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Issue 30 | WINTER 2013

Silver Linings

Moving Library Management into the Cloud Re-writing the Book

Digital innovation and traditional values come together in Birmingham’s new library

Transforming college libraries A new LMS for Further Education

All change for RFID – ensure you stay up to date


WELCOME TO PANLIBUS

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Reach your audience

Leeds City Council

Welcome to my first edition of Panlibus Magazine. Our Winter edition has a technological flavour, focusing on the benefits that technology brings not just to frontline library staff, but to their customers and partners, whether they’re students or members of the public.

18 RFID Technology Futures within the Library 4-5 Library of Birmingham – Rewriting the book The new Library of Birmingham was finally unveiled to the public in September and has received much publicity at a local and international level. Brian Gambles, Director, Library of Birmingham, explains the planning and delivery involved in providing a world-class facility.

digital signage

desktop messaging

mobile applications

solus.co.uk/app Solus UK Ltd James Watt Building, James Watt Avenue, East Kilbride G75 0QD Tel. 01355 813600 Email. info@solus.co.uk Web. www.solus.co.uk

The winter issue 2013

14 People’s Network – exploring new directions Insight Media provide examples of where significant benefits and cost-saving advantages can be associated with shared service delivery to deliver enhanced IT services. 16-17 Big data – augmented discovery Phil John, Capita’s Web Application Technical Lead, discusses how unlocking the full potential of the myriad of data sources you curate, generate or process is becoming ever more vital for a library service in the 21st century.

6 Mobile devices and library strategy: Meeting expectations Paul Williams, Birmingham City University’s eLibrary Manager, talks about the mobile strategy adopted at BCU, the voice of their students and why the provision of services through mobile devices is no longer a nice-to-have extra but simply 18-19 RFID technology Futures expected. within the library Mick Fortune reviews the changes 8-9 Reshaping copyright ahead for Library RFID, outlining the clearance standards and key developments Nottingham Trent University Library you should be aware of. and Learning Resources simplify their digitisation workflow, automate 20-21 Discovery and catalogue complex copyright clearance inter-operability checks and deliver scanned Solving the challenges of materials to students in their course integration through partnership reading lists with the help of Talis and collaboration, the University of Aspire Education. Winchester met the challenge of integrating a discovery service and 10 Capita launch Strato, a new a library catalogue that met both LMS for colleges the needs of the library and the Panlibus interview Capita’s Head of demands of its students. Libraries, Karen Reece, about the launch of their new LMS into the 26 Nielsen Further Education sector, a logical Nielsen LibScan most borrowed step for Capita. titles over the period 11th August to 7th September, which sees fiction 12-13 Leeds City Council still dominating the Neilsen LibScan In this case study we hear about borrowing chart, with Crime, Thriller Leeds City Council’s decision to and Adventure taking seven of the move their Library Management ten places. System to a fully hosted cloud solution from Capita.

I was delighted recently when I boarded a train heading to Birmingham City Centre and several stops into my journey, some very excited primary school children boarded the train. Their teacher explained that they were going to visit the new Library of Birmingham. Whether this was a coincidence or not, I thought it was quite ironic - and timely - given my new role. Here, Brian Gambles, Director, Library of Birmingham, provides us with an overview of the planning involved to deliver world-class facilities that incorporate emerging technologies to provide engaging experiences for their customers. This issue’s articles span both public and academic libraries, where we have looked at the success achieved by implementing technology and solutions that can really make a difference to front line services. These range from the use of mobile technology, expected as a given by customers today, to simplifying digitisation workflow and automating complex copyright clearance checks, through to a move by Leeds City Council to move to a fully hosted cloud based solution. Insight Media Internet explain the potential to apply some of the same principles to the delivery of other library services, given that the People’s Network and public access computers are now integral to the library’s core service provision. Mick Fortune also provides us with insight into the changes ahead for Library RFID and standards. So lots of content to digest and I hope you enjoy this issue. We encourage you to get in touch with your thoughts on any of the articles. If you have any topics you would like to share with the library world in future issues, then I would be extremely pleased to hear from you as I am now planning for 2014.

Wendy Pugh Editor, Panlibus Magazine libraries-panlibus@capita.co.uk

Panlibus Magazine is a Capita production

ISSN 1749-1002 Knights Court Solihull Parkway Birmingham Business Park B37 7YB United Kingdom Telephone: Web site:

+44 (0)121 717 3500 www.capita.co.uk/libraries

The views expressed in this magazine are those of the contributors for which Capita accepts no responsibility. Readers should take appropriate advice before acting on any issue raised. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is strictly prohibited. ©Capita. All rights reserved. Capita and the Capita logo are trademarks of Capita or its licensors in the United Kingdom and/or other countries. Other companies and products mentioned may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Winter 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Library of Birmingham – Rewriting the book

Library of Birmingham – Re-writing the Book

Library of Birmingham – “Rewriting the book” Brian Gambles, Director, Library of Birmingham (LoB)

Our vision for the Library of Birmingham aimed to provide world-class facilities combining digital innovation and the best traditional values of library and archive services. To meet this vision we wanted to embrace emerging technologies so as to create new and engaging experiences for our customers. In the early stages of the building design and the developing digital vision for LoB, we spent time talking to innovators in the digital space. A dialogue took place with the more traditional innovators such as IBM and Philips, online leaders like Google, Amazon and emerging creative SMEs working in the digital space.

Challenge to libraries

The challenge was to deliver digital in a way that was relevant to existing and new customers, but as part of both the physical experience in the building and the increasingly important online journey. From late 2008, the Library of Birmingham engaged with Service Birmingham, the City’s ICT partner, to build a team within the library project, who would lead the digital strategy development, ICT implementation and subsequently the service transformation. Even at this stage, the LoB recognised the importance of a new transformed business model enabled by ICT, as was clearly stated in the original ICT Blueprint for LoB:

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Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

“Taken in its totality this model represents a new paradigm of customer-focused service delivery which only becomes possible through enabling ICT. It releases staff using a range of technologies and new working practices to play an increasingly customer-focused role. It represents a revolution in customer interaction and service and is entirely consistent with the developing social themes of personalisation of service, social interaction and the delivery of a rewarding, fulfilling and sustainable experience to the future customer of the library.”

Digital infrastructure

In shaping our programme for ICT, we recognised the importance of stable foundations to support the future delivery of digital services. With this in mind, we have invested in a robust future-proofed infrastructure across the building, comprising of gigabit ethernet across all floors, redundant high speed wide area network links and a quality communications systems. All ICT operates across the IP network supporting voice, data and wifi provision. In the same way that the structural design of the LoB was critical to get right, so was the ICT infrastructure supporting all of our online and in-building services. As our ICT Programme Manager, Peter Marsden reported in the first week after opening, “The ICT systems in the building have stabilised very quickly, with only a handful of helpdesk calls outstanding at the end of the first week of opening. The 4,200 public wifi sessions and 3,000 internet PC sessions in the first week were completed by customers

with virtually no problems. This was in the main due to a robust design and thorough implementation of the ICT infrastructure.”

New ICT solutions

opening we have received much positive feedback from visitors with examples such as: “The whole library is an adventure – I especially loved the new technology”.

Major new investment into ICT solutions commenced in 2009 to build a range of systems to support the future customer interactions, which included:

The LoB has also developed a modern digitally enabled conference, interview and training suite.

• A  new digital asset management system for digitised content. • The replacement of the existing library management system for book issue, management and automation. • A new LoB branded web-site to deliver digital content and library services.

Following the successful opening of the LoB, internet access throughout the building has continued to be in high demand with a mix of standard, research, microform and information point PCs. Self service touch based information points have been well received and are in constant use by customers, providing access to the book catalogue, FAQs, membership joining and building features.

