANE: Australia has much work to do to protect the Great Barrier Reef but has done enough to save the natural wonder from an endangered listing. UNESCO adopted a draft decision to leave the reef off its “in-danger” list at a meeting in Bonn, Germany, on Wednesday evening (AEST). But the icon will continue to be monitored by UNESCO, with Australia required to provide an update on its Reef 2050 plan to the World Heritage Centre by December 1, 2016. Queensland Deputy Premier Jackie Trad said the World Heritage Committee ruling recognised Australia’s efforts

to protect the Great Barrier Reef. However, she said it was by no means a “clear victory” and the federal and state governments must now ensure all of its reef commitments were implemented to keep the natural wonder off the endangered list. “It (the decision) commends the efforts to date and is all about the implementation of the Reef 2050 plan,” she told AAP from Bonn. The long-term protection plan bans the dumping at sea of dredge spoil, limits port development and focuses on cleaning up water running onto the AAP reef.

“There are a couple of other works that are purposefully a little less resolved,” Kelly said of two canvases showing blurred emperor penguins, which were created during blizzards. “I wanted to try and convey that while nature is extremely kind and benevolent to most of us, it’s often not the case in Antarctica.” In fact Kelly experienced how tough life down south can be, when during his 2013 visit there was a helicopter crash which seriously injured a pilot and two passengers near Davis Base. Although not involved, Kelly’s time as Antarctic artist-in-residence was cut short by the crash. And more than a year after he jetted off the frozen continent, Kelly’s artwork was processed by Australian Customs and made its way straight to the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery where it will remain on exhibition until September 20. AAP


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Entertainment Movies Books Music What's On TV

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

THE COWLEY LITERARY AWA R D

This week, we bring you finalist Colleen Russell’s heartbreaking glimpse of a mother’s love and of a little girl lost.

Little Girl Lost BY COLLEEN RUSSELL HE was shown the ultrasound, the baby she was carrying was a girl. A little girl! Carla was overjoyed, could hardly believe it. Sam’s response to her news was strange, but not really strange for Sam, not unexpected. ‘You always were crazy, Mum, this just proves it.’ But his warm brown eyes were soft, his mouth twisted in a sardonic grin; he would always support her. And she wasn’t crazy – she was thrilled! Her neighbours were very accepting, very kind. As they watched her belly grow there were offers of help. ‘Let me put out the garbage bin for you, Luv.’ ‘I can mow your lawn, if you like.’ Carla had made the decision to avoid friends and relatives for the next six months. She politely put off a few invites, not difficult. She wasn’t much of a social person anyway. And she wasn’t ashamed, nor did she think that she had to explain her condition. Sam was now in his own apartment, so she didn’t have to feed him; her meager needs could be bought at the local shops, a short walk from home. This was her daily constitutional. She concentrated on buying only fresh food, even forgoing her evening glass of red wine. Day by day Carla grew more excited. The pregnancy was easy, she felt wonderful, waking each morning to a new day, a new life. When she looked at herself in the mirror, she could see that she was glowing – and growing. Her short curly hair shone in the light through the window, and her brown eyes, Sam’s eyes, were bright and alert. Her cheeks glowed with good health, her skin satiny smooth with a slight sprinkle of freckles across her nose. It had been a long time since there was a baby in the house. Surely everyone would be happy for her after the baby came. Who could resist a beautiful baby girl? Over the years she experienced a few one night stands, but these weren’t significant, just pure lust; initial attraction, satisfaction, no ties. One was a short-term dalliance with another woman, but that was a complete disaster; she would leave that sort of relationship to others. But her affair with one man had persisted for a few months. He made her laugh; he was attentive and very physical, their sex was like a battleground with two winners. When she discovered he was married, she reluctantly moved him on – no regrets, no recriminations. It wasn’t until later that she realised with a sense of wonder, that she was pregnant. She decided not to tell him – that would only complicate matters. Carla was not a sewer or a knitter. She bought a few baby’s clothes on-line, the easiest way to go. She also bought a couple of kaftans and some soft outsize pajamas for her-

S

self, so that as her baby bump grew, she would be comfortable and cool through the summer months. What would my namesake, Carla Zampatti, think of my maternity clothes? and she laughed to herself. She took delivery of a cot and change table, and she painted the walls of the third bedroom a bright yellow, to match the sunshine in her heart. You are my sunshine, my only sunshine, she had sung as a kid, singing now as the paint flowed from her brush. Her daughter would be called Sunny, the sunshine in her life. Why not? ••• Her marriage to Sam’s father was short and not so sweet. They were both young and madly in love, and when Sam arrived they thought their life was complete. Then he started drinking. There were subtle warnings from his work mates; falling into a drunken stupor over dinner, butter running from his fingers, gravy slobber down his chin; repulsive sexual advances as she helped him to bed; then rising abruptly in the night to vomit in the sink or out the window. It disgusted her. The final moment came during an argument (she couldn’t even remember what it was about), when, in an uncontrolled frenzy, he had thrown her on their bed and punched her, in the face, in the stomach, over and over. Carla spent the night in hospital, where she had a painful miscarriage. She hadn’t even realised she was pregnant. ‘I’m very sorry, Mrs Wade,’ the doctor explained as kindly as he could, ‘but I’m afraid that there will be no more children.’ Two days later she packed a bag, grabbed two year old Sam, and fled. Carla’s parents had a large house and she and Sam lived there for a while, until she was able to buy an apartment, and then, a few years later, this house. Sam still saw his father, but Carla insisted that the meetings were in a controlled situation at her in-laws’ home. Carla felt affection and loyalty for her husband, her son’s father, but she was frightened for herself and Sam. He acknowledged no wrong-doing, refused any outside professional assistance. She was forced to stand helplessly by as he slowly sank into alcoholism. She could only pray for him. ••• Now here she was pregnant against all the odds, against the doctor’s predictions. Perhaps God was on her side, was giving her another chance, and every night she thanked Him in her prayers. Carla whiled away the days pottering in her garden, in a contented dream world, totally at peace. The seedlings she planted now would be in full flower when the baby was born. Carla would teach her child the names of each flower, would point out the butterflies and the dragonflies, the grasshoppers shushing in the grass and the worms which burrowed into the warm soft soil. If a ladybird landed on her hand, she would croon to it softly the rhyme

of her childhood; she would teach it to Sunny, they would sing it together. They would lie prone on the green lawn, as they watched the clouds scudding ahead of the wind, forming sculptures in the sky. And Carla would tickle the little body, kiss each tiny dimple and they would laugh and giggle. When the light spring rain fell on their faces, trickling down their noses, she would tell her daughter that the French called it ‘the breath of God’; she would teach her about God. And on a clear night Carla would point out the stars, ‘Look, my little one, there’s Mars, and over here the Southern Cross. God has made this marvelous sky for us to wonder at and enjoy.’ And if a star fell from heaven, they would make a wish, and then wait in anxious anticipation for the wish to come true. Carla spent hours at her piano, practicing old pieces, learning new ones. She would lead her daughter into the delights of Bach, Haydn, Mozart; she could almost feel the young body next to hers on the piano stool. Carla had taught the piano to small children, and she spent time digging through pages of exercises and etudes for little fingers. Carla would also teach her Italian, her mother tongue, the language of music. ••• Then her waters broke, a little early, and Carla arrived at last in the antiseptic activity of the maternity ward. But the birth was not easy. When it was over the midwife swaddled her baby in a shawl, and with a gentle smile, placed the pink bundle in Carla’s waiting arms. For a long time she gazed at the tiny face; soft apricot-coloured curls framed her round head, a pursed rosebud mouth. Then the nurse silently took the lifeless little body away. Not one breath was taken. Carla remembered her mother telling her when she was a little girl, that a baby died because God needed a new star in heaven. Carla could gaze at the stars and know that her baby was with God. And Carla would find an inner peace, would learn to understand the deeper truths. By her hospital bed the nurse had placed a plastic envelope containing two tiny red curls. Carla had them encased in a golden pendant like the Victorians used to do when a loved one died. It now hung from a chain on her bed head and sometimes Sunny danced into her dreams. She was happy, sylph-like, and they ran together in the garden, laughing, and trying to catch the stars. Carla would go on, of course she would, and there was Sam, her handsome son. He would always need her. Life does go on, time does heal – the same old platitudes, but true. Her body was slowly mending, too, but how do you mend a broken heart? Please don’t take my sunshine away...


45

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

One for all and two for one who buy tickets at reduced prices as cheapskates. Having viewed the reality TV show Extreme Couponing I admit I would not spend an entire day scouring catalogues and magazines and sift through dumpsters in search of coupons offering 40 cans of baked beans for the price of 25. Astonishing as that saving would be, I do not eat canned baked beans and would not have the space to store them. However I do enjoy attending live performances at the theatre. Without having to sift through a dumpster, I’m not bothered if labelled a cheapskate because I purchased my Be Your Self by Australian Dance Theatre ticket for only $25.00 after seeing the offer on Facebook or receiving an eNewsletter or browsing the DRTCC website. Nor am I bothered if I am considered a lush as I sip wine and eat cheese, biscuits and chocolates at the Theatre Bar post show and at interval. I have saved money on my ticket, why not indulge myself?

BY CHERYL BURKE DRTCC

IN free tickets! Early-bird discount! Two for one offer! Cut price family deal! All tickets half price! Buy one get one free! What person in their right mind would not press ‘click here at 9.30am to book’, or phone on the dot of business opening hours, or line up outside a theatre box office fifteen minutes before opening, keen to get in early and take advantage of any of these outrageously great offers? At Dubbo Regional Theatre and Convention Centre (DRTCC) it would appear the answer to this question is surprisingly fewer people than you would guess. Stop reading now if you are expecting a pie chart and graphs and percentages and comparisons and statistics that will explain why many people do not choose to attend a show for less than the original ticket price. With no firm indicators and the possibility of a potential survey asking “why? why? why?” on the horizon, hazarding a guess at this phenomenon is often fodder for debate. So I ask my affirmative self, and my negative self, and sometimes consult my silent speaker self: If I don’t opt in and grab a ‘bargain’ priced ticket am I in my right mind?

W

I don’t like it: If your immediate response to this is “how do you know if you don’t like it if you haven’t tried it?” then you are now either a parent or remember your own parents reciting these words as you flung a spoonful of green peas in the opposite direction of your mouth. This same argument can be used in the face of purchasing two-for-one tickets to a show you may not think is something you would ordinarily like, for instance Johnny O’Keefe. For me the Wild One is not dissimilar to a spoonful of caviar. I cannot liken him to a plate of green peas because I love peas, but caviar is quite hideous, and yes, I have tried it. Outrageous as the admission is, until 2014 I had never seen a Dubbo Theatre Company (DTC) show. Their production of Shout! The Legend of the Wild One wasn’t overly attractive as I was not a Johnny O’Keefe fan. My memories of the 70s leant more toward tunes about Angelo on his hill in Mexico and the night when Al Capone tried to make Chicago his own and his gang went to war with the forces of the law. However, with a twofor-one offer on the opening night of Shout! I braved my apparent dislike of Johnny O’Keefe and his music and ventured into the unknown world of the DTC fan only to find that Johnny O’Keefe was maybe more like peas than I thought, and that I could sincerely talk up the entire cast and recommend the show to patrons who were thinking of attending one of the remaining performances.

It’s not worth the hassle: Sometimes children can whinge. A lot. We would

ERVICE S Y A D E M SA ards

Free tickets!

know, we were all children once. Parents often afford children the luxury of whining and allow them to not do things they don’t want to do. Silence is far more calming than listening to the phrase “do I have to?” repeated nonstop after having advised your child of the thing it is you want to do but they don’t. Older children may try different tactics – do not underestimate the lessons in strategy learned during hours playing Minecraft or Mount and Blade. However when a cut price family deal to attend the theatre presents itself, free Wi-Fi pre-show in the theatre foyer for sulky tweens may not be the only bonus the entire family experiences. As aunt to two preteens, I was the fifth wheel on a family excursion to The Listies Make you LOL show at DRTCC earlier this year. Since bagging a bargain evidently runs in the family, my sister had taken advantage of the special family discount deal on offer, despite the lack of enthusiasm from both my niece and nephew. By my observations pre-show it appeared that perhaps other parents had also tackled the hassle of convincing their children that live theatre was equally as exciting as Xbox Live, watching countless YouTube videos, or endlessly Snap Chatting with friends. By my observations post-show it appeared that many parents, my sibling included, considered it the best $50 they had spent and if anything, many young audience members had to curb their enthusiasm and stop bouncing around the foyer so they could go home to bed.

I’m not cheap: Humans have a tendency to judge others; it’s something we do. It could be argued that the premise of saving money on theatre tickets has box office staff judging patrons as odd if they do not get on board with these offers. Conversely other people may judge people

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Have you ever won a ticket to see a show, or been given a ticket by a friend who couldn’t make it to the show, and not used it? When I see empty seats at the theatre, and I know people have either purchased these tickets or received them as comps, I have a Buzzfeed moment and ponder the top five reasons you wouldn’t use a free ticket: • You completely forgot the date. • No one wanted to go with you and you didn’t want to go alone. • It was raining and you had straightened your hair that day • It was the Season finale of Game of Thrones and your MyStar was not working. • You fell asleep after work, it was a big day. And then the top five reasons you would use a free or discounted ticket: • It’s free! You paid nothing! Or snatched a bargain! • You can buy a new handbag with the money you saved. • You have something interesting to talk about to other people. • You have never been to DRTCC before, now you can say you have. • It’s a new experience; you wouldn’t ordinarily pay money to see a play/opera/contemporary dance. • You might enjoy it! •••

CALENDAR OF EVENTS July 4 – The Symphony of Australia July 7 – Be Your Self by Australian Dance Theatre July 11 – Erth’s Dinosaur Zoo July 17 | 18 | 24 | 25 – Fawlty Towers by Dubbo Theatre Company July 31 – SnapShorts August 3 | 4 – The 26 Storey Treehouse August 7 | 8 – A Stunning Classical Triple Bill featuring Swan Lake August 11 – Sex With Strangers August 14 – Roy Orbison and The Everly Brothers August 16 – Mother, Wife and the Complicated Life

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46

ARTS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Insights and Improvisations: a rare treat for music lovers The Macquarie Conservatorium sits in a unique position to attract musicians of incredible depth to perform in Dubbo and Elena Kats-Chernin and Tamara-Anna Cislowska are two such talents not to be missed. The duo’s Insights and Improvisations visits this month. WORDS Yvette Aubusson-Foley NTERNATIONALLY renowned Elena Kats-Chernin is one of Australia’s leading composers – and she’s about to fly in from Germany to perform at the Macquarie Conservatorium. She will be accompanied by concert pianist, TamaraAnna Cislowska, who is acclaimed for her recordings of the complete piano music of Peter Sculthorpe (film scores for Manganinnie, Bourke and Wills). Kats-Chernin has created memorable works in nearly every genre, from orchestral compositions to chamber and choral, as well as four chamber operas and soundtracks to three silent films. The concert experience is guaranteed to be unique and fascinating as the pair chats with the audience about the music and performs live transcriptions of some of the composer’s most famous works. Dubbo Weekender caught up with Elena, via Germany where she is recording a children’s opera called Snow White, and Tamara, for some personal insights on each other.

I

Elena Kats-Chernin: I was in Belinda Webster’s (of Tall Poppies) office just after I arrived back in Australia in the ‘90s and she suddenly handed me the phone to speak to this teenager. It was Tamara! We had quite a long conversation. She later claimed she didn’t understand a word I said as I was talking so fast. (Was it my accent?) But apparently I asked her to play a premiere of my piece and she agreed even though she didn’t know what she was agreeing to! We got along straight away and everything seemed very easy. Those first concerts together were really fun. I thought she was very mature for her age. Our sessions together are always filled with laughter. Sometimes I have to tell Tamara not to speak to me because she knows just how to make me laugh, and when I laugh, I can’t stop. It’s easy to work with her because she seems to know where I want to go in the music without me saying anything. Quite a luxury. As I said, she makes me laugh. She can pull some incredible faces, which can make it very difficult to concentrate. When I hear the colours and sounds she can get from the piano, it makes me love the instrument more and gives me lots of ideas. I often get ideas for new pieces when we perform. I think we both like velvet quite a lot. Almost everything revolves around the music for me so I don’t really have any hobbies. I like the basics such as eating and sleeping. Tamara has been playing and touring since she was very young, so she always knows exactly what to do. She gives you confidence when you are on stage. Makes you feel secure. She also knows what food to take along, as often you don’t get to eat at normal hours. It has happened often that there is absolutely no food available before, during and even after the concert. Tamara thinks ahead. She taught me many things, but mainly to follow my vision and to accept no musical ideas that I would not want to hear myself. We recently performed for International Woman’s Day. I think it was one of our best performances and I felt completely relaxed. Although it was live on radio it seemed like a really intimate concert. I very much enjoyed that one. It’s always been fun but also each performance has been quite different. I don’t think there’s anything I wouldn’t want to remember. One thing comes to mind – being really hungry after one of the concerts and only being offered wine afterwards with not a cracker, cheese or apple (or open shops at that hour) in sight. It’s been a great collaboration so far and I’ve probably never enjoyed performing so much. Having Tamara

Composer, Elena Kats-Chernin and pianist, Tamara-Anna Cislowska will raise the bar at the Macquarie Conservatorium brand of magic in Dubbo this month. PHOTO: STEVEN GODBEE

there gives me much more freedom and scope. I tend to improvise more than when I’m on my own. Lots of new ideas pop up when we play together. Tamara is a gifted poet and has written some lyrics for some of my recent pieces, she has most imaginative language and the words seem to just flow out of her.

Tamara-Anna Cislowska: WE actually met on the phone in 1995 and played together later that year. It was at the Sydney Spring International Festival of New Music and we performed in some multiple piano ensembles and I performed some of Elena’s solo piano pieces. I think we had an immediate rapport. I found Elena a fun and exciting person to work with. One of the first things we talked about was Elena’s dislike of rehearsals. I liked her instantly. I seem to remember her saying “I can’t believe they make you repeat things over and over”. It was very charming. At the same time, she is one of the most hardworking people I have ever known, and one of the quickest minds. For me, feeling that we have a similar take on music and many things, makes it easy to fit things together. Sometimes it’s as though we read each other’s minds. Not much has to be said in our preparation, which is quite rare. I think we like each other’s ideas, and that means work never feels like work. It can be difficult to work with Elena because of her schedule. It’s not unusual for Elena to be away every second week. She can be hard to pin down. I always feel grateful when we manage to co-ordinate some time together. She has an indefatigable drive and a real strength and passion for writing. It’s very infectious, very inspiring. She also has a penchant for bright coloured clothing which always makes me smile. It reflects her personality perfectly. I think we both have a liking for unusual jewellery and have often swapped ‘pieces’ with each other. I definitely like Elena’s Russian cooking and have sometimes been asked to sample her Russian salad, which

is quite a classic. She likes my ‘health’ soups, which involve a lot of lentils and celery. So we share a love of food. Elena would always prefer to be at her piano composing so getting her out and about is sometimes a challenge. Once she is on the stage though, she always seems completely at home. Elena has taught me many things from how to structure a work to how to orchestrate to how to bring out the best in any particular instrument. Our discussions are always broad and wide-ranging. I would be hard pressed to list every single thing I have learnt from her both consciously and unconsciously. Experiences we share and I wish never to forget, are the concerts we’ve done together when I’ve seen the pure joy on the faces of the audience and the warmth and sunshine that Elena’s music brings to people. I have often reminded myself not to forget those moments. I think we’ve been lucky to have always been in lovely venues surrounded by great people. I’ve had broken strings on pianos and pedals that didn’t work before when I was on my own, but nothing with Elena. Maybe she is a good luck charm. It always gives me great pleasure and a sense of privilege to be able to work so closely with one of our great composers and experience music creation from the ground up. It has a sense of history in the making to me. Something people may not know about her, she can do a mean workout at the gym. » Macquarie Conservatorium presents Elena KatsChernin and Tamara-Anna Cislowska Friday, July 17 School’s Music Seminar Day (Yrs 9-12) 7.30, Concert, Insights and Improvisations, Macquarie Conservatorium Saturday, July 18 11am, Masterclass for piano students, registration essential, observers welcome » Bookings and information at www.macqcon.org.au or call 6884 6686


