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PERSPECTIVE Spring 2019

Colon Health Matters Rehab Therapy Helps Patients from All Walks of Life

ORLAND PARK MAN NO LONGER NEEDS BLOOD THINNERS WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY


PALOS MEDICAL GROUP WELCOMES NEW PHYSICIANS Andrew L. Kazaniwskyj, DO Board certified and specializing in Family Medicine. Completed his residency at Rush St. Luke's Presbyterian Medical Center/Christ Hospital, Chicago and Oak Lawn, IL. He received his medical degree from Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Lubomyra M. Kazaniwskyj, DO Board certified and specializing in Family Medicine. Completed her residency at Rush St. Luke's Presbyterian Medical Center/Christ Hospital, Chicago and Oak Lawn, IL. She received her medical degree from Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine.

The physicians listed or quoted, while having privileges, are not employees or agents of Palos Health unless they are specifically identified as such.

Neethi Sural, MD* Board certified and specializing in Internal Medicine. Completed her residency at Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. She received her medical degree from MS Ramaiah Medical College, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

*Hospitalist providing general medical care to patients at Palos Hospital

Discrimination Is Against the Law

Perspective is a publication of Palos Health 12251 South 80th Avenue Palos Heights, IL 60463 708.923.4000 paloshealth.com

Palos Health complies with applicable federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. Palos Health does not exclude people or treat them differently because of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex.

Terrence Moisan, MD President and CEO Heather Mascarello Editor, Perspective Osborn & DeLong Graphic Design

Palos Health focuses on‌ n Creating a better everyday life for our community

n Supporting healthy living while calming the anxiety of serious illness n Providing compassionate health care

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PALOS HEALTH ALSO WELCOMES Tamer Abdelrhman, MD

Karen Johnson, MD

Sherazuddin Qureshi, MD

Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center

Obstetrics & Gynecology, DuPage Medical Group

Vascular Surgery, Vascular Specialists

Michael Romberg, MD Barbara Bellar, MD

Charles Kinder, MD

Family Medicine, Dr. Waidzunas

Electrophysiology, Heart Care Centers of Illinois

Wound Care, SAS Surgical LTD.

Dane Salazar, MD Brian Blumenstein, MD Gastroenterology, Midwest Center for Digestive Health

Orthopaedics, Loyola University Medical Center

Mazen Kawji, MD Cardiology, DuPage Medical Group

Lipi Sekhadia, MD Mini Sara Cherian, MD

Kirkeith Lertsburapa, MD

Endocrinology, Diabetes & Endocrine Care

Cardiology, DuPage Medical Group

Janet Majewski, MD

Joyce Elugbadebo, MD

Pediatrics, Dr. George Skarpathiotis

Pediatrics, Dr. George Skarpathiotis

Robert Miller, MD

Luciano Fochesatto Filho, MD Internal Medicine, Miinedoctor, Inc.

Nichole Butler-Mooyoung, MD

Internal Medicine, DuPage Medical Group

Samir Patel, MD Gastroenterology, Midwest Center for Digestive Health

Sunil Shroff, MD

Orthopaedics, Loyola University Medical Center

Kareem Folashade, MD

Internal Medicine, DuPage Medical Group

Obstetrics & Gynecology, DuPage Medical Group

Electrophysiology, DuPage Medical Group

Priya Venkataraman, MD Internal Medicine, DuPage Medical Group

Margaret Zabiega, MD

Leigh Halpern, MD

Michael Porter, MD

Emergency Medicine, Emergency Medical Associates of Palos, Ltd.

Electrophysiology, Heart Care Centers of Illinois

Internal Medicine, DuPage Medical Group

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TINY DEVICE MEANS BIG RESULTS FOR MANY PATIENTS WITH AFIB

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heard of the Watchman™ before,” said Ron. “I did not even know it was an option for me.”

Until recently, patients who took blood thinners for atrial fibrillation (otherwise known as AFib, a common kind of irregular heartbeat) faced a difficult dilemma: deal with the side effects and risk of excess bleeding, or stop taking them and have an increased chance of stroke. Last year, while walking up a little hill at his son’s house, Ron’s knee swelled up. He was taken to the hospital, where doctors removed the excess fluid from around his knee. However, the removed fluid contained blood, which was concerning. Cardiologist Roy Bliley, MD, recommended Ron quit taking blood thinners and instead have a device permanently implanted in his heart to reduce his chance of stroke. "The device decreases the chance of stroke secondary to AFib to a level comparable to blood thinners without the associated increased chance of bleeding," said Dr. Bliley.

