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ISSUE 29 | AUTUMN 2013

Cloud busting: Demystifying the ‘Cloud’ and its impact on libraries INNOVATING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE The Reading Agency asks ‘What if?’

IS THIS THE BEST TIME EVER TO BE A LIBRARIAN? Preparing for the future in a fast-changing environment

EDINBURGH FLIES THE FLAG FOR PUBLIC LIBRARIES From failing service to best UK library


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Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries


WELCOME TO PANLIBUS

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Autumn 2013 Innovating to make a difference

Welcome to the autumn issue of Panlibus Magazine and what will be my last edition as Editor.

22-24 Internet Librarian International

4-5 Welsh Information Literary Project Phase IV of the Welsh Information Literacy Project (WILP) was awarded to the North Wales Library Partnership (NWLP) and Coleg Llandrillo Library. Siona Murray talks us through the activities and progress of Phase IV. 6 Building a brave new library Bradford College is in the process of building a new state-of-the-art library and updating their libraries’ technology. In this article we find out more about the exciting times ahead at the college. 8-9 Innovating to make a difference The Reading Agency has always had a big focus on innovation and has recently been wondering ‘what if you could innovate to combine and strengthen libraries’ work to make more social impact?’. 10 Flying the flag for public libraries Five years ago, Edinburgh Libraries and Information Services was a failing service, unfit for the 21st century. Now it’s a thriving part of the community. Liz McGettigan outlines the changes Edinburgh Libraries went through to get to where they are today.

This issue has a public library focus but, as always, includes something for university and college libraries. We have recently reported on both the future of public and academic libraries, so this issue we continue the series by looking at the future of librarians and preparing librarians for the future (p14). The Welsh Information Literacy Project is entering its fourth phase following the successful initial three phases. The honour of progressing the fourth phase has been awarded to the North Wales Library Partnership and Coleg Llandrillo. Siona Murray gives us the inside track on the next phase.

12-13 Cloud busting Andrew Tattersall and Leo Appleton demystify the cloud and its impact on libraries.

The Reading Agency has been leading on many incredible projects over the years all born from a series of ‘what if’ questions. Miranda McKearney, in her last Panlibus article before her well-earned retirement, provides an overview of some of those innovative projects.

14-15 The future of librarianship Ben Showers provides a reorientation on the question of the future of libraries by focusing on three opportunities for librarians in a rapidly changing library and information environment.

Edinburgh Libraries has long been a beacon of success for public libraries, but it wasn’t always thus. We look at what changes Edinburgh have undertaken over the past few years to now fly the flag for public libraries.

16-18 Librarians as Teachers 2013 Clare Langman and Alison Lobo report from the second Librarians as Teachers event held at the University of Warwick Research Exchange. 20 Case study: lorensbergs North Tyneside libraries achieve internet access priorities with netloan PC management. 22-24 Internet Librarian International North Tyneside libraries achieve internet access priorities with netloan PC management. 25 Nielsen We take a look at Nielsen LibScan Library Borrowing Data for period 7 (16 June - 13 July 2013).

We also have articles demystifying cloud computing libraries, exploring Bradford College’s plans for their new library and a case study from lorensbergs. It has been an honour and a privilege to have been the editor of Panlibus for nearly four years, and thank you all for your support of Panlibus throughout its existence. I hope you enjoy this issue, and as always, I encourage you to get in touch with your thoughts on any of the articles. If you have any topics you would like to share with the library world, our new editor would be extremely pleased to hear them. Please contact them on the email address below.

Mark Travis Editor, Panlibus Magazine libraries-panlibus@capita.co.uk

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The views expressed in this magazine are those of the contributors for which Capita accepts no responsibility. Readers should take appropriate advice before acting on any issue raised. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is strictly prohibited. ©Capita. All rights reserved. Capita and the Capita logo are trademarks of Capita or its licensors in the United Kingdom and/or other countries. Other companies and products mentioned may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Autumn 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Welsh Information Literary Project

Welsh Information Literacy Project (WILP) Siona Murray Information Officer, Coleg Llandrillo and Project Officer for the Welsh Information Literacy Project.

Phase IV of the Welsh Information Literacy Project (WILP) was awarded to the North Wales Library Partnership (NWLP) and Coleg Llandrillo Library in April and this phase of the project will run until March 2014. The main aims and objectives of Phase IV include: • F  acilitating the embedding of information literacy (IL) activities and skills in public libraries and schools, with the addition of extending support to end users • S  upporting local authorities and selected schools to run pilot projects incorporating IL frameworks • E  xtending the case study and shared resource database • E  stablishig a network of FE and HE information literacy champions through a community of practice (CoP)

We have seen a growing interest in the support provided by public libraries for government ‘digital by default’ activities. The availability of digital inclusion support as an additional service in public libraries, as well as being a point of access to the internet, could make a big difference to how the value of the service is perceived in this time of cuts and closures. Just over half of our information literacy champions reported that some type of digital inclusion support for Universal Jobmatch or Universal credit was available in their library service. WILP is helping to support the digital inclusion agenda by facilitating front line library staff to attain Agored qualifications to better support staff and user information searching and management skills. In Phase IV the project officers will also be working collaboratively with public libraries to investigate how best to provide information literacy training for library users themselves.

Schools

Project officer Pat has been proactively engaging schools throughout Wales and supporting pilot IL activities at Ysgol Uwchradd Caerbybi in North Wales and Llanishen School

• Informing the development of Hŵb, specifically in terms of developing IL content for the all Wales Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) • D  eveloping a sustainable exit strategy for the project and associated activities. Project officer Gina has been facilitating public library staff in Monmouthshire and Merthyr Tydfil to complete the Level 3 Agored qualifications and it is envisaged that all nominated staff in these areas will have completed Level 3 or Level 2 Agored IL qualifications by April 2014. Project officers have also been facilitating library staff in Gwynedd to complete the Agored Cymru qualification through the medium of Welsh. Gina has also met with representatives from the new CILIP Special Interest IL Group and will be delivering IL awareness raising training for library staff in England in the new term. Project Officers Gina and Pat also recently presented a spotlight session at the CILIP Umbrella 2013 conference.

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‘Happy Faces’ Feedback. Image from IL activity day for schools in Abergele Library in South Wales. We can report that initial findings are very positive, with Ysgol Uwchradd Caerbybi indicating that 69% of the student group involved in the pilot displayed an increase in their Standardised Literacy Scores (SAS) of 4.4 points on average. The school also reported that the pilot IL activities

Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

were highlighted by the Inspectorate for Education and Training in Wales (ESTYN) as good practice for literacy improvement during their recent inspection. In Phase IV of the project we plan on having at least 10 schools actively involved in embedding IL activities within the curriculum. There has been a real interest from schools in providing accredited IL training for learners through the Agored Cymru qualifications. However, there are some issues with internal/external verification responsibilities and costs which are proving to be a challenge. Building links with teacher training departments throughout Wales will also be a feature of the project for Phase IV.

69% of the student group involved in the pilot displayed an increase in their Standardised Literacy Scores (SAS) of 4.4 points on average. The project officers are also keen to collate information on practical IL activities for schools and have attended events such as the COLRIC IL Teaching Takeaway and also the Cardiff Libraries in Co-operation (CLIC) Teach-meet. A Community of Practice for information literacy in Further and Higher Education in Wales is also due to be launched in the autumn. The project team are organising a best practice sharing day which will take place at Cardiff Central Library on 1st August 2013. The day will concentrate mainly on IL activities within schools and public libraries. A report of the event will be available on the project webpages at www.welshinformationliteracy. org. The project team will also be developing a draft sustainability plan and exit strategy for the project over the coming months.