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48

BOOKS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Marvellous Ways is a lavish and clever read BY KATE WHITING THE BOOKCASE

z BOOK OF THE WEEK A Year Of Marvellous Ways by Sarah Winman is published in hardback by Tinder Press. IF the name Sarah Winman rings a bell, it will be because of her phenomenally successful debut, When God Was A Rabbit, published in 2010. So this follow-up has been long anticipated – and it is with some relief I can say it lives up to expectations. In 1947 Cornwall, Marvellous (an 89-year-old woman) is waiting – “not for death, as you might assume”, but for something she senses is coming. This is the first hint of the magical realism that pervades the novel – we later hear of Marvellous’ mermaid mother, and (a personal favourite) of Peace, who bakes loaves in which you can taste her moods. Though just the phrase ‘magical realism’ is enough to put some off, here it works: there is a real grounding in reality, the stories are touching, but the twist lent by these quirks lends a joyful, fairytale element (complete with a trip to the woods). When the ‘something’ Marvellous has been waiting for arrives, it is in the form of Francis Drake: a young soldier returning from war to deliver a crucial letter, who finds and loses his love. In Francis, Marvellous recognises a broken young man, so sets out to heal him using stories, telling the tales of the three loves of her life in a poetic and deeply moving way, the present peppered with stories of the past. The only real downside to this novel is the, at times, disorientating way it’s told. No speech marks, and a somewhat experimental form can take some getting used to, and

though this meandering style suits the story, it can become distracting. Style aside, this is ultimately a lavish and clever read which will stand the test of time – Marvellous is a character you will want to spend time with. 9/10 (Review by Emma Herdman) z FICTION Grey by EL James is published in paperback by Arrow Books. WHEN the original Fifty Shades Of Grey came out, I chose not to review it. And then it exploded – and everyone read it, even my mum, swiftly followed by the film version, which has now been released on DVD. What started as fan fiction has snowballed into a marketing phenomenon, and the latest instalment came last week when E.L. James released Grey, the story of Fifty Shades told from the ‘hero’ Christian Grey’s viewpoint. She says fans begged her to write it, but sadly for those fans, she’s short-changed them with 557 pages of the same dialogue interspersed with scant new tidbits about the character. What we do learn about him is through dreams of his drug-addled mum, flashbacks to being adopted into a loving family as a scarred and mute child – and through a seemingly interminable inner monologue that reveals him to be a sex-addicted stalker, obsessed with making virgin Anastasia Steele his submissive. In his over ego-inflated mind, he pits himself against literary heroes Darcy, Rochester and Angel Clare, while typical Grey thoughts include “I stalk towards her like she’s my prey”. Just creepy. 5/10 (Review by Kate Whiting) The Not-Dead And The Saved And Other Stories by Kate

Clanchy is published in hardback by Picador. KATE Clanchy won the BBC National Short Story award for the title story of her debut collection, and it typifies the themes that run through these other 15 stories: families wrestling to understand their love for each other; how we live alongside degenerative disease; the false hopes that our dreams bring. When it is good it is very, very good. The Invention Of Scotland and Alas, The Tents Collapsed On The Green Fields Of The Mind, especially, demonstrate the complexities of character and multi-layered narratives that she can form in a few short pages. Others work less well, but are forgivable for being adventurous and pushing the boundaries of her themes. The Not-Dead And The Saved is about savouring the moments that make up real lives, scathing of the pretensions that we construct in their place, and the close observation and honesty of Clancy’s own work are fitting tribute to this. 8/10 (Review by Adam Weymouth) Nothing But Grass by Will Cohu is published in hardback by Chatto & Windus. BRITISH writer Will Cohu, a former journalist for London’s Daily Telegraph, ventures into fiction with this debut murder mystery set in his adopted county. Presented like a series of short stories, the chapters explore the fictional Wolds village of Southby, ostensibly near England’s Louth, and start with a Victorian secret: what happened to the son of landowner Charles Stavin, who disappeared before inheriting the Ranby estate? The narrative jumps forward 101 years to 1985, when a murder is covered up, and then

follows the lives of Southby residents to the modern day as consequences slowly combine. Cohu’s well-researched writing is full of county slang and evocative descriptions of the land, harnessing stereotypes such as the Lincolnshire poacher and rural conservatism. Yet his gradual revelation of small details through apparently unconnected, disjointed histories is hard work at first, only easing as the reader realises how connected the villagers all are. Worth the effort to stick with it. 7/10 (Review by Natalie Bowen) The Readers Of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald is published in hardback by Chatto & Windus. Sara is 28 and works in a bookshop in Sweden. For a while now, she has been corresponding and swapping books with Amy, a pensioner who lives in the godforsaken town of Broken Wheel, Iowa. When Sara loses her job, she heads off to visit Amy. By the time she gets there, however, Amy has died. Alone and at a loss as to what to do, Sara opens a bookshop. The townspeople soon take her to their hearts and Sara, in turn, falls for Broken Wheel. With her tourist visa about to expire, a plan is hatched to marry her off to Amy’s eligible nephew Tom, but will they be able to convince the authorities it is a genuine love match? If you’re looking for a book about books, which this professes to be, you’ll be disappointed. If you’re looking for some predictable, happy-ever-after chick-lit, you’ll love it. 6/10 (Review by Catherine Small) z NON-FICTION When Music Got Free: What Happens When An Entire

Generation Commits The Same Crime? by Stephen Witt is published in hardback by Bodley Head. STEPHEN Witt is a self-confessed downloading addict, who claims he hasn’t paid for music since the turn of the millennium. As such, he is well positioned to write this admittedly personal account of how the invention of the mp3 changed the way we consume music forever. Beginning with Karlheinz Brandenburg – who dedicated years of his life to perfecting and marketing the mp3 format – How Music Got Free explores the motivations of those involved in the moral morass of illegal file-sharing with aplomb. And whether writing about producers or pirates, research into psychoacoustics or the intricacies of copyright infringement trials, Witt has a knack for eking out illuminating human foibles. Despite a tendency to romanticise the early 2000s as something of a golden age, even his idols are not saved a skewering by his keen sense of irony, making this a surprisingly engaging guide – providing you’ve got a prior interest in the topic. 8/10 (Review by Rachel Farrow) Fox Tossing, Octopus Wrestling And Other Forgotten Sports by Edward Brooke-Hitching is published by Simon & Schuster. FUCHSPRELLEN is the inspiration for Edward BrookeHitching’s first book. The writer and documentary filmmaker’s German may not be the best, but even he was able to recognise the words ‘fox’ and ‘bouncing’. It was a cruel, peculiar activity which involved throwing a fox as high as possible and piqued BrookeHitching’s interest, leading to this fascinating A-Z of for-


BOOKS.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

gotten sports, activities and games. Meticulous research has led to fascinating accounts of these forgotten sports’ origins and endings, offering great little nuggets of information. For example, did you know the common pub name ‘Dog and Duck’ owes its name

in part to duck-baiting – or the bloody origin of the phrase ‘to beat around the bush’? Then there is eel-pulling, ice tennis and phone booth-stuffing, as well as the day in December 1937 when cheetahs took on greyhounds in Romford, Essex. All of these and so many

more are covered in this intriguing, go-to guide on the weird and wonderful activities of years gone by. 7/10 (Review by Simon Peach)

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z CHILDREN’S BOOK OF THE WEEK Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley is published in paperback by Dial Books. CIRCUS Mirandus is the first novel by young US author Cassie Beasley, which has already sparked a bidding war among publishers and had a Hollywood production company buying up the film and TV rights. When 10-year-old Micah’s grandfather becomes ill, he is desperate for a cure or, in this case, a little magic. The boy remembers one of the stories the old man told him, about a strange place called Circus Mirandus, and how, when his grandfather was young, he was promised a very special wish by a stranger there. So Micah sets out to find the circus before it is too late. But will the stranger keep his word and does the circus really exist or is it just another fantasy in his grandfather’s head? This book was one of the most heart-warming stories I have ever read! It had an imaginative storyline, a wonderful array of characters and an unexpected twist at the end. I especially liked Micah himself and the way he refuses to believe that Circus Mirandus does not exist, no matter what anyone else says. It is a truly magical story. So if you want a little magic this month, come and visit Circus Mirandus! 9/10 (Review by Noah Sanders, aged 10)

ADVERTORIAL

Churchill W HAT agenda do people have when they aim to depreciate the standard of living and ethical values that have prevailed in the last 50 years. Taking some titles from the bookshelves on Winston Churchill, one can recall several references in recent times to the “dreadful” things Churchill did. Whatever school his critics attended, the reality is that as humans we all make mistakes, some more transparent than others. Bill Fawcett wrote “Trust Me, I Know What I’m Doing” in which he identifies 100 international identities who, over time, have made mistakes that have lost elections, ended empires and made the world what it is today. These include Caesar, Kublai Khan, Napoleon, Herbert Hoover, Hitler, Nixon and Churchill. Another book of relevance is “History’s Worst Decisions – and the People Who Made Them” by Stephen Weir. Churchill gets two mentions: one relates to his involvement in “the disaster at Gallipoli”, the other is the 1940s move to hand Iraq to the House of Saud following an earlier defeat of the Ottoman Empire and its control. Paul Johnson has written “Churchill” which provides a biographical study of the man – he was born two months premature following a fall experienced by his mother. The book holds many lessons including some on youth: “How to use a difficult childhood, how to seize on all opportunities, phys-

ical, moral and intellectual. And how, while pursuing vaulting ambition with energy and relish, to cultivate friendship, generosity, compassion and decency.” His father was disappointed with Churchill’s school performance and “wrote him off as an academic failure”. He eventually went into the cavalry at Sandhurst. He went on to serve in India, Egypt and South Africa. In 1931 he endured three major challenges: a loss of his political position in the Conservative Party, the major loss of cash in the Crash, and being hospitalised following severe injuries when knocked down by a car while crossing a road. In 1895-89 Churchill served in the campaign to recover lost Sudanese territory. This is recorded in his book “The River War”. After the 1881 rebellion of the Mahdi in the Sudan, British attempts to withdraw from the region climaxed in General Gordon’s ill-fated attempt to rescue officials, soldiers and Egyptian subjects from Khartoum. An often-overlooked episode in the Middle East is the British attempt to recover the Sudan, the final battle was at Omdurman in which Churchill participated. One of the noted personalities in current times in the UK is Boris Johnson, Lord Mayor of London. Considered as having the qualities for a future Prime

Minister, Johnson has written “The Churchill Factor” in which he analyses the way Churchill as “one man, made history”. On page 103 Johnson describes how he visited Cambridge where there is an archive of Churchill’s credentials. Not only does the text reflect the mind of an intelligent writer but it provides a close reference to the warlord’s credentials, both personal and nationally. The book covers Churchill’s years in parliament and the decisions made leading up to and through World War II and afterwards. Max Hastings has written “Finest Years – Churchill as Warlord 1940-45” which brings out vital details of his leadership. Apart from UK Research, Hastings has examined this through the eyes of the Americans and the Russians, thus providing a rounded picture of reality behind the icon, farsighted and capable of folly, sometimes unpopular, yet loved and admired. One of the major histories of empires is Gibbon’s 1,100,000 word “Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire”. Over time Churchill wrote over 40 books including his account of the Second World War in over 2,050,000 words. Currently, some of these are being reprinted with Volume I, “The Gathering Storm”, and Volume 2, “Their Finest Hour” currently available.

From the bookshelves by Dave Pankhurst The Book Connection The first explains the dramatic events that followed the First World War, leading up to the inevitable confrontation with Adolf Hitler’s Germany. The second embraces Churchill’s first days as prime minister and relates the first eight months of the conflict as Britain stood alone against Germany following the enemy’s moves into neighbouring European countries. The Luftwaffe tried and failed to drive the RAF from the skies and the German Navy tried to starve the country into submission. However it also features the earliest gleams of light as the danger of invasion was reduced following the evacuation from Dunkirk and the year closed with Desert Victory. Author Christopher Catherwood has written “Winston Churchill – the Flawed Genius of World War II” of which one media commentator reported that it “is required reading for anyone wanting to have an in-

` His father was disappointed with Churchill’s school performance and wrote him off as an academic failure... a

formed opinion on recent events in Iraq”. Even Alexander McCall Smith notes that, “If you want to understand why Iraq seems doomed to conflict (And why our lives are being changed as a result) this book is a good place to start.” Whatever one may think of decisions made more than half a century ago, which at the time may have been considered the best move, there are those who are prepared to attribute today’s circumstances to the past. Humanity is something like that when taking the first chapter in the abovementioned book “History’s Worst Decisions” which is headed “In the Beginning: Adam and Eve” – and look where that led us. A set of volumes first published in 1958 is Churchill’s “History of the English Speaking People”. Volume I “The Birth of Britain”, 2 “The New World”, 3 “The Age of Revolution”, 4 The Great Democracies” are still available. These are considered among the great works of literature and history. Given the “state of the world” today, would there be a person who could be found as a worldclass leader with the capability, wisdom and leadership of Winston Churchill. Enjoy you browsing, Dave Pankhurst.


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BOOKS.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Has 'Boom Boom' Boris mellowed? Fame came too early for Boris Becker, and the former tennis champ still struggles to return to his home country

`Of

course I was embarrassed and very sad about how it happened, and about the way it broke up my family...a Boris Becker, above, and celebrarting with Novak Djokovic at Wimbledon 2014, above right. PHOTOS: PA

BY HANNAH STEPHENSON EXPECT Boris Becker, threetimes Wimbledon champion, one-time tabloid target and now coach to world number one Novak Djokovic, to be a little distracted as I catch him at the French Open, during a break from watching his star pupil. But Becker, 47, is charming and charismatic, his German accent ever-strong, still trying to find the right descriptive words in English that he did as a BBC commentator, even though he's lived in Wimbledon for more than five years. We're meeting to discuss his relationship with the club and the tournament, which he charts in his new book, Boris Becker's Wimbledon. Of course, back in 1985, at 17 years old, he became the youngest ever person – and the first German – to win the men's singles. It's a record he still holds, and the victory changed his life, creating highs and lows as he became a celebrity off, as well as on, the court.

I

Boris Becker winning the Wimbledon men's single's final, in London, July 7, 1985.

Becker now lives a stone's throw from the All England Club, and he's quite settled there. He likes Wimbledon, isn't bothered by locals in his everyday life, or approached for autographs or selfies, or asked to do tennis coaching at his five-year-old son Amadeus' school. "People are very respectful. The school hasn't asked me to do any tennis coaching, but I've heard that a ticket or two for the Wimbledon tournament this year would be very welcome!" he jokes. He shares his home with his second wife, Dutch model Lilly Kerssenberg ("I call her my last wife. I'm not going to marry again," he says drolly), and their son Amadeus, but also lives only half an hour away from his 15-year-old daughter, Anna, born following the infamous 'broom cupboard' tryst at London restaurant Nobu in 1999, with Anna's Russian mother Angela Ermakova. The scandal made tabloid fodder of Becker, as revelations of a paternity suit against him, DNA tests and his subsequent divorce from first wife Barbara hit the headlines. "I became too much on the front pages, not enough on the back pages," he admits. "It hastened the end of my marriage to Barbara," he writes. "That might have happened anyway as we were having our problems, but while the media had a field day with the story, I gained a daughter, a wonderful young woman I have loved from the day she was born and continue to love now. "Of course I was embarrassed and very sad about how it happened, and about the way it broke up my family. It left Anna's mother and me having to

set about being parents without any relationship of our own to fall back on." Understandably, he's protective of his daughter, and says she deserves her peace and privacy. "I'm now at a place with her and her mother that's very comfortable, peaceful and family-like. I don't see Anna as much as I'd like, but her mother and I are working on becoming a normal separated family, which hasn't been easy considering our starting point. "We've had our battles. We come from different family backgrounds, we have different values and we have different views about education, but I respect very much the fact that she is my daughter's mother." He says both he and Angela have matured. "Obviously the whole situation was very emotional, and

Boris Becker's daughter is model Anna Ermakova. PHOTO: AP/MARKUS SCHREIBER/PA

we both said things and did things that, in retrospect, we perhaps shouldn't have done. But all three of us are moving on in peace and harmony." His behaviour during that period might lead some to wonder whether, at 17, success simply came too soon. Having reached six finals in seven years at Wimbledon, by 1991 – when he lost to fellow German Michael Stich – he was yearning for some sort of private life beyond tennis. Two months later he met model Barbara Feltus, whom he married in 1993, and they had two sons together, Noah and Elias. He announced his retirement after his last Wimbledon singles in 1999 – which is when his private life imploded – and admits it took him a while to find himself afterwards. "In sport, you're called old when you are 31. It affects your confidence and self-belief. It took me a couple of years to redefine myself. "I didn't know what to write on my passport as a profession. Ex-tennis player? It's about finding a new role that satisfies you as much." He now runs his own private equity company, dabbles in professional poker and gave up commentating for the BBC when he became head coach to Djokovic 18 months ago. The Serbian's victory in last year's singles final was the most glorious moment for Becker since winning the title himself three decades ago. "I think the end of the match was the most emotional I've been since I stopped playing. "I had to pinch myself. It was the icing on the cake. I recall being in the locker room before the match and on one side, you had Novak, and me and on the other, you had Roger [Federer] and Stefan [Edberg, who played Becker in three successive Wimbledon finals and is now Federer's trainer]." Off court, his relationship with his disparate family seems to have become much more civilised. "We've all matured and got older. We've moved on. I'm still in close contact with my exwife. I'm in a good relationship

with Angela. It takes two to tango and without their help, I couldn't have moved on, and I don't think they would have moved on without my help... "In a way, we all call each other family now." He says his ex-wife and Lilly are friends. "I wouldn't say we go on holidays together but we go to Miami quite a lot, where Barbara lives. She invites us to her home and the brothers call themselves brothers, not halfbrothers. It's a testament to the women. I'm fortunate, but it's a team effort." Anna appeared on the catwalk earlier this year at Berlin Fashion Week. "It's every girl's dream. She looked beautiful. I was proud of her," Becker reflects. He would love to get all four children together, which hasn't yet happened. "I think eventually the kids would want to meet, but I'm not going to instigate it. Hopefully it will be a natural, organic thing that will happen." He would also love to have more children. "My wife wants another two at least, but I say let's start with one more, so, God willing, she'll be pregnant this year." Being Djokovic's coach means he's back on the road for 25 weeks of the year, but he says he and Lilly are never apart for more than 10 days, as she'll fly regularly to join him on the tennis circuit. He has a home in Germany and another in Spain, but doubts he'll ever live in Germany permanently again. "I have a mixed relationship with Germany. I don't have any privacy there and I sell newspapers, so that's a very difficult combination. If there isn't a story, they'll make one up." Becker will of course be with Djokovic every step of the way at Wimbledon, which is about to begin,, and predicts it could be a Murray/Djokovic final. "Having said that, I wouldn't rule Roger Federer out yet. Grass is his best surface, but I think Murray and Djokovic are the ones to beat. "Murray has been the second best player of the year so far. I wouldn't be surprised if he wins more Grand Slams, but hopefully not against my man!" :: Boris Becker's Wimbledon by Boris Becker is published by Blink.


THE SOCIAL PAGES.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

New website for Family History Society BY KAITLYN RENNIE THE Dubbo and District Family History Society celebrated the launch of their new website over morning tea on Tuesday, June 30, at their permanent library facility in the Community Centre, at the Western Plains Cultural Centre. The launch of the website (www.dubbofamilyhistory. org.au) is aimed at making their services more accessible to members, current and new, and anyone interested in researching families past and present who have lived in Dubbo or outlying areas since the town was established. The Dubbo and District Family History Society boasts an extensive library, archive and computer access to many more online archives across the globe. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friendly volunteer members are keen to assist anyone with questions on uncovering their past.

Eunice Sweeney, June Wilson and Cynthia Foley

Karlyn Robinson, Lesley Abrahams, and Lynette Harrison

Ronda Hewes, Kathy Furney and Diane Roberts

Lyn Smith, Jennifer Bruce and Doug Elliott

Visiting missionaries: Sister Koster from Denmark and Sister MacMillan of Capetown

Robyn Allan, Carol Korn and Roslyn Carlon

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THE SOCIAL PAGES.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Biggest Morning Tea with a twist BY KAITLYN RENNIE THE Dubbo RSL Day Club enjoyed their biggest morning tea on Thursday, June 25, at the Orana Gardens Country Club. The members donate their money to a different local charity each year. The day was celebrated with a raffle, a performance by the Palmer Street singers, plus much more.

Belle Southwell and Lorna Furney

The male volunteers enjoying a game of pool

Arthur McCumstie and Peter Whittaker

Barbara Hansen and Meg Wood

Marie Smith and Ailsa Harvey

Donna McLaughlin and Roberta Martin


Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

Jane Bromby, Wilma Ryan and Yvonne Gadsby

Keith Farrands, Joan Waites, Mary Chambers and Elaine Stanford

Connie Davis and Marie Tait

THE SOCIAL PAGES.

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Jan Bowyer, Joan Teale, Joy Anderson and Elizabeth Whittaker

Marcia Fahy and Dick Mackay

John Downes, Peter Fraser and Doug Stewart

GET YOUR REPRINTS HERE Reprints of most photos you see in Dubbo Photo News and Dubbo Weekender are available to buy. Call 6885 4433 during office hours, or call in to our office at 89 Wingewarra Street.


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THE SOCIAL PAGES.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Igniting the night sky BY KAITLYN RENNIE THANKS to Dubbo City Council and Myer Dubbo, the local community welcomed a light show in the city centre on Friday, June 26, at the Cyril Flood Rotunda on Church Street. With music, lights, and a table tennis table, the new instalment is sure to be a hit among locals and visitors. The lights are a part of the “Ignite our Centre” campaign at Dubbo City Council. The votes are in, and many people said they wanted to see more ambient spaces for people to spend time... So here it is!