However, a new FDA-approved device called the Watchman™ could be a game changer for many people living with AFib. During the hour-long procedure, a tiny device the size of a quarter is implanted into the left atrial appendage (LAA) of the heart. This one-time procedure requires only a small incision in the upper leg to allow for the insertion of a narrow tube. This tube is then used to guide the Watchman™ to the heart, where it is permanently implanted. It does not have to be replaced and can’t be seen outside the body. Ron Hatje of Frankfort recently had a WatchmanTM implant. After being diagnosed with AFib years ago, he was placed on blood thinners.

Understandably, Ron was concerned about undergoing the procedure. “I had never

Ron met with interventional cardiologist Ravi Ramana, MD, for an initial consultation to discuss risks and benefits of an implanted device. Dr. Ramana explained how the Watchman™ can help to reduce stroke risk for AFib patients by closing off the LAA (left atrial appendage) of the heart. With AFib, since the heart does not pump normally, blood can pool in the LAA, eventually forming a clot. If a clot escapes and travels to another part of the body, it can cut off blood supply to the brain, causing a stroke. Once he decided to have the procedure, Ron underwent a special test called a TEE, or transesophageal echocardiogram. With this test, the patient receives sedation and a device called a transducer is placed in the esophagus, where it takes pictures of the heart using high-frequency sound waves. These images ensure there are no clots present that could rule out surgery. About three weeks after starting testing, Ron had the Watchman™ implanted at Palos Hospital by Dr. Ramana and Dr. Martin Burke. (Continues on next page)

Symptoms of AFib* The most common symptom of AFib is a quivering or fluttering heartbeat. Additional symptoms may include: 䡲 General fatigue

䡲 Dizziness

䡲 Faintness or confusion

䡲 Rapid and irregular heartbeat

䡲 Shortness of breath and anxiety

䡲 Fatigue when exercising

䡲 Fluttering or “thumping” in the chest

䡲 Sweating

䡲 Weakness *According to the American Heart Association

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According to Ron, the procedure was pretty uneventful and he was able to go home the next day. “People said, ‘Oh my gosh! You’re going home in a day?’” remembers Ron. “But I really felt about the same, like it was nothing, really.” One thing that isn’t the same for Ron is the daily taking of blood thinners. He stayed on his medication for six weeks after the procedure before getting approval from his doctor to discontinue using. Without much in the way of downtime, Ron was able to quickly resume his normal routine. Regular follow-up visits with his cardiologist are one of the few reminders of his heart procedure.

If you answer yes to the following questions, you may be a candidate for an implanted device. 䡲 Do you have AFib not caused by a heart valve problem? 䡲 Has your doctor recommended you take a blood thinner? 䡲 Do you have a history of major bleeding while taking blood thinners? 䡲 Do you have a lifestyle, occupation, or condition that puts you at risk for bleeding?

Call our AFib Clinic at 708.923.5460 to learn if you are a candidate for this new procedure.

Don’t Skip a Beat! Living with AFib

May is Stroke Awareness Month

People who experience an irregular and/or rapid heartrate are at an increased risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. Learn how medications and other interventions can help manage this condition. Presented by electrophysiologist Martin Burke, DO.

People with AFib are at an increased risk for stroke, since irregular heartbeats can cause blood to collect in the heart and potentially form a clot. The clot can then travel to the brain and cause a stroke.

F A S T

FACE DROOPING

ARM WEAKNESS

SPEECH DIFFICULTY

TIME TO CALL 911

TIME/DATES: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 7 LOCATION: Palos Hospital Auditorium, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights

If you think someone is having a stroke,

REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300

call 911 immediately! Getting prompt medical

COST: Free

attention can help lead to a better recovery.

The FAST acronym is a copyright of American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

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don’t hold it!

