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cheeseplease

australian

enjoying australia’s quality cheese at its best


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discover cheese... The quality and diversity of Australian cheese has never been better. In delis, specialty stores and retail outlets, consumers can choose everyday favourites from cheddar, to an ever increasing range of specialist cheese, such as brie, blues and washed rinds.

We hope this guide helps to enhance your experience of fine cheese, and encourages you to seek out and discover a variety of quality Australian-made produce.


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...australian cheese When buying cheese, ask yourself: “Is it Australian? ”

As a nation we pride ourselves on the quality of our local produce. Australian dairy farmers produce over 10 billion litres annually to provide the drinking milk, dairy produce and of course, the wonderful cheese we all enjoy. Australia makes some great cheeses and you can’t do that without starting with great milk. Australian cheese is made with milk from cows that graze almost entirely on fresh, green pastures. They produce a cheese that is rich and creamy yellow in colour due to the increased amounts of beta-carotene in the milk. By comparison, European cheeses are generally made with milk from cows that are fed silage and are often pale in colour. Happy, pasture-fed cows produce high quality milk that is then turned into delicious, creamy-coloured cheese.

Is it any wonder Australian cheeses are so highly regarded on the world stage? Australia is gaining world recognition for the quality of our specialist cheeses. Not only are domestic consumption and exports growing, but Australian producers are repeatedly winning international awards. Australian cheese is celebrated for its quality, flavour and innovation – a result of best practice cheesemaking. Australian cheesemakers are artists who use science and experience to create flavour and character in every cheese they produce – the cheesemakers’ importance should never be under estimated. When you purchase Australian cheese, you are supporting the Australian cheese industry and its development and at the same time helping the Australian economy.

Ask for... “Australian Cheese Please”


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cheese speak Boost your cheese knowledge by brushing up on these often used terms.

Body: A term which denotes the physical consistency of a cheese – soft, firm, hard, crumbly - and is often determined by the moisture content.

Rind: A protective external surface of a cheese. Its role is to protect the interior of the cheese while allowing it to ripen and develop in flavour and texture.

Curd: This is the first stage in cheesemaking which is a coagulated portion of milk comprising protein, fat, water and a small amount of milk sugar (lactose).

Specialist Cheese: Refers to handmade cheese using both on farm and bought-in milk.

Eyes: Holes are formed in the cheese from bubbles of carbon dioxide gas produced during fermentation. Farmhouse Cheese: Refers to handmade cheese using milk sourced from the cheesemaker’s farm. Maturation: Also referred to as “Ageing”. This important stage in cheesemaking is when a cheese is left to ripen. Moulds: Moulds can be on the surface or interior of the cheese. They assist in the development of flavour and aroma, and hasten the ripening process. Most moulds are strains of Penicillium.

Surface Ripened: Ripening takes place from the surface of the cheese towards the centre. Surface ripened cheeses, such as brie, camembert and washed rind, develop an edible rind or crust which influences the flavour and body of the cheese. Use-by Date: Australian cheeses all display a use-by date on their packaging. It serves as a guide for when a cheese is expected to be in peak condition for serving. Wrapping: The style of cheese dictates how and when the cheese is wrapped. For example, white mould cheeses often breathe through the wrapping as they continue to ripen.


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…one perfect cheese Remember the three “R’s” when selecting Australian cheeses. When a cheese is

Ripe and at

Room temperature, it’s

Ready to serve!

More and more people are discovering the pleasures of selecting and serving Australian cheese; there are no fixed rules, cheese can be enjoyed at any time! Some like to serve cheese with pre-dinner drinks whilst others prefer to serve it with the meal. It depends very much on the style of cheese. Some like to serve cheese after the main course and others after dessert. Some simply serve cheese casually on a platter to share with friends. Cheese is that versatile!

To make it simple, there are a few easy guidelines to follow when selecting the perfect Australian cheese. 1. Where possible, always taste the cheese prior to purchasing. 2. Choose one or two perfectly ripened cheeses, rather than a collection of mediocre cheeses to feature on a cheese plate. 3. If possible, buy cheese freshly cut from a larger wheel or piece. 4. Choose cheese close to use-by date. Cheese is often reduced in price close to the use-by date for a quick sale. This is great for consumers as cheese is often ripe and at its best by then. (NB. Take care it’s not overipe). 5. Purchase Australian cheese from a reputable retailer with a large selection of cheeses and a high turn-over. Quality delis and supermarkets take time to know the best products and can advise you on a cheese that is in perfect condition and ready to eat.