Steve Jennings, Tony Aikins and Allan Smith

A table tennis table has been set up to provide a little extra entertainment for the community

Gaby and Peter Milling

Kelly Stanton, Florian Honeyball and Kate Crossley

Luke and Marina Raptis

Aarien Towney, Luke Towney and Amy Swan

Libby Hicks, Therese Porter, Maree and Libby McAneney

Rod Archer and David Dwyer

There was a great crowd at the official launch of “Ignite the Night”


THE SOCIAL PAGES.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

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Jumping for Jess BY KAITLYN RENNIE WITH the aim of making finances one less concern for a local family going through a rough time, friends and family of Jess Sutton had the opportunity to showcase their hard work in the last few months at the fundraiser held on Friday, June 26, at the Dubbo Harness Club. Jess Sutton was diagnosed with cervical cancer in April this year. Jess did have the cancer removed, but later found out that it has spread to her lymph nodes, which has led to six weeks of radiation and chemotherapy in Orange. The night included an auction, foot race, raffle, lucky gate prize, kids activities, twilight markets, and live music. Lloyd and Betty Sutton, Braithyn, Lorraine, Keighan and Philip Short

Jenni Floyd, Wendy Hoy, Laraine Garraway and Carolyn Carter

Darcy and Ashton Coe, Ruby Asimus and Harry Doughan

Candice, Ryan, Sam and Lachlan Maher

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Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Rotary changeovers celebrated IT’S a busy time of year for the Rotary fraternity, with official “changeovers” taking place across Dubbo and the region to usher in the new Rotary year. Among those local clubs to celebrate “changeover” this week was the Rotary Club of Dubbo Macquarie, whose members gathered at the Westside Hotel to pay tribute to outgoing President Lorraine Croft and welcome new club “boss” Sylvia Dunn. The past year has been a busy but successful year for Dubbo’s only day-time club, having amassed an impressive total of more than $30,000 in donations to worthy causes both local and international through-

out 2014/15. The night included some special presentations, including acknowledgement of 20 years’ continuous membership for Peters Bartley and McInnes, and a Sapphire Paul Harris Fellowship for another of the club’s six “Peters” – to Peter Croft for his outstanding contribution to Rotary. With the coming year’s Rotary International theme being “Be a gift to the world”, the club wasted no time in getting into the spirit of things with a number of prizes and gifts distributed during what new President Sylvia Dunn described as an evening of “food, fun and fellowship”.

David and Sylvia Dunn with Peter and Lorraine Croft and Harold Woodley

Past President Peter English proposes a toast to Rotary International

Ray Nolan and Annameike Neville

Mayor Mathew Dickerson congratulates new President Sylvia Dunn and outgoing president Lorraine Croft

Lyn McDonald with Lance Murphy and Marjorie and Don Stephens Lorna Breeze, Pauline Kuhner, Bev Hawkins, Kerin Stonestreet, Grace Aubusson and Janni Stanford

Peter and Kim Bartley with Lorna Breeze and Marty Morris

John Stonestreet, Lorraine Croft, Sylvia Dunn and Mark Horton

Kim and Peter English

Lawrie Donoghue, Margaret Hughes and Peter Stanford

Peter and Justine Kuhner with Annette Ferguson


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WHAT’S ON.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

T H E R E G I O N AT A GLANCE

hear ... a lot of grunting wrestlers AT the IWA Pro Wrestling event at the RSL Club on July 4. It’s a family fun action packed live show with heavyweight matches, women’s matches, tag teams and daredevils, all guaranteed to blow you away! It’s a body slamming, bone crunching non stop sports entertainment. International Wrestling Australia (IWA) is dishing out more fun, more action and more excitement than ever

before in it’s 100 year plus history. At 250 pounds plus the men and women of the wrestling show take up to half an hour of being jumped on, thrown down, pushed over and kicked and still have the strength to pick each other up and then do it all again, the following night. IWA Pro Wrestling guarantees lot of posing, body oil and lycra, grand entrances, great music, referees, announces and an all round live experience unlike anything you’ve seen before.

... expert speakers on farm life THE Mudgee Small Farm Field Days is the premier field days event in Central NSW, this year being held on July 10 and 11. Now running in its 38th year, the field days brings a great line up of demonstrations, talks and over 430 exhibitors. The Mudgee Small Farm Field Days was created to deliver education about living and working on the land. Since 1977 the event has organised a

wide range of speakers across a numerous topics to help people learn about everything from building a fence, understanding livestock, to sustainable building and agronomy. This year these will include agronomy, land management and conservation, fencing, fishing, Landcare, blacksmithing, cooking, fashion and family, tourism and wine. In celebration of this hardworking agricultural friend, at this year’s field days there will be a Scarecrow Building activity and competition.

see ... an author launch her book!

... Fawlty Towers return to the stage

NOT just any book and not just any author. Dubbo Weekender’s own editor, Jen Cowley will launch her children’s book, Grandpa’s Hat, with all proceeds going to NALAG – a not-for-profit, volunteer-supported organisation – to continue the work it does in supporting people who are grieving. Illustrated by local artist Mark Horton, Grandpa’s Hat has been developed with the support of the combined Rotary Clubs of Dubbo and Coonabarabran as a resource for the National Association of Loss and Grief NSW Inc. (NALAG) to help parents and carers guide children through the difficult time of loss and grief.

BASIL: “Now, I told you last time to book early and some of you just didn’t listen and missed out on getting seats, so you’d better get your tickets early if you want to catch us this time!” Manuel: “Si, it is Manuel. Pleased if you buy uno, dos, tres, tickets to see Fawlty Toweres, me need money to go home to Barcelona, me no like working no more. Muchas gracias.” It is the story of Jennywren and all her favourite animals, who help her discover that although her Grandpa is gone, he doesn’t have to be forgotten. Proceeds from the sale of the book

will go to help NALAG. The book launch is $50 per person, at Lazy River Estate on Sunday, August 1, 6pm. Book tickets and pre-order copies of the book through www.nalag.org.au

drop of passengers waiting on the platform around them. The Station will be making its way to Europe for a screening at the Berlin Film Festival. War time and post war fashions in Australia were simple given there wasn’t much money around, but well dressed none the less, with men in suits, hats and ladies, with your hair done. Period luggage is welcome if you have it. Extras will be treated to a barbecue.

... get in touch with the paranormal

horses from local station properties as well as some distance away in Queensland and South Australia. The riders, aged from about two years to, well, who knows, compete in a range of events including novelties such as the bending race, or flat races such as the Milparinka Cup. All day meals are available, and at night, after prize presentation, entertainment to get everyone up and

dancing. Visitors are welcome to join locals at the Milparinka Gymkhana on July 4, Milparinka-Hawker Gate Road, Milparinka.

Catch the Dubbo Theatre Company return to the Dubbo Regional Theatre stage with their hilarious rendition of Fawlty Towers on Friday July, 17, 2015 at 8pm and Saturday, July 18, at 2pm and 8pm.

do ... be an extra in a film IF you’ve ever wanted to see your face on the big screen, get down to the Dubbo railway station dressed in your 1940s gear and be an extra in the local film for ‘The Station’. From 9am until 12 noon, Saturday August1, the Dubbo station will turn back the clock for the film with scenes set for the main cast on the platform and in need of a realistic back-

OLD DUBBO GAOL’S Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory event is on this weekend and is one not to miss, but for a more spooky night out don’t forget their Beyond the Grave tours. The Beyond the Grave night tour has been created to take those who dare into restricted access areas of the Old Dubbo Gaol where

unexplainable extra sensory activity has been recorded. Includes: Beyond the Grave Tour and entry as well as full day entry on the same date or the following date of selected session only. During the tour devices will be used to measure the surrounding paranormal energy while listening to the tales of those who passed, their illnesses, deaths, and unmarked graves within the caol walls.

etc. Milparinka Gymkhana THE Milparinka Gymkhana is held annually on the second Saturday of the NSW July School Holidays. The daylong event takes place on the Milparinka Sports Grounds, just on the north side of Milparinka, alongside the Evelyn Creek. The gymkhana is a truly bush family day affair, with riders bringing their

Lightning Ridge Opal Festival THE 2015 Lightning Ridge Opal Festival is going to be one festival you don’t

want to miss. Jewellers, buyers, wholesalers, miners, rock hounds, lapidary enthusiasts and tourists are invited to experience the best Lightning Ridge has to offer with this culmination of information, spectacular jewellery, collectables, great deals and fantastic networking opportunities between July 30 and August 2, 2015.

To add your event to HSDE, email whatson@dubboweekender.com.au


WHAT’S ON. 59

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

OPEN WEEKENDER

DUBBO GROVE PHARMACY

COFFEE & MEALS

KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϵĂŵƟůϭϮŶŽŽŶ 'ŝŌǁĂƌĞ͕:ĞǁĞůůĞƌLJ ,ŽŵĞǁĂƌĞƐ 59A Boundary Road, 6882 3723

OLD BANK RESTAURANT KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϭϮƟůůĂƚĞ 'ŽŽĚĨŽŽĚ͕ŐŽŽĚŵƵƐŝĐ͕ŐŽŽĚƟŵĞƐ ΨϭϱůƵŶĐŚƐƉĞĐŝĂůƐ 232 Macquarie Street, 6884 7728

THE ATHLETES FOOT

REFLECTIONS RESTAURANT

Open Monday to Saturday from 6pm ƵƐƚƌĂůŝĂŶĐƵŝƐŝŶĞƵƐŝŶŐůŽĐĂůƉƌŽĚƵĐĞ͘ &ƵůůĂƌĨĞĂƚƵƌŝŶŐZŽďĞƌƚKĂƚůĞLJtŝŶĞƐ͘ YƵĂůŝƚLJ/ŶŶƵďďŽ/ŶƚĞƌŶĂƟŽŶĂů Newell Highway (next to the golf course), 6882 4777.

TED’S TAKEAWAY

Open Saturday and Sunday ϴ͘ϯϬĂŵͲϴƉŵ dŚĞďŝŐǀĂůƵĞŝŶƚĂŬĞĂǁĂLJĨŽŽĚ͘ 'ƌĞĂƚǁĞĞŬůLJƐƉĞĐŝĂůƐ͘ 26 Victoria St, 6882 7899

ŽŶ͛ƚŵŝƐƐKůĚ ƵďďŽ'ĂŽů͛Ɛ ƐƉĞĐŝĂůƐĐƌĞĞŶŝŶŐ ŽĨtŝůůLJtŽŶŬĂ ƚŽŵŽƌƌŽǁ ;^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJ͕:ƵůLJϰͿ ZĞƐƚĂƵƌĂŶƚŽƉĞŶĨŽƌůƵŶĐŚĂŶĚĚŝŶŶĞƌ͘ ůůĚĞƐƐĞƌƚƐŚŽŵĞŵĂĚĞ͘ Open Saturday and Sunday ĂůĐŽŶLJďƌĞĂŬĨĂƐƚ͛ƐĨƌŽŵ ϴĂŵͲϭϭ͘ϯϬĂŵ ^ĞƌǀŝŶŐŝůů͛ƐĞĂŶƐŽīĞĞ 110 Talbragar St, 6882 4219

DUBBO RSL CLUB RESORT

VILLAGE BAKERY CAFE

Open Saturday and Sunday 6am to ϱ͘ϯϬƉŵ͘ Gourmet pies DŽƵƚŚͲǁĂƚĞƌŝŶŐĐĂŬĞƐ ĞůŝĐŝŽƵƐƉĂƐƚƌŝĞƐ 'ŽƵƌŵĞƚ&ƌĞŶĐŚŐĂƌĚĞŶƐĂůĂĚ ďĂŐƵĞƩĞƐĂŶĚƐĂůĂĚƐ͘ WĞƌĨĞĐƚďƌĞĂŬĨĂƐƚĂŶĚďƌƵŶĐŚ 113 Darling Street (adjacent to the railway crossing), 6884 5454

STICKS AND STONES

Open Saturday and Sunday ƌĞĂŬĨĂƐƚϳ͘ϯϬʹϯƉŵ >ƵŶĐŚϭϮDʹϯƉŵ ŝŶŶĞƌϲƉŵʹYƵŝĞƚ ŝŶĞŝŶŽƌdĂŬĞĂǁĂLJ͘ tŽŽĚĮƌĞĚWŝnjnjĂƐ Homemade pastas ʹůĂʹĐĂƌƚĞĚŝŶŝŶŐ ŽīĞĞĂŶĚĚĞƐƐĞƌƚƐ ůůĚŝƐŚĞƐĂƌĞŵĂĚĞǁŝƚŚƚŚĞďĞƐƚ ĂŶĚĨƌĞƐŚĞƐƚƉƌŽĚƵĐĞƚŽĞŶƐƵƌĞƚŚĞ ĮŶĞƐƚŇĂǀŽƵƌƐĨŽƌĞǀĞƌLJŵĞĂů͘'ůƵƚĞŶ ĨƌĞĞĂŶĚǀĞŐĞƚĂƌŝĂŶŽƉƟŽŶƐĂƌĞĂůƐŽ ĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞ͘ 215A Macquarie St, 6885 4852

THE GRAPEVINE ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJĂŶĚ^ƵŶĚĂLJϴ͘ϯϬĂŵͲϰƉŵ 'ŽŽĚĨŽŽĚ͕ŐŽŽĚĐŽīĞĞĂŶĚŐŽŽĚ company 144 Brisbane St, 6884 7354

HOG’S BREATH BREKKY

Open Saturday and Sunday ϴĂŵʹϭϭĂŵ ,ŽŵĞŵĂĚĞWĂŶĐĂŬĞƐ ŽƐƐ,ŽŐ͛ƐŝŐƌĞĂŬĨĂƐƚ EŽǁƐĞƌǀŝŶŐZŽďƵƐƚĂĂŶĚƌĂďŝĐĂ ĐŽīĞĞďĞĂŶƐĨƌŽŵEĞǁ'ƵŝŶĞĂĂŶĚ ŽƐƚĂZŝĐĂ͘ 193 Macquarie Street, 6882 4477

CLUBS & PUBS PASTORAL HOTEL KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϭϬĂŵƚŽϰĂŵ͕^ƵŶĚĂLJ ϭϬĂŵƚŽϵƉŵ͘

Open Saturday 8am to 1am Sunday ϴĂŵƚŽϭϬƉŵ͘ YƵĂůŝƚLJĞŶƚĞƌƚĂŝŶŵĞŶƚ͕ďůĂĐŬďŽĂƌĚ ƐƉĞĐŝĂůƐŝŶƚŚĞďŝƐƚƌŽ͘ Cnr Brisbane and Wingewarra Streets, 6882 4411

CLUB DUBBO KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJĂŶĚ^ƵŶĚĂLJĨƌŽŵϵĂŵ͘ ZŝǀĞƌǀŝĞǁŝƐƚƌŽϭϮƉŵƚŽϮƉŵĂŶĚ ϲƉŵƚŽϵƉŵ͘ ZĞůĂdžĞĚĂŶĚĨƌŝĞŶĚůLJĂƚŵŽƐƉŚĞƌĞ͘ Whylandra St, 6884 3000

THE CASTLEREAGH HOTEL KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϭϬĂŵƚŽϮĂŵ͕^ƵŶĚĂLJ ϭϬĂŵƚŽϭϮĂŵ͘ZĞƐƚĂƵƌĂŶƚŽƉĞŶĨŽƌ ůƵŶĐŚĂŶĚĚŝŶŶĞƌϳĚĂLJƐĂǁĞĞŬ͘ ŽŵĞĚŽǁŶĂŶĚĞŶũŽLJĂĚƌŝŶŬǁŝƚŚ ĨƌŝĞŶĚƐŝŶŽƵƌďĞĞƌŐĂƌĚĞŶ͕ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ŽĨƉŽŽůŝŶƚŚĞĨƌŽŶƚďĂƌŽƌŽŶĞŽĨŽƵƌ ĚĞůŝĐŝŽƵƐĐŽƵŶƚƌLJƐƚLJůĞŵĞĂůƐŝŶƚŚĞ ƌĞƐƚĂƵƌĂŶƚ͘ Cnr Brisbane and Talbragar Streets, 68824877

SPORTIES KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJĂŶĚ^ƵŶĚĂLJĨƌŽŵϵĂŵ ZĞƐƚĂƵƌĂŶƚŽƉĞŶĨƌŽŵϭϭ͘ϰϱĂŵͲϮƉŵ ĂŶĚϱ͘ϰϱͲϵƉŵ͘ 101 - 103 Erskine Street, 6884 2044

GYMS RSL AQUATIC & HEALTH CLUB KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϳ͘ϯϬĂŵͲϱƉŵ KƉĞŶ^ƵŶĚĂLJϴ͘ϯϬĂŵͲϯƉŵ 'LJŵ͕/ŶĚŽŽƌƉŽŽů͕^ĂƵŶĂ Steam room ^ƋƵĂƐŚĐŽƵƌƚƐ Cnr Brisbane and Wingewarra Streets, 6884 1777

SHOPPING DUBBO ANTIQUE & COLLECTABLES

ϯƉŵ ŶƟƋƵĞĨƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞ͕ĐŚŝŶĂ͕ĐĂƐƚŝƌŽŶ͕ ŽůĚƚŽŽůƐĂŶĚĐŽůůĞĐƚĂďůĞƐ͘ 4 Depot Road, 6885 4400

THE BOOK CONNECTION KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϴ͘ϯϬĂŵƚŽϰƉŵ͘ ^ƵŶĚĂLJϭϬĂŵƚŽϮƉŵ͘ EĞǁĂŶĚƵƐĞĚŬƐ KǀĞƌϲϬ͕ϬϬϬŬƐŝŶƐƚŽƌĞ͘ 178 Macquarie St, 6882 3311

QUINN’S MYALL ST NEWSAGENCY ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJĂŶĚ^ƵŶĚĂLJĨƌŽŵϱĂŵͲϭƉŵ͘ EĞǁƐƉĂƉĞƌƐ͕ŵĂŐĂnjŝŶĞƐ͕ƐƚĂƟŽŶĞƌLJ ƐƵƉƉůŝĞƐ͘ 272 Myall St, 6882 0688

THE SWISH GALLERY KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϵĂŵƚŽϭϮƉŵ͘ ŝƐƟŶĐƟǀĞũĞǁĞůůĞƌLJ͕ĐƌĞĂƟǀĞ ĐŽŶƚĞŵƉŽƌĂƌLJĚĞĐŽƌĨŽƌLJŽƵƌŚŽŵĞ ĂŶĚƐƚLJůŝƐŚŐŝŌƐ͘ 29 Talbragar St, 6882 9528

BRENNAN’S MITRE 10 &ŽƌĂůůLJŽƵƌ/zƉƌŽũĞĐƚƐ͕ŚĂƌĚǁĂƌĞ͕ ƚŽŽůƐĂŶĚŐĂƌĚĞŶƉƌŽĚƵĐƚƐ ^ĞĞƵƐŝŶƐƚŽƌĞĨŽƌŐƌĞĂƚƐƉĞĐŝĂůƐ ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϴĂŵͲϰƉŵ ^ƵŶĚĂLJϵĂŵͲϰƉŵ 64-70 Macquarie Street, 6882 6133

ORANA MALL SHOPPING CENTRE ϱϮ^ƉĞĐŝĂůƚLJ^ƚŽƌĞƐ͕ŝŐt͕tŽŽůǁŽƌƚŚƐ ĂŶĚĞƌŶĂƌĚŝ͛Ɛ^hW/'͘ ĂƐLJWĂƌŬŝŶŐ͕ŶŽǁĂůƐŽǁŝƚŚĂƉƉƌŽdž͘ ϭϲϬƵŶĚĞƌĐŽǀĞƌ͘ Food Court ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϵ͘ϬϬĂŵʹϱ͘ϬϬƉŵ ^ƵŶĚĂLJϭϬ͘ϬϬĂŵʹϰ͘ϬϬƉŵ ǁǁǁ͘ŽƌĂŶĂŵĂůů͘ĐŽŵ͘ĂƵ Cnr Mitchell Highway & Wheelers Lane, 6882 7766

THE PARTY STOP KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϵĂŵͲϰƉŵ Party Costumes ĞĐŽƌĂƟŽŶƐ ĂůůŽŽŶƐ 'ŝŌƐĨŽƌŵŝůĞƐƚŽŶĞĞǀĞŶƚƐ dŚĞŵĞĚƉĂƌƟĞƐ 142 Darling Street, 6885 6188

KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϵĂŵƟůϮƉŵ ǀĞƌLJƚŚŝŶŐLJŽƵŶĞĞĚĨŽƌƚŚĞƉĞƌĨĞĐƚĮƚ for your foot 176 Macquarie Street, 6881 8400

GROCERIES DMC MEAT AND SEAFOOD KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJϲĂŵƚŽϯƉŵ ,ƵŐĞǀĂƌŝĞƚLJ͕ďƵůŬďƵLJƐĂŶĚƌĞĚŚŽƚ ƐƉĞĐŝĂůƐǁĞĞŬůLJ͘ 55 Wheelers Lane, 6882 1504

IGA WEST DUBBO KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJĂŶĚ^ƵŶĚĂLJϳ͘ϯϬĂŵƚŽ ϲƉŵ͘ 'ƌĞĂƚǁĞĞŬůLJƐƉĞĐŝĂůƐĂŶĚĨƌŝĞŶĚůLJ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞ͘ 38-40 Victoria Street, 6882 3466