Customer facing staff enabled with hands free Vocera “mobile telephony” devices provide instant, wifi supported conversations with colleagues anywhere in the building. Plans are progressing to provision iPad devices to staff in dealing with customer enquiries.

Building wide digital engagement

Throughout the building there has been an emphasis on customer interaction and self service but at all times we have worked closely with the architects to ensure that the digital experience integrates into the building design. Examples of what has been delivered include: a large 22 screen digital gallery; an events and marketing media wall in the foyer; multiple digital screens across the building; digital enabled gallery space; suite of BFI Mediatheque booths; interactive touch tables with digitised archive content and an interactive screen based Kinect application situated in the café area. In the time since

Internet access

Innovation

Digital innovation delivering new online customer experiences has been at the heart of the LoB development, with a clear recognition of the potential to address new channels of access and build commercially viable platforms for the cultural sector. Partnerships with national agencies, online suppliers and local creative and digital SMEs have been critical to this area of development. With some innovative research and development, the LoB has achieved much in repositioning libraries in the digital online space. Examples of this include: Digital Gallery: Using a multi-screen array and digital processor unit, amazing library content is displayed in a wide range of existing formats. The first digital gallery at the Library showcases a photographic collection of 1000 personalised self portrait photos of Birmingham people.

Dozens & Trails: This mobile app provides the user with access to the broad range of LoB collections and content either through ‘Dozens’ - a presentation of 12 linked assets from the LoB, or ‘Trails’ - themed trails around the city. Users can share assets via their social media networks as well as purchase high quality prints of some of the collections through a print on demand service which has been built into the app. Google partnership: The LoB has become the first public library partner with Google’s Cultural Institute - a visual online exhibition platform. This partnership will provide access to a worldwide audience for LoB’s collections. Other partners include the Anne Frank Museum, Nelson Mandela Archive and Smithsonian Library.

ways of engaging with customers. For the LoB, it is primarily about enriching the customer’s experience through the technology. We recognised the importance of sustaining the digital experience through future proofing the technology (where possible) and developing opportunities for our partners to work with us on new investments in innovation to sustain the vision for LoB’s digital journey.” The LoB has established itself as a major visitor attraction. As one of our recent visitors says, “Good work, stunning on the outside, stunning on the inside. Absolutely fantastic!” but we will need to keep our digital innovation fresh with new initiatives and ongoing investment.

Information Overlord: Build your own Library of Birmingham, this prototype mobile /browser based game is based around a resource management theme and gives an informal experience through which to find out more about the wide variety of content, collections and services that the LoB offers. FLIC: Future Libraries Interactive Catalogue uses visual search to explore the book catalogue and collections. This application in development will illustrate the size and scale of the Library’s holdings and enable exploration through deep zoom technology.

Photo: Christian Richter

Future

The LoB has achieved much, but as our innovation lead Rebecca Bartlett explains we are still in the early stages of developing the LoB’s digital strategy and sustainability is crucial. “There is a significant risk that digital innovation in 2013 will quickly be superseded as new technologies emerge along with new

FIND OUT MORE Web: http://www.libraryofbirmingham.com/ Twitter: @LibraryofBham

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Winter 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Mobile devices and library strategy

Mobile devices and library strategy: Meeting expectations Paul Williams , eLibrary Manager, Birmingham City University

Ask anybody who has recently started a new job in unfamiliar surroundings, and they will always tell you that it takes a little while to understand the culture of your new place of work. Libraries are complex places, with interdependent teams of very committed individuals, high standards and a central service to deliver. They need common goals to bring them together, a sense of strategy and purpose, and these need to be articulated with clarity and a genuine drive to just get it right. So, as a new member of the team, on my first day at Birmingham City University, this is what I was looking for. What did they see as the most important factor that brings us together? The answer was clear – we work in partnership with students, engage with them in their issues and use every opportunity to understand what they want from our service. This message comes through at every meeting, every corridor conversation, and underpins every key decision we make, so as organisational cultures go, it’s pretty unmistakeable. Why am I telling you this in an article on mobile strategies? Well, the uptake of mobile technology is one of those areas where the student voice has been quite unambiguous. Our formal conversations with our student partners, our feedback gathered online and in the libraries themselves, and those allimportant chats over the helpdesk all indicate that provision of our services through mobile devices is no longer a nice-to-have fringe benefit. It’s quite simply expected and if we don’t reflect that in our plans, then we risk becoming dangerously disconnected from those students who we work so closely with. Let’s take a very practical example of this in action. In common with most University (and many public) libraries, we now provide access to an enormous, varied and multi-platform

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Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

array of online resources. At last count, our resource discovery system numbered over 85 million articles and our library catalogue served an ever-growing number of users, all keen to view or download full text books and articles from wherever they were. While the last few years have established the model that people can access at whatever time they feel most appropriate –“Studying at 3am? No problem, use one of our ebooks!” - location was a little more binary. Are you on campus or off? This has become a much more nuanced conversation very quickly, and it is reflecting in how we plan our provision. Expectations dictate that I can access your service on the train, on my iPad, my mobile, my previously unheard of tablet that I bought on eBay. This is not a nice extra which can make us feel like we’re going the extra mile, this is pure expectation. Mobile devices are so all-pervasive across our student body that it is simply common sense for us to continually audit our resources to understand how they work across these platforms. If we don’t know, we can’t support, advise and purchase effectively, and that isn’t an option. Of course, this expectation extends to our staff too, and here in the eLibrary at BCU, we feel this very keenly. Staff from across the department use mobiles and tablets for all manner of everyday activities, and naturally expect this to extend to their work, looking to us for the right tools. Soprano, Capita’s LMS mobile web application, is the first of many steps in this direction, opening the circulation functionality of Alto (Capita’s LMS) up to library staff in a range of settings across the University. Student rovers in our libraries use a fleet of iPads to help their peers settle, help them understand the library a little better, and resolve any of those all-important account issues. For colleagues across the department, this is expanding into using Soprano as part of their outreach activities, taking a tablet device into the departments and social spaces, advising students on the resources available to them using the personalised recommendations. In line with their expectations, it’s easy to navigate, quick and simple to use, and very visual.

It’s easy to make incorrect assumptions that passing trends are a deep-rooted change in the attitudes of our users, and I’m sure we’ve all been guilty of that from time to time. In the case of mobile technology though, it would take a brave librarian to suggest that this is anything other than a fundamental part of how a large portion of the population communicate, read, share, study and play. That’s an expectation which, with our students’ help, we find ourselves in a good position to embrace.

FIND OUT MORE http://www.bcu.ac.uk Twitter: @paulwillia

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Reshaping copyright clearance

Re-shaping Copyright Clearance

Re-shaping Copyright Clearance Nottingham Trent University Library and Learning Resources simplify their digitisation workflow, automate complex copyright clearance checks and deliver scanned materials to students in their course reading lists. The challenges: • Manual checking of complex copyright licensing terms • Disjointed course resource provision • Meeting the legal requirements for reporting and documentation • Difficult to resource digitisation service • Anxiety about CLA compliance

The Outcomes: • Seamless workflows with automated Copyright Licencing Agency (CLA) clearance checks • All resources embedded in reading lists • Reporting and tracking automated to meet CLA requirements • Easier for the Library to meet peaks and troughs in demand • Peace of mind about CLA compliance Nottingham Trent University is a large and successful higher education institution with an embedded Gold Standard Customer Service strategy. As part of its commitment to this corporate objective, Libraries and Learning Resources (LLR) adopted Talis Aspire Reading Lists at an early stage, and also established

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Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

a small digitisation service which made more scanned materials available online to support student learning. Unfortunately the initial digitisation workflow was manual and labourintensive. “There was a great deal of data input and updates involved,” says Dorothy Atherton, Services Manager in the Resource Acquisition and Supply Team. To comply with the terms of the CLA licence, the item requested for digitisation had to be held by the Library, in print but not in e-book format, and in the latest edition. Library staff also had to check that the item was not listed by the CLA as ‘excluded’ material, and that the chapter had not already been scanned for that particular module. These time consuming checks slowed the service down, especially when Library staff needed to return requests to academics for clarification. In addition, the administrative burden of reporting and documentation placed a heavy demand on staff resources and it was difficult for LLR to scale up provision or adjust resourcing levels to meet seasonal variations in demand.