Taking Care of Your Colon Disposal trucks visit your neighborhood weekly to remove household waste, but your colon has a much tougher schedule. This organ (also known as the large intestine) works 24/7 to remove digested leftovers that your body no longer needs. It may sound like a thankless job, but good colon function is vitally important to your health. It’s crucial to take good care of your colon so it can serve you well for a lifetime. Fortunately, taking care of your colon is not complicated. Palos Medical Group colorectal surgeon Imad Qayyum, MD, offers suggestions on what you can do to keep your colon healthy and working for you:

diet Strive for a diet high in fiber, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grain breads and cereals, nuts and beans. These foods can help waste pass easily and regularly through the colon, and all are linked to a lower risk of certain cancers. “The recommended daily fiber intake is 30g for men and 25g for women,” said Dr. Qayyum. “Since this is unrealistic for many, I recommend a fiber supplement with powdered fiber/psyllium husk.” Also be sure to limit your intake of red meat, high fat and processed foods.

exercise Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderateintensity exercise five days a week to increase blood flow, which helps the colon do its job more effectively. According to Dr. Qayyum, “Exercise doesn’t necessarily mean going to a gym. For example, taking a walk around the block after dinner is a great way to stay active.”

alcohol According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), all types of alcoholic drinks, including red and white wine, beer, cocktails, and liquor, are linked with cancer. The more you drink, the higher your cancer risk. The recommended limits are up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men.

smoking “Quitting smoking is my number one recommendation to all of my patients,” said Dr. Qayyum. “Not only is it a risk factor for colon and rectal cancers, it is a risk factor for all other cancers as well as debilitating conditions.” Palos Hospital hosts free Courage to Quit classes throughout the year to help with smoking cessation. Find a class at: paloshealth.com/ classes-events.

Holding a bowel movement for long periods can be painful and result in constipation. Suppressing the urge may also release toxins into your body, resulting in further health problems. “Most people do not realize they are constipated,” said Dr. Qayyum. “The idea is to have an effortless bowel movement without straining.” See recommendations above on increasing fiber and water intake to reach this goal.

get screened According to CDC, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. For this reason, it’s very important to have regular colorectal screening tests beginning at age 50, or even earlier depending on certain risk factor, like ethnicity or family history. Precancerous polyps can be found and removed before they turn into cancer, and colon cancer can be detected at early stages when treatment is most effective. “I strongly recommend getting a colonoscopy,” explains Dr. Qayyum. “Frequently I perform colonoscopies and operations for colon cancer for completely abnormal growths that display no symptoms. The sooner we find them, the better the outcome!”

drink water Water helps keep the colon clean by flushing out harmful toxins. A good goal is to drink half your body weight in ounces each day, although Dr. Qayyum acknowledges that this is “difficult to achieve without a concerted effort.” He recommends keeping a water bottle by your work station so it is always available; it also makes it easier to keep track of your intake.

Imad Qayyum, MD, is a Palos Medical Group surgeon, board certified in general and colon/rectal surgery. He is trained in the use of robotic technology for minimally-invasive colorectal surgery. For more information or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Qayyum, please call 708.923.4400.

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REHAB THERAPY Oncology and Aquatic Rehab Help Survivor to Thrive Tinley Park resident Kim Wills is no stranger to adversity. After a routine mammogram in 2016 found breast cancer, she underwent two separate surgeries, followed by rounds of chemo and radiation, as well as infusions. By the time everything was complete, Kim was physically drained. “After the surgeries, my shoulders, arms and legs were weak,” she said. “I started working with an Oncology Rehab Specialist, Margaret, twice a week. She worked to heal my body and my soul.” Margaret praised Kim’s persistent and “feisty” spirit during their sessions together: “Kim faced an especially difficult time after her surgeries, but I give her great credit for persevering and getting back to herself.” In 2017, Kim underwent a hysterectomy, which again caused her to experience limited mobility. She began seeing Margaret

Oncology Rehabilitation Specialist Margaret Placek

for therapy but, after a few sessions, Margaret felt a different option might be better. “Aquatic therapy seemed like a good progression for Kim,” said Margaret. “The warmth and buoyancy of the water relieves the load on the joints and helps muscles to stretch more easily.” Although Kim was “a bit apprehensive” about changing therapists, she began seeing aquatic therapist Mike Hofferica for traditional and water therapy. She quickly noticed an improvement

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Kim Wills works on her leg strength and mobility

in how she felt, and gives credit to the treatments for helping her on her journey back to wellness. “I know I have a ways to go,” said Kim, “but with each visit, I am feeling better.”

PALOS HEALTH PERSPECTIVE


Fitness Center Director Gets Push from Therapy to do a little bit more and the injury became less of a limitation,” he said. “Erika watched every repetition and gave feedback, ensuring that I did the exercises correctly, which I know is critical to avoid setbacks.”