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soft and ripe… selecting the perfect cheese Always ask your deli for advice on which Australian cheeses are ripe and explain when you anticipate serving them. Be guided by their selection or suggestions when buying cheeses. After all, they are the experts!

As with most things in life, you will always be rewarded by choosing a quality product. Cheeses of quality will never disappoint so be sure your purchase is in peak condition when you plan to serve it. 1

Soft ripened cheeses, such as white moulds, washed rinds and blues, need to be specially selected to ensure they are served ripe and in premium condition. Look for white moulds and washed rinds that are soft to the touch, display a small amount of breakdown on the surface mould and have centres that ooze or bulge. White moulds have a ‘mushroom’ aroma, while washed rinds have a more robust smell. Blues should look moist, be evenly rinded and have an earthy aroma with a damp, but not sticky rind. Refer to the individual cheese classifications for further information on cheese selection.

2

3

The ripening of White Mould cheese Stage 1 - Chalky curd throughout the cheese. Approximately 6 – 8 weeks to ripening. Stage 2 - Curd under the rind has softened, still with a chalky centre. Approximately 3 – 4 weeks to ripening. Stage 3 - Chalk line has disappeared – the centre is soft throughout. A minimum of 6 weeks to achieve.


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storing and nurturing cheese Correct storage is a vital factor in nurturing cheese to its optimum serving condition.

• As a general rule and where possible, always store cheese wrapped in its original wrapper. • Use waxed paper (or loose cling wrap, depending on the cheese style) if the original wrapper is not available as it allows the cheese to breathe. • Avoid using foil for wrapping blue cheese for more than 2 weeks as it will react with the cheese. • Store fresh unripened cheeses in a covered container or tub and use preferably within a week of purchase or as indicated by the use-by date. • As a general rule, the harder the cheese the longer its shelf life. Factors that will affect shelf life are: the age of the cheese when purchased, and how it is cared for after purchase. Refer to the individual cheese classifications for further information.

• Store blue mould and washed rind cheeses separate to other foods. • Cheeses should be stored in the refrigerator at temperatures between approximately 4°C – 6°C. • Only cover the cut surface of cheese to enable the natural rind to breathe, except for earthy smelling washed rinds and blue cheeses that require individual wrapping and storing to reduce odours in the refrigerator. • When cheeses are removed from their original packaging, avoid stacking them on top of one another as it damages the rind, misshapes the cheeses and hinders further maturation.


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...presenting cheese Allow a total of 80-90g cheese per person or approximately 30g of each cheese if you are serving a selection. Remove cheese from the fridge one hour before service.

• Choose cheeses from different categories to offer a variety of textures, colours and flavours. • Enhance the presentation of a platter with different cheese shapes or by placing wedges at different angles on the plate. • Cheeses with rinds should be cut from the centre of the cheese to the edge, allowing each part of the cheese to be enjoyed. • When serving more than one cheese, always use a different knife for each cheese to prevent mixing flavours. • Remove cheese from the refrigerator at least one hour before service then cut to size and plate for presentation. Serve Australian cheeses at room temperature to achieve optimum flavour. To minimise wastage, only remove the portion of cheese that is required for use.

• To avoid cheeses drying-out whilst bringing them to room temperature, cover with a clean, damp tea towel or individually cover with plastic wrap. • Serve with complementary accompaniments that don’t overpower, such as quince paste, muscatel clusters, figs, pears or crisp apples. Keep it simple, yet stylish and feature only one or two accompaniments to complement the cheese selection on offer. • Encourage guests to cut cheese wedges along the length (from ‘nose to tail’) rather than cutting off the point!


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anytime is cheese time…. Whether it’s breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacktime, anytime is cheese time.

Pre-dinner tempters

Lovely lunches

Mash Australian Feta cheese with roasted red capsicum, spread on toasted baguette slices and sprinkle with continental parsley.

Panini, foccacia and bagels are delicious spread with Australian Cream Cheese or topped with Australian Bocconcini then finished with cured meats and marinated char-grilled vegetables.

Spread mini pizza bases with pesto and Australian Mozzarella or Bocconcini, bake until golden and top with slow roasted tomatoes. Layer slices of ripe Australian Camembert or Brie, smoked salmon, capers, baby cos lettuce and red onion slivers into a stack on a serving plate and drizzle with fruity olive oil.