Nottingham Trent University enhances its acquisitions processing The adoption of the Talis Aspire Reading List module raised expectations of course resource delivery. The module gives academics a single channel for communicating their

resource requirements to the library and making course materials available to their students. However the manual digitisation service lay outside this streamlined workflow, and the Library was keen to align it with the new module. Helen Adey, Team Manager in the Resource Acquisition and Supply Team, explains: “We wanted the academic to tell us what their students needed through a single communication channel, and let the Library work out the best way to deliver it.” Meanwhile students, who wanted quick and easy access to recommended resources, could not access digitised content on their reading lists along with other types of resource. Instead, they had to go through the virtual learning environment (VLE), as this was the only means of allowing access in a way that complied with restrictions on printing and downloading defined in the CLA licence. Because of the nature of the VLE at Nottingham Trent, the Library would upload the document to the VLE and ask the academic to create the link to make the resource accessible. “We couldn’t be sure that they always did this,” says Dorothy, “and we had to be vigilant in case they put the document in the wrong area, raising compliance concerns.”

Stepping up course resource provision across the University The Library explored a number of alternatives as it tackled these problems,

but neither in-house nor commercial options provided a comprehensive solution. Around that time, Dorothy and her colleague attended a demonstration of Talis Aspire Digitised Content, which gives academics a single channel for all digitisation requests, automates CLA compliance checks and manages access. “We were impressed,” recalls Dorothy. “We saw the opportunity to integrate digitisation with our resource lists and came away thinking that we’d found the right solution.” The Library saw that Talis Aspire Digitised Content represented the next step forward in their provision of course resources. “It ticked all the boxes in terms of both authentication and the compliance-checking workflow,” says Helen. “We were thrilled that one system could meet so many of our needs.” “We were fortunate to have support at the highest levels in the University, where senior managers recognised that all students had the right to access up-to-date and accurate resource lists through which academics could communicate recommended reading to all students,” adds Helen. Talis Aspire Digitised Content would improve the student experience and support the University’s strategic aim of making information available in electronic format where possible.

Rolling out the benefits of Talis Aspire Digitised Content With the help of Talis, Nottingham Trent University deployed the cloud-based Talis Aspire Digitised Content, and Library staff devised the best way of rolling out the project. “We began the roll-out to academics by selecting a number of pilot modules within three schools,” says Dorothy. “We deliberately chose academics who would give us forthright feedback, and so far they have all been very happy.” With Talis Aspire Digitised Content, academics can make digitisation requests on a form which auto-populates with bibliographic data where possible, reducing guesswork and errors. All CLA compliance checks are performed at the point of submission, returning an immediate decision. The module guides

academics through any queries on the spot, and resolves any issues directly with the Library. “We hope that an improved service for academics may encourage wider use of the service,” says Dorothy, “and make more materials easily available when and where required.” Nottingham Trent University, being a customer-centric institution, sees the benefits primarily in terms of the student experience.

The Library is keen to introduce more flexibility into its operations. “Previously we had one staff-member working solely on the digitisation service,” says Dorothy. “Removing the need for that specialist knowledge means that we can draft people in and out of teams according to peaks and troughs. Talis Aspire Digitised Content lifts away the burden of compliance decision-making from individual staff-members. We know that Talis has worked with the CLA in development and that we can

“It’s a great system; students love it, academics like its simplicity, and it has transformed our back-office workflows,” concludes Dorothy. “When we go fully live, students will find it easier to access more of their materials directly through their resource lists. For students, the fact that it’s all integrated means a more seamless experience,” says Jill Walker, Resource Assistant. Talis Aspire provides reassurance around access compliance. The module and its embeddable player work with institutional authentication mechanisms, opening up scanned materials on the reading lists, getting full value from the CLA licence while restricting print and download rights to cohort groups. Library staff can publish all scanned content directly onto the system, as an integral part of the digitisation workflow, giving the University complete peace of mind about CLA compliance. “The module brings everything together and takes away the complexity of checking, in a system that is very easy to use,” says Jill.

Quantifying the return on investment “When we compared previous workflows with Talis Aspire Digitised Content, we worked out that we could save between 10 and 15 minutes on each of the 800 new requests we receive every year,” says Dorothy. “That’s a considerable saving, and to that we can add savings from invalid requests, which the system rejects before they reach the Library. The time savings allow us to use staffing resources more flexibly and make improvements across all our services.”

depend on the judgement of the system.” The student experience adds an important dimension to the return on investment. “Previously students had to go outside the resource list environment to find book chapters and journal articles recommended in their reading lists”, says Helen. “Providing direct access from the reading list should increase their use of the content that academics and the Library have made available to them.”

A one-stop shop for all digitised content The priority for Nottingham Trent University now is to achieve 100 per cent roll-out, so all academics can make digitisation requests directly onto the system by the start of the next academic year. “It’s the Library staff who understand how much work the system carries out behind the scenes; only we know the difference it make to our workflows,” adds Helen. “Academics and students just see that it works for them. It gives the academic a single route for telling the Library what they want to recommend to their students, who now have seamless access to all electronic resources, whether they’re e-journals, e-books or digitised documents.”

FIND OUT MORE talis.com info@talis.com

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Winter 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Capita launch new LMS for Colleges

Strato – A new library management system for colleges

Increase student satisfaction by offering 24/7 access to IT equipment whist saving valuable staff time!

Karen Reece, Head of Libraries, Capita

Panlibus talks to Capita’s Head of Libraries, Karen Reece, about Strato, a new LMS that aims to transform college libraries. Panlibus: There are several library management systems in use by colleges. What’s different about Strato? Karen: With Strato we set out to create an LMS that’s a significant step up from the solutions currently being used by the further education sector. Our aim was to create an LMS that would meet students’ growing expectations as well as system that made life easier for college staff. Prior to developing Strato we did some significant research amongst the FE library community to ensure we delivered a solution that met colleges’ needs. There are many things that are different but being a cloud based solution, being optimised for mobile devices and the discovery experience particularly stand out. Panlibus: Use on mobile devices sounds interesting; can you tell us a bit more about that? Karen: The ability to work on smartphones and tablets was an absolute must have feature. The latest research from OFCOM reveals that 77% of 16-24 year olds now own a smartphone and research by IDC (International Data Corporation) indicates that tablets will outsell PCs this year. The discovery interface in Strato recognises the device you are using and provides an optimal user experience. If you’re accessing it on your smartphone you get a simplified experience that’s ideal for your smartphone’s small screen.

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We’ve also designed the staff interface to work on tablet devices enabling staff to roam around the library and beyond assisting students wherever they are. Panlibus: Cloud is a hot topic, why did you go down that route with Strato? Karen: College libraries and resource centres are often staffed by relatively small teams. Delivering Strato as a cloud based solution means that library staff can focus on supporting students rather worrying about running the latest LMS version, ensuring it is backed up and secure or installing software on PCs. Strato is delivered from Capita’s secure datacentres eradicating the need for colleges to manage your own costly hardware and locally installed software all that’s needed to access the service is a device with a web browser. Panlibus: How are electronic resources catered for? Karen: Strato enables students to search for both physical and electronic resources from a single search box and provides a single set of relevance ranked search results. If the college subscribes to electronic journals using EBSCO’s Discovery service then they even search both the library catalogue and EBSCO at the same time and directly access journal articles provided by EBSCO. Panlibus: Are there any other features that will help improve the student experience? Karen: The whole discovery interface has been designed with the student in mind. In many ways it’s more like Amazon than a traditional library catalogue. The system can recommend items based on a users borrowing history and students can leave reviews to help other students. The system can also be integrated into your Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to ensure that students have a single destination for all College information.

Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

Larger colleges may be interested in the support for self service kiosks enabling the opening hours to be extended. Panlibus: What else can we expect from Strato? Karen: Lots. Strato is a complete library management system so you’ll get all the features you would expect from an LMS. Colleges will also benefit from being able to link Strato to other systems such as the student management information system enabling colleges to easily synchronise data with their LMS. Panlibus: Why did Capita decide to develop Strato? Karen: Capita’s library business has significant expertise providing library systems to the academic library market. Our systems are currently used by over 40 universities across the UK and Ireland as well as a small number of colleges. Capita plc has considerable expertise in the further education market. For example, today over 150 colleges use our UNIT-e student management information system. At the same time colleges are delivering more higher education and increasingly focusing on the student experience. Putting these factors together meant that developing a solution for further education was a logical step.

Offering an equipment loan service is a great way to increase student satisfaction. However, many libraries are worried about the potential drain on valuable staff resources to effectively manage such a facility. The MyritracTM system from Bretford, offers a secure, self-service deployment and equipment tracking solution to manage such a facility with the most efficient use of staff time.

• Allows the potential to provide 24/7 access to IT equipment • Compatible with existing library management software • Compatible with standard student interface systems i.e. RFID, swipe card, key pad or biometric access control

• User access rights can be set and equipment tracked either locally or remotely via an intranet or web based connection

• Gives responsibility of the IT loan to the student helping to reduce damage & loss

FIND OUT MORE Web: www.capita.co.uk/libraries Email: cssenquiries@capita.co.uk Tel: 0870 400 5000

• Offers total control over the equipment loan process as ALL transactions are monitored and logged

• Integrated alarms to monitor and advise of improper use or abuse • Integrated power management system ensures optimum charging time for stored IT equipment

For more information or to book a FREE demonstration contact Bretford on

Tel: 01753 53 99 55 Email: uksales@bretford.com

www.myritrac.co.uk


Leeds City Council

Leeds City Council

Silver linings How Leeds City Council moved library management into the cloud When the library management system server needed replacing, Leeds City Council seized the opportunity to review the latest technology available to them. It took advantage of the benefits of Chorus, a fully hosted cloud library management solution from Capita. The bigger you are and the more necessary your service is, the harder it sometimes is to change it. Leeds City Council is pretty significant in terms of size – it has 36 static libraries, eight mobile libraries, one school library service and almost 90,000 active borrowers. Its library management system (LMS) helps users discover hundreds of thousands of books, ebooks and other items, and helps its libraries stock and issue them more than three million times a year.

A choice

As the hardware supporting the whole LMS was ageing, the library service was faced with a choice. Sandra Sharp, Electronic Services M anager at the Library and Information Service, explains: “Our server was reaching ‘end of life’ so we knew we needed to either replace it or look at other options. I was keen to find out more about a hosted cloud solution that could potentially lower costs and reduce the management time, but it was important that we did not risk service levels to customers.” The council had an existing relationship with Capita and felt Chorus would offer a service they could rely on as well as the benefits they were looking for. “Moving to a cloud based system was the sensible choice,” says John Daniel, the Senior Technical Advisor at the Library and Information Service. “After all, this is the

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direction the world is heading. I also felt there were advantages to be gained from having our LMS hosted by those who had designed and built it. Who could understand it better, or provide better support?”

Teamwork

Having made the decision to move to a hosted solution, the migration to Chorus went very smoothly. “Capita assigned someone to walk us through the implementation, and they were able to pull in the appropriate people for different parts of the project,” says John. Moving to a hosted solution requires planning and, like many organisations, there was a complex network set up within Leeds City Council. Integration with the self-service machines and other council corporate systems such as the finance system was needed, so any issues that came up were worked through, with the Leeds and Capita teams collaborating closely on solutions. “Capita don’t leave you to sort things out by yourself,” says John. “When our existing network processes needed to be joined to the new system, such as when a borrower gives us their postcode and we find their address, Capita were happy to liaise with Corporate IT to get this right.”

“We have a fully future proofed system.” Sandra Sharp, Electronic Services Manager at the Library and Information Service, Leeds City Council

Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

The customer experience

One of the most significant results of the switch was probably that borrowers were not aware that anything had changed. “Our customers didn’t notice any difference, which is what we wanted,” says Sandra. The differences behind the scenes were more significant, however. Using Chorus means Leeds City Council no longer has any hardware on site to look after. There are no servers for Corporate IT to monitor, and Capita deals with any data protection concerns. It also means Leeds City Council doesn’t need to worry about coping with increasing demand or the system becoming slow at peak times as it is Capita’s responsibility to ensure there is always the capacity to meet needs.

Speed and simplicity

“The LMS is now much quicker than it was before. The team that works on our performance indicators say they are able to run their reports faster too, so it’s saving us time in a number of places,” explains John. In addition, there are other advantages; “Security is tighter than ever, and we have simplified the network which helps integrate with the third party systems we use. It also reduces the potential number of points of failure. If anything happened, we would have less places to look as well as a single point of contact at Capita.”

“Overall I feel confident that we have a fully future proofed system,” says Sandra. “And I’m glad that in another five years, we won’t have to buy new servers!”

Key benefits at Leeds City Council • System runs more quickly • Improved security • Capacity to meet peak demands • Performance reports completed faster • Energy and time savings anticipated • Significantly reduced overhead for Corporate IT • No interruption to customer service

Key features of Capita’s Chorus hosted solution

• No need for hardware onsite • No maintenance, replacement or upgrading operating system costs • Frees staff from routine maintenance and administration • Fully scalable • Available 24/7 • Reduces the overall cost of ownership

FIND OUT MORE Email: libraries-enquiries@capita.co.uk

In fact, significant time is being saved as IT staff no longer have to check everything is running smoothly each day, back up the server, or perform security patches upgrades to the operating system as this is now Capita’s responsibility. The council is also expecting to note savings in energy costs through not having the servers located on site.

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Winter 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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People’s Network – Exploring new directions

People’s Network – Exploring new directions Neil Johnson, Managing Director, Insight Media Internet Limited

We keep hearing phrases like “software as a service”, “hosted services” and “managed services” and these have been promoted by some as the way to go! We can see how some of these services have been adopted in the library market with more Library Management Systems (LMSs) being externally hosted and service solutions. This combined with a move towards shared systems and service delivery does appear to offer some real benefits. So if it’s recognised that there are benefits associated with delivering shared, hosted and managed LMSs, is there the potential to apply some of the same principles to the delivery of other library services to provide similar benefits? The People’s Network and public access computers are now an integral part of a library’s core service provision. With increased demand and greater expectations by the public for more computers with internet access and more demanding applications, the load on library servers and network services continues to increase. Replacing these servers and extending existing networks to accommodate additional public access can be costly and challenging. It is not just the hardware, software and centralised infrastructure that needs to be considered, but also the telecommunications and connectivity along with the resources to deliver, manage and support these services. Whilst we have seen our customers adopt externally hosted, shared and managed LMS implementations, we have also experienced an increase in the number of People’s Network deployments where Insight Media are providing hosted and managed services. This includes our iCAM range of products incorporating computer booking and access management system, our print control and public wireless hotspots. Although the products and services provided will vary within our customer base we believe the majority of our customers are looking to reduce the overall cost of ownership and improve the services they provide but without increasing workloads or compromising their support and security levels.