FIND OUT MORE Web: librarywales.org/informationliteracy Email: wilp@gllm.ac.uk Tel: (01492) 542342 Twitter: @welsh_info_lit.


www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Autumn 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Building a brave new library

Building a brave new library Simon Lyes, Academic Liaison Librarian, and Chris Martin, Learning Resources Manager Bradford College

consideration the budget changes that our sector is currently facing.

Learning spaces that stimulate students. Realistic state-of-the-art working environments. The embracing of emerging technologies. These are the foundations on which Bradford College’s exciting new multi-million pound campus is being built in the heart of the city.

Review

To fit in with this vision, we needed to ensure that the library service we offered our students was equally forward thinking and could cater to a cohort almost as diverse as Bradford itself. There was a practical requirement to consolidate as much college activity as possible at the new sites – as part of the renovations, our libraries are moving to new premises. And, of course, we had to factor into

In order to assess how we could improve the service we offered, a team of three library staff began by reviewing the library management software we were already using, and investigating what else was on the market. We visited other organisations to see what they were doing, and we invited providers to visit us and tell us about the products and services they could offer. It was important to us to get the best functionality we could, whilst still ensuring good value for money.

Libraries can be perceived as being oldfashioned, so the key objective of any college or university library is to ensure they remain relevant, easily accessible and useful to the technologically minded students of today.

Having pulled in quotes and discussed the options at length, we decided to continue with our existing provider, Capita. They had made some useful improvements to their products, which suited us well. There were enhancements to the library catalogue software, which gave it a more user-friendly and familiar appearance, with the covers of books presented similarly to websites like Amazon. We also liked the fact that you could buy a basic core product, and then purchase add-on packages to tailor the system to requirements.

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Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

Moving with the times We’re very aware of the trend of mobile technology when it comes to students. We think it’s important that we move with the times and lead in practices that support a student’s overall experience with us. Having a web-based interface for staff administration of the library system is a new and exciting step for us, and it means we’ll be able to use mobile devices to deliver a better customer service. We’ve already bought tablets for staff use and it’s something we are trialling at the moment. Now that staff can access what they need via their tablets, they are able to circulate freely around the premises, wearing badges so they are more visible. Central work stations for searches are becoming increasingly obsolete – staff can directly approach students who need help and assist them immediately. A side effect of this is managing behaviour in the library. Gone are the days of total silence, but equally most students tend to be self-organised and want the noise kept to a low, useful hum of business. Having instantly recognisable staff wandering around is a low impact way to keep noise levels under control and create a productive work environment for everyone.

E-resources With the growing popularity of e-resources, our updated library management system will make certain that the thousands of e-books we have are fully integrated into our system and are therefore more accessible to our students.


Building a brave new library

We buy electronic journals from various different sources, which used to mean multiple search points for our students. Now we’re able to present a seamless site to our students with a single point for conducting searches and getting relevance ranked results back. We take a balanced approach to digital resources versus print editions, as some journals are not available in electronic versions from the publishers. Essentially all our energy is directed to supporting teaching and learning as best we can – and that means being sure that students are able to find the information they require.

Device hire From April 2013, we introduced laptops and tablets to lease to students for limited periods of time, which is very popular. In the library, we are trying to move away from fixed PC points, which can make the space we have less flexible. We have further and higher education students in large and fluctuating numbers, so we need to make provision for both and respond adequately to their different needs. With mobile technology, even social sitting spaces can be used for working if the occasion requires. Interestingly, there is currently less demand for tablets than there is for laptops, apart from in subjects like construction and engineering where tablets are easier to carry off campus. Our students have told us tablets are not as easy to write on, and don’t always have the Microsoft Office applications – Word, PowerPoint and Excel – that they would like to use. On the other hand, we are developing various Gaming courses, and tablets will be useful for students who need to review existing games as part of their programme of study.

Implementation We are keen to have the public face of our online catalogue ready for the new intake in September 2013, as this makes sense from a practical point of view. At the beginning of each academic year, we demonstrate how the library system works to new students and we

Student experience

didn’t want to be a position where we showed them how one system works when they start college, then three months down the line have to show them a new one all over again.

Our circumstances have meant that we are able to look at our library provision holistically. For example, as a result of changes in policy, we have taken on more 14-18 year old students so, as safety is of paramount importance in and around the new buildings, we have tried to minimise the number of roads that need to be crossed to get to the library. Similarly, our previous buildings were showing substantial signs of wear and tear so our new buildings will ensure our students feel they are in the best possible environment for learning.

So, although we won’t be moving into our new buildings until September 2014, implementing improvements to our library management system started straightaway. In this respect, having an existing relationship with Capita was an advantage in moving quickly. We’ve found our contacts there to be to very efficient, quick and helpful.

Back end improvements Student experience is at the heart of everything we do so, while the improvements to the interface are significant in that it looks more modern and is in a style that students will be used to, the students will be largely unaware of all the back end alterations. We’re using integration software to import student enrolment details, records and photographs automatically. Previously, we had to manually transfer this in a cumbersome process involving Excel spreadsheets. Now, just a few weeks after the contracts have been signed, we are working towards automatically transferring student data in real-time.

Hosted solution

While our circumstances may be unique, the ethos underpinning our vision is common to most colleges and universities. For any educational organisation that wants to provide a modern library service, the importance of flexibility – after all, we are dealing with unpredictable student numbers, and the possibility that subject demands can alter dramatically – and excellent software to support mobile technology have to be the two major considerations. In short, students are now aware they are paying for the privilege of learning and so they expect and deserve high levels of support. This is where libraries play a crucial role – enhancing and enabling an excellent overall student experience.

During our review process, we saw a number of colleges and universities successfully choosing a hosted solution and, although we won’t take advantage of this until next year at the earliest, we have chosen this too. It will afford us a number of benefits in terms of space saving – the new buildings do not have copious amounts of office space – and a saving in technical costs as we don’t have to buy or maintain servers. Having a back-up at another location is reassuring as it would help in the event of disaster recovery. We also don’t have to rely on IT support within the college – as librarians, some of the technical aspects can be above and beyond our remits!

FIND OUT MORE Email: c.martin@bradfordcollege.ac.uk Web: www.bradfordcollege.ac.uk/library

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Autumn 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Innovating to make a difference

Innovating to make a difference Miranda McKearney Director The Reading Agency

In these tough times, some may question whether there is room for innovation in the library world – I’d argue that it’s more essential than ever. But what exactly is it? These are the three definitions that make most sense to me, out of a whole load of Google gobbledegook: • Management guru Peter Drucker defines innovation as the specific instrument of entrepreneurship • An OECD think tank as New products, business processes and organic changes that create wealth or social welfare • Barack Obama as The creation of something that improves the way we live our lives. The origins of The Reading Agency mean that the charity has always had a big focus on innovation. I’ve watched many innovators over the years, and observed that all of them loosely use a common “what if?” methodology. The

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Reading Agency started in a what if session round my kitchen table. A bunch of us were working on reading and literature projects, and we wondered why, in a wealthy society with free education, so many people’s lives were still being blighted by poor literacy. We wondered about the difference you could make if you could innovate to combine and strengthen libraries’ work to make more social impact…we had a specific what if session about fusing libraries’ summer holiday reading support for children into a shared scheme that could attract the attention of the media and big partners, create economies of scale and support much better sharing of good practice. And so the charity was born, with our first programme, the Summer Reading Challenge. The Reading Agency’s mission is to create a fairer society by helping people become confident and enthusiastic readers. We help people struggling with reading and do all we can to help public libraries maximize their impact on people’s life prospects. We equip librarians with tools and training so they can reach out and inspire people to read, through very practical activities which make reading much more fun and social.

Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

Our reading for pleasure programmes involve people in reading challenges, reading groups, and reading based volunteering. We now reach a million people a year with experiences which increase their reading enjoyment, motivation, confidence and skills.

Reading Activists Our young people’s work now all comes under the banner of Reading Activists. We’re passionate about this audience, especially now UK youth unemployment stands at one million. Getting young people engaged in and enjoying reading is so important to their life chances. 2011 Oxford University research shows that for 16 year olds, reading for pleasure is the only out of school activity demonstrably linked to securing a better job. So we are working with 18 local authorities, in wards with high indices of social deprivation, to ask what if you could motivate disadvantaged young people to think about reading and libraries very differently by giving them a real sense of agency, genuine power to shape and run local reading and library experiences.


Innovating to make a difference

We team up with librarians to introduce new ways of working with young people, giving them real power to shape their own local reading hubs – the spaces and activities they want. Young people are eager to join steering groups and roll up their sleeves. In Gateshead, events which were attracting around ten young people now attract audiences of around 200 because it’s all peer led. In the last two years, 2,900 young people have worked with libraries to open 40 reading hubs, joining 42 steering groups and acting as creative producers and volunteers. 16,000 young people have joined in physical reading and writing events and creative online activities. Evaluation shows that they are growing in resilience, confidence, and a range of skills…and enjoying reading more. How fantastic if every library could have a Reading Activist hub where young people can grow, with a team of young people building their literacy skills whilst helping co-create the service, and maybe design apprenticeships. Building on the learning, we’re now working up a new what if, exploring combining all this work into a new Reading Activist Challenge, with mini challenges, rewards and incentives along the way. We’re very lucky to have attracted a major gift from the Paul Hamlyn Foundation to develop this.

Summer Reading Challenge The Summer Reading Challenge was our first experiment in seeing if, as a charity, we could help create more social value, by combining things differently, acting as a multiplier and aggregator. Through librarians’ wonderfully creative and hard work it now involves three quarters of a million children. One of the Challenge’s features that is attracting a lot of interest from partners like the BBC is the Booksorter, introduced last year after a what if session – see http:// summerreadingchallenge.org.uk/book-sorter. Here children can log their age, gender and what they’re reading and it is creating a huge crowdsourced reading recommendation list – showing what today’s children really like reading, children from every kind of community, not just those who can afford to buy books. We watch with mounting excitement the daily rising tally of books logged. In June and July 2013, the Creepy House website has had 1.7 million page views and children have logged 45,368 books.

Adult Literacy Six years ago we had another big what if moment, inspired by Hull Libraries. What if

we could apply the powerful structure of an incentivised challenge to read six books to help adults struggling with reading. In England alone, 5 million adults have poor literacy skills. So we created the Six Book Challenge for people aged 16+, which inspires participants to read six books. If you’ve never read a whole book, let alone six, or ever received any kind of qualification or public recognition, completing the Challenge is a big, big thing. Surveys show that it increases participants’ literacy skills, reading range and confidence “I am somebody now. All my life people have told me I was thick, but I knew deep down I wasn’t and now the Six Book Challenge has brought that out and proved what I can do” (Tina, Hull). The scheme has grown hugely and we hope to double participation by 2017. In 2013, new partners are helping us innovate – we are working with 3 Mobile to launch a new website, using the same books database technology as the Booksorter.

Digital work with publishers The hurtling pace of digital change is revolutionising the way people read, and posing big challenges, and opportunities, for libraries. Mobile internet access has more than doubled in the last two years to 51%. 87% of 16-24 year olds used social networking sites last year. Against this background we’ve been exploring two what if areas, looking at how we can help publishers and librarians work together to strengthen libraries’ role as modern gateways to reading, and are working on two digital projects, both funded by Arts Council England. Library 21 is an R&D project which came out of discussions between chief librarians and leading publishers about how, in a digital age, they could partner each other safely with copyright protected. This work runs alongside any e-lending solutions that may emerge from the Sieghart Review Library 21 asks ‘how can we make the public library community space the most thrilling place to go for readers?’. Increased engagement in literary festivals, music gigs, museums indicates a growing public appetite for sharing experiences in a physical space. A recent Bookseller report identifies the future importance of people having a ‘third space’, neither home nor work, to gather, work, and decompress. Library 21 explores a vision for libraries’ reading services which blends physical and digital reading experiences in the library building. It is underpinned by the notion of new arrangements to share and distribute

publishers’ digital content which would give the public free access to an unprecedented range of reading material. There is very positive support from some big stakeholders, and we are fundraising in order to pilot the approach in a few library buildings. A recent digital skills sharing scheme used publishers’ digital skills to strengthen libraries’ reading offer. It brought together six mixed teams of publishers and libraries to devise reading campaigns using tools like Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Storybird. You can see the results at http:// readingagency.org.uk/digitalskills/ The project showed that with support libraries can very successfully integrate on and offline activity with readers. It also revealed a huge workforce skills gap, and we are now offering a new training roadshow to help librarians build the digital reader development skills.

Strategy As well as innovating through programmes, the charity has partnered the Society of Chief Librarians in developing library strategy – SCL launched four national library offers this January. We are the lead partners in the reading and health offers, and the latter has been the platform for the launch of a new English Books on Prescription scheme, now running in 86% of English library authorities. The Universal Reading Offer came out of what if sessions exploring how libraries could keep their reading momentum going during budget reductions by massively combining forces, and committing to some big, shared programmes within a strategic framework. 98% of English and Welsh library services have committed to this framework from 2012-15. It prioritises big programmes and times of year when everyone has agreed to work together on a huge shared reading push. It is backed by big partners and has a shared outcomes and evidence framework. We are immensely proud to be a charity specialising in working alongside librarians to innovate, through lots of what ifs, to make a big social difference through reading. Please get in touch if you’d like to work with us miranda.mckearney@readingagency.org.uk

FIND OUT MORE Please get in touch if you’d like to work with us. miranda.mckearney@readingagency.org.uk

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Autumn 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Flying the flag for public libraries

Flying the flag for public libraries Liz McGettigan Head of Libraries and Information Services City of Edinburgh Five years ago, Edinburgh Libraries and Information services was a failing service, unfit for the 21st century. Staff were demoralised, we had tired, worn furniture and buildings and little or no investment in technology and digital services. Well guess what? Last year we won the Best UK Library service and we did it by being an excellent team united in a vision and delivery of our 21st century strategy to transform the service. It started with a restructure and a whole new team. We set ourselves the challenge to be the best library and information service and went for it! We reshaped, engaged the frontline, challenged the status quo and sold a vision for the future. We had a mountain to climb and to do this we had to consolidate a number of building blocks for change and practical toolkits to support and embed performance management and new ways of working, for example: • performance management • people plan • technology and self-service rollout • promotion brand and marketing plans • tepurposing resources • capital bids and spend • buildings fit for purpose - estate and interior plan • new opening hours and working patterns • establishment of new ‘Digital and Bright Futures’ teams. We developed a clear vision of an innovative, customer led service. The team continually emphasised the need for the change, raising awareness and addressing the “what’s in it for me?” issue. Small successes and events were communicated to all staff through a weekly staff communication bulletin. We began to achieve external recognition for early changes, for example in social media, and staff began to see the benefits of the changes. Despite taking almost two million pounds out of the budget over the last five years, we are now delivering an exceptionally high quality, high performing and innovative service across the city, virtually and physically.

We identified thee key areas for improvement and developed our Next Generation Library strategy: • physical • virtual • social. We rationalised and improved our library estate, building and combining with other services to deliver new “hub” libraries and electronic services to meet the requirements of 21st century users. We are bucking the UK trend and have built one new library “hub” in Drumbrae in 2012 and the second in Craigmillar opened in January 2013 - ideal examples of the model of future services for us.