Beautiful breakfasts Serve sliced fresh Australian Ricotta on thick toasted raisin bread, drizzled with honey or pure maple syrup. Stir shredded Australian Cheddar cheese and chopped continental parsley through hot scrambled eggs before serving with crisp cooked bacon. Try shredded Australian Gruyere or Raclette cheese sprinkled over a spicy herb and mushroom omelette.

Combine hot cooked angel hair pasta with shredded Australian Parmesan, Pecorino, Pepato or Romano cheese, thinly sliced chilli, fresh parsley and olive oil. Scatter generous shavings of Australian Parmesan over freshly steamed asparagus.


ACP.24pp cookbook.Ć’

Add flavour, texture and interest to your cooking by adding a little Australian cheese.

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Fondue is back! For your next dinner party, try your favourite fondue recipe using Australian Gruyere or Swiss style cheese as the base. Serve with baguette slices and crisp cooked vegetables. Fill wonton wrappers with Australian Ricotta flavoured with roasted garlic, fresh herbs and nutmeg. Boil and serve with melted butter, chopped parsley and shavings of Australian Parmesan or Pepato cheese. Pile cubes of roasted pumpkin that are seasoned with smoked paprika and olive oil, on a bed of rocket with semidried tomatoes and plenty of shaved Australian Pecorino cheese. Crumble Australian Blue cheese over boiled new potatoes. Drizzle with olive oil and toss with rocket for a warm, peppery salad.

Delicious dinners Layer slices of roasted pumpkin, capsicum and eggplant with sliced Australian Ricotta cheese in a baking dish, finish with a layer of Italian tomato sauce, lashings of Australian Mozzarella cheese and bake until golden.

Sweet moments Serve ripe Australian White Mould, Blue or Washed Rind cheese with figs drizzled with cognac, sprinkled with brown sugar and caramelised under a hot grill. Serve Australian Washed Rind, Blue or White Mould cheese with muscatels that have been gently infused in a port syrup. Combine Australian Mascarpone cheese, ground almonds, castor sugar and Cointreau together, then layer in a serving glass with Cointreau macerated berries.


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australian cheeses are classified as follows: 1. Fresh Unripened Cheese 2. Stretched Curd Cheese 3. White Mould Cheese 4. Washed Rind Cheese 5. Semi-Hard Cheese (Cheddar & Cheddar Style) 6. Eye Cheese 7. Blue Cheese 8. Hard Cheese

Serve Australian Blue with delicious wedges of buttery, oven roasted fresh pear.


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cheese accompaniments Keep accompaniments for cheese simple and stylish - enhance don’t detract from your magnificent cheese.

Cheese Varieties

Suitable Accompaniments are:

Fresh Unripened and Fresh Stretched Curd (specifically Bocconcini styles)

Olive bread Olives Anchovies Fresh herbs Capers Prosciutto

Semi-dried tomatoes Olive oil Roasted peppers Fresh berries Basil and olive oil Slow-roasted onions

White Mould (Brie/Camembert styles)

Crisp baguette Almond bread Water crackers

Quince paste Fresh or frozen grapes Figs Poached pear

Washed Rind

Toasted raisin bread Pears Bitter greens Apple puree

Sultanas Hazelnuts Fruit bread Rye bread

Cheddar and Cheddar Styles

Muscatels Chutney Sourdough bread Oatmeal or wheatmeal biscuits Green tomato chutney

Celery Green apples Quince paste Fig jam Fruit cake

Eye Cheese

When melted: Warm waxy potatoes Peaches Sweet potato Smoked meats

On a cheese plate: Pickles Gherkins Dried fruit

Blue Vein

Drizzle of wild honey Walnuts Port-soaked prunes Fresh or grilled figs Fresh or roasted pears

Quince paste Fresh dates Toasted walnut bread Almond biscotti

Hard Cheese

Apples Chutney Pears Rocket Tomatoes

Grapes/Walnuts Olives Ham/Prosciutto Nashi


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fresh unripened cheese Story

Also known as Soft White or Unripened, these are the simplest of cheeses. With no rind and a soft and smooth texture, they are high in moisture, generally lower in fat than firmer cheeses and not pressed. As fresh cheeses have a short shelf life, they have little time to develop any distinctive taste and are delicate and milky in flavour.

Styles

Cottage Cheese, Creamed Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Feta, Mascarpone, Neufchatel, Quark, Ricotta and Stracchino.

Select

• Snowy white in colour. • Fresh and moist. • Use within one week of purchase or by use-by date. • Sweet smelling. • Free from excess liquid.

Store

Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Stracchino, Neufchatel and Mascarpone • Keep refrigerated. • Store in original tub of purchase or with vacuum-sealed packs, re-wrap in cling wrap after opening and use within 1 or 2 weeks. • Freezing not recommended.

