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Palo Alto

Vol. XXXVII, Number 15

Q

January 15, 2016

District could rename Jordan, other schools Page 5

w w w. P a l o A l t o O n l i n e.c o m

In East Palo Alto, an art and music center is born Page 5

Pulse 14 Transitions 15 Eating Out 18 Shop Talk 19 Puzzles 36 QArts The Beach Boys: They get around

Page 17

QHome Gardener shares tips for growing healthy citrus

Page 24

QSports Season of promise for Stanford water polo

Page 38


Page 2 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


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Upfront

Local news, information and analysis

Crisis training, teams aim to prevent police shootings Police often encounter mentally ill persons, but some say training isn’t enough by Sue Dremann

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he Dec. 25 shooting death of a mentally ill man by Palo Alto police has raised questions regarding the officers’ crisis training before they fired at 31-year-old William David Raff. Police say he was screaming in the street and charged in the darkness toward officers while

waving what turned out to be a dinner knife. The whole incident lasted just 19 seconds. Encounters between police and people who have a mental illness are not uncommon. Palo Alto officers placed 1,760 people in crisis on 72-hour psychiatric

holds — an average of 176 per year — between Jan. 1, 2006, and Dec. 27, 2015, Palo Alto police spokesman Lt. Zach Perron said. Last year’s figure was the highest in a decade: 239. To prepare for possible crises, police departments statewide are required to offer a few hours of crisis-intervention training when officers are in the academy. More recently, police departments are adding a 40-hour Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) program.

Perron said the crisis training, which includes role playing to interactive videos of people in crisis, has proved crucial in saving the lives of police, persons in crisis and victims caught up in the incidents. “I was one of the first officers to go through the program, and it is of exceptional value. I have used the training repeatedly throughout my career any time I encounter someone in a mental health crisis,” he said.

About 90 percent of Palo Alto’s officers have received the training, Perron said. He would not comment on whether the officers involved in Raff’s death are among them, citing the privacy of personnel records. But given the high number of trainees in the department, “You could read between the lines,” he said. Palo Alto police use Interactive Videos Scenarios Training. (continued on page 10)

EDUCATION

Jordan, other schools now up for renaming Petition spurs conversation about Palo Alto schools’ namesakes by Elena Kadvany

W Veronica Weber

From left, Maama Fihaki, Yvonne Hamel and Pisileni Tautuaa, members of the Youth Action Team, warm up their voices Jan. 8 at a weekly open mic at Live in Peace, a grassroots organization in East Palo Alto.

YOUTH

Art for community’s sake Youth-driven movement secures land to open community arts and music center in East Palo Alto by Elena Kadvany

E

ntering East Palo Alto, people are greeted by rising construction and a sterile sign announcing the future home of University Plaza, a four-story, 208,000-square-foot office complex with a pedestrian bridge, roof deck and two levels of underground parking. A little more than a mile away, tucked in the southwest corner of the city, is a very different sign announcing a very different kind of project, one its organizers see as uniquely created by and for the community. Colorful and bright, the sign’s large, 3-D graffiti letters spell out “FUTURE” in front of a series

of images — a building, a music note, an artist’s paint palette and a pencil. The 3½ acres at the corner of Bay Road and Pulgas Avenue are the future home of the East Palo Alto Youth Arts and Music Center, a grassroots effort that will come to fruition in the next few years thanks to the San Francisco-based John & Marcia Goldman Foundation, which recently purchased the land. The center will be an enormous boon for the community, a project organizer said, not only as a safe and peaceful space in a city known for its high crime rates, but one where residents struggling against a rising tide of external

forces — gentrification, climbing rents, new office buildings — can celebrate and maintain their city’s culture as it is today. That sentiment is embodied in the sign at the empty lot — actually a temporary art installation designed by East Palo Alto youth along with Scape Martinez, an urban artist who has worked in the community for more than a decade, including as artist in residence with the nonprofit Mural Music & Arts Project. (Martinez recently worked with youth artists to create two murals that were in(continued on page 12)