Insight Media’s hosted service from our Datacentre has become a popular managed service for our customers where we provide database and web server provision. Some customers who initially implemented our products on their own servers have subsequently moved to our hosted solution to improve the service and support arrangements. Some customers adopted the hosted route from the onset as opposed to providing or using their own servers. When a customer’s server is reaching end of life or needs upgrading, we would naturally explore the options of a hosted service and the additional enhanced benefits this type of service can provide. East Renfrewshire Libraries were one such customer who implemented iCAM Workstation Control, our booking and access management solution which utilises the libraries’ public network and our Datacentre. Scott Simpson, Systems Manager at East Renfrewshire, said “Insight Media’s hosted solution has removed the overhead for us of managing a dedicated server while at the same time meeting the demands of our corporate IT dept. We have been able to maintain the same level of application administration and control without having to worry about server hardware, patches and upgrades. The same hosted database is also used for our public Wi-Fi provision and management.” Enfield Libraries implemented a hosted Wi-Fi solution running from Insight Media’s Datacentre completely independently of the existing council network and lines. This comprehensive solution is delivered as a managed service with both customer and end user support. Within a couple of months of installing Enfield’s Hotspots in the first three sites, the library service decided to implement the same solution in five more libraries. Madeline Barratt, Libraries & Museum Service Business Manager, Enfield Council, said “With the growth of hand held and portable devices, offering Wi-Fi in libraries is vital to developing new user groups and ensuring libraries remain relevant in local

Self-Service Charging Lockers

communities. Insight Media are able to offer key requirements such as integration with the Library Management System, a range of statistical data and a flexible approach to set up and configuration. Insight Media also offer a proactive approach to technical support and system management that gives us a degree of confidence. Users and staff are very happy with speed and stability and we’re looking forward to the further roll out.” East Lothian Council made significant changes to their People’s Network to further enhance the library service when they implemented iCAM Workstation Control, iCAM Printer Control and public Wi-Fi across all their libraries. This work included changes to the underlying public network, which was migrated from its existing telecoms provision onto an ADSL system, with aspects of the service being delivered as a managed service. The implementation utilises Capita Keystone Borrower Services for real time authentication purposes. Alan Cruickshank, IT Services Manager at the Council, said “Insight Media’s solution has enabled us to completely restructure our People’s Network, saving approximately £30,000 a year whilst expanding the service to include the Wi-Fi hotspots. Insight Media have been an excellent partner to work with, consistently meeting the challenging targets set on this project whilst maintaining a customer friendly focus which has ensured minimal disruption to the libraries and the public.” So in summary, there can, in certain situations, be significant benefits and cost savings associated with shared service delivery when working with strategic partners to deliver enhanced IT services. These projects are just a few examples of how a review of service delivery by IT departments and library services can lead to changes in service provision that not only save money but can significantly enhance the services provided.

FIND OUT MORE

The Diplomat™ range of self-service charging lockers securely store and safely charge laptops, netbooks or tablets in individual user bays. The Diplomat™ LMS provides students and teachers with individual access to securely stored and charged laptops netbooks or tablets using our intelligent access control system, which links directly into your existing Library Management System. The locker enables librarians to track and monitor equipment use and save resources, whilst providing students with greater freedom and an improved user experience. Students take ownership of the loaned device which leads to reduced damage and loss of equipment.

Functionality • Individual access, allocation and deployment of securely stored and safely charged laptops or tablets • Simultaneous charging of all devices • Always loans the best charged device • Provides 24/7 access to IT equipment • Students can be identified by RFID, barcode, magnetic stripe or biometrics • 19” touchscreen user interface - fully customisable • Unlimited number of lockers can be deployed • Network compatible for Data Transfer (optional)

Visit www.diplomatlocker.com to view our case studies

Email: info@insight-media.co.uk Tel: 0844 335 6350 Web: www.insight-media.co.uk

Call now for a free onsite demo 14

Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

0800 130 3456

sales@lapsafe.com


Big data – augmented discovery

Big Data – Augmented Discovery

Big data and augmented discovery Phil John, Technical Lead, Capita

What is “Big Data”? Is it a definition based on the volume of data being processed? How about the complexity of the data? Or even, the ability of an entity to store, process and use this data to power their services? It’s all of these things, and making sure you’re unlocking the full potential of the myriad of data sources you curate, generate or process is becoming ever more vital for a library service in the 21st century. Libraries are finding themselves managing so many disparate resources that furnishing their borrowers with effective tools for finding all of these “things” is no longer a “nice to have” but a necessity. As the Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC) gives way to the unified discovery interface, a move spearheaded in the academic sector, but increasingly being adopted by the public sector, the requirement for systems that can handle these increasingly large data processing needs is coming to the forefront. Data sets from archival services, institutional repositories, archaeological reports and local-interest image repositories need to be harvested and indexed, which would stretch the traditional, locally deployed search system to breaking point; the number of items “held” by some “average” libraries has increased exponentially from hundreds of thousands to many millions. Disparate data sources pose a problem – how do you find a common way of expressing this data that allows it to be indexed, retrieved and displayed? MARC 21 data from the LMS is very different to Encoded Archival Description (EAD) data from the archives system for example. Several years ago we realised that we needed a more flexible data model to make harvesting, processing and knitting together this volume, and spectrum, of data feasible. We chose, and have pioneered, the use of Resource Description Framework (RDF) and Linked Data to express library data, which has since been validated by more recent

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efforts such as OCLC’s Virtual International Authority File (VIAF), the British Library’s Linked Open British National Bibliography (BNB) and Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME). We made the decision to build our “next generation” products on a foundation of RDF as it brought many benefits over competing data processing standards, and avoided some of the common pitfalls. Fitting, and managing, data of different “shapes” into a traditional relational database management system would have led to a sub-optimal schema design, with hundreds of attributes that may only apply to a subset of items. Conversely, using a modern “NoSQL” document or key/ value store would allow a freer, schema-less, data storage pattern, but preclude us from performing complex queries or analysis in real time. RDF on the other hand, allows us to have “the best of both worlds”: a flexible, but defined, schema and a powerful query language (SPARQL) that makes finding and reasoning about links and patterns in wildly differing data sets quick and easy. Furthermore, since it is based on the premise of “anyone can say anything anywhere” we can pull in, and merge other data sets (such as the aforementioned VIAF) simply by ensuring that we refer to entities by a common identifier, in this case a URI. We can identify authors in a MARC 21 record and refer to them by their VIAF URI, which then allows us to traverse the graph and find a Wikipedia link, allowing us to enrich the experience with a biography and image. This way we can talk about an author, such as JK Rowling, as a concrete entity, and not just “text in a record”. Subjects can also

The data is all there, it’s just waiting to be used. be augmented with the Linked Data Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), allowing us to link to subjects and provide further jumping off points to related subjects, eg the Champagne region of France linking to items about the eponymous beverage.

Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

It’s also possible to weave commercial data sets, such as enhanced enrichments, into catalogue records; surfacing them in searches and displaying them prominently on full record displays. Only storing this data once, and materialising it when we have matching items, allows us to keep storage requirements and query speed manageable. To support all of these requirements, we’ve built a Linked Data platform that allows us to store and reason over tens of billions of RDF triples, which will allow us to shoulder the big data needs of our customers for the foreseeable future. Building a system that can return results in a split second was no easy task, and a great deal of research and development was undertaken to choose the very best components and ensure they work together in a robust and performant way.

Our platform is able to harvest data that sits in the LMS silo, convert it and store it in a format that can be used for powering these services. Our recommendations system is one example; by taking circulation data, we can generate recommendations for items, and borrowers, repurposing data that was previously only used for a single purpose – managing issues and discharges. This data is used not only in Prism for generating item recommendations, but also in Soprano to recommend new items based on a borrower’s past lending history, which can be used to assist vital services such as housebound visitors, helping them decide what to take when visiting a borrower. Our ability to merge in data from other sources also comes into play here, as we can leverage disparate data sets like clickstream logs, and user-contributed lists to further refine the results.