Ricotta • Keep refrigerated. • Drain off any whey to prevent souring the cheese. • Store fresh Ricotta in an airtight container or leave pre-packaged Ricotta in its original tub of purchase. • Freezing not recommended.

Feta • Keep refrigerated. • Store fully immersed in brine in a plastic-wrap covered bowl. • Freezing not recommended.

Serve

• Always serve fresh, soft cheeses at a cooler temperature than firmer cheeses. • Because of their delicate flavour, fresh unripened cheeses can be combined with fresh berries, honey, grated citrus rinds and liqueurs to create serving accompaniments to desserts, or served as a sweet course on their own. • Serve with crusty breads and soft textured biscuits rather than crunchy biscuits as the crunchiness detracts from the texture of the cheeses.


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stretched curd cheese Story

Mozzarella, Pizza Cheese, Bocconcini and Haloumi are Stretched Curd cheeses and are often referred to as ‘spun curd’ or ‘string cheese’ because of the way they are made. To make Stretched Curd Cheese, the curd is heated in water (70˚C–80˚C) until it becomes elastic, then kneaded and pulled into threads. This gives the cheese its stringy texture and characteristic ‘stretch’ when melted.

Styles

Mozzarella, Pizza Cheese, Bocconcini and Haloumi.

Select

• Stretched Curd cheeses should be smooth and supple in appearance. • Choose Bocconcini that is stored in clear water only - avoid those in cloudy water. • Fresh Bocconcini should have a shiny surface with an interior similar to cooked chicken breast.

Store

• Use fresh varieties within 1 week. • Mozzarella and Pizza Cheese will keep up to 4 weeks after opening (although freeze if grated). • If water becomes cloudy when storing Bocconcini, drain well, clean the container and add fresh water, then replace the Bocconcini. • Haloumi cheese should be well covered in the brine to avoid drying out.

Serve

• If Mozzarella, Pizza Cheese and Haloumi are cooked, serve immediately to maximise the visual ‘stretch’ that is a trademark with this style of cheese. • The mild flavour of Bocconcini is complemented by the robust flavours of olives, cured meats, ripe tomatoes and fresh basil. • Remove Bocconcini from refrigerator 15 minutes prior to serving to develop its full flavour.


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white mould cheese Story

White Mould cheeses, such as Brie and Camembert, age from the exterior to the interior. This process contributes to the maturation and character of the cheese. Once the white mould has fully grown on the cheese, it must be wrapped in special cheese paper as this is a crucial stage of the ripening process. When the rind of the cheese ages, the surface will start to break down, changing from its pristine white colour to off-white tinged with orange at times. This is an indication that the cheese is ripe and ready to eat!

Styles

Camembert, Brie, Double Brie and Triple Cream Brie.

Select

• Cheese should have a velvety white rind, a creamy and glossy, golden interior with no dry edges or overpowering smell of ammonia. • Centre of the cheese should ooze or bulge when cut. • Surface mould should show signs of breakdown. • Avoid Camembert or Brie that has a chalky centre as this indicates an unripened cheese.

Store

• Store from 1 - 4 weeks, depending on level of maturity. • Store White Mould cheeses in their original wrapper where possible. The wrapping forces the white mould to grow back into the middle of the cheese, thus ripening it from the outside into the centre. • White Mould cheeses absorb other flavours so store away from strong smelling foods in the refrigerator. • Freezing is not recommended.

Serve

• Remove cheese from fridge at least an hour before service for the best flavour development. • Delicious drizzled with toffee and walnuts for a simple and stunning dessert. • Add to gourmet sandwiches or baguettes with smoked ham and vine-ripened tomatoes. • Top cooked fillet steak with a slice of ripe Camembert or Brie before serving.


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washed rind cheese Story

This cheese style is among the world’s strongest smelling, yet surprisingly sweet tasting cheeses. It has a robust aroma with a sweet and earthy flavour that is slightly nutty. The cheese surface is washed during making with a brine solution containing a special bacterium, Brevibacterium Linens (also known as Brevy or B. Linens). This gives the rind its distinctive aroma and red/orange colour.

Styles

Semi-Soft Washed Rind, Wine Washed Rind and Reblochon. (Note: Australian manufacturers market washed rind cheese types by brand name)

Select

• Look for a red/orange rind with an earthy barnyard aroma. • No smell means no flavour and the cheese is yet to ripen! • When cut, cheese should bulge or ooze.