As the Center Director for the Orland Park Health & Fitness Center, David Brainerd was familiar with Palos Rehabilitation Therapy, just a short walk from his office. What he wasn’t familiar with was being a Palos therapy patient. That all changed in December of 2018 when a fall resulted in an elbow injury. “I was in a lot of pain,” said David. “It hurt to wiggle my fingers.” David’s doctor gave him an order for therapy to help restore movement and range of motion. He was directed to physical therapist Erika Kruchten, partly for her experience working with elbow injuries, but also for her passion working with sports injuries and athletes. Given David’s love of

Fitness Center Director David Brainerd is back to doing pushups after physical therapy

exercise and fitness, it was a perfect fit. “Each session I was able

At the end of four weeks, David was amazed at the progress he had made, including being able to do pushups again as part of his workout. “What stood out to me about Palos was the oneon-one attention I received,” explained David. “Since therapy, I’ve ramped up my exercise routine, and have more confidence and energy. Plus, my wife is happy that I can help wash dishes again!”

Shoulder Injury Can’t Derail Professional Janet Tatgenhorst was rushing to catch a train at Chicago’s Union Station when she was pushed and fell, completely dislocating her right shoulder. After seeing her doctor, she began rehabilitation at Palos with physical therapist Jerome Ocampo. After a couple sessions, Janet “thought she was doing well” with therapy, but Jerome realized something was very wrong with Janet’s shoulder. “Jerome quickly noticed that therapy wasn’t progressing the way it should, and urged me to see an orthopaedic surgeon. I ended up having an MRI done, which indicated I needed surgery. My surgeon, Edward Joy, MD, said that I would have lost the use of my right arm within

a year if Jerome had not urged me to see a specialist instead of continuing with therapy.” Two months after surgery, Janet was ready to begin physical therapy again with Jerome. She did exercises to strengthen her shoulder muscles and help her return to more normal functioning. “I noticed improvement almost immediately,” said Janet. “That’s the benefit of a good therapist! Jerome is excellent. He’s very courteous, but also disciplined; he does not baby you, but gently encourages you to do the most you can to achieve the best result.” Today Janet is back to work and an active life of Zumba, yoga and enjoying long walks with her beloved dogs. SPRING 2019

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Physical therapist Jerome Ocampo assists Janet Tatgenhorst with her shoulder mobility

PALOS HEALTH PERSPECTIVE


Therapy Helps Unleash Mobility After Dog Attack A dog attack five years ago left Palos Park resident Phyllis Adams moving slowly and in pain “all the time.” When she finally went for a consultation with orthopeadic surgeon William Earman, DO, she was shocked to find out that what she had thought for years was a hip problem was actually a problem with her back.

get better. He also taught me tai chi moves that are helpful for improving my balance.”

Phyllis underwent spine surgery, followed by a stint in rehab. Once her doctor gave the order for therapy, Palos physical therapist Aristede Dukes began working with Phyllis. “I am so glad to work with Aristede because he encourages me to do all I can to

When asked how she feels post spine surgery and rehabilitation, Phyllis says, “It’s not even comparable. I was crippled before, but with therapy I could see improvement every day. Palos Rehabilitation has been a wonderful place for me.”

Aristede was proud of the transformation Phyllis achieved in therapy. “When I first saw Phyllis, she thought of herself as very debilitated,” he said. “She has really progressed and realizes she is capable of great things.”

Physical therapist Aristede Dukes works on balance exercises with Phyllis Adams

Getting a Hand from Occupational Therapy Vanetta Wiegman was spending a pleasant afternoon gardening when she suddenly found herself lying on the ground, her right arm racked with pain. “I was standing on only the second rung of a ladder. I must have reached for something and lost my balance,” she believes. Her injuries were, in a word, “catastrophic.” Essentially, Vanetta had fractured both bones in her arm, essentially separating her hand from her arm. While her orthopedic surgeon, Michael Liston, MD, remained positive, the reality was that she was at risk for losing her hand and could end up crippled for life. Vanetta spent the next 10 weeks in a cast, after which she began occupational therapy at Palos. “When I started I could barely

for a year after her surgery. “When I initially saw Vanetta, her severe injury meant treatment would focus on restoring motion and strength, while maintaining control of swelling. Throughout the rehab process, she remained highly motivated. Her positive approach made a difficult process very successful.” “Nancy gets so much credit for Vanetta Wiegman strengthens her helping me throughout the rehab process and giving me little victogrip with occupational therapist ries so I would not get discourNancy Stanley aged,” said Vanetta. Although her road to recovery was not an easy move my hand,” she recalls. one, today Vanetta has almost “Fortunately, I had a therapist complete use of her hand. She who was right there with me.” enjoys golf and even took up That therapist is Palos occupapiano to keep mobile and not tional therapist Nancy Stanley, regress. The only thing she does who worked with Vanetta weekly avoid—ladders!