Another use for the wealth of data that resides in the LMS is data mining, of the type undertaken by supermarkets and other large businesses. They feed the wealth of data they collect on customers and transactions into machine learning systems, which allows them to target salient offers that will entice shoppers back into the store. This type of analysis has, until recently, been out of reach for all but the largest of companies, but with the massive decreases in cost of large-scale computing power, thanks to the commoditisation led by the likes of Amazon Web Services, it’s possible for libraries to also use this to drive re-engagement. Feeding data from the LMS into our platform, we’ll soon be able to automatically categorise borrowers into distinct groups, and allow the library to target them more effectively, e.g. there may be a group of borrowers who initially joined, used the

services and then let their level of engagement tail off; re-engaging these borrowers with events they may be interested in or informing them of new stock in genres they’ve shown a preference for previously. Having a library management system that can unlock, analyse, and harness this large scale of data will give libraries using it a distinct advantage; offering borrowers innovative and genuinely useful features to keep them coming back to the discovery interface, providing tools to help reach out to and re-engage past borrowers, giving deeper insights into stock levels and usage. The data is all there, it’s just waiting to be used.

FIND OUT MORE http://www.forbes.com/sites/ciocentral/2013/04/22/ big-data-isnt-about-big/

We can now also pull in external search results, and present them in a unified way, as we have started doing with EBSCO’s discovery service. Academic customers are able to surface the majority of their physical and electronic holdings via Prism’s intuitive interface, all powered by a single search box. By pulling in other data that we hold, we can also augment these external search results with ratings and reviews, and allow them to be placed on reading lists and exported to citation management software. This platform wasn’t just designed with the goal of search and discovery in mind; over time, libraries have built up a massive volume of data; data that is rife for harnessing to offer innovative services for borrowers, and to drive engagement of its resources as a whole. The problem? This data, and therefore this promise of innovation, is tied up in what we term a “data silo”. Some library services have put a lot of effort into harnessing their data, however, this is often a labour intensive exercise, one that is becoming increasingly impractical with the constant pressures on budgets and staffing levels. Shouldn’t these data processing capabilities, and resultant benefits form part of the standard offering by LMS providers?

Clickstream logs are logs saved by our webserver of every page accessed by people - which allows us to map a “path” through the site taken by each visitor. www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Winter 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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RFID Technology Futures within the Library

RFID Technology Futures within the Library

Changes ahead for library RFID Latest news about standards and other developments Mick Fortune, Managing Director, Library RFID Limited

As long ago as 2009, Cisco published a presentation suggesting that to focus on the “ID” part of the RFID acronym was rather missing the point. A JISC Techwatch report (published in 2006) referred to the use of RFID tags in libraries as being “barcodes on steroids”, an association which has set the tone for how most UK libraries have viewed them ever since. But it’s not just an ID – it’s an interactive, reprogrammable, multi-use, multipurpose piece of intelligence attached to an item - and we’re only just beginning to figure out how it can be made more productive. Many of the changes happening at the moment are a consequence of what we did – or didn’t do – when we first started using the technology, so a little context might help explain why these changes are needed. When RFID was first launched into the library world - I first saw it when 3M invited me to a discussion at the IFLA congress in Stockholm in 1990 - it was new and exciting, and no-one seemed quite sure what to do with it. In effect it was 3M who made that decision by using it to combine ID and security in order to streamline their existing self-service option - and things haven’t really changed much since.

All this is now changing… LMS suppliers, myself included at the time, have never really got to grips with the potential RFID offers for improving library workflows or user experiences and tended to view it as “someone else’s product” - one that security companies used to provide self-service circulation. They all (eventually) adopted SIP (3M’s Standard Interface Protocol) which prescribed how data should be exchanged between an LMS and a self-service solution (and pre-dated RFID). Very few considered using RFID for anything else, thereby establishing both an interdependence and limits to use that still prevail today. Eventually, RFID suppliers began to find their dependence on SIP a major obstacle to delivering the functionality that their customers demanded and began to find their own ways to work with both tags and connect to LMS systems. New methods of communication and new data elements on tags began to appear both in the UK and in the US. Web services by passed SIP and tags began to store rather more than barcodes.

At the same time there was a boom in RFID adoption – especially in the UK public library sector. Between 2006 and 2012, investment in RFID self-service in this sector appears to have grown more rapidly than almost anywhere else in the world. In some countries, especially those with national library agencies, the potential of RFID was recognised immediately. The Danes saw both the threat and the opportunity for using RFID and rapidly established rules for storing tag data (the Danish Data Model - DDM) that ensured future interoperability between different suppliers. Outside of the handful of European nations that adopted or adapted the DDM, suppliers were left to decide for themselves how best to meet the demands of individual libraries. By 2011, these individual solutions had tended to make it harder to develop new functionality for the whole market, while different ways of storing different data on tags was making the interoperability that libraries sought very difficult to achieve.

In 2010, RFID suppliers announced their full support for a new international data standard to replace the DDM – ISO 28560. Since its publication in 2011, most new UK procurements have mandated ISO 285602. The standard defines a total of 31 data elements, hopefully sufficient for developers to create new services and functionality without resorting to proprietary means.

Standardising tag data was only the first obstacle to be overcome in improving RFID/ LMS integration. The dependence on SIP with its rather narrow view of RFID use was another limiting factor. Apart from SIP, APIs and web services – open and proprietary – have become the most popular means of interacting with the LMS. Each uses its own methodology, data elements and values – and each offers a potentially unique and non-transferable solution.

The immediate effects of this change are twofold. Firstly, anyone using the standard can be assured that wherever they buy their RFID devices they will be able to read and write to their tags. (Early adopters have had to find workarounds to solve this problem – with varying degrees of success). Secondly, application developers now have a standardscompliant – and much larger – market in which to operate.

I think there are two ways to approach this problem. The approach favoured by the National Information Standards Organisation (NISO) has been to develop a new protocol. Indeed NISO are currently developing new versions of both NCIP for self-service and SIP (having been gifted the protocol by 3M in 2012). This strategy relies on the industry supporting the new protocol and potentially sacrificing solutions developed in the interim.

So one of the changes you are likely to see in the next year or so is a growth of new applications for a range of devices able to interact with stock. Two examples I showed delegates to the recent National Acquisitions Group (NAG) conference in York linked items to social networks (in the Netherlands) and used stock items as discovery tools for online searching (in Norway). More are on the way.

The alternative approach – taken by the members of Book Industry Communication (BIC) - has been to try and codify all the elements and values that are exchanged between third party and LMS systems and leave the communication methodology to the developer. BIC members comprise LMS, RFID and other third party suppliers together with representatives from libraries and other interested parties like the Publishers Association, Society of Chief Librarians and CILIP, so it’s a good cross-section of the industry! BIC’s Library Communication Framework (LCF) will be published before the end of 2014 and has already attracted considerable attention in North America.

One other change you may hear about soon also concerns ISO 28560. The ISO Working Group (WG11), of which I am a member, has been asked to agree a new standard for UHF based systems. Only one UK library has reported using UHF (almost all preferring HF) so this is not a matter for concern for the vast majority of librarians. Currently most UHF based library systems use only the tag ID to support self-service circulation but newer chips carry significantly more data. To allow for the development of more functionality, the creation of a new version of 28560 (28560-4) is in process. But unless you’re using UHF, 28560-4 is not for you.

All UK LMS suppliers that are members of BIC are actively involved in developing the framework which has especially benefited from the very active participation of Capita.

Privacy concerns

The EU began to worry about RFID in 2008 with the publication of M436 – a mandate for standards bodies across Europe to examine the use of RFID in all industry sectors, including libraries. This was concerned with two elements of RFID use - signage and Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs). The decision has already been made that signs should be displayed wherever RFID is in use – now they’re just discussing what they should look like. For libraries the most likely outcome is that the signs should also display additional information about the way the technology is being used – and what information is being stored, on items and/or on borrower cards. We don’t know much more about the exact form the PIA will take as yet. BIC has set up a group to monitor the progress of the mandate and to produce guidance for members. The UK Information Commissioner – who represents UK interests in this area has also been contacted by BIC. Both the PIA and the recommendations on signage will be published in 2014. Whether they are mandatory or advisory will depend on the attitude of the ICO, but if the EU so decides, it can make compliance a legal requirement.