Public libraries are already places of safety and support for people with no access to learning or ICT, people with mental health needs, learning disabilities or addictions, or homeless people, and our services are already delivered taking account of local geography, communities and access for claimants in rural areas. Some of the work has been truly pioneering - for example the Families Day at Saughton Prison, which was the first event of its type in Scotland to allow families, including children, inside the prison to work with their fathers. Our work with children in care, partnerships with Dyslexia Scotland, The Reading Agency and Unesco City of Literature. I am moving on but Edinburgh will continue to deliver a superb all-round service, demonstrated by knowledgeable and inspiring staff, expertly selected books and a welcoming physical and online environment. Edinburgh’s ongoing strategy

New Craigmillar Library Hub We moved our services into the 21st century and developed our virtual library, “Your Library”. We decided on the experience approach and repackaged our products and services in an engaging electronic way to deliver just that, reinventing the information and learning experience, delivering an innovative new model of Citizen Engagement for libraries across the city. Your Library is Edinburgh’s portal to a full range of online services and resources. Your Library was the first fully online customer service available from the council and is the home of all the online services available from Edinburgh City Libraries from language learning to e-book and e-Magazine downloads, events and activities. As 2012 UK Public Sector Digital Awards Finalists, we are very proud of how our cutting-edge use of technology and innovative use of electronic information and social media has developed and is changing the way we deliver services, increasing visits and usage in Edinburgh.

• Continue to introduce technologies to free up staff to work with customers • Continue to review supply chain efficiencies • Add value to council wide services, eg take payments for rents at library self service kiosks • Rationalise councilwide property and staff to deliver improved one-stop shop customer benefits • Offer assisted digital to support PSWR to those most in need • Continue to develop “symbiotic “ partnerships • Increase effort in income generation APSE has announced Service Award finalists for 2013. The prestigious local government awards recognise excellence in local government frontline services and we are flying the flag for public libraries finalists in the Best Culture & Sport service teams. Our service is also flying the flag for public libraries as a finalist for the EUROCITIES Awards under the category ‘smart governance’ alongside Gijon and Helsinki. The jury will meet to determine the winners in each category on 27 November.

FIND OUT MORE Web: yourlibrary.edinburgh.gov.uk/ Twitter: @talesofonecity

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Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries


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Cloud busting

Cloud busting: Demystifying the ‘Cloud’ and its impact on libraries Andrew Tattersall Information Specialist - ScHARR University of Sheffield Leo Appleton Associate Director of Library Services Liverpool John Moores University

The ‘Cloud’ concept If you’ve ever used any of the popular Web 2.0 services such as Facebook, Twitter, Gmail and Dropbox, you are in effect already experienced with ‘Cloud’ computing. However, even though the concept of ‘the Cloud’ as with Web 2.0 has been around for several years, it can be defined in a number of ways. This can make it confusing for library and information professionals to understand exactly what is available in ‘the Cloud’ and what it delivers. Over time the term has become ubiquitous with a general acceptance that ‘the Cloud’ has a definite impact on the way in which we use computers and information technology and how individuals interact with information. It is widely regarded that cloud computing can streamline processes for organisations and save them money and as a result many of the benefits associated with the ‘Cloud’ have been around efficiencies and effectiveness of services. Expressions such as ‘Software as Service’ and Platform as Service’ refer to the Cloud’s remote nature and the advantages it provides through not having to host services or install and upgrade software on a continual basis. The interesting thing about cloud computing is that it did not actually start out as a business solution, but was driven by public demand for online communities and information sharing (Moore, 2013)1. However, whilst there is an acceptance that the ‘Cloud’ is indeed a good thing, there still remains some confusion as to exactly what we are accepting. More importantly, what does ‘the Cloud’ mean for library and information services? Cloud computing has certainly provided libraries with lots of opportunities to extend their impact,

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not least in the areas of resource discovery, data sharing, building reusable services and moving to Web scale solutions. For the library and information professional, this can mean many things, but on a very basic level means that cloud computing is about library data and services hosted beyond the library’s walls and accessible via the web.

Searching and resource discovery in the ‘Cloud’ Many services that libraries have traditionally offered have been migrated into cloud solutions, for example the use of OpenURL providers and federated and pre-indexed search engines allowing users to search all of a library’s collections through a single search box. One of the advantages of the ‘Cloud’ is that it allows for library services to be offered on a ‘web scale’. A service like OCLC’s Worldcat2 gives its users the ability to search the vast WorldCat.org database. Such services have been offered by the likes of OCLC many years before the ‘Cloud’ came into existence, but it is the ‘Cloud’ has enabled faster and more significant developments in ‘web scale’ resource discovery.3

Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

Similarly, many libraries have adopted federated or single search interfaces otherwise known as ‘discovery layers’ into their services, and such platforms have almost become accepted as the norm in many academic environments. Examples of these cloud based services include Serials Solutions’ Summon4, EBSCO’s EDS5 and Ex Libris’s Primo Central5, all of which allow access to all of a library’s collections and data, not simply resources found on the library catalogue. Such discovery layers can provide enhanced service such as access to special collections, digital collections and institutional repositories.

Library management systems If the library requires more than cloud based discovery layers, then many library vendors have developed, or are developing Library Management Systems, entirely hosted in the Cloud. LibLime Koha7 was one of the first open-source integrated Library Management Systems and is now well used throughout the world. Other vendors offering ‘Cloud’ based systems include Capita’s Chorus system8 and Ex Libris’s Alma system9.


Cloud busting

As with other ‘Cloud’ based library solutions, such systems allow for libraries to adopt a different approach to hosting and maintaining systems. In effect this is no longer the domain of the systems librarian, and a major benefit of such developments is the library staff time which can be made available and deployed more effectively as a result of remote hosting of services. In his article about implementing the Koha LMS, Dave Parkes suggests that open source ‘Cloud’-based solutions allow for ‘an interconnected library ecology of books, eBooks, monographs, journals, e-journals, serials, periodicals, databases, statistics, data, research, library holdings, document delivery, digital repositories, reference collections, special collections, images, multimedia content, open educational resources, open archives, learning objects and student-centred content.’10

Enterprise solutions – the University of Google Another way academic institutions have moved parts of their technology infrastructure to the Cloud is by going to the big players such as Google and Apple. In 2011, the University of Sheffield made the decision to move part of its technology infrastructure over to the suite of services offered as part of the Google Apps For Education (GAFE) licence. The tools included Gmail, Calendar, Sites and Drive, alongside other tools not in the agreement such as YouTube, Google+, Scholar and Blogger. Like so many large organisations, the University faced a growing problem of ageing systems and several services situated on a multitude of platforms, all of which placed extra burdens on resources requiring more staff and financial support. The problem the University and other similar organisations faced is that existing enterprise products are hugely expensive. Since moving to Google Apps it has allowed greater work processes, established more reliable systems and improved collaboration.

Cloudme The growth in Cloud technologies on the back of Web 2.0 have afforded library and information professionals a wealth of opportunities to not only improve services but also their profiles and skills. Tools such as Scoop.It, Netvibes, Pinterest, Evernote and

their mobile counterparts allow for the creation of bespoke current awareness services. For the library and information professional they also make for excellent personal curation and discovery tools. Professional development can be aided with the various formats from podcasts to video; whilst a host of useful presentations and posters can be sourced on Slideshare, Prezi and F1000, not to mention help raise the profile of any information professional through their own output.