hat began as one Jordan Middle School seventhgrader’s research project on the questionable history of the school’s namesake, David Starr Jordan, has now given way to a commitment to review not only that school’s name but those of all schools in the Palo Alto school district. The Board of Education expressed support Tuesday night for the creation of a district committee that would take a closer look at the history of the people whose names the district’s 17 schools bear. The issue came to the board through Lars Johnsson, the father of the Jordan student, who in November started a petition to rename the school. Johnsson was shocked to read in his son’s project last year that Jordan was an “early, lifelong” leader in the eugenics movement, an early 20thcentury science that promoted the reproduction of particular races’ genetic traits over others. Johnsson’s petition has since collected more than 300 signatures from individuals and also received official endorsements from several parent groups in the school district, including Parent Advocates for Student Success (PASS), which represents parents of minority students; the Palo Alto chapter of the Community Advisory Committee, which represents families of students with special needs; and the Palo Alto Council of PTAs. Christina Schmidt, chair of the Palo Alto Community Advisory Committee, wrote in a Nov. 20 letter that “any promotion of Mr.

Jordan’s philosophy represents a direct threat to all children born with disabilities and their families, and disfavored minority groups.” Johnsson’s son, Kobi, now an eighth-grader at Jordan, told the board Tuesday that while Jordan may have had many admirable qualities and accomplishments — he was the founding president of Stanford University, a pacifist, an ichthyologist (fish researcher) and an educator — his active role in the eugenics movement makes him an unsuitable role model for a 21st-century public school. Jordan penned one of the earliest books published in America on eugenics called “The Blood of the Nation: A Study in the Decay of Races by the Survival of the Unfit”; chaired the eugenics section of the American Breeders Association, the first organization in the United States devoted entirely to eugenics; and promoted sterilization as a method of so-called “race betterment,” among other efforts. Clearly, he was a leader rather than simply a participant in the movement, Johnsson told the board. He also provided examples of Jordan’s writing, which described Irish, Greek, South Italian and Polish people as “controlled by emotions, animal instincts, subliminal tendencies and the like, instead of brains and will” and Mexicans as “ignorant, superstitious, ill-nurtured, with little self-control and no conception of industry or thrift, lacking, indeed, most of our Anglo-Saxon (continued on page 8)

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Names matter. — Heidi Emberling, Palo Alto school board president, on the impact of the views held by people for whom district schools are named. See story on page 5.

Around Town

WEATHER OR NOT ... “Around the San Francisco-Bay Area, it’s difficult to be a meteorologist,” Larry Smith, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said this week while making a special presentation about storm preparation to the Palo Alto City Council. Why, you ask? “Because typically we have either sunny days with mild weather or cloudy days and mild weather,” Smith said. Sure, there are winter storms that occasionally move through the area. And yes, there are foggy days that could affect airline traffic. The wildfire season can be destructive, and there is even the occasional tornado, like the one that Smith said destroyed a barn in Hollister last week. But compared to other parts of the nation, preparing for severe weather just isn’t a pressing priority in places like Palo Alto. It is, however, taking on an urgency this winter season, as drought-parched communities are bracing for the impacts of El Nino. On Monday night, Smith indicated that Palo Alto is among the nation’s leaders when it comes to storm preparation when he presented the city with a certification declaring it to be a “storm ready community.” The certification program was developed by the National Weather Service to help communities develop emergency-preparedness plans and to recognize those that do. So far, Palo Alto is the only city in the county to achieve this rating. The city gratefully accepted the commendation, though Mayor Pat Burt took some issue with the idea that California doesn’t really have seasons. “When people from out of state say we don’t have seasons, we actually say we have four: fire, flood, quake and riot,” Burt said.

INSPIRED APP ... A team of five Gunn High School juniors this month won “Best in State” in the Verizon Innovative App Challenge, a national competition for middle and high school students in which they develop concepts for mobile apps that solve a problem in their community. Inspired by a fellow Titan who has cerebral palsy and has trouble speaking clearly, the group of Gunn students developed Say It, an app to help people with speech impediments and accents and whose smartphone personal assistant (i.e. iPhone’s Siri) cannot understand them, said team member Lauren Tan. “Since all of our team members are aware of the lack of technology for those who cannot