Store

• Store from 1 - 4 weeks, depending on level of maturity. • Store the cheese in its original wrapper or in waxed or greaseproof paper. • Keep well covered in the refrigerator, preferably in a glass container with a lid, to prevent the aroma affecting other produce. • Freezing is not recommended.

Serve

• To encourage first time users of Washed Rinds, it is recommended to taste only the centre of the cheese without the rind - the flesh is sweet and nutty with no hint of the wildness of the rind. • Allow a minimum of half an hour at room temperature prior to serving. • As the flavour of the cheese is quite complex, keep the accompaniments simple. Serve with pear or apple and toasted fruit bread. • Delicious thinly sliced in gourmet sandwiches.


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cheddar style cheese Story

Cheddar cheese is perhaps the most well-known cheese in the western world and certainly Australia’s most popular cheese. The many flavour variations of Cheddar reflect different cheesemaking methods and the length of maturation. For example, an aged Cheddar crumbles in the mouth and has a long, lingering flavour whereas a mild Cheddar will slice well for sandwich making. Cheddar is available wrapped in wax or cloth or cut from the block and vacuum packed.

Styles

Cheddar, Cheshire, Club Cheese, Colby, Red Leicester, Lancashire and Gloucester.

Select

• Look for crumbly cheese that is free from dryness or cracks on the surface. • Cheese should have a lingering flavour (ask to taste). • The longer the cheese is aged, the more the flavour will develop.

Store

• Cheddar and Cheddar-style cheeses can keep for up to several months. • Store wrapped loosely in plastic wrap. • Note the use-by date; the shelf life will vary depending upon the age of the cheese when purchased. • Freezing causes cheese to become dry and crumbly and is not recommended unless grated for cooking.

Serve

• Serve at room temperature for the best flavour. • Accompany with muscatels or with pickled onions and chutney as part of a Ploughman’s Lunch. • Shave over soups and roasted vegetables. • Sprinkle over sweet potatoes. • Grill on toast. • Stir into thick polenta. • Place on oysters and grill. • Add to garlic bread for a cheesy touch.


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eye cheese Story

Named for the eyes that are formed by bubbles of carbon dioxide gas produced during maturation, these cheeses have a smooth, satin-like texture and sweet, nutty flavour.

Styles

Swiss style, Emmenthal, Gruyere, Tilsit, Raclette, Gouda, Edam.

Select

• Select cheese with a smooth cut surface and shiny eyes and with surface rind intact. • Should be light in colour and smooth in texture. • Avoid cheese with moisture (tears) that has collected in the eyes.

Store

• Eye cheese keeps for several weeks in the refrigerator. • Store by covering only the exposed surface in plastic wrap as this allows the rind to continue to breathe. • Freezing is not recommended unless grated into an airtight, freezer bag. • Shelf life depends on the age of the cheese when purchased.

Serve

• Always serve at room temperature. • Use as a grilling or melting cheese or a fondue base. • Slice into sandwiches, hamburgers and steak sandwiches. • Shave into salads. • Grate into soups, tarts and quiches. • Grill and enjoy on crusty bread.


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blue cheese Story

A unique cheese with veins of green, grey or blue mould featuring throughout. A mostly strong, tangy flavoured cheese with a salty finish but with many milder versions available for the more delicate palate.

Styles

Blue Brie - A rich and creamy Brie with subtle blue characteristics. Perfect as a ‘beginner’s’ Blue cheese! Gorgonzola Style Blue - Earthy with distinct fruity overtones. Danish Style Blue - Sharp tasting with a salty bite. (Note: Australian manufacturers produce Blues in a variety of styles, marketed under specific brand names).

Select

• Select Blue cheese that is moist and evenly veined and with an earthy aroma. • The rind should be damp but not too sticky. • Avoid Blue cheeses that have wet or sticky rinds and a strong yeasty smell. • Outer edges of cheese should be firm and not crusted or split. • Choose Blue Brie if the rind, like that of Brie or Camembert, shows signs of breakdown.

Store

• Blue cheese maturation varies from 1 - 4 weeks, depending on the level of maturity. • Store in its original wrapper or with foil against the cut face for up to 2 weeks only. • Store in the warmest part of the refrigerator which is the vegetable drawer. • Because of its distinctive aroma, it is a good idea to store Blue cheese in a glass container with a lid to avoid flavour exchange to other foods. • Freezing is not recommended.