The growth in Cloud technologies on the back of Web 2.0 have afforded library and information professionals a wealth of opportunities. Managing resources has become much easier thanks to the Cloud. Hosting shareable publications, creating libraries and making lists is much simpler than it ever has been. Mendeley, Zotero and Readcube are just a few examples of how libraries can help users and students make order from chaos when it comes to their large collections of research papers. Established tools including Library Thing allow individuals and organisations to set up their own online library with reading lists and recommendations; whilst online bookmarking tools such as Diigo and Delicious make creating resource lists very quick and simple. Video hosting now allows for larger and longer films to be hosted freely on the web again allowing Library and Information professionals to make, find and share useful teaching and promotional materials. The ability to record your videos and screencasts has become affordable (free) thanks to better mobile devices and instant uploads. Recording screencasts no longer exclusively requires software thanks to the likes of Screencastomatic, whilst editing can now be done in the Cloud with a multitude of free options from YouTube to Pixorial. ‘Free’ is the key word for libraries, especially at a time where budgets are getting slashed and purse strings tightened. All of the aforementioned applications in this paragraph are or have free versions, which is a price not to be sniffed at.

Conclusion Cloud computing has certainly had a positive impact on the ways in which technology is used and developed. This is apparent both within the education sectors and also in how the public interact with technology generally on a daily basis. Large firms such as Amazon, Google and Apple all provide ‘Cloud’ based solutions and much of their development is centred around cloud computing and mobile technology. Applications such as Dropbox and Google Drive are commonly used within learning environments nowadays as online data storage. Cloud based enterprise solutions are becoming more and more the norm, and have evolved alongside the mobility of computing and devices. There are many such cloud computing applications and developments which fall outside the traditional remit of libraries, but as the gatekeepers of data and information resources, an understanding of how it is accessed and supported is now a fundamental basic requirement for the library and information professional. Add to this the complications surrounding intellectual copyright, data protection and general data management, and it is clear to see that the impact of the ‘Cloud’ on libraries is vast. It has never been more important for librarians to continue to excel in what they have always excelled at…. adapting to the technology! 1 Moore, Geoffrey Core Content and the Cloud. http://www. youtube.com/watch?v=0swJCYLH2C Accessed 15th July 2013 2 http://www.oclc.org/worldcat/ 3 Goldner, Matt: Winds of Change; Libraries and Cloud Computing, OCLC, 2010. 4 http://www.serialssolutions.com/en/services/summon/ 5 http://www.ebscohost.com/discovery/about 6 http://www.exlibrisgroup.com/category/PrimoOverview 7 http://www.liblime.com/open-source 8 http://www.capita-softwareandmanagedservices.co.uk/ software/Pages/libraries-chorus.aspx 9 http://www.exlibrisgroup.com/category/AlmaOverview 10 Parkes, Dave. Staffordshire University implements an open source LMS/ILS. Multimedia Information and Technology, 39 (1). P.11

FIND OUT MORE Email: a.tattersall@shef.ac.uk Email: l.appleton1@ljmu.ac.uk Twitter: @andy_tattersall Twitter: @leoappleton

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Autumn 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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The future of librarianship

Three principles for the future of librarianship Ben Showers Programme Manager, Digital Infrastructure Jisc

Is this the best time ever to be a librarian?

Imagine being at the birth of the printing press. A couple of decades after its invention, things begin to start really happening: large volumes of pamphlets begin to emerge, small businesses and publishers begin to pop up and people were even preaching about the dangers of this new communications innovation. Radical new developments, like the academic journal, are still many decades away and the real changes are yet to come. As we experience the first few decades of the web we are witnessing a similar picture to the one at the dawn of the printing press. We are beginning to experience the tremors from the first small changes: social networks, mobile devices, digital content and so on. The information landscape is never going to be the same again. This may, possibly, be the most exciting time to be a librarian, ever! But, when it comes to thinking about the future of the library and the role of technology, we can cause ourselves problems: new technologies attract our attention and we miss the bigger patterns or challenges. We fight a manageable fire in one corner while the forest around us is consumed. It is easy to become seduced by the promise of new innovations or view the latest development as a simple dichotomy between saviour and/or destroyer. Understanding the impact of specific technologies on libraries is important, but we need to be aware of three potential dangers:

1. Becoming too technology centric in our understanding of the library’s role - focusing upon specific technologies at the expense of developing a wider, greater resilience to a fluid technological environment.

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2. Confusing the role of the librarian bundling their role up with visions of new systems and evolving services, which means everything appears to be a technology problem and, inevitably, a lack of relevant technology skills. 3. Finally, and maybe most importantly, ensuring we don’t forget the user technologies shouldn’t be adopted without a clear view of how they directly benefit users (take the misuse of QR codes as a negative example).

much the realm of librarians: the creation, procurement and curation of content, for example. We all know Wikipedia and similar crowdsourcing models, but more tightly coupled to library roles are developments such as patron-driven acquisition1 where the procurement of, and access to, content is initiated and completed by the user. We might say the library is increasingly becoming a platform for various forms of participation among diverse groups of users. Take one example, the library might make its

Building on a presentation originally given at Cilip’s Umbrella conference in July 2013, this article provides a reorientation on the question of the future of libraries by focusing on three opportunities for librarians in a rapidly changing library and information environment. So, in order to manage the potential dangers, this article sets out three principles upon which librarianship can be anchored. Three principles that allow libraries to maintain a focus on their users and the services they provide while enabling the adoption and experimentation of new technologies in a constantly changing and disruptive information landscape.

1. The principle of participation

Increasingly, we are not satisfied by simply consuming the content of others; we want to tell our own stories, create our own narratives and build our own solutions. The forms of participation libraries have engaged in previously might be defined by their use of librarians’ skills and expertise to support the participation of users in the library and related services, for example, information literacy training. The model has been one of inside-out: the library holds a particular set of skills, resources and services around which users can particpate.

However, the forms of participation that are emerging in our current web-based information environment are of an entirely different form. Users expect to be able to participate in areas which may have traditionally been very

Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

metadata openly available to its users, along with a few tools, so they can create their own personalised search engines/catalogues, apps and other tools; current projects include students building their own cataloguing apps2 and libraries working with their communities to crowdsource collections3. Participation will transform the mundane into something new and fun. Take Lemon Tree, which has ‘gamified’ the library experience at the University of Huddersfield by turning the borrowing of books and using e-resources into a social game where you can compete against your friends and fellow students (the game is beginning to be used in other libraries, both academic and public). While this form of participation is still in its early stages it demonstrates how seemingly everyday aspects of the user experience can be transformed into entirely new experiences. Experiences driven by the user’s needs and motivations will see libraries participate in other spaces, outside their own physical and digital environments, allowing users to engage them in spaces they already inhabit and in ways determined by them. Ultimately, participation leads to a greater understanding of the user.


The future of librarianship

2. The principle of understanding

As users participate online in radically new ways, with different types of motivations and behaviours, the need for libraries to gain an understanding of their users’ online practices and requirements has never been greater.

In the US there are examples of libraries (usually large academic institutions) employing anthropologists and ethnographers on staff to capture the behaviours and motivations of users as they interact with the library and its services4. Large-scale research, such as that undertaken by Pew Internet and Researchers of Tomorrow is helping provide a UK-wide shared knowledge base of user behaviours and expectations. Similarly, research such as Visitors and Residents, a collaboration between Jisc, OCLC and the University of Oxford, is uncovering critical insights into the behaviours of students in a digital information environment, as students progress through the educational system (from school to postgraduate). The work is already challenging the assumptions we have about how students behave in an online environment, how they learn and collaborate, and is identifying new modes of engagement such as ‘learning black markets’. From the qualitative to the quantitative: libraries are fortunate to be awash with data, from the usage of the catalogue and e-resources, through to who’s borrowing which books. Making sure librarians are able to access and interrogate this data enables resources and effort to be focused on what really counts for the user. A number of recent projects, such

as those at the University of Huddersfield5 and Wollongong in Australia6, have begun to use this kind of data to demonstrate the impact of the library on the attainment and retention of students. Equipped with a deep understanding of their users, libraries can tailor a more personalised experience with recommendertype systems, and deliver new and more effective services based on this data. Establishing a principle of understanding helps move our discussions from one focused on solutions (our users need a catalogue to find resources) to one that prioritises user needs (I want to find an answer to this question). Such a principle means librarians need to be open to the potential for entirely new answers to these questions; answers that may even begin to redefine the notion of librarianship itself.