speak clear and fluent English,” Tan said, “we decided to help make their lives easier by making their interactions with technology more efficient and effective.” Say It allows users to record messages and commands, like “call mom,” so the device remembers their voice and performs the desired function. The team — which also includes Sophie Krylova, Ariel Pan, Sarah Tan and Jady Tian — is now entering Say It into another sub-contest of the Verizon competition, called the “App Challenge Fan Favorite Award,” in which the winner is chosen through votes texted in by members of the public. Watch a video about Say It at appchallenge.tsaweb.org/vote/6486. TESLA GOES VEGAN ... Animal rights organization PETA and Tesla Motors have been working together to build a “cruelty-free” vehicle and this month, the electric-car company launched its Model X, which is available with a fully vegan interior including seats, steering wheel and gear shift, according to a press release. “By offering a 100 percent leather-free car, Tesla is pushing its eco-friendly business even further into the future,” PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman said in a statement. PETA, a Tesla Motors shareholder, pointed out that Tesla could reduce its carbon footprint by using only faux leather. According to the organization, turning animal skins into leather requires 130 different chemicals, and people who work in and live near tanneries where the skins are processed suffer from exposure to the toxic chemicals, including cyanide. “Leather production also squanders valuable natural resources, including up to 15,000 gallons of water per ton of hides, and produces massive amounts of the carbon emissions that contribute to climate change,” the press release states. ‘SWEET SHENANIGANS’ ... A whimsical float featuring giant gummy bears, lollipops and ice cream cones by a group of Cal Poly and Cal Poly Pomona students won the Lathrop K. Leishman Trophy for the most beautiful non-commercial entry at the 127th Tournament of Roses Parade held New Year’s Day in Pasadena. Palo Altan Philippe Napaa, who is a bioresource and agricultural engineering student at Cal Poly, played a role in the win as the assistant construction chair for his campus. The 18-by-55-foot entry was titled “Sweet Shenanigans.” Q


Upfront EDUCATION

Board urged to be ‘bold’ yet also cautious on new-school plans Superintendent, enrollment committee present final report, recommendations by Elena Kadvany

T

here was a mixed bag of reactions Tuesday night to Palo Alto Superintendent Max McGee’s and his Enrollment Management Advisory Committee’s (EMAC) final report and recommendations, with at least one board member expressing enthusiastic support but others caution. School board members were mostly supportive of passing the baton from the committee to a new task force that would take a closer look at whether the district truly needs to open a new elementary, middle or high school. They disagreed, however, on what the

role of that new group should be. McGee’s recommendation is that this group of teachers, administrators, students and parents start work next month to “develop a comprehensive plan and proposed model” for a pre-kindergarten to grade 12 campus that encompasses three neighboring district sites — Cubberley Community Center, 525 San Antonio Road and Greendell School on Middlefield Road — with the goal of issuing a report to the board by October. Despite the recommendation that this task force take a comprehensive look at the entire grade

spectrum, debate over the secondary schools in particular — not only in size and capacity but also connectedness, pedagogy and ability to innovate — took center stage in both board and community comments on Tuesday night. For some, the enrollment committee’s and McGee’s recommendations offer a reinvigorating moonshot for which the district has been waiting. “I think that in the sense of John F. Kennedy, this is a shoot to the moon,” said board member Camille Townsend of McGee’s recommendations. “It’s about time.

CITY HALL

City’s labor groups hope to benefit from surging economy Strong budget has Palo Alto employees calling for higher salaries by Gennady Sheyner

S

oaring tax revenues from new hotels and other sources have improved Palo Alto’s economic climate, allowing city officials to finally move forward with a new police headquarters, accelerate street repairs and construct a new bike boulevard. The prosperity has also lifted the hopes of the city’s major labor unions, which are now in negotiations over new contracts. After taking pay cuts five years ago and agreeing to make greater contributions toward their pensions and health care over the past two years, the city’s employees say they are hoping to see a pay bump soon. City officials, for their part, acknowledge that some salary increases will be forthcoming.