THINGS TO DO WESTERN PLAINS CULTURAL CENTRE KŶĞŽĨƚŚĞůĂƌŐĞƐƚŐĂůůĞƌŝĞƐĂŶĚ ŵƵƐĞƵŵƐŝŶE^t ŶĞǀĞƌͲĐŚĂŶŐŝŶŐĂƌƌĂLJŽĨ ĞdžŚŝďŝƟŽŶƐĂŶĚĞǀĞŶƚƐŝŶĐůƵĚŝŶŐƚŽƉ ŶĂƟŽŶĂůĞdžŚŝďŝƟŽŶƐ͘ 76 Wingewarra Street, 6801 4444

OLD DUBBO GAOL KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJĂŶĚ^ƵŶĚĂLJϵͲϱƉŵ >ĂƌŐĞĚŝƐƉůĂLJŽĨĂŶŝŵĂƚƌŽŶŝĐƐĂŶĚ ŚŽůŽŐƌĂƉŚƐƉƌŽǀŝĚŝŶŐĂƌĞĂůŝƐƟĐ ŝŶƐŝŐŚƚŝŶƚŽĂďLJŐŽŶĞĞƌĂŽĨƉƌŝƐŽŶ ůŝĨĞ͘ 90 Macquarie Street, near the old clock tower, 6801 4460

TARONGA WESTERN PLAINS ZOO KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJĂŶĚ^ƵŶĚĂLJϵͲϰƉŵ͘ dŚĞnjŽŽ͛ƐĞŶĐŽƵŶƚĞƌƐĂŶĚƐŚŽǁƐŽīĞƌ ǀŝƐŝƚŽƌƐƚƌƵůLJƐƉĞĐŝĂůĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞƐǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞŝƌĨĂǀŽƵƌŝƚĞĂŶŝŵĂůƐ͘ Obley Road, off the Newell Hwy, 6881 1400

TRIKE ADVENTURES ŽŽŬĂƌŝĚĞ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJŽƌ^ƵŶĚĂLJ ǀĂŝůĂďůĞĨŽƌƚŽǁŶƚŽƵƌƐ͕ƐƉĞĐŝĂů ŽĐĐĂƐƐŝŽŶƐ͕ŽƵƚďĂĐŬƉƵďůƵŶĐŚĞƐŽƌ ũƵƐƚďůĂƐƟŶŐĂůŽŶŐǁŝƚŚƚŚĞǁŝŶĚŝŶ your face 1300 TRIKES (1300 87 45 37)

READINGS CINEMA ŽŵĨŽƌƚ͕ƐƚLJůĞĂŶĚǀĂůƵĞ ΨϭϬƟĐŬĞƚƐ ϯĞdžƚƌĂ͘ĂŶĚLJďĂƌ͖ϱƐĐƌĞĞŶĐŝŶĞŵĂ ĐŽŵƉůĞdž͖ŝŐŝƚĂůƐŽƵŶĚ ŽůďLJŝŐŝƚĂůϯƉƌŽũĞĐƟŽŶ >ƵdžƵƌLJĂƌŵĐŚĂŝƌĐŽŵĨŽƌƚ 49 Macquarie St,6881 8600

KƉĞŶ^ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJĂŶĚ^ƵŶĚĂLJ͕ϭϬĂŵƚŽ

CALL FOR A GREAT RATE ON A LIST FOR YOUR BUSINESS HERE! 6885 4433.


60

3-DAY LOCAL TV GUIDE.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Friday, July 3 Miniseries: Arthur & George ABC, 8.30pm Martin Clunes plays Sherlock Holmes’ author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in this three-part miniseries based on the best-selling book by Julian Barnes. Clunes is on point, proving what a versatile actor he is. The costumes and sets are impressive and the support cast is great, but the pace is slow, making it hard to find a reason to care about Doyle’s efforts to solve a puzzling case. In tonight’s premiere we meet Doyle, who is grieving the loss of his wife, as he agrees to help George Edalji (Arsher Ali), a man who has spent three years behind bars for a crime he claims he did not commit.

ABC

The Graham Norton Show

So You Think You Can Dance

TEN, 8.30pm

ELEVEN, 7.30pm 30pm

One has to wonder if Graham Norton’s 50th birthday was as starstudded as his chat show. The host is obviously well liked by celebrity fraternity, because there doesn’t seem to be a star who won’t appear on his red couch. Tonight, Arnold Schwarzenegger is back in the acting game with his new (or should we say old?) film Terminator Genisys and is excited to talk about it. Emilia Clarke, who most of the world knows as Daenerys Targaryen in Game of Thrones, is in for a chat after the shocking season five finale. Then there’s Jake Gyllenhaal, who has a new release with Southpaw and model of the moment Cara Delevingne.

Singers seem em to have their fingers in many pies these days.. Perhaps it’s because music sales aren’t whatt they used to be? Both here and around the e world, they are popping up like pimples on n prom night as judges on the many talent shows ws sprouting like weeds. Eighties songstress Paula Abdul (right) and R&B crooner Jason son Derulo are the judges on this American version of So You Think You Can awing on their background Dance?, drawing as dancers as inspiration. Backing them up is the other judge, former choreographer pher Nigel Lythgoe. Tonight, we’re in for the Los Angeles es auditions, with those who impress set for a callback allback to Las Vegas. as.

PRIME7

WIN

TEN

SBS

6.00 ABC News Breakfast. (CC) 9.00 ABC News Mornings. (CC) 10.00 One Plus One. (CC) 10.30 Making Couples Happy :) (PG, R, CC) 11.30 Hospital Chaplains. (PG, R, CC) 12.00 News. (CC) 1.00 Antiques Roadshow. (R, CC) 2.00 Tractor Monkeys. (R, CC) 2.30 The New Inventors. (R, CC) 3.00 Catalyst. (PG, R, CC) 3.40 Doctor Who. (PG, R, CC) 4.30 Eggheads. (R, CC) 5.00 News: Early Edition. (CC) 5.30 The Drum. (CC) A discussion of the day’s events.

6.00 Sunrise. (CC) 9.00 The Morning Show. (PG, CC) 11.30 News. (CC) 12.00 MOVIE: Hannah Montana: The Movie. (R, CC) (2009) A girl struggles with the burden of fame. Miley Cyrus, Emily Osment. 2.00 The Daily Edition. (CC) The hottest issues from the day’s news. 3.00 The Chase. (R, CC) Hosted by Bradley Walsh. 4.00 News. (CC) 5.00 Deal Or No Deal. (R, CC) Hosted by Andrew O’Keefe. 5.30 Million Dollar Minute. (CC) Hosted by Simon Reeve.

6.00 Today. (CC) Presented by Karl Stefanovic. 9.00 Mornings. (PG, CC) 11.30 News. (CC) 12.00 WIN’s All Australian News. (R, CC) 1.00 The Ellen DeGeneres Show. (PG, R, CC) Variety show. 2.00 Extra. (CC) Entertainment news program from The Grove in Los Angeles. Hosted by Mario Lopez and Maria Menounos. 2.30 Alive And Cooking. (R, CC) Easy-to-cook recipes. 3.00 News Now. (CC) 4.00 News. (CC) 5.30 Millionaire Hot Seat. (CC) Hosted by Eddie McGuire.

6.00 Antiques Roadshow. (R, CC) Fiona Bruce and the team pay a visit to Hampton Court Castle, near Leominster. 7.00 News. (CC) 7.30 7.30. (CC) Current affairs program. 8.00 QI. (R, CC) Guests Rich Hall, Phill Jupitus and Andy Hamilton join host Stephen Fry for a letter “H”-inspired discussion. 8.30 Miniseries: Arthur & George. (M, CC) Part 1 of 3. British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle agrees to help a man unjustly accused of murder. 9.20 Janet King. (M, R, CC) Following a shocking death, Janet tells Andy about the pressure she has been under because of the investigation. 10.20 Lateline. (R, CC) News analysis program featuring up-to-the-minute coverage of current events. 10.50 The Business. (R, CC) The day’s business and finance news, including a look at the latest trends on the international share and currency markets. 11.10 Dirty Laundry. (M, R, CC) Comedy game show. 11.55 Rage. (MA15+) Continuous music programming.

6.00 PRIME7 News. (CC) 6.30 News. (CC) 7.00 Better Homes And Gardens. (CC) Joh and Pete visit a renovated Queensland home that has embraced tradition with a modern twist. Dr Harry visits a diva dog. Adam and Jason combine forces for an exciting backyard makeover. Ed tries a Mediterranean classic. 8.30 MOVIE: Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason. (M, R, CC) (2004) Bridget Jones fears her relationship with Mark Darcy is in jeopardy after meeting his glamorous colleague. The situation escalates to the point where she decides to go to Thailand where she encounters her ex. Renée Zellweger, Colin Firth, Hugh Grant. 10.40 Tennis. (CC) Wimbledon. Day 5. From the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, England. Hosted by Todd Woodbridge, with commentary from John Newcombe, Rennae Stubbs, Sam Smith and Geoff Masters.

6.00 News. (CC) 7.00 WIN News. (CC) 7.30 Rugby League. (CC) NRL. Round 17. Penrith Panthers v South Sydney Rabbitohs. From Pepper Stadium, NSW. 10.00 MOVIE: Never Back Down. (M, R, CC) (2008) After a rebellious teenager is lured into joining an underground fight club, he is mentored by a mixed-martial arts veteran. However, having second thoughts about his decision, he discovers his new patrons are not willing to allow him to quit. Sean Faris, Djimon Hounsou, Cam Gigandet.

6.00 Family Feud. (CC) Hosted by Grant Denyer. 6.30 The Project. (CC) Join the hosts for a look at the day’s news, events and hot topics. 7.30 The Living Room. (PG, CC) Amanda chats with two of the stars of Terminator Genisys (2015), Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jai Courtney. 8.30 The Graham Norton Show. (M, CC) Irish comedian Graham Norton chats with actors Arnold Schwarzenegger, Emilia Clarke and Jake Gyllenhaal, and fashion model Cara Delevingne. Music from rapper Tinie Tempah. 9.30 NCIS. (M, R, CC) After a media frenzy sparks Gibbs’ barber to suspect his son may be involved in a murder, he asks Gibbs to help clear his son of suspicion. Tony takes a probationary agent on his first undercover assignment. 10.30 Have You Been Paying Attention? (M, R, CC) Five comedians compete to see who can remember the most about events of the week. Hosted by Tom Gleisner. 11.30 The Project. (R, CC)

6.00 Heston’s In Search Of Perfection. (CC) Chef Heston Blumenthal makes his own version of the popular English dessert dish, trifle. 6.30 World News. (CC) 7.30 The Spear Of Destiny. (PG, CC) A look at the so-called Spear Of Destiny, which is said to be housed in a museum in Vienna, Austria. 8.30 Secrets Of The Castle: Why Build A Castle? (CC) Part 1 of 5. Takes a look at the reconstruction of Guédelon Castle in France. 9.30 I’m A Stripper. (MA15+, R, CC) Documents the lives of male strippers as they work in various cities in North America. They tackle some of the hard questions about the choice of their career, from what their friends and family think to how they feel performing for people they might not be attracted to. 10.25 World News. (CC) 11.00 MOVIE: 2 Plus 2. (MA15+) (2012) After the fun of double dating with their friends begins to grow old, a couple reveal they are really swingers. Adrián Suar, Carla Peterson.

5.00 Rage. (PG, CC) Continuous music programming.

4.00 Home Shopping.

12.15 WIN’s All Australian News. (CC) 1.15 A Current Affair. (R, CC) 1.45 MOVIE: Cactus. (M, R, CC) (2008) Bryan Brown. 3.30 Anger Management. (M, R, CC) 4.00 Extra. (R, CC) 4.30 Good Morning America. (CC)

12.30 The Good Wife. (M, R, CC) Alicia recalls the challenges she faced returning to the workplace, as she prepares for an important speech. 1.30 Infomercials. (PG, R) 2.30 Home Shopping.

12.55 The Bridge. (M, R) Saga comes face-to-face with the killer. 4.25 Food Lovers’ Guide To Australia. (R, CC) Maeve and Joanna go mud crabbing. 5.00 Korean News. News from Seoul. 5.35 Japanese News.

6.00 6.30 7.00 7.30 8.00 8.30 11.00 12.15 1.30 2.00 3.00 3.30 4.00 4.30 5.00

Ent. Tonight. (PG, R, CC) Huey’s Kitchen. (R, CC) Ben’s Menu. (R, CC) The Bold And The Beautiful. (R, CC) Family Feud. (R, CC) Studio 10. (PG, CC) MasterChef Australia. (PG, R, CC) Dr Phil. (PG, CC) Entertainment Tonight. (PG, CC) The Doctors. (PG, CC) Judge Judy. (PG, CC) Good Chef Bad Chef. (R, CC) Everyday Gourmet With Justine Schofield. (CC) The Bold And The Beautiful. (CC) Eyewitness News. (CC)

6.00 Japanese News. 6.10 Hong Kong News. 6.30 Chinese News. 7.00 Al Jazeera News. (CC) 7.30 Italian News. 8.10 Filipino News. 8.40 French News. 9.30 Greek News From Cyprus. 10.30 German News. 11.00 Spanish News. 12.00 Arabic News. 12.30 Turkish News. 1.00 NITV News Week In Review. 1.30 France 24 International News. (CC) 1.45 The Journal. (CC) 2.00 PBS NewsHour. (CC) 3.00 Al Jazeera News. (CC) 3.30 Inspector Rex. (R) 4.25 The Boy In The Bubble. (R) 4.35 Robson Green: How The North Was Built. (R, CC) 5.30 Letters And Numbers. (R, CC)

CLASSIFICATIONS: (P) For preschoolers (C) Children’s programs (G) General viewing (PG) Parental guidance (M) Mature audiences (MA15+) Mature audiences only (AV15+) Extreme violence. (R) Repeat (CC) Closed Captions. Please Note: Listings are correct at the time of print and are subject to late change by networks. 0307


3-DAY LOCAL TV GUIDE.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

61

Friday, July 3 PAYTV HIGHLIGHTS MOVIES

GENERAL

DOCUMENTARY

SPORT

8.30pm The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty (2013) Adventure. Ben Stiller, Kristen Wiig. A daydreamer embarks on an adventure. (PG) Comedy

7.35pm Arrow. The Count has a new scheme to turn Starling City’s residents into clients by addicting them to a new drug. (M) FOX8

6.30pm Beasts Of The Bayou. (PG) Animal Planet

5.40pm Cricket. Third Test. Sri Lanka v Pakistan. Day 1. From Pallekele International Cricket Stadium, Sri Lanka. Fox Sports 1

8.30pm I, Robot (2004) Sci-fi. Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. (M) Action

8.30pm Saving Hope. Alex is set to perform a gender reassignment surgery on a hopeful patient who has his mother cheering him on. (M) SoHo

10.20pm Deliver Us From Evil (2014) Horror. Eric Bana, Olivia Munn. A police officer joins forces with a priest to combat possessions that are terrorising the city. (MA15+) Premiere

ABC2/ABC KIDS 6.00 Children’s Programs. 1.55 Mouk. (R) 2.05 Elmo The Musical. (R, CC) 2.20 Q Pootle 5. (R, CC) 2.35 Little Princess. (R, CC) 2.50 Dinosaur Train. (R) 3.20 Timmy Time. (R, CC) 3.30 Play School. (R, CC) 4.00 Bananas In Pyjamas. (R, CC) 4.10 Hoopla. (R, CC) 4.25 Mister Maker. (R, CC) 4.45 Thomas. (R, CC) 5.00 dirtgirlworld. (R, CC) 5.10 Fireman Sam. (R, CC) 5.25 Peppa Pig. (R, CC) 5.30 Octonauts. (R, CC) 5.45 Peg + Cat. (R) 6.00 Ben And Holly. (R, CC) 6.10 Peter Rabbit. 6.25 Curious George. (CC) 6.50 Shaun The Sheep. (R) 7.00 Spicks And Specks. (PG, R, CC) 7.30 Doctor Who. (PG, R, CC) 8.15 That ’70s Show. (PG, R, CC) 8.40 Confessions Of A Nurse. (M, R, CC) 9.30 Forbidden Love. (M, CC) 10.15 Jimmy Fallon. (PG, CC) 10.55 Unsafe Sex In The City. (M, R, CC) 11.55 Cherry Healey: How To Get A Life. (M, R, CC) 12.55 Doctor Who. (PG, R, CC) 1.40 Jimmy Fallon. (PG, R, CC) 2.25 News Update. (R) 2.30 Close. 5.00 The Numtums. (R, CC) 5.05 Driver Dan’s Story Train. (R, CC) 5.15 Guess With Jess. (R, CC) 5.30 Angelina Ballerina. (R, CC) 5.40 Olivia. (R, CC) 5.55 Children’s Programs.

ABC3 6.00 Children’s Programs. 6.50 Vic The Viking. (R, CC) 7.05 Oh No! It’s An Alien Invasion. (R, CC) 7.30 Studio 3. 7.35 The Flamin’ Thongs. (R, CC) 7.45 Almost Naked Animals. (R, CC) 7.55 The Day My Butt Went Psycho. (R, CC) 8.20 Endangered Species. (R, CC) 8.30 Grojband. (R, CC) 9.15 Camp Lakebottom. (R, CC) 9.35 Slugterra. (R, CC) 10.20 Prank Patrol Road Trip. (R, CC) 11.10 You’re Skitting Me. (R, CC) 11.35 Big Babies. (R, CC) 11.50 Canimals. (R) 12.00 The Day My Butt Went Psycho. (R, CC) 3.40 Almost Naked Animals. (R, CC) 3.50 Riders Of Berk. (R, CC) 4.15 The Penguins Of Madagascar. 4.40 News On 3. (CC) 4.45 Studio 3. 4.50 So Awkward. 5.15 Operation Ouch! (R) 5.50 Dance Academy. (R, CC) 6.15 Officially Amazing. (R, CC) 6.50 News On 3. (CC) 7.00 The Adventures Of Merlin. (PG, R, CC) 7.45 Girl Vs Boy. (PG, CC) (New Series) 8.10 My Great Big Adventure. (R, CC) 8.30 Degrassi: The Next Generation. (PG, CC) 8.55 Kobushi. (R, CC) 9.00 K-On! (PG, CC) 9.25 Sword Art Online. (PG, R, CC) 9.50 Puella Magi Madoka Magica. (PG, R, CC) 10.15 Close.

7.30pm Architects Of Darkness. Explores the roots of Adolf Hitler and traces the story of his life. (PG) History 7.30pm Railroad Alaska. An earthquake threatens to bring the railroad to a standstill. (PG) Discovery

9.05pm Judy, Frank & Dean: Once In A Lifetime. (G) Arts

7TWO 6.00 Shopping. 6.30 Shopping. 7.00 The Woodlies. (C, R, CC) 7.30 In Your Dreams. (C, CC) 8.00 Jay’s Jungle. (P, R, CC) 8.30 Harry’s Practice. (R, CC) 9.00 Home And Away. (PG, R) 9.30 Shortland Street. (PG) 10.00 The Martha Stewart Show. 11.00 Homes Under The Hammer. (R) 12.00 Dr Oz. (PG, R, CC) 1.00 Coastwatch. (PG, R, CC) 1.30 Mr Selfridge. (PG, R, CC) 3.30 The Martha Stewart Show. 4.30 60 Minute Makeover. (PG) 5.30 Homes Under The Hammer. 6.30 Bargain Hunt. 7.30 Dog Patrol. (PG, R, CC) Drugs are detected in a prison visitor’s car. 8.00 Animal Airport. (PG, R, CC) Follows Heathrow’s Animal Reception team. 8.30 Tennis. (CC) Wimbledon. Day 5. From the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, England. 10.40 Escape To The Country. (R) 11.40 Best Houses Australia. (R) 12.10 Homes Under The Hammer. (R) 1.30 Taggart. (M, R, CC) 3.00 The Martha Stewart Show. (R) 5.00 Home Shopping.