Palos Health offers specialized therapy at convenient locations to meet your needs. Call 708.923.5050 to learn more. SPRING 2019

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PALOS OFFERS LUNG CANCER SCREENING A written order from a physician or qualified non-physician practitioner is required. A shareddecision meeting with your primary physician is recommended in order to fully understand the benefits of screening, the risks of smoking, and the importance of follow up. For those who qualify, a low- dose CT screening test is recommended annually until the age of 77.

Palos Health offers a painless, noninvasive screening test for patients at high risk of developing lung cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, low-dose CT (LDCT) is the most effective tool for early detection and diagnosis of lung cancer, increasing the chances of survival. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, claiming the lives of more people each year than colon, breast, pancreas and prostate cancers combined.

Cardiothoracic surgeon Paul Gordon, MD, has extensive experience performing lung surgeries, and can attest to better outcomes for patients when cancer is detected early. “Lung cancers found through low-dose CT screening are much more likely to be early stage and therefore respond better to treatment,” he noted. How is low-dose CT (LDCT) performed? 䡲 LDCT is fast, painless and noninvasive.

Is this screening for you?

䡲 Patients lie on an examination table, which moves quickly through a cylindrical scanner. The scanner takes 3-D pictures of the lungs in a matter of seconds.

The lung cancer screen is covered by Medicare and is available to current or former smokers who meet the following criteria: 䡲 Age 55-77

䡲 LDCT uses up to 90 percent less radiation than a conventional chest CT.

䡲 Current smoker or have quit within the last 15 years

Results

䡲 Have a tobacco smoking history of at least 30 “pack years” (average of one pack a day for 30 years)

A radiologist will interpret your images and send a report to your personal physician, who can then coordinate any required follow-up testing or treatment.

䡲 No signs or symptoms of lung cancer

Schedule your screening Patients who meet the screening guidelines are encouraged to call 708.827.2030 to schedule an appointment. Please note that a physician’s order is required.

For help quitting smoking, see our Courage to Quit class listing on page 14.

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No Place Like Home: How Palos Home Health Allowed a Patient to Stay in the Place He Loved Best Jack Toczek hated to be tied down. Well into his 90s, he lived independently in his own home and kept busy playing his cello, repairing shoes, or making Polish-style cheese. Although his family thought he might benefit from a move to a place that could offer more help, he refused to hear of it. everything. It made things so much easier.”

One day, while working on one of his repair projects, Jack took a tumble and landed in the hospital with a broken leg, finger and wrist. He spent a month in rehab before being discharged. His daughter, Zofia Michniak, knew that he could no longer remain home by himself, but the thought of bringing him to live with her was daunting. “I wanted to care for my dad but didn’t know how I would be able to, especially with my work responsibilities,” she explained. “Our daughter told us about Palos Home Health Care and how they could give us the extra help we needed.”

After consulting with Jack’s doctor and caregivers the family decided he would benefit from palliative care—specialized medical and nursing care for those with serious illness. Palliative care can provide relief from symptoms, including pain, physical stress or mental stress at any stage of illness. Palos APN Janet Burda (APN-CNS) has been providing palliative care to patients for over five years. “Involving palliative care earlier in the disease process allows a relationship to develop between the patient, family and palliative care provider,” she said.

Zofia and her husband, Leopold, arranged for a consultation with Palos Home Health. In addition to coordinating physical therapy for Jack at home, they were able to check and reorder medications as needed, help him bathe regularly, and manage house-call visits from Jack’s doctors. “When my dad needed an X-ray, they were able to bring a portable machine right to our home,” said Zofia. “When his regular bed was no longer a good option, Home Health arranged for a hospital bed. They helped coordinate

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Janet worked with Jack and his family to develop a course of action that everyone could feel good about. “I was able to meet with Jack and his family, and learn about what was important to them. Jack’s goal of independence and the emphasis everyone placed on caring for him at home as long as possible guided the plan of care that was created,” she said. “My father used palliative care for about a year,” said Zofia. “They helped keep him happy and comfortable in our home, and worked with the doctor to coordinate his medications.” As time went on, it became obvious that a

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“My father wanted to live life on

his own terms, and Home Health allowed him to do that as much as was possible.” different type of care was needed. “When we knew that Jack was nearing the end of his life, and the goal was comfort, it was appropriate to transition his care to hospice," said Janet. Caregivers came every day to keep him clean and comfortable, as well as administer medications and manage his pain. “When he finally passed away, it was in his sleep and was very peaceful,” remembers Zofia. “We did not need to call an ambulance; hospice came within the hour and was able to arrange everything.” “My father wanted to live life on his own terms, and Home Health allowed him to do that as much as was possible,” continues Zofia. “He was happy to stay with us and not be in any kind of assistedliving facility. “We were very happy with all the services that Palos provided to us in the home and would recommend to anyone.”