EBRATING CE L

A new financial forecast states the city’s desire “to retain and attract a talented workforce,” an endeavor that has become more challenging as the costs of living in Palo Alto have skyrocketed. The city’s forecast also acknowledges that, in comparison to other similar agencies, “The salaries of our employees, primarily safety employees, have fallen behind.” “Therefore,” the report states, “this forecast includes salary and benefits increases to adjust employees’ salaries to the average of the market over the next few years.” How big should these adjustments be? That’s the question the two sides are now trying to hash out. On Jan. 6, members of the city’s largest labor group, the Service Employees International Union

(SEIU), Local 521, signaled that the gap between their request and the city’s offer remains too wide. While labor negotiators and management’s representatives were meeting behind closed doors, about 30 employees gathered outside King Plaza with signs that read “FAIR CONTRACT,” “PALO ALTO, REINVEST IN YOUR WORKFORCE” and “PALO ALTO PRESERVE OUR QUALITY SERVICES.” After receiving an update from union organizers, employees marched around the “Rondo” sculpture and recited a familiar chant. “What do we want?” “Contracts!” “When do we want them? “Now!”

I’ve been on the board almost 13 years — there are very few times in life we get this opportunity.” Townsend said she feels a “drumbeat” in the community to explore a different kind of educational model in Palo Alto. McGee, for his part, characterized the committee’s work over the last 10 months as a muchneeded spark for “big thinking” in the district. “I think this task force can be a catalyst for thinking bigger about current practices, and it already has been,” he said. Several district parents and community members repeatedly urged the board to be “bold” and not shy away from decisions that might feel risky. Palo Alto resident Helen Waters, speaking at her first-ever school board meeting, told the board, If “it feels risky, you’re probably on the right path because that is what innovation and disruption feels like.” Others, both on the board and in the community, were not as convinced by the enrollment com-

mittee’s case for a new secondary school. New board Vice President Terry Godfrey, Ken Dauber and Melissa Baten Caswell all questioned whether Palo Alto’s high schools are, in fact, too big, and if their true capacities merit the opening of a third site. “I’ve said it before: ‘We can do a lot of things; we can’t do everything,’” Baten Caswell said. “So we have to pick and choose what we’re going to do. I would love a fresh, brand-new start and go invent a school. I think that would be really fun. But is that the best use of our resources? Dauber pointed to new student survey data, collected in November by enrollment group’s secondary subcommittee and released Tuesday, that indicates students themselves are satisfied with the current size of their schools. Only 7 percent of high school respondents said they are dissatisfied or strongly dissatisfied with the overall size of their schools today, and only 6 percent say their

Lacey Lutes, a utility account representative, said that employees’ salaries are not keeping up with the costs of living. In the last contract, she noted, the city’s contributions for health care switched from a percentage to a flat rate — a move meant to reduce fiscal risk for the city. As health care costs have risen, employees have had to spend more. To be sure, employee salaries have also increased. In March 2014, the city approved a salary hike over two years of 4 1/2 percent for every employee. In addition, 320 employees represented by the SEIU received one-time raises ranging from 2 percent to 10 percent. These were based on the salaries that neighboring cities offer to workers in similar positions. The 2014 salary hike was the first the union had seen since 2008. That contract expired in December, and the two sides have been negotiating a new agreement since mid-September. Lutes said the city continues to lose employees to other cities and companies that offer higher pay. “If we can’t offer a comparative package in comparison to other cities in the area and other utilities

in the area, we aren’t able to retain our workers, let alone attract new workers to our area,” Lutes said. Others shared her concerns. During recent City Council meetings, workers from the Utilities and Public Works departments testified about the challenge of retaining employees. Joseph Duran, a facilities mechanic who has been in the Public Works Department for the past five years, said he has seen many experienced employees leave the city for other opportunities, making it “increasingly difficult for operations to meet residents’ expectation.” “In order to recruit and retain quality employees who meet the city’s high standards, compensation needs to reflect the competition and the living reality,” Duran said. “Living in the Bay Area has become increasingly more difficult. Rent alone takes nearly half of my monthly income. Mixing in food for five and all the other necessities in daily living brings new meaning to ‘living on a shoestring.’” Neither the SEIU nor the city (continued on page 11)

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www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 7