7MATE 6.00 Shopping. 7.00 Art Attack. (R, CC) 7.30 Jake And The Never Land Pirates. (R, CC) 8.00 Doc McStuffins. (R) 8.30 Henry Hugglemonster. (R) 9.00 NBC Today. (R, CC) 11.00 Starsky & Hutch. (PG, R) 12.00 Cash Cowboys. (PG, R) 2.00 Fifth Gear. (PG) 3.00 Pair Of Kings. (R, CC) 3.30 Kickin’ It. (R, CC) 4.00 Zeke And Luther. (R, CC) 4.30 Lab Rats. (R, CC) 5.00 Ultimate Spider-Man. (R) 5.30 Guinness World Records Gone Wild. (PG, R) 6.30 Turtleman. (PG, R) Ernie deals with a badger. 7.00 AFL Pre-Game Show. (CC) Pre-game coverage of the big match. 7.30 Football. (CC) AFL. Round 14. Collingwood v Hawthorn. From the MCG. 11.00 MOVIE: Scorpion King 3: Battle For Redemption. (M, CC) (2011) A warrior fights an evil tyrant. Billy Zane, Dave Bautista. 1.15 Scare Tactics. (M, R) A hidden-camera show. 2.30 Cash Cowboys. (PG, R) The guys head to Quebec. 4.30 Motor Mate. (R)

GO! 6.00 Robocar Poli. 6.30 PAW Patrol. 7.00 Yu-Gi-Oh! 7.30 Kitchen Whiz. 8.00 Pyramid. (C, R, CC) 8.30 Rabbids. (PG, R) 9.00 Magical Tales. (P, CC) 9.30 SpongeBob. (R) 10.00 Green Lantern. (PG, R) 10.30 Young Justice. (PG, R) 11.00 Power Rangers. (PG, R) 11.30 Yu-Gi-Oh! Classic. (R) 12.00 Extra. (CC) 12.30 Suburgatory. (PG, R, CC) 1.00 Thunderbirds. (R) 2.00 Thunderbirds Are Go! (PG, R) 2.30 Tom And Jerry. (R) 3.00 SpongeBob. (R) 3.30 Rabbids. (PG, R) 4.00 Kids’ WB. (PG) 4.05 Looney Tunes. (R) 4.30 Young Justice. (PG, R) 5.00 Ben 10. (PG, R) 5.30 Teen Titans Go! (PG, R) 6.00 Regular Show. (PG, R) 6.30 MOVIE: The Spiderwick Chronicles. (PG) (2008) 8.30 MOVIE: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King. (M, R, CC) (2003) Elijah Wood, Sean Astin. 12.30 Supernatural: The Animated Series. (AV15+, R) 1.00 Supernatural: The Animated Series. (M, R) 1.30 Rabbids. (PG, R) 2.00 TMZ Live. 3.00 TMZ. 3.30 Yu-Gi-Oh! (PG, R) 4.00 PAW Patrol. (R, CC) 4.30 Robocar Poli. (R) 4.50 Thunderbirds. (R) 5.30 Yu-Gi-Oh! Classic. (R)

GEM 6.00 Friends. (PG, R, CC) 6.30 Skippy. (R) 7.00 Sun, Sea And Bargain Spotting. (R) 8.00 Gilmore Girls. (PG, R, CC) 9.00 Shopping. 10.30 Alive And Cooking. (R, CC) 11.00 Friends. (PG, R, CC) 12.00 Secret Dealers. (PG, R) 1.00 MOVIE: High Country. (PG, R, CC) (1984) 3.00 Alive And Cooking. (CC) 3.30 Fatal Flight 447: Chaos In The Cockpit. (PG, R) 4.30 Ellen. (PG, R, CC) 5.30 Gilmore Girls. (PG, R, CC) 6.30 Friends. (PG, R, CC) 7.30 A Current Affair. (CC) 8.00 Antiques Roadshow. (R, CC) The team head to Castle Coole. 8.30 MOVIE: Assassins. (M, R, CC) (1995) A young assassin tries to murder a rival who is the best in the business. Sylvester Stallone, Antonio Banderas, Julianne Moore. 11.10 MOVIE: A Bridge Too Far. (M, R, CC) (1977) Robert Redford. 2.40 MOVIE: Dr Jekyll And Sister Hyde. (M, R, CC) (1972) Ralph Bates, Martine Beswick. 4.30 Gideon’s Way. (PG, R) 5.30 Friends. (PG, R, CC)

8.00pm Football. AFL. Round 14. Collingwood v Hawthorn. From the MCG. Fox Footy 8.30pm Tennis. Wimbledon. Day 5. From the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, England. Fox Sports 4

ONE 6.00 Infomercials. (PG, R) 8.00 M*A*S*H. (PG, R) 9.00 Generation Astronaut. (R) 10.00 The First Bounce. (R, CC) 11.00 Undercover Boss. (PG, R) 12.00 Dads. (PG, R) 1.00 David Letterman. (PG, R) 2.00 The Living Room. (PG, R, CC) 3.00 Totally Wild. (R, CC) 4.00 Scrappers. (PG, R) 4.30 The Home Team. (R, CC) 5.00 Extreme Boats’ Big Angry Fish. (PG, R) 5.30 iFish. (R) 6.00 Family Feud. (CC) 6.30 M*A*S*H. (PG, R) 7.30 Black Gold. (PG, R) Brandon struggles to keep a crew on Rig 28. 8.30 Cops: Adults Only: Domestic Disturbance. (M, R) Officers patrol the streets of the US. 9.30 MOVIE: True Justice: Blood Alley. (M, R) (2012) A martial arts expert takes on a gangster. Steven Seagal, Tanaya Beatty. 11.30 Bellator MMA. (M) 2.00 Darren & Brose. (M, R) 2.30 Cops: Adults Only. (M, R) 3.00 Emergency Search & Rescue. (PG, R) 4.00 Undercover Boss. (PG, R) 5.00 Scrappers. (PG, R) 5.30 International Fishing Series. (R)

ELEVEN 6.00 Toasted TV. 8.00 Vic The Viking. (C, R, CC) 8.30 Toasted TV. 9.30 Wurrawhy. (P, R, CC) 10.00 Touched By An Angel. (PG, R) 11.00 Raymond. (PG, R, CC) 11.30 Taxi. (PG, R) 12.00 Charmed. (PG, R, CC) 1.00 JAG. (PG, R) 2.00 Sabrina. (PG, R, CC) 3.00 Infomercials. (PG, R) 3.30 Cheers. (PG, R) 4.00 King Of Queens. (PG, R) 4.30 Laverne & Shirley. (PG, R) 5.00 Mork & Mindy. (PG, R) 5.30 Becker. (PG, R, CC) 6.00 Family Feud. (CC) 6.30 Neighbours. (CC) 7.00 Everybody Loves Raymond. (PG, R, CC) 7.30 So You Think You Can Dance. (PG) 9.30 New Girl. (PG, R, CC) Jess and CeCe throw a Halloween party. 10.00 Snog, Marry, Avoid? (M, R) 10.40 Sex And The City. (M, R) 11.20 Movie Juice. (PG, R) 11.50 The Late Late Show With James Corden. (PG) 12.50 The King Of Queens. (PG, R) 1.25 Clueless. (M, R) 2.00 Touched By An Angel. (PG, R) 3.00 Charmed. (PG, R, CC) 4.00 JAG. (PG, R) 5.00 Shopping.

Michael Shanks and Erica Durance star in Saving Hope

SBS 2 6.00 Urdu News. 6.20 Indonesian News. 7.00 Russian News. 7.30 Polish News. 8.00 DW Global 3000. 8.30 Macedonian News. 9.05 Croatian News. 9.40 Serbian News. 10.20 Portuguese News. 11.05 Japanese News. 11.40 Hong Kong News. 12.00 Hindi News. 12.30 Dutch News. 1.00 Italian News. 1.35 German News. 2.05 Spanish News. 3.05 Greek News. 4.00 Iron Chef. (R, CC) 4.45 Vs Arashi. (R) 5.35 Massive Moves. (R, CC) 6.00 Parks And Recreation. (PG, R) 6.30 If You Are The One. (R) 7.30 Friday Feed. 8.00 The Tim Ferriss Experiment. (PG) Presented by Tim Ferriss. 8.30 Ctrl Freaks. (M) Adam Gibbs interviews Scott Mills. 9.25 Lost Girl. (MA15+) A babysitter pleads for Bo’s help. 11.05 Attack On Titan. (MA15+, R) 12.05 Friday Feed. (R) 12.35 PopAsia. (PG) 2.35 NHK World News In English From Tokyo. 5.00 French News. 5.50 Urdu News.

NITV 6.00 Welcome To Wapos Bay. 6.30 Bizou. 7.00 Move It Mob Style. 7.30 Mysterious Cities Of Gold. 8.00 Mugu Kids. 8.30 Tales Of Tatonka. 9.00 Go Lingo. 9.30 My Animal Friends. 10.00 Around The Campfire. 10.30 By The Rapids. 11.00 Vote Yes For Aborigines. 12.00 30th Anniversary Commonwealth Games. 12.30 Sitting Bull: A Stone In My Heart. 1.30 Goin’ Troppo In The Toppo. (PG) 2.00 Our Spirit To C-Gen. 2.30 Mugu Kids. 3.00 My Animal Friends. 3.30 Tales Of Tatonka. 4.00 Go Lingo. 4.30 Move It Mob Style. 5.00 Mysterious Cities Of Gold. 5.30 NITV News. 6.00 Outback Cafe. 6.30 By The Rapids. (PG) 7.00 NITV News. 7.30 The Dream And The Dreaming. (PG) 8.30 Indians And Aliens. 9.00 Go Girls. (M) 10.00 By The Rapids. (PG) 11.00 NITV News. 11.30 Outback Cafe. 12.00 Fusion With Casey Donovan. 1.00 Rugby League. Koori Knockout. 2.00 Rugby League. Queensland Murri Carnival. 3.00 Rugby Sevens. 4.00 Football. 2011 Lightning Cup. CAFL v Plenty Hwy. 5.00 Characters Of Broome. 5.30 Kriol Kitchen.

6.00 ABC News Breakfast. (CC) 9.00 ABC News Mornings. (CC) 12.00 News. (CC) 1.00 Capital Hill. (CC) 1.30 News. (CC) 6.30 The Drum. (R, CC) 7.00 News. (CC) 9.30 Lateline. (CC) 10.00 The World. (CC) 11.00 News. 11.30 7.30. (R, CC) 12.00 News. 12.30 The Drum. (R, CC) 1.00 Al Jazeera Newshour. 2.00 BBC World News. 2.30 7.30. (R, CC) 3.00 BBC World News. 3.30 BBC Focus On Africa. 4.00 Al Jazeera Newshour. 5.00 BBC World News. 5.30 Lateline. (R, CC)

ABC NEWS

0307


62

3-DAY LOCAL TV GUIDE.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Saturday, July 4 Getaway

Where The Wild Men Are With Ben Fogle

WIN, 5.30pm Sometimes it’s a hard task choosing where to go on holiday – and it can be a big risk if it’s somewhere new. Why not let a team of experts try to test places for you, while you fulfill your wanderlust by tuning into this travel and lifestyle show that explores sensational holiday ideas. This week, Natalie Gruzlewski unwinds at a lifestyle retreat in the Gold Coast hinterland while David Reyne jumps into Victoria’s famous spa country. Meanwhile, Jesinta Campbell learns the art of Thai cooking and the lucky Catriona Rowntree sits back and relaxes as she continues her cruise in France. Expect to be inspired.

ABC

SBS 2, 8.30pm Adventurer Ben Fogle gets a taste of extreme escapism in this exciting new series where he spends time in some of the world’s most remote locations. Tonight, we meet former businessman Dave Glasheen who lost $10 million in the stock market crash of 1987 and with his last savings he bought the lease on part of Restoration Island where he’s learned to live as a voluntary castaway. Would you leave the comforts of ordinary home life behind to have the experience of inhabiting in an inhospitable corner of the planet? It’s certainly food for thought for Fogle.

PRIME7

MOVIE: Night At The Museum useum TEN, 7pm, PG (2006) If you’ve ever wanted to see a prehistoric historic man mo sapien’s face, spray a fire-extinguisher in a homo here’s your chance. Bumbling security urity guard Larry (Ben Stiller, right) accidentally ally lets loose an ancient curse that causess all the wax figures, animals and insects cts m on display at New York’s Museum of Natural History to come to life and wreak havoc – think the ed animal mayhem of Jumanji blended with the historical fantasy of Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure. Cameos abound, including Stiller’s pal Owen Wilson as a cowboy, English comic Ricky Gervais as the museum boss and the late Robin Williams as Teddy Roosevelt.

WIN

TEN

SBS

6.00 Rage. (PG, CC) 11.30 Spicks And Specks. (R, CC) Hosted by Josh Earl. 12.00 Two Men In China: Chengdu. (PG, R, CC) 1.00 Antiques Roadshow. (R, CC) 2.00 The Restaurant Inspector. (PG, R, CC) Fernando heads to Somerset. 2.55 Rick Stein’s India. (PG, R, CC) Rick searches for the “perfect” curry. 4.00 QI. (R, CC) Hosted by Stephen Fry. 4.30 Landline. (R, CC) Presented by Pip Courtney. 5.00 Midsomer Murders. (PG, R, CC)

6.00 Home Shopping. 7.00 Weekend Sunrise. (CC) 10.00 The Morning Show: Weekend. (PG, CC) 12.00 To Be Advised. 12.20 MOVIE: Step Up. (PG, R, CC) (2006) A juvenile delinquent falls for a dancer. Channing Tatum, Jenna Dewan. 2.30 MOVIE: Guarding Tess. (PG, R, CC) (1994) A former first lady torments a Secret Service agent. Nicolas Cage, Shirley MacLaine. 4.30 Better Homes And Gardens. (R, CC) Joh meets the Dowson family. 5.30 The Lucky Country. (PG, CC) Hosted by Andrew Daddo.

6.00 PAW Patrol. (R, CC) 6.30 Dora The Explorer. (R, CC) 7.00 Weekend Today: Saturday. (CC) 10.00 Mornings: Saturday. (PG, CC) 12.00 Cybershack. (PG, CC) 12.30 Food CIA. (PG, CC) 1.00 Nine Presents. (R, CC) Music special. 1.15 Hot In Cleveland. (PG, R, CC) The ladies find themselves in hot water. 1.45 MOVIE: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. (PG, R, CC) (1988) Steve Martin. 4.00 Australian Geographic Adventures. (CC) 4.30 Deep Water. (PG, CC) 5.00 News. (CC) 5.30 Getaway. (PG, CC)

6.00 RPM. (R, CC) 7.00 ET’s Fishing Classics. (R, CC) 7.30 Good Chef Bad Chef. (R, CC) 8.00 Family Feud. (R, CC) 8.30 Studio 10: Saturday. (CC) 10.00 Studio 10: Saturday Extra. (PG, CC) 11.00 The Living Room. (PG, R, CC) 12.00 The Talk. (PG, CC) 2.00 Dancers On Tour. (CC) 3.00 Everyday Gourmet With Justine Schofield. (R, CC) 3.30 iFish. (R, CC) 4.00 What’s Up Down Under. (CC) 4.30 Places We Go With Jennifer Adams. (CC) 5.00 Eyewitness News. (CC)

6.30 Gardening Australia. (CC) Sophie visits a country garden. In preparation for a subtropical winter, Jerry plants some crops. 7.00 News. (CC) 7.30 Father Brown. (PG, CC) The machinations of his old adversary, Flambeau, see Father Brown embroiled in an art heist. 8.20 Doc Martin. (R, CC) In an effort to get Martin and James to bond, Louisa asks him to take his baby son to playgroup. 9.05 The Bletchley Circle. (M, R, CC) Follows four women whose work at Bletchley Park during World War II helped break codes used by the Germans. 9.55 The Weekly With Charlie Pickering. (M, R, CC) A satirical news program exposing the humorous, absurd and downright hypocritical. 10.25 Adam Hills: The Last Leg. (M, R, CC) UK-based panel show featuring host Adam Hills taking an offbeat look at events of the week. 11.10 Rage. (MA15+) Features videos chosen by guest programmers, Melbourne band King Parrot.

6.00 News. (CC) 7.00 MOVIE: The Mummy. (PG, R, CC) (1999) An Egyptian priest mummified 2000 years ago, is revived after his burial place is disturbed by an American explorer. With the fate of the world hanging in the balance, he and his companions, a librarian and her ne’er-dowell brother, must find a way to stop his murderous rampage. Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz, Arnold Vosloo. 9.30 MOVIE: Tears Of The Sun. (AV15+, R, CC) (2003) With the country on the brink of civil war, a US special operations commander and his team head to Nigeria to rescue a doctor. However, she proves unwilling to cooperate with their efforts unless they agree to also help a group of 70 refugees under her care. Bruce Willis, Monica Bellucci, Cole Hauser.

6.00 News. (CC) 7.00 The Voice. (PG, R, CC) With some help from coaches Ricky Martin, Delta Goodrem, Joel Madden, Benji Madden and Jessie J, a group of contestants set out to prove they have what it takes to be a singing sensation and claim the grand prize of a recording contract. Hosted by Darren McMullen. 8.30 The Voice. (PG, R, CC) 10.00 The Voice. (PG, R, CC) 11.30 MOVIE: Interview With The Vampire. (AV15+, R, CC) (1994) A vampire recounts to a young reporter how he was seduced into eternal damnation 200 years ago, and how his immortal vigil devolved into bloodshed and violence, after his creator decided to turn a child.Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Antonio Banderas, Kirsten Dunst.

6.00 Bondi Vet. (PG, CC) Dr Chris Brown heads to South Australia to meet a threemonth-old baby cheetah. 7.00 MOVIE: Night At The Museum. (PG, R, CC) (2006) A down on his luck man takes a position as a security guard at New York’s Museum Of Natural History, only to discover the unwritten part of his job is dealing with the exhibits which come to life each night. Ben Stiller, Robin Williams. 9.15 MOVIE: Prometheus. (M, R, CC) (2012) Following a trail of clues, a team of scientists travels to a remote world in search of aliens they suspect may have been responsible for the creation of humanity. However, what their expedition uncovers challenges their assumptions and endangers all their lives. Noomi Rapace, Logan Marshall-Green. 11.45 48 Hours: The Pretender – The Case Of Christian Longo. (M, R, CC) Tells the story of Christian Longo, who was convicted of killing his wife and children after being arrested in Mexico.

6.30 World News. (CC) 7.30 Secrets Of The Manor House: Althorp. (R, CC) A look at Athorp House, the final resting place of Princess Diana and the home of her brother, Charles, the 9th Earl Spencer. The family has presided over this estate for more than 500 years, with a host of politicians, military heroes, dukes and duchesses among them. 8.30 RocKwiz Salutes The Decades. (M, CC) (Final) Julia Zemiro, Brian Nankervis and the RocKwiz Orkestra explore the music scene of the first 15 years of the new millennium. Julia Stone sings The Strokes, John Butler performs one of his songs, and Seth Sentry relives a performance from Jimmy Kimmel Live. 9.30 Cycling. (CC) Tour de France. Stage 1. Utrecht to Utrecht. 13.8km individual time trial. From Netherlands. Hosted by Michael Tomalaris and Robbie McEwen, with commentary from Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwin, and reports by David McKenzie and Matt Keenan.

5.00 Rage. (PG) Continuous music programming.

12.00 MOVIE: The Operator. (M, R, CC) (2000) A Dallas lawyer’s verbal assaults provoke a telephone operator to ruin his life. Michael Laurence, Jacqueline Kim, Lilas Edwards. 2.00 Home Shopping.

1.50 MOVIE: Golden Gate. (M, R, CC) (1994) A man is recruited as an FBI agent. Matt Dillon. 3.30 Spyforce. (PG, R) Erskine is sent to destroy fuel dumps. 4.30 Extra. (R, CC) 5.00 The Middle. (PG, R, CC) 5.30 Skippy The Bush Kangaroo. (R)

1.00 Infomercials. (PG, R) 2.00 Home Shopping. 4.30 It Is Written. (PG) Religious program. 5.00 Hour Of Power. Religious program.

2.00 The Bridge. (M, R) 4.15 Food Lovers’ Guide To Australia. (R, CC) 4.50 The Pub. (M, CC) 5.00 Korean News. 5.35 WeatherWatch And Music. 5.45 Soccer. FIFA Women’s World Cup. Third place play-off.