3. The principle of emergence

Things are not going to stop changing; disruption is the norm. There is no route from where we are today to a stable point in the future. Librarians are very good at protecting the past from the onslaught of the future, but we need to increasingly protect the future from our past. Just because something has always been done a certain way, doesn’t mean it can’t be done better by adopting a different approach. Think about the changes brought about with the emergence of open, in all its various incarnations: open source solutions, open access to research, open data, to name a few. Open disrupts the assumptions we have about how we should go about doing something.

Certain types of expertise will also emerge or become more important - user experience/usability experts; designers; software engineers; marketers and so on. These skills may be distributed in small, agile teams, or in an individual – depending on the circumstances. But what marks these skills out is their focus on providing an exceptional user experience to help drive new forms of participation and an increasing understanding of the library. This is, without doubt, a very exciting time to be a librarian. But that doesn’t mean the rapid pace of change is easy or doesn’t cause concern and worry. Like the printing press, digital technologies threaten to systematically change everything around us. Yet we can maintain our focus by ensuring we concentrate on our users – they are ultimately our drivers for change – and are open to the new tools and approaches that will inevitably be part of librarianship’s future. 1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patron-driven_acquisition For example: http://dailybruin.com/2013/06/24/ucla-student-group-simul8-develops-apps-for-ucla-library/

2 

For example: http://sounds.bl.uk/Sound-Maps/UK-Soundmap

3 

4

For example: http://atkinsanthro.blogspot.co.uk/

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http://library.hud.ac.uk/blogs/projects/lidp/ http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/discovering-impactlibrary-use-and-student-performance

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FIND OUT MORE Email: b.showers@jisc.ac.uk Twitter: @benshowers

www.capita.co.uk/libraries | Autumn 2013 | Panlibus Magazine

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Librarians as Teachers 2013

Librarians as Teachers 2013: Joint event hosted by ARLG and CDG West Midlands

Clare Langman Information Specialist Aston University (ARLG Chair, West Midlands)

Alison Lobo Information Assistant Aston University (ARLG Events Officer, West Midlands) Following on from a successful event in 2010, the second Librarians as Teachers event was held on June 13th at the University of Warwick Research Exchange. The event was attended by delegates from across the country and even included someone from Australia who said on her feedback form that “it was worth coming from Australia for!” The event was opened by Anthony Brewerton, Head of Academic Services, whose enthusiasm was infectious as he spoke about the Library Services at Warwick and the projects they have been involved in, such as Informal networking nights for researchers and an innovative teaching database. The morning keynote speaker was Professor David Nicholas Director of CIBER Research who provided an overview of the way we people seek, use, consume and trust information in today’s digital world. He believes that searching in this digital world is completely different to the pre-digital era, stating that we are all librarians now. He went on to talk about how we are facing the Perfect Storm incorporating smartphones,

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Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

social media and the Google generation. He talked of terms such as “bouncing and skittering” through cyberspace which basically means that people only ever look at one or two pages and often never go back to the same web page. These changes in behaviour have major implications for how we should market our websites and who we should market them to, as well as the way in which we teach our students. Feedback comments from this included the comments “thought provoking” and “inspirational”. Following on was a presentation from Helene Gorring and John Loy, Health Librarians, who talked about the depiction of mental illness in film and how cinemeducation has been used

about their Student as Researcher project. With funding from the Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning, they have been able to redesign existing approaches to develop broader skills including digital literacy. They showed us examples of the work they had done with a diverse range of subjects and levels including a Facebook page for supporting dissertations, poster competitions, wikis and student videos. One of their lessons learned from the project was to only use tools and technology that are appropriate to your aims for the project and not just use something because it is popular at the time. The plan for the future is to capture student reflections on the project and create a good practice guide for academic staff to increase their involvement.

Feedback from the day: “Excellent value for money, I was self-funded so the reasonable price meant it was easy for me to attend”, “just so good to think outside of the box” and “the day made me question my practice and assumptions of what we can do as teacher”. in Information Literacy teaching within hospitals. There has been collaboration between both hospitals and universities, which has included library staff, consultants and students. Their talk gave us an excellent insight into how film is frequently used in teaching as part of medical courses. It also gave us an opportunity to watch part of “One flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest” as an example of a mental health theme in films and participate in a quiz about films! After a networking coffee break we then heard from Helen Curtis and Cate Mackay from the University of Warwick who spoke

We were then lucky enough to have Barbara Band, Vice President of CILIP and a school librarian, who gave a really practical and enthusiastic demonstration of a lesson she gives to secondary school pupils about the importance of evaluating websites. As people who work in Higher Education, it was very pleasing to see the knowledge that students are gaining whilst at school. We picked up some excellent tips on what we could cover with our own students and learned of some spoof websites to help to highlight to students how important it is to evaluate the information they are finding.


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Librarians as Teachers 2013

After a busy and informative morning, we were then treated to a fantastic lunch courtesy of Capita. Rachel Westwood, Internal Accounts Manager and ARLG Secretary introduced us to Capita’s new web based Library Management System, Soprano which has been designed to be used on mobile devices. The keynote for the afternoon session was rethinking Information Literacy presented by Jane Secker and Emma Coonan who have presented and written widely on this subject. They have recently launched “ANCIL, A New Curriculum for Information Literacy” which coincides with their recent book. ANCIL focuses on the way we think and learn rather than the resources. The framework can be a valuable tool to help librarians to redefine information literacy and set their teaching and support provision within a wider, more learner-focused perspective. Institutions can map where they currently are with Information Literacy teaching by looking on the ANCIL website http://newcurriculum. wordpress.com/using-ancil/ We need to change the perception of the library as a resource provider and encourage joint support between departments. A feedback comment from this session stated that it gave

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Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

“encouragement to change thinking about Information Literacy and what it means”. Next up was Virginia Power from Bridgwater College who gave an inspiring presentation on evaluating your teaching for measuring impact. She introduced a range of tools to us which we can use to evaluate our own teaching, which originated from The MLA Inspiring Learning programme. Virginia believes that we should be concentrating on measuring the effectiveness of our teaching rather than counting the number of people who come through the doors. She spoke about the importance of the distance travelled for individual students, ie monitoring students’ progress from where they are when they arrive with you and where they are when they leave. She went on to highlight practical tools and resources which can be used virtually or face-to-face. These can be accessed via her website http://www.scoop. it/t/librarians-as-teachers. The final speaker of the day was Matt Gallon from JISC Regional Support Centre who spoke about physical learning spaces. He talked of the importance of marketing your own library space to make it as stimulating as possible. He highlighted the

JISC Info Kit which can be used to help develop new libraries or refurbish existing spaces. His main recommendation was to design for flexibility as learners preferences change and technology evolves over time. Overall the day was interesting, informative and inspiring. There is some fantastic work being done across all sectors in the Information Literacy field and we personally learned a lot from the day. It was useful to have speakers from a range of sectors as very often we tend to work in our sector bubble whereas we can learn lots from colleagues in other sectors. Feedback from the day was overwhelmingly positive, comments included “Excellent value for money, I was self-funded so the reasonable price meant it was easy for me to attend”, “just so good to think outside of the box” and “the day made me question my practice and assumptions of what we can do as teacher”.