Upfront

Jordan (continued from page 5)

virtues.” Kobi and other community members who spoke in support of renaming not only Jordan but two other schools named after eugenics proponents, Lewis Terman and Ellwood Cubberley, noted that they themselves would have been sterilized under this movement. “I believe, bottom line, if we’re going to put someone’s name on a school, it has to be someone who believed in the value and the potential and the worth of every single student in this school district,” said Nancy Krop, whose son attends Terman Middle School. “Being the parent of a middle schooler, I’ve been having discussions with him and his friends about this topic. (They say) ‘How can you say, on the one hand, you believe in my potential, but yet we know that the names on two schools thought I’m unfit?’ Be-

cause my son and his friends all fall in that unfit category for various reasons, my son and each one of his friends would have been sterilized under both Mr. Jordan and Mr. Terman’s beliefs.” Board President Heidi Emberling pointed out that another Palo Alto Unified school namesake, Juana Briones, would have also been considered an “undesirable” by eugenicists’ standards. “Names matter,” Emberling added. This is not the first time a renaming proposal has been presented to the board. In 2008, Suz Antink, a Palo Alto High School math teacher, sent the board and then-superintendent Kevin Skelly a detailed letter documenting research she had conducted on school namesakes, primarily Jordan, Terman and Cubberley. Antink requested that Jordan, Terman and possibly Cubberley Community Center be given new names to better reflect district values.

“I recognize that they were doing what they believed was best for society at the time; their detractors, who challenged their assumptions, were in the minority of the power base at the time so that other perspectives created little competition with their views and the execution of their ideas,” Antink wrote. “Still, I believe that our current struggle, to encourage and support students successfully reaching their ambitions, is somewhat hampered by the legacy left by their national design and its implementation.” PASS co-chair Sara Woodham, also Johnsson’s wife, told the board Tuesday that now that Jordan’s questionable history is more publicly known, the board is faced with making a decision that will send a critical message to its students and families, particularly those of color. “The genie is out of the bottle,” Woodham said. “We are about to send a message one way or the other.”

Each board member was supportive of launching a citizen advisory committee charged with reviewing all school names in the district. Board Vice President Terry Godfrey emphasized that students should be front and center in the committee’s process. It could also serve as a potential vehicle for student projects and research, she noted, such as for Paly’s Social Justice Pathway students. The Jordan social studies department also expressed interest to the school’s PTA in developing a lesson or unit in conjunction with the renaming proposal, Johnsson said. Johnsson noted in an October presentation to the district’s Minority Achievement and Talent Development committee that if Palo Alto Unified decided to move forward with a name change, it would not be alone. In recent years, schools across the country have changed their names, including Nathan Bed-

ford Forrest High School in Florida, which became Westside High School in 2014 after a petition garnered more than 140,000 signatures in opposition to using the name of a Confederate Army general and the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. Palo Alto is also not the only district home to a school named after Jordan; there are also two high schools in Los Angeles and Long Beach and a middle school in Burbank. The Stanford campus also has a Jordan Hall, which houses the Department of Psychology. Under Palo Alto Unified board policy, a citizen advisory committee can be appointed to review name suggestions and submit recommendations for the board’s consideration. Superintendent Max McGee said that at the board’s next meeting, on Jan. 26, he will bring a draft charge for this committee and, ideally, an application process for members. Q

Enroll (continued from page 7)

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schools feel very crowded. Students also ranked more elective classes, choice options and alternative learning pathways as the most important elements that a new middle and/or high school could have. About half of high school teachers who responded to the survey also said they are satisfied with their school’s overall size, compared to 15 percent who are dissatisfied or strongly dissatisfied. About 18 percent of high school teachers said their schools feel very crowded. Other board members and several members of the community voiced concerns that investing resources — both in terms of dollars and personnel — in an effort to evaluate the need for new schools will inevitably mean less focus and energy on needed reforms at the existing schools. Well aware of this concern, the enrollment group’s secondary subcommittee has over the last few months repeatedly urged the district to take a “both/and” approach moving forward: work to make changes at the existing middle and high schools while simultaneously evaluating the need for a new school or schools. McGee, too, is recommending not only the creation of the task force but also that the district “encourage, empower and incentivize the secondary schools principals, leadership teams, faculty and staff to design, develop, implement, and evaluate innovative programs, services, and supports that will increase student connectedness and authentic engagement, provide additional student choice, and enhance and deepen student learning.” “I think that we can be bold and forward-thinking within our own two existing high schools,” said (continued on next page)