Jack Toczek surrounded by his great granddaughters

Palos Home Health offers many levels of care, allowing qualified patients to remain in their homes while receiving medical care, making the effects of illness easier to deal with and relieving some of the burden on family caregivers. To learn more about Home Health Services through Palos, visit paloshealth.com/ medical-services/homehealth-services or call 630.257.1111.

Leopold and Zofia Michniak with her father, Jack Toczek (right), at their home in Palos Hills

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CLASSES, EVENTS & GROUPS SPRING

2019

and/or rapid heart rate are at an increased risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. Learn how medications and other interventions can help manage this condition. Presented by electrophysiologist Martin Burke, DO. TIME/DATE: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 7 LOCATION: Palos Hospital Auditorium, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

Take Better Care of Your Back Learn how posture, body mechanics and other forms of physical therapy can be used to prevent or manage back pain. This workshop is led by a Palos physical therapist. Registration is required.

WELLNESS Foods to Fight Inflammation There’s a lot of confusion about what inflammation is and how it impacts wellness. This class explores how food can help fight inflammation that may contribute to health problems and disease. Cooking tips, recipes and tasty samples will be provided. Presented by registered dietitian nutritionist Loretta Wojtan. TIME/DATE: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m., Thursday, April 11 LOCATION: Palos Hospital Auditorium, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

Craft a Better Salad Up your salad game by learning how to create fresh, fabulous salads and dressings that are, not only delicious, but better for you. By using a few unexpected toppings, you can really boost flavor and healthfulness! Presented by registered dietitian nutritionist Loretta Wojtan. TIME/DATE: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 9 LOCATION: Palos Hospital Auditorium, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

Don’t Skip a Beat! Living with AFib People who experience an irregular

TIME/DATES: 6 – 7 p.m., Wednesdays, May 8 or August 7 LOCATION: ACC1 Conference Room, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights (please park in lot 5 or 6 and enter through Rehabilitation Services) REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

Don’t get sidelined by diabetes! Our nationally recognized Diabetes Program gives you the tools you need to manage the physical and emotional aspects of this disease. Get information about nutrition and physical activity, instructions on

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Nutrition for Your Heart Eat healthy for your heart’s sake! Understand how to control fat and saturated fat intake, avoid trans fats, cholesterol and sodium, increase fiber and read food labels. Taught by a Palos registered dietitian nutritionist. INFORMATION: For additional information, including meeting times, call 708.226.2300. LOCATION: Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights

This seven-week program is designed for adults over the age of 18 who are ready to quit smoking. Offered by the Respiratory Health Association. Maximum 10 participants per class.

Led by a Palos diabetes educator, this class offers lifestyle modifications to help you eat healthy and lose weight. Learn how losing just five to ten percent of your body weight can make a difference in delaying or preventing diabetes.

Your Diabetes Game Plan

INFORMATION: For additional information, including meeting times, call 708.226.2626. LOCATION: Palos Diabetes Counseling and Education, Suite 122, Building D, Palos Health South Campus, 15300 West Avenue, Orland Park

Courage to Quit

Diabetes Prevention: Living on the Border

TIME/DATES: 1 – 2 p.m., Tuesdays, May 14 or July 9 LOCATION: Palos Diabetes Counseling and Education, Suite 122, Building D, Palos Health South Campus, 15300 West Avenue, Orland Park TIME/DATES: 6 – 7 p.m. Tuesdays, April 9, June 11, or August 13 LOCATION: ACC1 Conference Room, Palos Hospital, 12251 S. 80th Avenue, Palos Heights (please park in lot 5 or 6 and enter through Rehabilitation Services) REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: $10/individual; $15/couple (max 10 people)

blood glucose monitoring and a customized eating plan. Note: a physician referral is required to join the program.