FIND OUT MORE To view the presentations from the day, please go to http://lat2013.wordpress.com/the-big-day/ presentations/


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Case study: lorensbergs

North Tyneside libraries achieve internet access priorities with netloan PC management Post-installation experience

Since installing netloan, residents have found it easy to use, and staff have been further empowered by its functionality. “Staff have found they have greater control over what the PC management system allows them to do.” adds Paul. “For example, it’s now easier to set up or change PC session times around library opening hours and holidays. Staff also like the ability to make group bookings. netloan is a powerful tool that allows you to achieve much more than other solutions.”

North Tyneside metropolitan borough authority’s library service comprises fourteen public libraries in the North East. It serves a growing population across some diverse communities including urban areas such as Killingworth, Wallsend, North Shields and with a new purpose-built library in Whitley Bay, as well as covering former mining villages and seaside towns. The library aims to serve all sectors of the community, providing access for books, reference information and internet access to support study and research, genealogy projects, homework assignments, hobbies and leisure time. There are regular events such as story times, reading groups and computer courses. A wide range of information relating to Housing, Revenues and Benefits enquiries is also available for library users. In 2012, the authority explored new options for managing public access across over 200 library PCs. There was a need in the prevailing economic climate to begin charging for internet use, but without reducing accessibility for patrons that relied on it for life critical areas, such as jobs or health.

Choosing a new solution

Paul Bell, Libraries IT manager, worked with colleagues in IT and support services to arrive at a new solution. The aim was to take into account all key scenarios for PC access across their user base. They decided to move away from their existing PC management solution provider, and install netloan PC booking and print management across all library sites, allowing them to manage PC access across the community in tune with different users’ needs.

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“netloan provides an innovative solution for getting round potential problems when charging for internet access,” explains Paul. By adding the netloan charging, combi and webstat solutions, it was possible to run access options tailored to their users’ requirements. Combi provides a way to set up patrons with two different sets of privileges dependent on the booking scenario. At the same time, Webstat settings control which website addresses can be accessed in each scenario, along with metric reporting. Users could opt for free PC access when using the internet for ‘whitelisted’ websites including government, NHS, recruitment and community sites. Alternatively, free access could be booked for shorter timespans for more general internet access, with the ability to book and pay for longer sessions up to a set weekly limit. The ability to configure netloan for user groups that supported each scenario was key in the purchase decision. The netloan staff from lorensbergs worked with Paul and his colleagues to answer their questions relating to each scenario, and ensure that netloan and its combi module would provide the functionality required. In addition, the netloan user group provided further information and advice around the product. “With netloan combi and webstat, those needing community information and websites relating to life critical areas, access remains free.” says Paul. “For other leisure-related areas, access charging can be sensitively applied.”

Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

As North Tyneside increases the number of public-access PCs, installation of the netloan software on the new PCs is also proving much more straightforward than previously experienced. North Tyneside continues to work with lorensbergs on future projects, including installing netloan on its Bibliotheca smartserveTM 400 kiosks, and Wi-Fi authentication.

“netloan does a lot. We started from the point of ‘this is what we’d like it to do, can it do it?’ netloan did exactly what we wanted it to do. We advise libraries to look at netloan combi and webstat – they provide a bespoke solution to any problem you’ve got. The lorensbergs support team also come highly recommended, it’s been a very good experience all round.” Paul Bell, Libraries IT Manager, North Tyneside libraries

FIND OUT MORE Web: www.lorensbergs.co.uk Email: enquiries@lorensbergs.co.uk Tel: 01992 415505 Twitter: @lorensbergs


Our self-service booking solutions keep you in control… … of resources, staff time, not to mention the user experience

when visiting your library. You’ll find it’s a smoother, happier operation all round. For flexible solutions that cover: • PCs • Print payment • Wi-Fi • Rooms • Appointments • Media/AV equipment • Events • Courses • Resource charging • And much more… Solutions accessible via web or kiosk. Integration possible with all leading LMS providers. Call: 01992 415505 Visit: www.lorensbergs.co.uk Email: enquiries@lorensbergs.co.uk Follow us: @lorensbergs


Internet Librarian International

Katherine Allen, Business Development Director, Europe, Information Today

The theme for this year’s Internet Librarian International (ILI) conference is ‘Smart Solutions to Real Challenges’. Described as ‘the innovation and technology for information professionals’, ILI will take place in London on 15 and 16 October 2013, with workshops preceding the event on 14 October. This year, a new one day pre-conference event also explores MOOCs and libraries. The event will once again take place at Olympia Conference Centre which has plenty of room to accommodate the rapidly growing conference, which has seen a 65% increase in attendance in just 2 years. Every year, ILI features keynote speakers who are thought-provoking and inspirational, but also directly relevant to the concerns and interests of librarians and information professionals. This year’s opening speaker is author and consultant Peter Morville, who is perhaps best known for helping to create the discipline of information architecture. His keynote, ‘Inspiration Architecture: the future of libraries’, will argue that to understand the future of the library, it is necessary to look beyond its walls, to the tools and contexts – both physical and digital – where learning takes place. Morville describes his story as “colourful – both kaleidoscopic and contrarian”, and aims to “connect the dots from ebooks to ecosystems, framing the library as both cultural keystone and courageous act of inspiration architecture”. Day Two’s keynote speaker is Joe Tree, founder of photo sharing website Blipfoto, chosen by the British Library as one its ‘100 Websites’ judged to be essential reading for

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future generations. He takes as his starting point the way in which our relationship with photography has experienced a dramatic shift in the last ten years, moving from a way to preserve life’s special moments to a form of instant communication. At the same time, instant sharing means that we have stopped considering the future value of our photographs: “our grandparents did a better job of preserving their lives for us than we are doing for our grandchildren”. This leads Joe to consider themes such as creating a community, the curation of images, lifelogging, social history and research. He will also examine the role of photography in social media, his experiences in setting up Blipfoto, and how we can ensure our moments of today are saved for the future. This year’s conference is split into six tracks, with the emphasis on practical case studies: • Transformative Technologies – virtual and physical worlds collide • Connecting with Community and Customers – new ways to engage with users • New Resources and New Services – the latest in research, privacy, e-resources and more • Marketing and impact – how to promote services • Search, Discovery and Data – how are users searching, and what are they looking for? • The New Professional – Skills and Roles – careers and how to develop them. The ‘Transformative Technologies’ track is dedicated to technology futures, the merging of virtual and physical worlds, and the development of virtual services. Technology analyst and trend spotter Joe Murphy will open the track with an in-depth exploration of the potential impact and implementation of the newest technologies in libraries, ranging from wearable tech and smart objects, to the internet of things and new content delivery models.

Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

Case studies in this track include the University of Michigan library, who will discuss how they used an open-source exhibit content management system to create online exhibitions featuring items from their collections. Also from the USA, Emporia State University Libraries & Archives will share how they have used augmented reality (via free mobile software) to change their way patrons see and interact with the physical library space and resources.

The ‘transformative technologies’ theme is continued with a case study from a partnership of libraries from Sweden’s Sörmland, Västmanland and Örebro counties who will be discussing how they have used virtual conference technology to encourage interactivity and learning for both staff and users. Indiana’s Purdue University will share the story of how they created a YouTube video game to educate users about library resources. The ‘transformative technologies’ track concludes with a session called ‘Beyond websites – new ways to connect users to content’ where libraries including Imperial College London and Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden will talk about how they have revolutionised their library websites to better engage with patrons.