6.00 Japanese News. 6.10 Hong Kong News. 6.30 Chinese News. 7.00 Al Jazeera English News. (CC) 7.30 Italian News. 8.10 Filipino News. 8.40 French News. 9.30 Greek News From Cyprus. 10.30 German News. 11.00 Spanish News. 12.00 Arabic News. 12.30 Turkish News. 1.00 PBS NewsHour. (CC) 2.00 In Search Of Haydn. (R, CC) 3.50 Sol3 Mio Down Under. (PG, CC) 4.20 Sol3 Mio: Live In Concert. 5.30 Who Do You Think You Are? Sue Johnston. (R, CC)

CLASSIFICATIONS: (P) For preschoolers (C) Children’s programs (G) General viewing (PG) Parental guidance (M) Mature audiences (MA15+) Mature audiences only (AV15+) Extreme violence. (R) Repeat (CC) Closed Captions. Please Note: Listings are correct at the time of print and are subject to late change by networks. 0407


3-DAY LOCAL TV GUIDE.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

63

Saturday, July 4 PAYTV HIGHLIGHTS MOVIES

GENERAL

DOCUMENTARY

SPORT

6.45pm Philomena (2013) Biographical. Judi Dench, Steve Coogan. A journalist helps a woman search for her son, who was taken away from her after she became pregnant as a teen and forced to live in a convent. (M) Premiere

6.30pm Marriage Boot Camp: Reality Stars. Stars come face-to-face with death after they refuse to participate in a communication drill. (M) Arena

7.00pm The Secret Life Of Pets. (PG) Animal Planet

7.00pm Football. AFL. Round 14. Western Bulldogs v Carlton. From Etihad Stadium, Melbourne. Fox Footy

7.30pm Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010) Fantasy. Daniel Radcliffe. Family 8.30pm Blended (2014) Comedy. Adam Sandler, Drew Barrymore. (M) Premiere

ABC2/ABC KIDS 6.00 Children’s Programs. 1.25 Lah-Lah’s Adventures. (R) 1.40 Abney & Teal. (R, CC) 1.55 Mouk. (R) 2.05 Elmo The Musical. (R, CC) 2.20 Q Pootle 5. (R, CC) 2.35 Little Princess. (R, CC) 2.50 Dinosaur Train. (R) 3.20 Timmy Time. (R, CC) 3.30 Play School. (R, CC) 4.00 Bananas In Pyjamas. (R, CC) 4.10 Hoopla. (R, CC) 4.25 Mister Maker. (R, CC) 4.45 Thomas. (R, CC) 5.00 dirtgirlworld. (R, CC) 5.10 Fireman Sam. (R, CC) 5.25 Peppa Pig. (R, CC) 5.30 Octonauts. (R, CC) 5.45 Peg + Cat. (R) 6.00 Ben And Holly. (R, CC) 6.10 Peter Rabbit. 6.25 Curious George. (CC) 6.50 Shaun The Sheep. (R) 7.00 Spicks And Specks. (PG, R, CC) 7.30 Total Wipeout. (CC) 8.35 The Home Show. (CC) 9.20 Live At The Apollo. (M, CC) 10.05 Dirty Laundry Live. (M, R, CC) 10.55 The IT Crowd. (M, R, CC) 11.20 Archer. (M, R, CC) 12.05 This Is Jinsy. (R, CC) 12.30 This Is Jinsy. (PG, R, CC) 1.45 The Home Show. (R, CC) 2.30 News Update. (R) 2.35 Close. 5.00 The Numtums. (R, CC) 5.05 Driver Dan’s Story Train. (R, CC) 5.15 Guess With Jess. (R, CC) 5.30 Angelina Ballerina. (R, CC) 5.40 Olivia. (R, CC)

ABC3 6.00 Children’s Programs. 6.20 The Jungle Book. (R, CC) 6.40 Sally Bollywood. (R, CC) 6.55 Dennis & Gnasher. (R, CC) 7.20 Dr Dimensionpants. (R) (Final) 8.00 SheZow. (R, CC) 8.15 Almost Naked Animals. (R, CC) 8.25 The Penguins Of Madagascar. (R, CC) (Final) 8.55 Studio 3 Gold. (R) 9.00 Good Game: SP. (CC) 9.25 Total Drama All Stars. (R, CC) 9.50 Studio 3 Gold. (R) 9.55 Slugterra. (R, CC) 10.35 Endangered Species. (R, CC) 11.00 Camp Lakebottom. (R, CC) 11.25 Kobushi. (R, CC) 11.30 Lockie Leonard. (R, CC) (Final) 12.00 Dani’s House. (R, CC) 12.30 So Awkward. (R) (Final) 2.50 Trop Jr. (R, CC) 3.00 Deadly Pole To Pole. (R) 3.25 WAC. (R, CC) 3.55 Pixelface. (R, CC) 4.25 The Aquabats Super Show! (R, CC) 4.50 Slugterra. (R, CC) 5.15 Studio 3. (R) 5.20 SW: Clone Wars. (PG, R, CC) 5.40 Operation Ouch! (R, CC) 6.10 The Penguins Of Madagascar. (R) 6.35 Mortified. (R, CC) 7.00 Outnumbered. (PG, R, CC) 7.30 Operation Ouch! (R, CC) 8.00 Deadly Pole To Pole. (R) 8.30 Good Game: SP. (R, CC) 9.00 Degrassi: The Next Generation. (PG, R, CC) 10.45 Close.

6.30pm Hart Of Dixie. Zoe makes a monumental decision, and Wade tries to fulfil her wishes before their baby arrives. (PG) FOX8 7.30pm The Pretenders: No Turn Left Unstoned. (M) Arts

7TWO 6.00 Shopping. 6.30 Shopping. 7.00 Saturday Disney. (CC) 9.00 Jessie. (R, CC) 9.30 Shake It Up. (R, CC) 10.00 Shopping. 11.00 Melbourne Weekender. (CC) 11.30 Great South East. (CC) 12.00 Creek To Coast. (CC) 12.30 Sydney Weekender. (R, CC) 1.00 Qld Weekender. (CC) 1.30 WA Weekender. (PG, CC) 2.00 Tennis. (CC) Wimbledon. Highlights. 3.00 Rugby Union. Shute Shield. Round 15. Eastern Suburbs v Randwick. 5.00 Intolerant Cooks. (PG) 5.30 Homes Under The Hammer. (R) 6.30 Bargain Hunt. (R) The teams head to Topsham Antiques Centre. 7.30 Cities Of The Underworld: Rome – The Rise. (PG, R) Eric Gellar goes back to the Roman Empire. 8.30 Tennis. (CC) Wimbledon. Day 6. From the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, England. 12.00 Tennis. (CC) Wimbledon. Day 6. 4.00 Country Calendar. (PG, R) 4.30 RSPCA Animal Rescue. (R, CC) 5.00 Neighbours At War. (PG, R) 5.30 Animal Academy. (R)

7MATE 6.00 America’s Game: The Super Bowl Champions. 7.00 A Football Life. (PG) 8.00 Shopping. 9.00 Shannon’s Legends Of Motorsport. (PG, R) 10.00 Zoom TV. (PG) 10.30 Trash To Treasure. (PG, R) 11.30 Construction Zone. (PG, R) 12.30 Selling Big. (PG, R) 1.30 Football. (CC) AFL. Round 14. Richmond v GWS. 4.30 Footy Flashbacks. (CC) 6.00 Turtleman. (PG, R) Ernie helps out a university frat house. 6.30 AFL Pre-Game Show. (CC) Pre-game coverage of the big match. 7.00 Football. (CC) AFL. Round 14. Western Bulldogs v Carlton. 10.30 MOVIE: Wanted. (AV15+, R, CC) (2008) James McAvoy. 12.45 MOVIE: Smokin’ Aces 2: Assassins’ Ball. (AV15+, R, CC) (2010) 2.30 Construction Zone. (PG, R) 3.00 Construction Zone. (PG, R) 3.30 Trash To Treasure. (PG, R) 4.30 Shannon’s Legends Of Motorsport. (PG, R) 5.30 Home Shopping.

7.30pm Treehouse Masters. Pete builds an adventurethemed treehouse. (PG) Discovery 7.30pm Queen Victoria And The Crippled Kaiser. Examines the marriage of Queen Victoria’s eldest child, Vicky, to the German Crown Prince. (PG) Biography

GO! 6.00 Thunderbirds. (R) 7.00 Kids’ WB Saturday. (PG) 7.05 Looney Tunes. 7.30 Pirate Express. (C, CC) (New Series) 8.00 Teen Titans Go! (PG, R) 8.30 Scooby-Doo! (PG, R) 9.00 Tom And Jerry. (R) 9.30 Adv Time. (PG, R) 10.00 The Batman. (PG, R) 10.30 Ben 10. (PG, R) 11.00 Heidi. (C, CC) 11.30 Move It. (C, R, CC) 12.00 Kitchen Whiz. (C, R, CC) 12.30 SpongeBob. (R) 1.30 Danoz. (R) 2.00 Yu-Gi-Oh! (PG) 3.00 Thunderbirds Are Go! (PG, R) 3.30 Gumball. (R) 4.30 Looney Tunes. (R) 5.30 Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated. (PG, R) 6.30 MOVIE: Dolphin Tale. (PG, R, CC) (2011) Morgan Freeman. 8.45 MOVIE: Jumper. (M, R, CC) (2008) A man discovers he can teleport. Hayden Christensen, Rachel Bilson. 10.30 MOVIE: Mortal Kombat. (M, R, CC) (1995) Christopher Lambert. 12.30 MOVIE: Cadillac Records. (M, R, CC) (2008) 2.30 The Amazing World Of Gumball. (R) 3.30 Yu-Gi-Oh! Zexal. (PG, R) 4.00 PAW Patrol. (R, CC) 4.30 Thunderbirds. (R) 5.30 Yu-GiOh! Classic. (R)

GEM 6.00 MOVIE: High Country. (PG, R, CC) (1984) 8.00 Shopping. 8.30 Destination WA. (PG, CC) 9.00 Our State On A Plate. (PG, CC) 10.00 MOVIE: I Was Monty’s Double. (R, CC) (1958) 12.05 Postcards. (CC) 12.35 Duncan’s Thai Kitchen. 1.05 MOVIE: A Shot In The Dark. (PG) (1964) Peter Sellers. 3.15 MOVIE: The Sundowners. (R, CC) (1960) Robert Mitchum. 6.00 Antiques Roadshow. (R, CC) Hosted by Fiona Bruce. 7.00 Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple. (PG, R) Miss Marple investigates a murder on a train. 9.00 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. (M, R, CC) Two students who were pronounced dead suddenly come back to life and disappear. 11.00 The Mentalist. (M, R, CC) Jane is offered a job. 11.50 Prime Suspect. (M, R, CC) 12.50 MOVIE: The Sundowners. (R, CC) (1960) Robert Mitchum. 3.20 MOVIE: Scott Of The Antarctic. (R, CC) (1948) 5.30 Postcards. (R, CC)

7.30pm Rugby League. NRL. Round 17. St George Illawarra Dragons v North Queensland Cowboys. From WIN Stadium, NSW. Fox Sports 1 8.30pm Tennis. Wimbledon. Day 6. From the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, England. Fox Sports 4

ONE 6.00 Shopping. 8.00 M*A*S*H. (PG, R) 9.00 Shred! (PG, R) 9.30 Emergency Search & Rescue. (PG, R) 10.30 Temporary Australians. (PG, R) 11.00 Trans-Tasman Muscle Car Battle. (R) 11.30 Motor Racing. Aussie Racing Cars. Round 1. Replay. 12.00 RPM. (R, CC) 1.00 Motor Racing. Targa Tasmania. Replay. 2.00 Black Gold. (PG, R) 3.00 Undercover Boss. (PG, R) 4.00 Merv Hughes Fishing. 4.30 Reel Action. 5.00 Escape With ET. (R, CC) 5.30 Extreme Fishing With Robson Green. (PG, R) 6.30 Monster Jam. Highlights of monster truck racing. 7.30 Cops. (PG, R, CC) Officers patrol the streets of the US. 8.30 48 Hours: The Ultimatum. (M, R, CC) Two daughters trying to find their mother’s killer uncover some hidden secrets. 9.30 Ross Kemp: Back On The Frontline. (M, R) Kemp returns to Afghanistan. 10.30 Have You Been Paying Attention? (M, R, CC) 11.30 Extant. (M, R, CC) 5.00 Shred! (PG, R) 5.30 International Fishing Series. (R)

ELEVEN 6.00 Toasted TV. 8.00 Totally Wild. (C, CC) 8.30 Scope. (C, CC) 9.05 The Loop. (PG) 11.35 So You Think You Can Dance. (PG, R) 1.30 MasterChef Aust. (PG, R, CC) 5.30 Becker. (PG, R, CC) 7.00 Everybody Loves Raymond. (PG, R, CC) 8.30 The Graham Norton Show. (M, R, CC) Guests include Arnold Schwarzenegger, Emilia Clarke, Jake Gyllenhaal and Cara Delevingne. 9.30 Sex And The City. (M, R) Carrie wonders why she has never become friends with an ex-boyfriend and decides that she should start with Big. 10.10 Sex And The City. (MA15+, R) The girls judge the firefighters’ calendar contest. 10.50 The Late Late Show With James Corden. (PG) Hosted by James Corden. 11.50 The Loop. (PG, R) 2.25 Frasier. (PG, R) 3.00 Becker. (PG, R, CC) 4.00 Everybody Loves Raymond. (PG, R, CC) 5.00 Home Shopping.

Rachel Bilson stars in Hart Of Dixie

SBS 2 6.00 Urdu News. 6.20 Indonesian News. 7.00 Russian News. 7.30 Polish News. 8.00 Hungarian News. 8.30 Macedonian News. 9.05 Croatian News. 9.40 Serbian News. 10.20 Portuguese News. 11.05 Japanese News. 11.40 Hong Kong News. 12.00 Hindi News. 12.30 Dutch News. 1.00 Mysterious Cities Of Gold. (PG, R) 2.00 Kung Fu Changed My Life. (PG, R) (Final) 3.00 The World Of Jenks. (PG, R) 4.00 Monster Moves. (R, CC) 5.00 The Climb Starts Here. 6.00 Knife Fight. (PG, R) 6.30 Heston’s Feasts. (M, R, CC) 7.30 If You Are The One. Hosted by Meng Fei. 8.30 Where The Wild Men Are With Ben Fogle: Australia. Part 1 of 4. 9.25 Dig. (M, R, CC) Peter makes a startling discovery. 11.00 MOVIE: The Big Picture. (M) (2010) A man goes on the run. Romain Duris. 1.05 MOVIE: Inju: The Beast In The Shadow. (AV15+, R) (2008) Benoit Magimel, Lika Minamoto, Shun Sugata. 3.00 CCTV News In English From Beijing. 5.20 Latin American News. 5.50 Urdu News.

NITV 6.00 Welcome To Wapos Bay. 6.30 Waabiny Time. 7.00 Move It Mob Style. 7.30 Bizou. 8.00 Mugu Kids. 8.30 Go Lingo. 9.00 Tales Of Tatonka. 9.30 Move It Mob Style. 10.00 By The Rapids. (PG) 10.30 The Marngrook Footy Show. (PG) 12.00 NITV News Week In Review. 12.30 Football. NEAFL. 2.45 Surviving. 3.00 Desperate Measures. 3.30 Our Footprint. 4.00 Around The Campfire. 4.30 Unearthed. 5.00 Ngurra. 5.30 NITV News Week In Review. 6.00 Maori TV’s Native Affairs. Current affairs show. 7.00 Pacific Games Opening Ceremony 2015. 9.30 Colour Me. Follow motivational speaker Anthony McLean into the ethnically explosive city of Brampton, Ontario. 10.30 MOVIE: The Necessities Of Life. (PG) (2008) A sick Inuit hunter rediscovers his pride. Natar Ungalaaq, Éveline Gélinas. 12.00 Volumz. (PG) Music program featuring interviews.

6.00 Morning Programs. 11.00 News. 11.30 Australia Wide. (CC) 12.00 News. (CC) 12.30 Landline. (CC) 1.00 National Press Club Address. (R, CC) 2.00 News. 2.30 The Mix. (CC) 3.00 News. (CC) 3.30 The World This Week. (CC) 4.00 News. 4.30 #TalkAboutIt. 5.00 News. 5.30 One Plus One. (R, CC) 6.00 News. (CC) 6.30 Foreign Correspondent. (R, CC) 7.00 News. (CC) 7.30 The Mix. (R, CC) 8.00 Four Corners. (R, CC) 8.45 The Quarters. 9.00 News. (CC) 9.30 Australia Wide. (CC) 10.00 News. (CC) 10.10 IQ2. (R, CC) 11.00 News. 11.30 One Plus One. (PG, R, CC) 12.00 National Press Club Address. (R, CC) 1.00 Al Jazeera Newshour. 2.00 BBC World News. 2.30 #TalkAboutIt. (R) 3.00 BBC World News. 3.30 Landline. (R, CC) 4.00 BBC World News. 4.15 BBC Sport Today. 4.30 The Mix. (R, CC) 5.00 Al Jazeera Newshour. 5.30 Australian Story. (R, CC) 0407

ABC NEWS


64

3-DAY LOCAL TV GUIDE.

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

Sunday, July 5 MOVIE: Side Effects

MOVIE: Mystery Road

Californication

GEM, 8.30pm, M (2013)

ABC, 10.30pm, M (2013)

ELEVEN, 10.25pm

Through the fog of anxiety and depression, Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara) can’t celebrate the release of her husband (Channing Tatum) from prison. Her world is spinning fast out of control so her psychiatrist Dr Jonathan Banks (Jude Law) consults with her old doctor, Victoria Siebert (Catherine Zeta-Jones), before prescribing an experimental new drug. Then, when the drug’s side effects are blamed for a sinister chain of events, Dr Banks must scramble to clear his name. The twists in this edge-of-your-seat thriller from Steven Soderbergh will make you sit up and think – things are not always as they seem.

Sometimes the best thing you can do with a film is go into it without knowing a thing and without any preconceptions. All you might want to note about this Aussie thriller is who displays their fine acting chops. Starring Hugo Weaving (The Matrix), Ryan Kwanten (True Blood), Jack Thompson (Australia), Aaron Pedersen (The Circuit) and Tasma Walton (who has been a tad quiet on the acting front since her golden Blue Heelers days), the psychological thriller is set in the Queensland hinterland, which feels like it is in the middle of nowhere. It’s a slow-build, tense drama that entices with its deliberate silences and moody cinematography.

Writer Hank Moody’s (David Duchovny, ny, right) drama-filled life has been something ething akin to watching car-crash TV as he fell ell from one bad decision to the next, with a heavy dose of lusty dalliances in between. Itt feels like he could go on forever trying to work his life out, but tonight it’s time to say y goodbye. In the series’ final episode will the writers give Hank a happy ending? Life is certainly changing as Becca (Madeleine Martin) prepares to get married – it feels like it was only yesterday she was Hank’s teenager. Meanwhile, Hank must choose between a future with two beautiful women, Karen (Natascha McElhone), the mother of his child, or old fling Julia (Heather Graham).

ABC

PRIME7

WIN

6.00 Rage. (PG, CC) 7.00 Weekend Breakfast. (CC) 9.00 Insiders. (CC) 10.00 Offsiders. (CC) 10.30 Australia Wide. (R, CC) 11.00 The World This Week. (R, CC) 11.30 Songs Of Praise. (R, CC) 12.00 Landline. (CC) 1.00 Gardening Australia. (R, CC) 1.30 The Mix. (R, CC) 2.00 Light From The Shadows. (R, CC) 2.30 The Redfern Story. (PG, R, CC) 3.30 Ripples From Wave Hill. (PG, R, CC) 4.25 Father Brown. (PG, R, CC) 5.10 Restoration Man. (R, CC) Hosted by George Clarke.

6.00 Home Shopping. (CC) 7.00 Weekend Sunrise. (CC) Latest news, sport and weather. 10.00 The Morning Show: Weekend. (PG, CC) 11.00 Malibu Country. (PG, CC) Reba’s family helps her get a date. 11.30 To Be Advised. 4.00 Air Crash Investigations: Fire In The Hold. (PG, R, CC) Documents the crash of ValuJet Flight 592 which caught fire following its take off from Miami on May 11, 1996. 5.00 News. (CC) 5.30 Sydney Weekender. (CC) Mike explores Central Tilba.

6.00 6.30 7.00 10.00

6.00 The Book Club. (CC) Host Jennifer Byrne is joined by guests for a passionate discussion about books, from new releases to classics. 6.30 Compass: Babe In The Reeds. (PG, CC) The story of how Lois Cook’s exploration of her great grandfather’s life revealed the history of indigenous massacres. 7.00 News. (CC) 7.40 Grand Designs. (CC) Kevin McCloud meets a couple who are transforming a bungalow, in Cornwall, into a cuttingedge home. 8.30 Inspector George Gently. (M, CC) After a woman is found dead, Gently and Bacchus investigate a spate of asbestos-related deaths in a factory. 10.00 The Darkside. (PG, CC) Lesigo is visited by half a woman. 10.30 MOVIE: Mystery Road. (M, R, CC) (2013) An indigenous detective returns to his hometown, in rural Queensland, to investigate the murder of a girl. Aaron Pedersen, Hugo Weaving, Ryan Kwanten.

6.00 News. (CC) 7.00 House Rules. (PG, CC) It’s the second round of the exterior transformations, and the teams have to tackle the remaining front and back yards of each other’s homes. 8.15 Sunday Night. (CC) Current affairs program. 9.15 Bones. (M, CC) A miniature golf star’s death exposes the sport’s highly competitive nature. Brennan is afraid that her dad is dabbling in crime. A distressed Wendell asks Hodgins to help him fix his girlfriend’s family heirloom. 10.15 Bones. (M, CC) Brennan is concerned Booth, a former gambling addict, might succumb to temptation when he goes undercover while investigating the murder of a high-stakes gambler. Hodgins comes up with an idea for a new invention. 11.10 Covert Affairs. (M, CC) Annie and Ryan get stuck in Venezuela after their effort to cross the border into Colombia, with Boris, fails. However, the delay gives Annie the time she needs to find some answers about Boris’s operation.

12.25 Tudawali. (M, R, CC) Charts the life of Robert Tudawali. 2.10 MOVIE: Breakfast For Two. (R, CC) (1937) 3.20 Inspector George Gently. (M, R, CC) 5.00 The New Inventors. (R, CC) 5.30 Eggheads. (R, CC)

12.05 Do No Harm. (M) After being forced to work late, a desperate Jason uses an untested drug to try and hold off Ian. 1.00 Home Shopping. 5.30 Early News. (CC) Local, national and overseas news, including sport and the latest weather.

PAW Patrol. (R, CC) Dora The Explorer. (R, CC) Weekend Today. (CC) Wide World Of Sports. (CC) NRL Sunday Footy Show. (CC) Hosted by Peter Sterling. Surfing. (CC) World Surf League. Margaret River Pro. From Western Australia. MOVIE: Get Smart’s Bruce And Lloyd Out Of Control. (PG, R, CC) (2008) Two friends try to find a missing device. Masi Oka, Nate Torrence. Rugby League. (CC) NRL. Round 17. Manly Sea Eagles v Cronulla Sharks. From Brookvale Oval, NSW.