TIME/DATES: 9 – 10 a.m., Mondays beginning April 29, June 24 or August 19 TIME/DATES: 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays beginning May 1, June 26 or August 21 LOCATION: Conference Room B, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

A Matter of Balance This evidenced-based program is led by Palos physical or occupational therapists and emphasizes practical strategies to decrease fall risks and fear of falling, and increase activity levels and independence. Know a loved one who might benefit? Gift certificates now available for purchase! TIME/DATES: 10 a.m. – noon, Tuesdays, May 7 – June 25 LOCATION: Orland Park Fitness Center, 15430 West Avenue, Orland Park TIME/DATES: 10 a.m. – noon, Wednesdays, May 8 – June 26 LOCATION: ACC1 Conference Room, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights (please park in lot 5 or 6 and enter through Rehabilitation Services) REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: $80

14

Nutrition and Cancer Care Good nutrition can be a challenge when dealing with cancer and treatment. Learn how to eat to maintain body weight, cut the risk of recurrence, reduce nausea and improve your overall quality of life. Led by registered dietitian nutritionist Lela Iliopoulos. TIME/DATES: 2 – 3 p.m., Thursdays May 16 or July 18 LOCATION: Woodland Café Conference Room, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

FAMILY-CENTERED Birth, Babies and Beyond Express Get the most out of your birthing experience. In a relaxed setting, expectant mothers and their support person learn about labor, birth, medical interventions, physical and emotional changes after birth, infant care and more. TIME/DATES: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., Saturdays, April 6, May 4, June 8, July 13 or August 10 LOCATION: Childbirth Classroom, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: $85/couple, meals provided

Baby Basics This three-hour class offers up-todate information on caring for a newborn. Topics include: feeding, diapering, bathing, growth and development, infant stimulation, newborn characteristics and behavior, infant-soothing techniques, signs of illness, immunizations, choosing baby equipment, car seat safety and general safety. TIME/DATES: 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Wednesdays, April 17, May 22, June 26 or August 28 TIME/DATES: 8 – 11 a.m. Saturdays, April 27, June 22, July 27 or August 17 LOCATION: Childbirth Classroom, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: $20/couple

Breastfeeding Basics A Palos lactation consultant provides the basics for successfully nursing your baby. This class covers breastfeeding advantages, practical techniques, pumping, storing, returning to work, dad’s role and family support. TIME/DATES: 6:30 – 9 p.m.,

PALOS HEALTH PERSPECTIVE


Thursdays, April 18, May 16, June 13, July 18 or August 15 TIME/DATES: 8 – 10:30 a.m., Saturdays, April 13, May 18, June 15 or July 6 LOCATION: Childbirth Classroom, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: $20/couple

Birthing Center Tour One of the most important decisions to make when expecting a baby is where to deliver your child. Learn how Palos is different from other hospitals through our single-room maternity care, where labor, delivery, recovery and postpartum all take place in private rooms. TIMES/DATES: 6 – 6:45 p.m., select Wednesdays and Thursdays; 11 – 11:45 a.m., select Saturdays. Call for dates. LOCATION: Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

REGISTRATION: Call for details, 708.923.4970. COST: Free

Nursing Moms Network Get the support you need when it comes to breastfeeding. Meet and share experiences with other mothers and receive ongoing guidance and support from an experienced lactation consultant.

Fall-Prevention Support Group Offered by rehabilitation professionals from Palos Health, this group provides information and practical support for preventing falls, increasing activity level and maintaining and improving independence. Each group includes a demonstration of tai chi or other exercises.

TIME/DATES: 11a.m. – 12:30 p.m., most Tuesdays; 6 – 7:30 p.m., third Monday of the month LOCATION: ACC1 Conference Room, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights (please park in lot 5 or 6 and enter through Rehabilitation Services) REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

I’m a Big Brother/Big Sister! Future siblings can learn what to expect with a new baby and how they can be a help to their growing family. Class includes a short tour of the birthing unit. Appropriate for children ages 3-9 years of age; children should bring a doll or stuffed animal to class.

Joy of Grandparenting Are you welcoming a grandchild? Explore the many facets of the grandparent role and learn about family adjustment as well as ways you can support the new parents. An update on childbirth practices, the latest in baby care and a tour of the Birthing Center are included.

TIME/DATES: 4 – 5 p.m., Wednesdays, May 29 or July 24 LOCATION: Childbirth Classroom, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: $5/child with a maximum of $15/family

SUPPORT GROUPS

TIME/DATES: 7 – 9:30 p.m., Thursdays, May 9 or July 25 LOCATION: Childbirth Classroom, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

Lymphedema Support Group Network with others experiencing lymphedema while receiving updates on products, community resources and management strategies.