NAG and BIC also included future support for LCF as one of their recommendations for RFID procurement criteria in their guidelines, published in 2011. The framework will be available to any developers for consultation, and new elements will be added as required – subject to an approval process managed by BIC on behalf of the library market.

So a busy year ahead – and that’s without mentioning the possible impact of Near Field Communication (NFC) devices on the library market. If that’s a subject that interests you, feel free to read my recent blog post on the subject. It’s a little too complex to cover here!

FIND OUT MORE Web: http://www.libraryrfid.co.uk/ Twitter: @mickfortune

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Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Winter 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

19


Discovery – Winchester

Discovery – Winchester

Discovery and catalogue interoperability: Learn how the University of Winchester successfully integrated Capita’s Prism and EBSCO Discovery Service David Farley, University Librarian, University of Winchester

When students at the University of Winchester regularly asked the library inquiry desk if they could look for journal articles in the library catalogue, Librarian David Farley looked at ways they could integrate a discovery service and a library catalogue that would meet student demand and address the library’s needs. He didn’t have to look far. Capita and EBSCO provided a solution that was tailored to what worked for the University of Winchester. Winchester has used Capita’s Prism as its library catalogue for several years, so when looking for a discovery tool, the goal was to find a resource that could work with Prism, because students and library staff were accustomed to using it. “Students are used to using the catalogue,” explains Farley. “It is what we teach them from day one because it is the first thing they’ve got to get through to find books on the shelves.”

in multiple resources in a single search experience. It can provide libraries with more choices on how they invoke their catalogue - either with the LMS as the front end, or through the EDS platform as the front end – while retaining the benefits of both systems. Libraries benefit from Capita’s 45 years of experience as market leaders in the library management supply field as well as EBSCO’s position as the leading research database and discovery service provider. “When we’re looking at partnerships, we’re looking at collaborations and integrations that enable our customers to get an even better return from their library management system,” ecplains Rachel Broadbent, Internal Account Manager for Capita. “Integrating EBSCO’s Discovery Service into Prism enables our customers to provide a one-stop shop for their students. They can access all the different information resources, including books and journals, in one place, which provides a great user experience.” Prism users can explore library resources and access data and services right where they

That high-quality metadata and relevancy ranking system of EDS produces higherquality search results, which leads to increases in usage. In addition, only EDS provides users with direct access to full text when available through the library. For libraries that subscribe to full-text resources from EBSCO, including databases, eBooks and individual e-journals, EDS provides users with one-click access to PDF or HTML full-text content directly through the detailed record or from the results list preview pane. Initial integrations between Prism and EDS initially took place by having the data from Prism extracted and sent into EDS where it could be searched. David Farley had some concerns about this method when he was looking at building a link into the library catalogue. He felt it wasn’t optimal for students to use discovery as the primary way into the collections instead of using the catalogue, which is how they had been trained. Instead, he was looking at an implementation where EDS was built into the catalogue rather than having the catalogue built into EDS. Capita and EBSCO came up with a solution that did just that.

“It wasn’t demanding of our time, Capita did the design on our library catalogue. They put a drop-down menu on the library home page so that people could search for journal articles on EDS rather than on the catalogue.” David Farley. EBSCO has long been the library’s primary source for journals and it has gradually added more EBSCO databases over the years. After a trial of EBSCO Discovery Service™ (EDS), the library decided to go with EDS, citing the existing partnership between EBSCO and Capita as a main reason. “The fact that there was a relationship between the two companies, both of which we knew, trusted and have used for several years, made it a win-win for us. It was perfect from our point of view.” The EBSCO and Capita partnership allows libraries to maximise their investments

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need them and can create lists of selected items, such as wish lists and favourite books or items needed for study. The pages are highly configurable so libraries and users have the convenience of online account and transaction management. By adding the strength of EDS to those services, libraries that use Prism can increase their value by allowing more use to be made of their data. “What EBSCO brings to the table is being very much at the forefront of search and discovery,” says Capita Partners Manager, Wendy Pugh. “Libraries not only benefit from the integrated front end but the rich metadata and superior relevancy algorithm of EDS.”

Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

What makes this possible is the straightforward technology of the EDS API (application programming interface), which allows libraries to enable a unique user interface experience while complementing and enhancing the users’ experience of the catalogue and discovery service. EDS API fits modern technology requirements, offers easy integration with library systems, provides comprehensive documentation and support, and has flexibility and features that allow it to be consumed in many ways while offering the best discovery experience.

Working with EBSCO, Capita was able to integrate the EDS API into Prism. “Once we had the EDS API, we were able to incorporate it within our coding so that we could make a request to the EDS API to pull back the data,” says Gareth James, Capita’s Technical Partner Consultant. Incorporating the EDS API into the catalogue has several benefits. There is no extra training needed to learn a new interface, no need to log on to a separate site and no need for separate validations and passwords. It also eliminates the need to load the library’s entire catalogue into EDS, greatly reducing set up time as well as maintenance time. The University of Winchester can attest to the ease of implementation. “It wasn’t demanding of our time,” says David Farley. “Capita did the design on our library catalogue. They put a drop-down menu on the library home page so that people could search for journal articles on EDS rather than on the catalogue. We did a bit of tweaking to make it look the way we wanted it to look. The back end was all there, and all the data was available from EBSCO.” The ultimate benefit is the convenience of a powerful search in a familiar interface. “Now you can just put a term in on the same interface that you use to find books on the shelf, and bam, there you are,” he continues. “You’ve got the online full-text of the journal on your screen. It couldn’t be easier.” University of Winchester began using the EDSCapita solution in September and based on the questions being asked at the inquiry desk, early indications are that patrons are using the service. “What a lot of academic libraries are telling us is that they want more integrated electronic resource management,” concludes Rachel Broadbent. And that can be made possible through partnerships like the one between EBSCO and Capita.

FIND OUT MORE Web: http://www.ebscohost.com/discovery Twitter: @EBSCO

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Winter 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Swindon and Gloucester Councils

Strato

Helping to

transform

A new library management system for colleges

your library

student expectations Strato, Capita’s library management system (LMS) for colleges, is designed to support educational achievement by focusing on the needs of your students.

customers better choice and more ways to access our services, at the same time as delivering greater value for local tax payers. Working together with Swindon, we are doing just that, saving over a quarter of a million over the life of the contract.”

Two neighbouring councils have selected Capita’s software service business to deliver a new shared library management system. Working together, Gloucestershire County Council and Swindon Borough Council will use Capita’s library management software to provide staff with user-friendly and up-to-date library systems, and their customers with greater access to increasingly intuitive library services.

Capita will manage and maintain the core system used by both councils via its fully hosted next generation library management system (LMS), Chorus. With no need for any on-premise servers, costs will be reduced for both councils. Further efficiencies will be delivered through integration between the LMS and core council systems, including finance and payments.

Both councils have worked with Capita to develop a powerful and accessible online catalogue in order to promote the full wealth of stock and formats available to members, including eBooks. For customers of Gloucestershire County Council, this will be the first time they will have access to the county’s archive collection, be able join the library (generating an automatic temporary borrower status), reserve books and pay any fines via the library’s website, improving the overall self-service experience.

Satisfying growing

• • •

Swindon and Gloucestershire Councils choose new shared LMS

Accessible from anywhere using any mobile device User reviews help gauge the usefulness of each resource Personalised recommendations based on previous borrowing history Relevance ranked search results with cover images displayed for quick and easy recognition.