TEN

SBS

6.00 Creflo Dollar Ministries. (CC) 6.30 Hillsong. (CC) 7.00 Mass For You At Home. 7.30 Joel Osteen. (CC) 8.00 Everyday Gourmet With Justine Schofield. (R, CC) 8.30 Studio 10: Sunday. (CC) 10.00 The Bolt Report. (CC) Hosted by Andrew Bolt. 11.00 The Talk. (PG, CC) 1.00 Huey’s Kitchen. (R, CC) Hosted by Iain Hewitson. 1.30 The Offroad Adventure Show. (CC) (Series return) A look at the great outdoors. 2.00 iFish. (R, CC) 3.00 The Bolt Report. (R, CC) 4.00 RPM. (CC) 5.00 Eyewitness News. (CC)

6.00 Soccer. FIFA Women’s World Cup. Third place play-off. Continued. 8.00 Tour De France Daily Update. (CC) 8.40 French News. 9.30 Greek News From Cyprus. 10.30 German News. 11.00 Spanish News. 12.00 Arabic News. 12.30 Turkish News. 1.00 Climbing Great Buildings. (R, CC) 1.30 Cycling. (CC) Tour de France. Stage 1. Utrecht to Utrecht. 13.8km individual time trial. Replay. 3.30 Speedweek. (CC) 5.00 World Of Cycling. (CC) 5.30 Cycling. (CC) Tour de France. Stage 1. Utrecht to Utrecht. 13.8km individual time trial. Highlights.

6.00 News. (CC) 7.00 The Voice. (PG, CC) With some help from coaches Ricky Martin, Delta Goodrem, Joel Madden, Benji Madden and Jessie J, a group of contestants sets out to prove they have what it takes to be a singing sensation and claim the grand prize of a recording contract. Hosted by Darren McMullen. 8.30 60 Minutes. (CC) Current affairs program. Featuring reports from Liz Hayes, Tara Brown, Allison Langdon, Michael Usher and Charles Wooley. 9.35 A.D. Kingdom And Empire. (M, CC) (Series return) The continued retelling of the events depicted in the Bible. Peter and his fellow disciples experience their darkest hour as Jesus Christ is crucified. Afterwards, Christ’s body is moved to a tomb. 10.35 Stalker. (AV15+, CC) A series of harrowing attacks befall two seemingly random victims. 11.35 The Following. (AV15+, CC) A massacre, thought to be the work of Joe Carroll, leads Ryan and Mike into dangerous territory.

6.00 Family Feud: Sunday. (CC) Two families try to win big prizes by guessing the most popular responses to a survey of the public. 6.30 Modern Family. (PG, R, CC) Gloria teaches Jay a lesson. 7.00 Modern Family. (PG, R, CC) Lily decides it is time for a new family portrait, as she is not in the one currently hanging over the mantel. 7.30 MasterChef Australia. (PG, CC) The eight remaining contestants discover the mystery box challenge is one they have faced before. 9.00 CSI: Cyber. (M, CC) Brody suspects his former partners in crime may have a hand in a series of cyberrelated blazes. 10.00 NCIS. (M, R, CC) The wife of a marine, in a K-9 bomb detection unit, urges the team to investigate the death of her husband. 11.00 MOVIE: Never Let Me Go. (M, R, CC) (2010) Three friends, who were bred for the purpose of organ donation, must come to terms with the ramifications. Keira Knightley, Carey Mulligan, Andrew Garfield.

6.00 Grand Tours Of Scotland: Atlantic Twins. (CC) (Final) Presenter Paul Murton concludes his exploration of Scotland with a visit to the islands of Coll and Tiree. He learns about the military history of the MacLeans of Coll and makes a boat trip out to the lighthouse on the rocky outcrop of Skerryvore. 6.30 World News. (CC) 7.30 Michael Scott: The Story Of Luxury: Ancient Greece – Nothing In Excess? (PG, CC) Part 1 of 2. Historian Dr Michael Scott explores the nature and attitude towards luxury throughout the ages. Begins in ancient Greece, with the role the debate over the subject played in the beginnings of democracy, and why certain forms of luxury were embraced and others reviled. 8.30 Cycling. (CC) Tour de France. Stage 2. Utrecht to Zélande. 166km flat stage. From Netherlands. Hosted by Michael Tomalaris and Robbie McEwen, with commentary from Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwin.

12.35 Arrow. (AV15+, R, CC) 1.30 What Would You Do? (M, R, CC) 2.30 Impractical Jokers. (M, R, CC) 3.00 20/20. (R, CC) 4.00 Good Morning America: Sunday. (CC) 5.00 News. (CC) 5.30 Today. (CC)

1.00 Infomercials. (PG, R) 2.00 Home Shopping. 4.00 Life Today With James Robison. (PG) Religious program. 4.30 CBS This Morning. (CC) Morning news and talk show. Hosted by Charlie Rose, Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell.

2.00 MOVIE: Little White Lies. (MA15+, R) (2011) A group of friends gathers for a holiday. François Cluzet, Marion Cotillard. 4.40 Cross. (M) Short film. 5.00 Korean News. News from Seoul. 5.35 Japanese News. News from Tokyo.

11.00 1.00 2.00

3.30

CLASSIFICATIONS: (P) For preschoolers (C) Children’s programs (G) General viewing (PG) Parental guidance (M) Mature audiences (MA15+) Mature audiences only (AV15+) Extreme violence. (R) Repeat (CC) Closed Captions. Please Note: Listings are correct at the time of print and are subject to late change by networks. 0507


3-DAY LOCAL TV GUIDE.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

65

Sunday, July 5 PAYTV HIGHLIGHTS MOVIES

GENERAL

DOCUMENTARY

SPORT

6.30pm Edge Of Tomorrow (2014) Action. Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt. A soldier in a war against alien invaders awakes at the start of the day each time he is killed. (M) Premiere

6.10pm Cougar Town. (PG) SoHo

6.30pm How The Universe Works. A look at how light escapes from the sun. Discovery

2.30pm Cricket. Third Test. Sri Lanka v Pakistan. Day 3. From Pallekele International Cricket Stadium, Sri Lanka. Fox Sports 2

6.35pm Thor: The Dark World (2013) Action. Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman. (M) Action 8.30pm The Hundred-Foot Journey (2014) Drama. Helen Mirren, Om Puri. A restaurant goes to war against a rival establishment. (PG) Premiere

ABC2/ABC KIDS 6.00 Children’s Programs. 12.00 Sesame Street. (R, CC) 12.30 Arthur. (R) 12.40 Maya The Bee. (R, CC) 12.55 Pingu. (R) 1.00 Humf. (R, CC) 1.10 Postman Pat. (R, CC) 1.25 Lah-Lah’s Adventures. (R) 1.40 Abney & Teal. (R, CC) 1.55 Mouk. (R) 2.05 Elmo The Musical. (R, CC) 2.20 Q Pootle 5. (R, CC) 2.35 Little Princess. (R, CC) 2.50 Dinosaur Train. (R) 3.20 Timmy Time. (R, CC) (Final) 3.30 Play School. (R, CC) 4.00 Bananas In Pyjamas. (R, CC) 4.10 Hoopla. (R, CC) 4.25 Mister Maker. (R, CC) 4.45 Thomas. (R, CC) 6.00 Ben And Holly. (R, CC) 6.10 Peter Rabbit. (R, CC) 6.25 Curious George. (CC) 6.50 Shaun The Sheep. (R) 7.00 Spicks And Specks. (PG, R, CC) 7.30 Total Wipeout. (PG, CC) 8.30 7/7: One Day In London. (M, CC) 10.00 Forbidden Love. (M, R, CC) (Final) 10.45 Bodyshockers. (M, R, CC) 11.30 Louis Theroux. (M, R, CC) 12.30 Don’t Blame The Dog. (M, R, CC) 1.30 News Update. (R) 1.35 Close. 5.00 The Numtums. (R, CC) 5.05 Driver Dan’s Story Train. (R, CC) 5.15 Guess With Jess. (R, CC) 5.30 Angelina Ballerina. (R, CC) 5.40 Olivia. (R, CC) 5.55 Children’s Programs.

ABC3 6.00 Children’s Programs. 6.20 The Jungle Book. (R, CC) (Final) 6.40 Sally Bollywood. (R, CC) 6.55 Dennis & Gnasher. (R, CC) 7.20 Jamie’s Got Tentacles. (R, CC) 7.45 Dr Dimensionpants. (R) 8.05 SheZow. (R, CC) 8.20 Almost Naked Animals. (R, CC) 8.30 Riders Of Berk. (R, CC) 8.55 Studio 3 Gold. (R) 9.00 Operation Ouch! (R) 9.25 Total Drama All Stars. (R, CC) 9.50 Studio 3 Gold. (R) 9.55 Slugterra. (R, CC) 10.40 Endangered Species. (R, CC) 11.00 Camp Lakebottom. (R, CC) 11.25 Kobushi. (R, CC) 11.30 Roy. (R, CC) 12.00 Dani’s House. (R, CC) 12.30 M.I. High. (R, CC) 2.50 Trop Jr. (R, CC) 3.00 Deadly Pole To Pole. (R) 3.25 WAC. (R, CC) 3.55 Studio 3. 4.00 The Legend Of Dick And Dom. (R, CC) 4.30 Roy. (R, CC) (Final) 5.00 Life With Boys. (R, CC) 5.25 Mal.com. (R, CC) 5.40 Bushwhacked! (R, CC) 6.10 The Penguins Of Madagascar. (R) 6.35 Mortified. (R, CC) 7.00 Outnumbered. (PG, R, CC) 7.30 Operation Ouch! (R, CC) 8.00 Deadly Pole To Pole. (R) 8.30 Yonderland. (R) 8.50 Karaoke High. (PG, R, CC) 9.15 Good Game: Pocket Edition. (PG, R, CC) 9.25 Rage. (PG, R) 1.55 Close.

6.30pm Fresh Off The Boat. Jessica is annoyed with Louis for not being jealous when her college boyfriend visits. (M) FOX8 10.00pm Inside Amy Schumer. Amy travels through time, listens to terrible stories and gives an entire town an STI. (MA15+) Comedy Channel

7TWO 6.00 Shopping. 7.00 Tomorrow’s World. (PG) 7.30 Leading The Way. (PG, R) 8.00 David Jeremiah. (PG) 8.30 Shopping. 9.30 Home And Away Catch-Up. (PG, R, CC) 11.00 Downsize Me. (PG, R) 12.00 Tennis. (CC) Wimbledon. Highlights. 1.00 Travel Oz. (PG, R, CC) 2.30 The Travel Bug. (PG, R) 3.30 Life Inside The Markets. 4.00 Neighbours At War. (PG, R) 4.30 Mighty Ships. (R, CC) 5.30 Border Patrol. (PG) 6.30 Bargain Hunt. (R) A team has trouble with their choices. 7.30 Escape To The Country. (R) Alistair Appleton heads to North Yorkshire. 9.30 Best Houses Australia. Hosted by Gary Takle. 10.30 Mighty Ships: Peregrino. (R, CC) 11.30 Border Patrol: War On The Streets. (PG, R) Follows officers who patrol the US-Mexican border. 12.30 Neighbours At War. (M, R) 1.00 Neighbours At War. (MA15+, R) 1.30 Downsize Me. (PG, R) 2.30 Travel Oz. (PG, R, CC) 4.00 The Travel Bug. (PG, R) 5.00 Home Shopping.

7MATE 6.00 Shopping. 6.30 Hook, Line And Sinker. (PG, R) 7.30 Shopping. 9.30 Hook, Line And Sinker. (PG, R) 10.00 AFL Game Day. (PG, CC) 11.30 Construction Zone. (PG) 12.30 Brashernats. (PG) 1.30 Mark Berg’s Fishing Addiction. (PG) 2.30 AFL Pre-Game Show. (CC) 3.00 Football. (CC) AFL. Round 14. Adelaide v Geelong. 6.00 Seinfeld. (PG, R, CC) George changes his lunch order. 7.00 MOVIE: Despicable Me 2. (PG, R, CC) (2013) A reformed villain is recruited to save the world. Steve Carell. 9.00 MOVIE: Terminator 3: Rise Of The Machines. (M, R, CC) (2003) A cyborg is sent back in time to protect a future resistance leader from a robotic female assassin. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Nick Stahl, Claire Danes. 11.15 Family Guy. (M, R, CC) 2.30 Repo Games. (MA15+, R) 3.00 Repo Games. (M, R) 4.00 Hook, Line And Sinker. (PG, R) 5.00 Mark Berg’s Fishing Addiction. (PG, R)

7.30pm Henry VIII: The Mind Of A Tyrant. Part 4 of 4. (G) History 8.30pm Elizabeth Taylor: An Intimate Portrait. An up-close documentary about the star, with never before seen footage and interviews. (PG) Biography

GO! 6.00 Thunderbirds. (R) 7.00 Kids’ WB. (PG) 7.05 Looney Tunes. 7.30 Captain Flinn And The Pirate Dinosaurs. (C, CC) (New Series) 8.00 Teen Titans Go! (PG, R) 8.30 Scooby-Doo! (PG, R) 9.00 Looney Tunes. (R) 9.30 Adv Time. (PG, R) 10.00 Young Justice. (PG, R) 10.30 The Batman. (PG, R) 11.00 Rabbids. (PG, R) 12.00 Tom And Jerry. (R) 12.30 SpongeBob. (R) 1.30 Danoz. 2.00 Power Rangers. (PG, R) 3.00 Young Justice. (PG, R) 4.00 Yu-GiOh! (PG) 4.30 The Batman. (PG, R) 5.30 Scooby-Doo! (PG, R) 6.00 MOVIE: Chicken Run. (R, CC) (2000) 7.40 The Big Bang Theory. (PG, R, CC) Penny tries to romance Leonard. 8.40 Gotham. (M, CC) Gordon takes Dr Thompkins to the circus. 9.40 Arrow. (M, CC) Malcolm is captured by Ra’s al Ghul. 11.40 Almost Human. (M, R, CC) 12.40 The Cube. (PG, R) 1.30 Beware The Batman. (M, R) 2.30 The Batman. (PG, R) 3.30 Yu-Gi-Oh! Zexal. (PG, R) 4.00 PAW Patrol. (R, CC) 4.30 Robocar Poli. (R) 4.50 Thunderbirds. (R) 5.30 Yu-Gi-Oh! Classic. (R)

GEM 6.00 Skippy. (R) 6.30 GEM Presents. (R, CC) 6.40 MOVIE: She’ll Have To Go. (PG, R, CC) (1962) 8.30 TV Shop. 9.30 Antiques. (R, CC) 10.30 MOVIE: Topkapi. (R) (1964) 1.00 Australian Geographic Adventures. (R, CC) 1.30 Getaway. (PG, R, CC) 2.00 MOVIE: Separate Tables. (PG, R) (1958) 4.00 MOVIE: Band Of Angels. (PG, R) (1957) 6.30 Antiques Roadshow. (R, CC) 7.30 David Attenborough’s Life: Primates. (R, CC) Narrated by Sir David Attenborough. 8.30 MOVIE: Side Effects. (M, CC) (2013) A successful New York couple’s world unravels when a new drug has unexpected side effects. Channing Tatum, Jude Law, Catherine ZetaJones. 10.40 Cold Case. (M, R, CC) 11.35 Prime Suspect. (M, R, CC) 12.30 Getaway. (PG, R, CC) 1.00 Seaway. (PG, R, CC) 2.00 Home Shopping. 4.30 Enjoying Everyday Life With Joyce Meyer. (PG) 5.00 Seaway. (PG, R, CC)

3.00pm Football. AFL. Round 14. Adelaide v Geelong. From Adelaide Oval. Fox Sports 3 10.00pm Golf. Euro PGA. French Open. Final Round. From Le Golf National, France. Fox Sports 1

ONE 6.00 Shopping. 8.00 Motor Racing. World Series Sprintcars. Round 4. Replay. 9.00 Shred! (PG, R) 9.30 Monster Jam. (R) 10.30 Reel Action. (R) 11.00 Motor Racing. FIA Formula E Championship. Round 9. Moscow ePrix. Highlights. 12.00 World Sport. (R) 12.30 Undercover Boss. (PG, R) 2.30 Temporary Australians. (R) 3.00 4x4 Adventures. (R) 4.00 Emergency Search & Rescue. (PG, R) 5.00 What’s Up Downunder? (R, CC) 5.30 iFish. 6.00 Family Feud: Sunday. (CC) 6.30 M*A*S*H. (PG, R) BJ goes to Seoul for a haircut. 7.30 Gold Coast Cops. (PG, R, CC) The team chases a man on the run. 8.30 Territory Cops. (PG, R, CC) A look at the Northern Territory Police. 9.30 MOVIE: Die Hard. (M, R, CC) (1988) A police officer takes on a gang of terrorists. Bruce Willis, Bonnie Bedelia. 12.10 Extant. (M, R, CC) 4.35 World Sport. (R) 5.00 Shred! (PG, R) 5.30 Football’s Greatest Managers. (R)

ELEVEN 6.00 Toasted TV. 9.00 Infomercials. (PG, R) 9.30 TMNT. (R) 10.00 Mako: Island Of Secrets. (C, CC) 10.30 Brady Bunch. (R) 11.00 Infomercials. (PG, R) 11.30 MasterChef Aust. (PG, R, CC) 2.00 Infomercials. (PG, R) 2.30 Neighbours. (R, CC) 5.00 Mork & Mindy. (PG, R) 5.30 Becker. (PG, R, CC) 6.00 Family Feud: Sunday. (CC) 6.30 Everybody Loves Raymond. (PG, R, CC) 7.00 Futurama. (PG, R) 7.30 The Simpsons. (R, CC) 8.00 The Simpsons. (PG, R, CC) Homer and Flanders head to Las Vegas. 8.30 MOVIE: Blades Of Glory. (M, R, CC) (2007) Two rival ice skaters team up. Will Ferrell, Jon Heder. 10.25 Californication. (MA15+) (Final) 11.05 The Late Late Show With James Corden. (PG) 12.05 Nurse Jackie. (MA15+, R) 12.45 Star Trek: The Next Generation. (PG, R) 2.55 Mork & Mindy. (PG, R) 3.30 Becker. (PG, R, CC) 4.00 Everybody Loves Raymond. (PG, R, CC) 5.00 Shopping.

Emily Blunt stars in Edge Of Tomorrow

SBS 2 6.00 Urdu News. 6.20 Indonesian News. 7.00 Russian News. 7.30 Polish News. 8.00 Maltese News. 8.30 Macedonian News. 9.00 PopAsia. (PG) 11.00 Portuguese News. 11.30 Croatian News. 12.00 Hindi News. 12.30 Dutch News. 1.00 Mysterious Cities Of Gold. (PG, R) 2.05 Lily Cole’s Art Matters. (PG, R, CC) 3.00 The Jo Whiley Sessions. (R) 3.30 Cycling. (CC) Tour de France. Stage 1. Utrecht to Utrecht. 13.8km individual time trial. Replay. 5.30 FIFA Women’s World Cup Highlights Show. 6.00 Secret Life Of… (PG) 6.30 Cycling. (CC) Tour de France. Stage 1. Utrecht to Utrecht. 13.8km individual time trial. Highlights. From Netherlands. 7.30 If You Are The One. 8.30 Nick Helm’s Heavy Entertainment. (M) 9.05 Drunk History UK. (M) 9.30 Housos. (MA15+, R, CC) 10.00 Pizza World Record. (M, R, CC) (Final) 10.35 Indie Sex. (MA15+, R, CC) 11.50 The Sex Show. (MA15+, R) (Final) 12.30 In Her Skin. (M) 2.05 MOVIE: Trivial Matters. (M, R) (2007) 3.45 CCTV News In English From Beijing. 5.00 French News. 5.50 Urdu News.