Infant/Child/Adult CPR Be prepared to act in an emergency. This American Heart Association class is intended for anyone 11 years and older interested in learning cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques to assist infants, children and adults in distress. Note: This is not a class for CPR certification. TIME/DATES: 6 – 9 p.m., Thursdays, April 11, April 25, May 2, May 23, June 6, June 20, July 11, August 8 or August 22 LOCATION: Palos Hospital Childbirth Classroom, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: $30/person

TIME/DATES: 10 – 11 a.m., first Thursday of each month (no group July or Dec – Feb) LOCATION: Palos Hospital Auditorium, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) Support Group PICS is a condition of health problems that may remain after critical illness has been resolved. The PICS Support Group offers guidance and interventions to reduce the difficulty of recovery. TIME/DATES: 6 – 7:30 p.m., first Thursday of the month LOCATION: ACC1 Conference Room, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights (please park in lot 5 or 6 and enter through Rehabilitation Services) REGISTRATION: 708.923.4800 (Please leave a message, with contact information, to let us know you are planning to attend.) COST: Free

TIME/DATES: 5:30 – 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 19 LOCATION: ACC1 Conference Room, Palos Hospital, 12251 South 80th Avenue, Palos Heights (please park in lot 5 or 6 and enter through Rehabilitation Services) REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SMART Recovery SMART Recovery is an abstinencebased mental health and educational program focused on changing addictive behaviors. Weekly meetings focus on ideas and techniques to help participants change from a selfdestructive and unhappy life to one that is constructive and satisfying. TIME/DATES: 8 – 9 p.m., most Tuesdays LOCATION: Conference Room B, Building A, Palos Health South Campus, 15300 West Avenue, Orland Park For further information, please call: 708.460.2721 COST: Free

SMART Recovery Family & Friends SMART Recovery offers a supportive group environment for those affected by the substance abuse or addiction issues of others. Participants receive education, skills and training on how to develop a healthier relationship with their loved one, including how to increase the likelihood of recovery. TIME/DATES: 6 – 7 p.m., most Thursdays LOCATION: Suite 313, Building C, Palos Health South Campus, 15300 West Avenue, Orland Park For further information, please call: 708.460.2721 COST: Free

Understanding and Responding to Dementia-Related Behaviors

Caregiver Support Group

PLOWS Council On Aging and Palos Health will cohost this event featuring a presenter from the Alzheimer’s Association. Representatives from PLOWS and the Palos Health Caregiver Resource Center will discuss support services available to families and caregivers. Q&A to follow the presentation.

Offered by professionals from Palos Home Health Care, this group provides emotional and practical support for family members and friends caring for a loved one in the last years of life.

TIME/DATE: 5:30 – 7 p.m., Wednesday, May 8 LOCATION: Conference Room A, Building A, Palos Health South Campus, 15300 West Avenue, Orland Park REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

Register online at paloshealth.com/classes-events or call 708.226.2300. SPRING 2019

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PALOS HEALTH PERSPECTIVE


PALOS HEALTH

Non-profit Organization U.S. Postage

12251 South 80th Avenue Palos Heights, IL 60463

PAID Palos Health

Palos Hospital 12251 South 80th Avenue Palos Heights, IL 60463 708.923.4000

Palos Health South Campus 15300 West Avenue Orland Park, IL 60462 708.460.5550

Palos Women’s Center 17333 South LaGrange Road Tinley Park, IL 60487 708.590.5500

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Blood Thinner Alternative for AFib Patients

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Keys to Colon Health

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April is Stress Awareness Month

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Rehab Therapy and the Road to Wellness

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Home Health: Meeting Patient Needs in the Place They Love Most PAGE

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One Step at a Time – Treating Anxiety Anxiety can negatively impact all areas of life. Join us to review evidencebased techniques that deal with adversity and difficult emotions. In addition, learn about mindfulness, the art of being in the now and living in the present. Presented by Matthew Reed, LCSW. TIME/DATES: 6:30 – 7:30 pm, Monday, May 6 LOCATION: Conference Room A, Building A, Palos Health South Campus, 15300 West Avenue, Orland Park REGISTRATION: 708.226.2300 COST: Free

Profile for Palos Health

Perspective Spring 2019  

The quarterly magazine of Palos Health.

Perspective Spring 2019  

The quarterly magazine of Palos Health.

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