Partnering with Capita and selecting Chorus will allow the councils to share a library IT infrastructure, while retaining local work practices and policies allowing each other to best serve their own customers’ unique needs. Launched earlier this year, Capita’s next generation cloud-based web application, Soprano, will also be used to provide greater flexibility for the councils. The application

Sue Laurence, Head of Library Services at Gloucestershire County Council explains, “We wanted a library system that would give

CTOR ONTRA C E Y & F F LIBRAR

E FOR TH INGHAM BIRM

allows day-to-day tasks to be completed using mobile devices, which will deliver a faster and increasingly efficient service for customers. Allyson Jordan, Service Manager for Arts and Libraries at Swindon Borough Council adds: “We have been very impressed at every stage of the integration process. Whether helping customers with queries out on the library floor or signing up new library users at external events, we are confident that our staff and customers will reap the rewards that this technology offers.” Karen Reece, Head of Libraries at Capita, knows exactly where they’re coming from. “We understand the desire of libraries to use technology to cost effectively transform the offering both for staff and citizens and make services more accessible to users,” she says “We have been able to draw on our wealth of experience of being able to tailor systems to meet the specific requirements of each council and we are extremely pleased to be building on our existing relationship with Gloucestershire County Council and embarking on our new relationship with Swindon Borough Council.”

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Developed with the user firmly in mind our attractive, yet powerful, discovery interface means students feel immediately at home. What’s more, being optimised for mobile devices, students have access when and where it’s convenient for them.

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0870 400 5090 www.capita.co.uk/libraries libraries@capita.co.uk

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See how we can help transform your library for your students, contact us today

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Hosted in our state-of-the-art secure data centre, we eradicate the need for you to manage your own costly hardware and locally installed software. What’s more, with automatic back-up processes your data is protected from disaster, eliminating any downtime and ensuring you have peace of mind at all times.

plasma screen by others

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Consultancy

youth AV

Design

Product Development

Demco Client Services

Contingency Project Management Quality Control

To find out more, please visit www.demcointeriors.co.uk email us enquiries@demcointeriors.co.uk or call us today, on 01992 454600 Demco Interiors Shipton Way, Express Park, Northampton Road, Rushden, Northants NN10 6GL A Demco family company


Upcoming events

Events The EDGE 2014, The Roxburghe Hotel, Edinburgh, 2728th February 2014

CILIP’s LMS Suppliers Showcase, CILIP HQ, London, 7th March 2014

We are pleased to again be sponsoring the EDGE Conference, taking place on 27th & 28th February 2014 at the Roxburghe Hotel, Edinburgh. The conference brings together some of the best speakers around to discuss ‘Rising to the Challenge – Delivering value through Innovation & Partnership’. We look forward to seeing you there.

We will be exhibiting at the CILIP LMS Showcase in London on 7th March 2014. The event is taking place at CILIP HQ, 7 Ridgmount Street, London. Visit us throughout the day and talk to our representatives, who will be on hand to answer your questions. The showcase is free to attend; register your place with CILIP today.

For more information on all our upcoming events, visit www.capita-libraries.co.uk/events. We will updating our Webinar calendar shortly, so please take the time to visit our Webinar page at www.capita-libraries.co.uk/webinars.

Partner News Shaping the future together, Capita’s Additions Partner Programme

3M worked with the architects to incorporate the V-Series Systems into the library’s bespoke furniture.

The Additions Partner Programme builds strong relationships with companies providing third party products that extend the functionality of Capita’s library management system. The relationship between Capita and partners delivers the benefits of integrated products, ensuring you can save time and money while continuing to improve customer experience.

The new library at the Stratford Campus of UEL opened in July 2013 and will see its full potential realised in September, when the new term starts. To view the full story, please visit: www.3m.co.uk/UEL.

Recent Partner Highlights:

3M helps create a modern library at UEL The University of East London’s (UEL) Stratford Campus library recently underwent a £15 million redevelopment, which saw 3M, the diversified technology company, working closely with the architects to optimise the library’s space and offer its users 21st century amenities, including advanced self-service facilities and 24-hour accessibility. The newly installed FX Automated Sortation System allows staff to automatically sort books left by students in study spaces, on trolleys or returns shelves, as well as those returned at a SelfCheck System. In addition to the sorter,

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Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

EBSCO eBooks™ chosen as Vendor for SUPC Members. EBSCO eBooks™ from EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) has been chosen as an e-book supplier for higher education libraries in England. Members of the Southern University Purchasing Consortium (SUPC) will be able to select e-books from EBSCO’s extensive collection including nearly 500,000 e-books and audiobooks. This agreement enables members who participate in this joint consortia agreement to easily obtain ebooks from EBSCO in a streamlined format. EBSCO eBooks give users the best possible search experience by offering the ability to discover e-books and audiobook titles alongside databases and other digital content in one search experience. For further information please visit, http://www. ebscohost.com/ebooks.


Introducing

Nielsen LibScan data

the NEW 3M SelfCheck Kiosk

Nielsen LibScan data

Nielsen LibScan library borrowing data – period 9, 2013 (11 August - 7 September2013)

Looking at Nielsen LibScan public library borrowing data for the 4 weeks ending 7 September 2013, we see Dan Brown’s Inferno has taken the top spot in the ‘All Titles’ chart. Lee Child has been toppled off the top spot, which he has held for some time, however, James Patterson continues to dominate the chart with four titles in the Top 10, taking positions 3, 4, 5 and 8. Jeffrey Archer’s Best Kept Secret has entered the chart at position 9 with John Grisham’s The Racketeer taking the last spot in the Top 10. The Casual Vacancy by J K Rowling is in position 6 – no sign yet of The Cuckoo’s Calling despite the fact it

has sold over 98,000 copies (lifetime sales) to date in the UK. Fiction still dominates the Nielsen LibScan borrowing chart, with Crime, Thriller & Adventure taking seven of the ten places; the other three positions are occupied by General & Literary Fiction. All of the Top 10 are hardback and priced between £18.99 and £20.00. The difference in issues between the top and bottom positions is under 500 copies. The data would suggest that library users prefer to borrow rather than buy new hardback fiction.

The Nielsen LibScan Non-Fiction borrowing chart has Jamie Oliver in the top spot with Save with Jamie and Jamie’s 15-Minute Meals in position 8, issuing over 1,200 and 500 respectively over the four weeks ending 7 September. Normally there is a lag between a title hitting the UK TCM top slot and reaching the Nielsen LibScan top position, interestingly Jamie Oliver has bucked this trend with Save with Jamie – could this be a sign of the times?

FIND OUT MORE Web: www.nielsenbookscan.co.uk

Nielsen LibScan Top 10 Chart – 17 August-7 September 2013 Position

Title

Author

The new kiosk from 3M provides high performance RFID technology incorporated into a sleek, compact and contemporary design. With a 22 inch touchscreen and fully integrated payments the new 3M SelfCheck Kiosk offers exceptional ease of use for library patrons and staff.

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Inferno: Robert Langdon

Dan Brown

2,160

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A Wanted Man

Lee Child

2,016

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Second Honeymoon

James Patterson

1,783

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Private Down Under: Private Series

James Patterson

1,719

5

Alex Cross Run

James Patterson

1,716

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The Casual Vacancy

J K Rowling

1,714

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Six Years

Harlan Coben

1,711

8

Dead Man’s Time

Peter James

1,698

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Best Kept Secret

Jeffrey Archer

1,688

To find out more go to www.3M.co.uk/selfcheckkiosk

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The Racketeer

John Grisham

1,676

Or phone us on 0800 389 6686

(©2013 Nielsen Book Services Limited [trading as Nielsen BookScan and Nielsen LibScan]) For further information about Nielsen BookScan TCM Panel or LibScan panel, email: info.bookscan@nielsen.com

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Volume

RFID self-service for the modern library

Panlibus Magazine | Winter 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries



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