NITV 6.00 Welcome To Wapos Bay. 6.30 Waabiny Time. 7.00 Move It Mob Style. 7.30 Bizou. 8.00 Mugu Kids. 8.30 Go Lingo. 9.00 Tales Of Tatonka. 9.30 Move It Mob Style. 10.00 Soccer. (CC) OFC Champions League. 11.45 Unearthed. 12.00 Pacific Games. Daily highlights. From Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. 1.00 Pacific Games. Daily coverage. 7.30 Backyard Shorts. (PG) Shorts from communities across the country. 8.00 The Deerskins. (PG) 8.30 The Loner. 9.00 NITV News Week In Review. 9.30 A Time For Reflection. 9.40 MOVIE: Barking Water. (M) (2009) 11.00 Finding Dawn. (M) A look at Aboriginal murders in Canada. 12.30 Backyard Shorts. (PG) 1.00 MOVIE: Barking Water. (M) (2009) 2.30 Awaken. Hosted by Stan Grant. 3.30 The Loner. 4.00 Vote Yes For Aborigines. 5.00 Kriol Kitchen. 5.30 Flying Boomerangs. (PG)

6.00 Morning Programs. 12.00 News. (CC) 12.30 #TalkAboutIt. (R) 1.00 News. 1.30 Landline. (R, CC) 2.00 News. 2.30 One Plus One. (R, CC) 3.00 News. (CC) 3.30 Offsiders. (R, CC) 4.00 News. 4.30 The Mix. (R, CC) 5.00 News. 5.30 Australia Wide. (R, CC) 6.00 News. (CC) 6.30 Australian Story. (R, CC) 7.00 News. (CC) 7.30 The World This Week. (R, CC) 8.00 Insiders. (R, CC) 9.00 News. (CC) 9.30 One Plus One. (R, CC) 10.00 News. (CC) 10.30 The Mix. (R, CC) 11.00 News. 11.30 #TalkAboutIt. (R) 12.00 Landline. (R, CC) 1.00 Al Jazeera Newshour. 2.00 BBC World News. 2.30 The Mix. (R, CC) 3.00 BBC World News. 3.30 The World This Week. (R, CC) 4.00 BBC World News. 4.15 BBC Sport Today. 4.30 Australia Wide. (R, CC) 5.00 Al Jazeera Newshour. 5.30 One Plus One. (R, CC) 0507

ABC NEWS


UP GRADE WITHOUT

BEING STUNG

MANY BUILDERS USE ‘UPGRADE’ TO UPSELL. WE SEE THIS PRACTICE AS A BETRAYAL OF OUR CUSTOMERS TRUST. AT BELLRIVER WE DO THINGS DIFFERENTLY. WE ENSURE WE INCLUDE EVERYTHING THAT IS NEEDED – EVEN THE DOORBELL. DISPLAY HOME 3 Champagne Drive Outlook Estate, Dubbo Yvette Laws: 0448 162 370 Zara Jom: 0428 128 860

bellriverhomes.com.au Builders Lic. 61247C. BELL 2325-09

WHO’S BUILDING YOUR HOME?

RUN WITH THE HERD IN 2015 Dingo Dash

5.5KM The Dingo Dash offers walkers and runners a fun day out to safari through the Taronga Western Plains Zoo.

Cheetah Chase

10KM

Whether a 10km specialist or aiming to achieve a 10km PB, all will enjoy the Cheetah Chase.

Zebra Zoom Half Marathon

Enjoy one of NSW’s most unique running festivals In the heart of regional NSW is the 2015 Dubbo Stampede. Come and run with the herd in a positive, inclusive and unique event – we have something for everyone. Walkers and runners alike get to run ‘around the world’ in the iconic Taronga Western Plains Zoo. You can join the 5.5 km Dingo Dash, 10 km Cheetah Chase, 21.1 km Zebra Zoom and the 42.2 km Rhino Ramble. • Improve your health, be challenged and achieve your goals! • Participants receive entry to zoo, water bottle and finisher’s medal. • Free shirt for half and full marathon runners. • Substantial prize pool for competitors. For more information: contact@dubbostampede.com.au www.dubbostampede.com.au

Sunday 6th September 2015 REGISTER ONLINE NOW!

We’re on Facebook, Instagram & Twitter!

21.1KM

Rise to the challenge and take on the relatively flat 21km Zebra Zoom.

Rhino Ramble Marathon

DUBBO

weekender NELSON KEANE & HEMINGWAY

LAWYERS

42.2KM

Ready for the big one?Running 42.2 kilometres The Dubbo Stampede Festival of running fun and adventure! presents our inaugural marathon.

For more information visit www.dubbostampede.com.au


THE PLAY PAGES.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 1

THE

BIG

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rine creature (3,5) 194. Deceitfully 195. Inundated

70. Hewn (logs) 72. Cosmetic liner (7,6) 73. Suspenseful novel 75. Simplicity 77. Cries of pleasure 79. Dodged 81. Just manage, ... out a living 84. Enrols 85. Denies 86. Inexpensively 87. Vast 88. Lily-livered 90. Surfing areas 92. Cake covering 95. Kept us going, ... us over 97. To & ... 101. Top dog, numero ... 109. Carnival

111. ... port in a storm 113. Nip 115. Outline 116. Appalled 118. Weeded 119. Skim swiftly 121. Days & ... 122. Defame 124. Treatment using essential oils 126. Dealt out (justice) 129. Getting 130. Open grassland 131. Consumer response 132. Tenderness 138. Writer 139. Speechless (6-4) 143. Trying 144. Receding 146. Stinging insect

149. Popular purple flower 155. Capsicum (3,6) 157. Guarantees 159. Tattooist’s tools 161. Directing 165. Reveals 169. Passed 171. Drank like kitten 172. Dicey 175. Ruffians 176. Holler of delight 177. Rub until sore 178. Data entered 181. Flimsy (excuse) 184. Denmark native 186. Geological age 190. Lout © LOVATTS PUZZLES MEG3328


68

THE PLAY PAGES.

WUMO

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

by Wulff & Morgenthaler

FIND THE WORDS This is a theme puzzle with the subject stated below. Find the listed words in the grid. (They may run in any direction but always in a straight line. Some letters are used more than once.) Ring each word as you find it and when you have completed the puzzle, there will be 15 letters left over. They spell out the alternative theme of the puzzle. Vacation

OUT ON A LIMB

by Gary Kopervas

FLASH GORDON

by Jim Keefe

assets Ballina bays bikes buses camp canals casino catch cliffs Coolangatta

dip Dreamworld evenings highrise hotels idle Iluka keno lifesavers Miami mix

Movie World nightclubs ocean paddle racing radio relax rent sand seagulls Sea World

sunny swim surf tickets tourist trips Tugun unit

Š australianwordgames.com.au 858

WEEKENDER SUDOKU Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.

GRIN & BEAR IT

by Wagner

LAFF-A-DAY SNOWFLAKES There are 13 black hexagons in the puzzle. Place the numbers 1 to 6 around each of them. No number can be repeated in any partial hexagon shape along the border of the puzzle.


THE PLAY PAGES.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

69

GO FIGURE

DUAL CROSSWORD 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17 18

19

22

20

21

23

24 CROSSWORD 18,943

CRYPTIC CLUES Across 1. Proportion Stalin found out to be anti-supernatural (11) 9. Letters to be sent to remote settlement (7) 10. Corn to be seen in the wood? (5) 11. Spoil firstclass backing for girl (5) 12. Otherwise cool van could erupt (7) 13. Feeling less for the figure? (6) 15. Blamed for the mad-house (6) 18. Priest loses

CRYPTO-QUOTE

one in church (7) 20. Big hit – 150 published (5) 22. It’s more pleasant in Venice, really (5) 23. Source of gratuities at the race-course? (7) 24. Show men road test (11)

Down 2. A man of parts... (5) 3.... set apart from one extremely tardy (7) 4. Four in neat arrangement are indigenous (6) 5. It’s lawful for example in all construction (5) 6. Defence

against main attack (3-4) 7. Order remark about fellow dunderhead (11) 8. Tell a British Conservative it’s instructive (11) 14. It puts one pupil under glass (7) 16. See carp as the one that got away (7) 17. Jars in fireplaces (6) 19. Roots forming the trunk (5) 21. 8 etc. to reform (5)

QUICK CLUES Across 1. Curative (11) 9. Instance (7) 10. Sham (5)

11. Go in (5) 12. Rags (7) 13. Clothe (6) 15. Ship (6) 18. Trap (7) 20. Memorise (5) 22. Stick (5) 23. Jealous (7) 24. Symbolised (11)

>> The idea of Go Figure is to arrive at the figures given at the bottom and right-hand columns of the diagram by following the arithmetic signs in the order they are given (that is, from left to right and top to bottom). Use only the numbers below the diagram to complete its blank squares and use each of the nine numbers only once.

Down 2. Centre (5) 3. News (7) 4. Abundance (6) 5. Inappropriate (5) 6. Malady (7) 7. Kindness (11) 8. Animality (11) 14. Trace (7) 16. Invigorate (7) 17. Alcove (6) 19. Portend (5) 21. Exclusively (5)

MEGA MAZE

>> AXYDLBAAXR is LONGFELLOW: One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used for the three Ls, X for the two Os, etc. Single letters, apostrophes, the length and formation of the words are all hints. Each week the code letters are different.

KIDS’ MAZE

DRTCC OFFERS QUALITY ENTERTAINMENT SATURDAY 4 JULY, 7.30 PM

TUESDAY 7 JULY, 7.30 pm

SPECI A PRICE L !

SATURDAY 11 JULY, 12noon and 6.30pm

SHOW DETAILS & BUY TICKETS

DRTCC.COM.AU Keep up to date – join our mailing list

BOX OFFICE HOURS MONDAY FRIDAY, 9.30AM - 4.30PM AND 1 HOUR PRIOR TO THE SHOW BAR OPEN BEFORE & DURING INTERVAL MOST SHOWS 155 DARLING ST, DUBBO (02) 6801 4378

PRESENTED BY MACQUARIE PHILHARMONIA

THE SYMPHONY OF AUSTRALIA A unique inland-based orchestra which brings together the extraordinary talents of professional musicians from across regional New South Wales. A musical experience to be savoured.

PRESENTED BY AUSTRALIAN DANCE THEATRE

BE YOUR SELF Australian Dance Theatre, a 60 minute explosion of powerful and athletic contemporary dance. Special price of $25 per ticket! WARNING: Performance contains strobe lighting and theatrical haze effects. It is recommended for people aged 12+ only.

PRODUCED BY ERTH - VISUAL AND PHYSICAL INCORPORATED

ERTH’S DINOSAUR ZOO

Meet awesome prehistoric creatures, from cute baby dinosaurs to some of the largest carnivores and herbivores that have ever walked to planet! Erth’s dinosaurs are unmistakably ‘alive’ and mostly friendly in this fun, educational and unique performance that will delight all audiences from ages 5 years and up. This is a great family outing during the school holidays.

A facility of Dubbo City Council.


70

THE PLAY PAGES.

PRINCE VALIANT

Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015 | Dubbo Weekender

by Murphy & Gianni

KING CROSSWORD

ACROSS

AMBER WAVES

by Dave T. Phipps

A TOUCH MORE DORIN

by Paul Dorin

JUST LIKE CATS & DOGS by Dave T. Phipps

1. Throws in 5. Tatter 8. Wound cover 12. Tide type 13. Compass dir. 14. Corn concoction 15. Severe decline 17. Dermatologist’s case 18. As found 19. Bush ..., food 21. Youngster 22. 36-Across segment 23. Blue 26. “Charlotte’s ...” 28. Make into law 31. Old portico 33. Homer’s interjection 35. Arizona river 36. Variety show 38. Talk on and on 40. Back talk 41. Advantage

43. Sweet potato’s kin 45. Sunscreen, usually 47. Complained bitterly 51. Bedouin 52. Drive too close behind 54. Astronaut Armstrong 55. Conclude 56. Sharpen 57. Mete (out) 58. Deli loaf 59. Despot

DOWN 1. Opposed 2. Campus bigwig 3. Raised platform 4. Divided 5. Considered 6. Blackbird 7. Fellows 8. What “thisclue” needs 9. Mixed drink

HOCUS-FOCUS

STRANGE BUT TRUE

10. Boleyn or Bancroft 11. “Cheers” serving 16. Pack away 20. Guitar’s cousin 23. Georgia’s exstatus (Abbr.) 24. Chowed down 25. Overlap 27. Marsh 29. Roman 151 30. Spigot 32. Within earshot 34. Outing on a wagon 37. Id counterpart 39. False god 42. Go in 44. Possibly will 45. Crow’s-nest cry 46. Sandwich treat 48. Neighbour of Cambodia 49. Sicilian spouter 50. Antelope’s playmate 53. Whatever amount

by Henry Boltinoff

by Samantha Weaver z It was Nora Joyce, wife to the Irish novelist James Joyce, who wrote the notoriously difficult – and influential – stream-of-consciousness novel “Ulysses”, who asked her husband, “Why don’t you write books people can read?” z You might be surprised to learn that contemporary model and actress Brooke Shields is descended from that notorious figure of the Italian Renaissance, Lucretia Borgia, who was suspected of such crimes as adultery, incest and murder. z In this era of helicopter parenting, some are shocked to learn that in the 1960s, nearly half of all children in America walked to and from school by themselves. z What do “Where’s Wally”, “Where the Sidewalk Ends”, “My Friend Flicka”, “Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?” and “Harriet the Spy” have in common? Aside from being books meant for a young audience, all of these titles have been banned at one

time or another. z There are about the same number of chickens as there are humans on the planet. z If you’re like 83 per cent of pet owners who responded to a recent survey, you feel that you receive more unconditional love from your pet than from your kids, your best friend or even your romantic partner. z Americans use the term “Podunk” to describe a small, unimportant town, but you might not know where the word came from. It seems that a Native American tribe in Connecticut was known as the Podunk, and a nearby river was called by the same name. Local small towns on the river were referred to as “Podunk”, too, and so the word entered the lexicon. Thought for the Day: “I have lived in this world just long enough to look carefully the second time into things that I am most certain of the first time.” – Josh Billings

See page 79 for all the Solutions and Answers


THE PLAY PAGES.

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

YOUR STARS 坥 坦

TAURUS (APR 21-MAY 21) Your

VIRGO (AUG 24-SEP 23) As

stresses slowly melt away, so do your negative thoughts. A little more relaxation makes the world of difference to your wellbeing. Still busy at work but looking forward to a holiday? Take special care with paperwork to avoid glitches. Romance comes through group activities and online contacts. A better understanding of your finances also eases pressures. Now you realise that being in charge brings peace of mind, you will be determined to stay so.

GEMINI (MAY 22-JUN 21) Your

recent shows of confidence and enthusiasm have certainly hit their mark. A financial blip should now turn into a smoother cash flow. Be aware of the needs at work and try to work closely with colleagues. Once again a bit of charm works wonders and don’t be afraid to flatter where praise is due! An interest in changing your image is fine, but it is your personality that counts.

BY CASSANDRA NYE

LEO (JUL 24-AUG 23) There is an aura of power and knowledge about you this week. This gives others confidence in your abilities. Keep things practical, though, not promising something that you cannot deliver. Patterns are being set for the rest of the year, especially where personal decisions are concerned. There is no need to hurry with these so make sure that they feel right for you. Appreciation comes your way at the weekend in response to a loving gesture.

hopes and dreams are very strong in your mind right now. Over the week ahead, it is possible for a plan of attack to be hatched. Don’t be put off if it is a slow start. This is more likely to spell success. A promising beginning to a new relationship sparks enthusiasm and, if combined with a joint activity, could grow into something quite special. Just be yourself and keep that smile sparkling.

for the week commencing 06.07.2015

ARIES (MAR 21-APR 20) This is a week of caring and sharing. There is nothing wrong with caring for yourself and, surely, it is essential. Even so, when caring for others you feel a deep sense of satisfaction. Although keen to get on with some pet project, maybe this is the time to slow down a little and take a break. Spending time with a loved one can be just the tonic that you need.

LIBRA (SEP 24-OCT 23) There are some parts of life that only time can sort out. Going on holiday or for a break? The chances are that you will return to good news. Someone who may have been taking you for granted seems to get the message that you have had enough. Being a kind person, you are happy that you do not have to push the point! Being kind to yourself instead of always thinking of others is allowable, you know.

CANCER (JUN 22-JUL 23) Luck

and love continue to come your way this week. Enjoy this month as a time that is special in many ways. Through to the weekend there is an awareness of your value to others. At times you feel really blessed. Approach any negative people with a smile and sympathy. Surely they have some problems in their life? The offer of a change at work is negotiable, so ask for what you need.

SCORPIO (OCT 24-NOV

22) Eagerly expected news

may be slow in coming. Don’t necessarily let this worry you. With holidays and slower communications this is to be expected. A business matter is making progress but this may not be apparent. Have patience. A certain lack of energy this week could mean asking a friend or partner to lend a hand. Any decisions about a change in your love life should be considered but not acted on immediately.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV 23-DEC 21) A week of loving exchanges

is ahead. Your partner or a close friend is doing very well and will want to pamper you. Please enjoy this time and don’t be afraid to show your appreciation. What you need now are people who you feel are in tune with you. How do you find them? A new group activity could be the answer. Intimate moments are loving and full of promise.

CAPRICORN (DEC 22-JAN 20)

Determined to give your love life a boost, you choose to be very attentive to a loved one. Those who still seek romance need to get out and about, especially at the weekend. Remember that the most unpromising activities can turn out to be fun! Any new eating regime is likely to be a success right now, so show that determination! Don’t shy away from change as it could give you the best chance of a free and happy future.

AQUARIUS (JAN 21-FEB 19)

Love is at a peak this month. This week in particular sees you realising exactly what you need in this area of your life. Although you will not accept second best in any sense, do give others a chance to show their true colours. Before you begin a new area of your work or career, pace yourself to save energy. Love yourself as well as others! This is a week of bringing yourself together rather than bringing others together.

PISCES (FEB 20-MAR 20) Sharing

your life really does mean that this week. Although there are many demands on you, you give your time with pleasure. There is a certain spirituality about you that leads others to confide their thoughts and feelings. Your own emotions are also finely tuned. Although easily upset at this time, you realise that this is for a short period only. Artistic experiments could include a visit to a gallery or taking up a creative hobby.

Monday’s Birthday Luck: Happy Birthday! You share your day with Australian actor Geoffrey Rush (below), 64. The more you learn in the coming months, the greater will be your reward. Finances should be running smoothly. Even so, don’t sit on your hands if there are advantages to be taken. Teamwork could be the key, Cancer. Tuesday’s Birthday Luck: Happy Birthday! You share your day with former Beatle Ringo Starr, 75. Prospects are good and you see this for some time ahead. However, there is more to be made from a long-term idea. You may keep this on the back boiler, but keep it under review. Changes are ahead, Cancer. Wednesday’s Birthday Luck: Happy Birthday! You share your day with Paul Cronin (above), the actor best known for his roles in Matlock Police and The Sullivans, who turns 77 today. Instead of worrying about the future, Cancer, concentrate on the here and now. This is where your success story starts. Dream about what is ahead by all means but keep today real. Thursday’s Birthday Luck: Happy Birthday! Taking advantage of any chances to progress, expect some swift action. Be sure at the start that your goals belong to you alone. Your heart needs to be in your work for it to succeed, Cancer. Friday’s Birthday Luck: Happy Birthday! Today’s birthday list includes convicted drug smuggler Schapelle Corby (far left), 38. Stop tip-toeing around a certain subject and get it out into the open, Cancer. Until your mind is clear it will be hard to make a success of anything else. Confiding in a partner or friend is not a weakness! Saturday’s Birthday Luck: Happy Birthday! Whatever anchors you to your heart’s desire must come first, Cancer. Success will come when you really want something and show the determination to get it. Sunday’s Birthday Luck: Happy Birthday! Small successes, at the end of the year, lead to one big success. So don’t fuss if progress is steady rather than instant. What comes too easily can just as quickly go, Cancer!

SOLUTIONS AND ANSWERS for this week’s puzzles and tests The Big 1 Crossword 3328 T

E

A M M A

A

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A M E

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S

V

L

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C O D L

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I

N D E

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T

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F

F

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D

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A W A S

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B L

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Find the Words solution 858 Fun for the family DUAL CROSSWORD 18,943 CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS Across: 1 Rationalist; 9 Outpost; 10 Grain; 11 Maria; 12 Volcano; 13 Number; 15 Bedlam; 18 Minster; 20 Clout; 22 Nicer; 23 Tipster; 24 Demonstrate. Down: 2 Actor; 3 Isolate; 4 Native; 5 Legal; 6 Sea-wall; 7 Commandment; 8 Informatory; 14 Monocle; 16 Escaper; 17 Grates; 19 Torso; 21 Octet. QUICK SOLUTIONS Across: 1 Therapeutic; 9 Example; 10 False; 11 Enter; 12 Tatters; 13 Invest; 15 Vessel; 18 Ensnare; 20 Learn; 22 Cling; 23 Envious; 24 Represented. Down: 2 Heart; 3 Reports; 4 Plenty; 5 Unfit; 6 Illness; 7 Beneficence; 8 Beastliness; 14 Vestige; 16 Enliven; 17 Recess; 19 Augur; 21 Alone.

King Crossword

CryptoQuote answer

E

This week's Go Figure!

B U

B

A

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I N

P

A G E L

T E T

S

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D

P

N

C N N

N

A L

A

D

N G O

N G U

E

M

I

D D O N

E

L

Mega Maze

E

S L

D

P L

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I I

This week's Snowflake

I

T

H O

A

N

S

S

A

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K

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C R U D

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This week's Sudoku K

A

N D O O R

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71

F

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The Baker's Dozen Trivia Test: 1. Dr Julius Sumner Miller. 2. Matthew. 3. Cocoa Beach, Florida. 4. Phnom Penh. 5. Member of Parliament. 6. Sir Christopher Wren. 7. Sleigh. 8. Bubba. 9. Uranus. 10. Hurricane winds. 11. “Spirit in the Sky”, in 1969. Greenbaum also was responsible for “The Eggplant That Ate Chicago”, released by Dr West’s Medicine Show and Junk Band. 12. It was 1982. 13. “The Rose”, by Bette Midler, in 1979. Midler recorded the song for the soundtrack of the film by the same name. Although nominated in multiple categories for an Academy Award, Best Original Song was not among them because a song must be “original and specifically written for a motion picture”, according to Academy rules.


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Dubbo Weekender 03.07.2015  

Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

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Dubbo Weekender | Friday 03.07.2015 to Sunday 05.07.2015

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