Serve

• The smell, flavour and appearance of Blue cheese serves as a guide to its ripeness. • For beginners, select a mild, creamy Blue Brie to serve. • Excellent added to salads, incorporated into sauces, quiches, tarts and pasta dishes. • Great melted onto steak, used as a stuffing in chicken or served as a sandwich ingredient. • Delicious added to hot polenta and risottos. • Take cheese out of the refrigerator at least one hour before serving.


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hard cheese Story

Hard cheeses have their own distinctive, robust, concentrated flavour. They keep very well due to very low moisture content and the longer they are aged, the more flavour and character they develop. They are most often grated or shaved over hot dishes or salads, but can also be served as a table cheese.

Styles

Parmesan - A robust cheese with a slightly sweet and fruity flavour that lingers on the palate. Pepato - The flavour of the peppercorns complements the piquant flavour of this cheese. Pecorino - A characteristic sharp flavoured cheese which is slightly sweet and slightly salty. Romano - A strong flavoured cheese when fully matured - yet not sharp.

Select

• Look for cheese that is hard and granular in texture and with no cracks or splits. • If mould appears, trim the surface and use remaining cheese.

Store

• Can be stored unopened or well covered for long periods of time due to its low moisture content. • Hard cheeses keep for up to 12 months in the refrigerator. • Freezing is not recommended unless grated, then it can be stored in an airtight freezer bag or container for up to 12 months.

Serve

• Serve as a table cheese with pears, apples, figs, almonds or walnuts. • Shave onto pizza, salads and cooked asparagus. • Grate onto pasta, lasagne or into soup. • Grill on eggplant or zucchini. • Add to a cream sauce. • Combine grated Hard cheeses with breadcrumbs or ground almonds and fresh herbs to crumb meats and vegetables. • Stir grated into risottos. • Infuse the cheese rind in olive oil and add fresh thyme over a low heat for 10 minutes. Allow to cool and use oil to drizzle over pizza, pasta or salads.


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a natural selection... Welcome to the world of cheese and wine matching.

The idea of matching wine and cheese is to provide a complementary balance of flavours and textures. As every cheese and wine has its own unique flavour, texture and other inherent characteristics, so too does every palate. The key is experimentation and working out what you like. Experiment with the cheese and wine styles to discover your own preferences, and have fun in the process! When choosing a wine to match a certain cheese, consider the following:

Does it Contrast, Complement or Clash? For example, the sweet stickiness of a dessert wine contrasts with the saltiness of a blue and the yeasty notes in a sparkling wine complement the mushroomy characteristics of a brie, but the tannin in the red wine will often clash with a blue. The following chart matches cheese styles with wine styles and is the result of a systematic program of tastings. It is intended as a guide only.


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...with wine, a perfect marriage

Fresh Unripened Cheese

White Mould Cheese

Blue Cheese

Washed Rind Cheese

Lighter, refreshing wines that don’t overpower delicate flavours e.g. • Sparkling • Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc • Pinot Noir, Grenache or cool climate Shiraz • Dessert wines

Suits a variety of wine styles e.g. • Chardonnay or Semillon • Sparkling • Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot or warm climate Shiraz

Sweet wines are the best match for the tangy, saltiness of Blue e.g. • Dessert wines • Fortified wines • Riesling or Gewürztraminer

Can be hard to match. The best styles are usually sweet and full bodied e.g. • Dessert wine • Fortified wine • Pinot Noir, Grenache or cool climate Shiraz • Sparkling red • Also good with beer

Stretched Curd Cheese

Eye Cheese Quite versatile to match with wine e.g. • Chardonnay or Semillon • Pinot Noir, Grenache or cool climate Shiraz • Dessert wine • Fortified wine

Cheddar and Cheddar Styles

Hard Cheese

For matching with fresh types, choose light, refreshing wines e.g. • Sparkling • Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc • Pinot Noir, Grenache or cool climate Shiraz

Suits a variety of wines e.g. • Chardonnay or Semillon • Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot or warm climate Shiraz • Dessert wine • Fortified wine

Choose intense wines to match e.g. • Chardonnay or Semillon • Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot or warm climate Shiraz • Fortified wine • Sparkling wines also match as acidity contrasts with the texture of the cheese


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Dairy Australia Level 5, IBM Centre, 60 City Road Southbank Victoria 3006 T + 61 3 9694 3777 F + 61 3 9694 3733 E enquiries@dairyaustralia.com.au

For further information visit www.dairy.com.au

DANMACP 001/05

Australian Cheese Please  

australian cheese please enjoying australia’s quality cheese at its best The quality and diversity of Australian cheese has never been bette...

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