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39 R1

39

39

47

.2

40

47

39

39

KEY TEXTS

.2

40

47

enclosed area 46

4

39

39

40.1

.2

47 47

4

R7

R8

40.1

47

40

Viewing area

39

R7

R9

40.1

double sided A/V gondolas 4 47

46

R7

40.1

47 REFERENCE

R4

R9

R8

40.1

9

9

high stools

R4

47

KEY TEXTS computer workstation

2

4

39

47

36 2

paperback fiction 39

R2 R2 39

R11

39

39

39

2

R4

R2

glass desktop dividers

47

KEY TEXTS

7

R2 39 7 2

2

2

2

2

standing height computer units

2 36

Consultancy

youth AV

Design

Product Development

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Internet Librarian International

Librarians from The Netherlands and Denmark will discuss how they have refocused their activities in order to support community growth and development as part of the ‘Connecting with Community and Customers’ track. In the Netherlands, Bibliotheekservice Fryslân faced large budget cuts which in turn led to the creation of a radical new business plan, guided by the motto ‘you need to change to stay the same’. In Denmark, Copenhagen Libraries have introduced a library on the beach which aims to introduce patrons to all that libraries have to offer, but also takes the concept seriously, offering the same services that are provided back home and staffing the mobile library solely with librarians. Continuing the theme of community engagement, Jan Holmquist of Denmark’s Guldborgsund Libraries, speaking with Michael Stephens of San Jose State University, will explore the potential of mobile tools for delivering library services, discussing the ’23 Mobile Things’ course developed by an international team of librarians. Simon Chaplin of The Wellcome Library will share how the library has been transforming itself through mass digitisation of holdings and physical development of the building. The aim is to create a new ‘public library’ which bridges the gap between the Wellcome’s events programmes and research collections. Career development is another major theme. “There has never been a more challenging time for our libraries, but it’s also a great opportunity to transform ourselves,” says ILI’s Programme Director Val Skelton. An entire track is dedicated to ‘the new professional’, exploring the many opportunities for information professionals to extend or translate their skill sets into new areas, as well as to enhance the deliverables within existing library workplaces. Speakers

24

include Sheila Pantry, Ulla de Stricker, Alison McNab and SLA President Deb Hunt.

development – with budgets and resources to match. For libraries, there should be plenty of opportunities to contribute to MOOCs, from supporting digital engagement to collaborating with faculty in their creation. But with the MOOC phenomenon at such an early stage there are many unanswered questions. Internet Librarian International’s delegates come from a wide variety of international academic institutions, and so this is a great opportunity for them to explore the potential of MOOCs, and to share experiences from different national contexts.

Internet Librarian International 15 & 16 October 2013, Workshops on 14 October 2013

The conference will close with a plenary session, hosted by ILI’s co-chairs Thomas Brevik, Donna Saxby and Marydee Ojala, which will focus on the real-world and practical solutions presented during the conference. They will explore the positive aspects of librarianship and information work, setting out a vision of a positive future for librarians as they face real challenges and exciting opportunities. New for Internet Librarian Interntional 2013 is a particular focus on MOOCs and libraries, with the launch of a new one day pre-conference event. The theme of Libraries & MOOCs 2013 is ‘getting involved and making it work’ and it will take place at the Hilton London Olympia on 14 October 2013 – the day before Internet Librarian International’s main annual conference. Many institutions are putting a high priority on MOOC

Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries

The conference includes hands-on workshops, three parallel conference tracks, keynotes, plenary sessions, panel discussions, 40 case studies and over 70 expert speakers, networking with information professionals from over 30 countries, and the event’s Sponsor Showcase of global information products and service providers. A variety of discounts are available to members of various professional associations including CILIP, SLA, AIIP, CLSIG, MmIT, SFIS and UKeIG. Discounts are also available for multiple delegates from the same organisation.

FIND OUT MORE Full programme and registration at www.internet-librarian.com


14 October 2013

40 real world case studies

70 expert speake rs ❚ 3 parallel conference track s ❚ Networking , networking, networking! ❚

WORKSHOPS HILTON LONDON OLYMPIA

15 & 16 October 2013 CONFERENCE AND SPONSOR SHOWCASE OLYMPIA CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON, UK

Internet Librarian International offers Smart Solutions to Real Challenges Fast-changing technologies, new business models, heightened user expectations. How are your information peers competing to deliver innovative and imaginative services?

At Internet Librarian International, information professionals share their experiences about their creative projects, innovative solutions, and practical implementation strategies. ❚ Exchange best practice with colleagues from all types of organisations and disciplines ❚ Hear real-world case studies of innovation in action ❚ Discover new technologies, tools and techniques to directly impact and improve your services ❚ Learn to maximise resources, time and budget ❚ Network with fellow information professionals from around the world

KEYNOTES ANNOUNCED

Inspiration Architecture: The Future of Libraries Peter Morville, President, Semantic Studios, USA Information architecture founding ‘father’ Peter Morville joins the dots from ebooks to ecosystems, framing the library as both cultural keystone and courageous act of inspiration architecture. Hear his story – colourful and contrarian – with an argument that just may change the way you think about the future of our libraries.

Sharing and Saving Joe Tree, Founder, Blipfoto, UK

Joe Tree’s Blipfoto was chosen by the British Library as one of its

‘100 Websites’ judged to be essential reading for future generations. In a world where photography now leads the way in instant communication, Joe considers community creation, image curation, lifelogging, social history and research.

Registration is now live at

www.internet-librarian.com Produced by


Nielsen

Nielsen LibScan data Nielsen LibScan Library Borrowing Data – period 7, 2013 (16 June- 13 July 2013) Fiction still leads the Nielsen LibScan borrowing chart. Lee Child is in the top spot for period 7 (4 weeks ending 13 July) and has occupied this position for the last three periods. James Patterson continues to have very strong borrowing figures with three titles in the Top 10. However, there is some change in the chart – not surprisingly - Dan Brown’s, Inferno (published in May) entered in period 6 (4 weeks ending 15 June), going straight to position 2, which he has maintained ever since. The Top 10 are all hardbacks: Crime, Thriller & Adventure takes 8 of the 10 spots with General & Literary Fiction taking only 2 places. Whilst the UK TCM Top 10 is topped by Dawn French and with the exception of Dan Brown, all others in the chart are paperback.

Position

With so many bestselling authors being of the female gender, is it surprising that women writers figure so sparsely in the Top 10 library borrowings? In period 6, Maeve Binchy dropped out, but Hilary Mantel (Booker Prize winner) remained to keep up appearances with Bring Up the Bodies. J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy is the sole female offering in period 7; you will need to watch this space to see if The Cuckoo’s Calling [written under the name of Robert Galbraith] will sneak into the next chart. The Nielsen LibScan Children’s Top 10 is dominated by Jeff Kinney who takes the top spot, but also occupies another 5 positions in the Children’s chart; his titles dominate the

FIND OUT MORE For further information about Nielsen BookScan TCM Panel or LibScan panel: Email: info.bookscan@nielsen.com Web: www.nielsenbookscan.co.uk

Title

Author

Volume

1

A Wanted Man

Lee Child

2,251

2

Inferno: Robert Langdon

Dan Brown

2,167

3

12th of Never: Women’s Murder Club

James Patterson

1,836

4

The Racketeer

John Grisham

1,749

5

The Casual Vacancy

J.K. Rowling

1,741

6

Standing in Another Man’s Grave

Ian Rankin

1,723

7

Alex Cross Run

James Patterson

1,712

8

The Black Box

Michael Connelly

1,710

9

Private Down Under: Private Series

James Patterson

1,700

10

Six Years

Harlan Coben

1,692

(©2013 Nielsen Book Services Limited [trading as Nielsen BookScan and Nielsen LibScan])

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borrowing charts and are also popular in the retail sales charts around the world. In the UK TCM Children’s Top 10, David Walliams’ Gangsta Granny takes the top spot.

Panlibus Magazine | Autumn 2013 | www.capita.co.uk/libraries



Panlibus 29