Page 8 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


Upfront (continued from previous page)

parent Mary Vincent. “My concern is that the most precious asset of the board and the administration of the district is their time and attention. My concern is that this proposal would be too much of a dilution of the time and attention, and I know that administrators can multitask. I just think that there are a lot of things that we are on the road to improving in our two existing high schools and I would prefer to see our attention still directed there.� For the elementary-level recommendations, most board members agreed with McGee’s recommendation to place at Nixon Elementary School an influx of about 150 new elementary students set to enter the district in 2017 from new Stanford University housing currently under construction, with plans to add portables to accommodate them. Board President Heidi Emberling, however, said, “In the long run, this does feel a bit like a BandAid approach to growth.� She also said that she’s supportive of opening a new elementary school at the 525 San Antonio Road/Greendell site “within the context of a larger Cubberley plan.� Dauber, too, said there is a demonstrated need for a new elementary school and suggested pursuing an assessment of which district properties would make the most sense for a new site rather than adding portables at Nixon. Dauber, Godfrey and Baten Caswell also asked for McGee to look into potential solutions to address what they said are overcrowded middle schools. About 63 percent of middle school students reported in enrollment committee’s survey, however, that they are satisfied or strongly satisfied with their school sizes. About 7 percent said they are dissatisfied or strongly dissatisfied and the same percentage reported their school feels very crowded. Joe Lee, chair of the secondary subcommittee, said his team has seen an “appetite� in the community and on the board for a fourth middle school but cautioned against focusing on which schools feel crowded today — the middle schools — versus those that will become more so in several years — the high schools. Lee said while middle school enrollment will peak this fall with about 100 to 200 additional students, high school enrollment will peak in fall 2020 with 700 more students than there are today. The enrollment committee’s and McGee’s recommendations will return for action at the board’s meeting on Jan. 26. If the recommendations are approved, McGee aims to develop a charge and budget for the new task force, which the board will be expected to act upon in February. The district will also host a town hall on the committee’s recommendations on Jan. 20, 7-8:30 p.m. The meeting will also be streamed online. Q

News Digest Man booked for attempted murder of ex-boss A Palo Alto man was arrested Sunday, Jan. 10, and charged with attempted murder and arson after he allegedly tried to burn down his former boss’s Eichler home. Muhammad Hassan Khan, 26, was arrested without incident at his Webster Street home on Sunday, police said. The arrest came a day after police and firefighters responded to a fire on the 3400 block of Kenneth Drive in the Midtown neighborhood. The three people in the home, a couple in their 50s and a teenager, were awakened shortly after 6 a.m. on Saturday by a smoke detector in their garage, according to police. When the woman tried to open the garage door, she reportedly burned her hand. The man, meanwhile, went outside and saw that the exterior of the garage, including the driveway, were on fire, according to police. The man used a garden hose to put the fire out just before Palo Alto police officers and firefighters arrived. According to a police department press release, it didn’t take long for investigators to suspect arson and identify a suspect, whom police described as a “disgruntled former employee� of the homeowner. Khan was booked at the Santa Clara County Main Jail for arson of an inhabited dwelling and attempted murder. The Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office has filed a felony count of arson of an inhabitant dwelling against Khan, with an enhancement for using an accelerant, police said. Police said the investigation is continuing and the DA may amend the filed charge as appropriate. — Gennady Sheyner

Slain Palo Alto man uttered three words The accused accomplice in the homicide of a Palo Alto engineer described his three last words and the single shot that ended his life in Las Vegas on Dec. 29, according to a police arrest report. Megan Lee Hippie, 19, told Las Vegas Metro police that she and alleged shooter Kyle Staats, 27, had intended only to rob Neil Brian Gandler, 42, who was asleep in his car. But Staats allegedly shot and killed Gandler, according to the report. Staats and Hippie, Las Vegas residents, now face first-degree murder, attempted robbery with a deadly weapon and conspiracy to commit robbery charges, and Staats is also charged with possession of a stolen vehicle, according to police. Both were arrested separately without incident on Jan. 2. Police said they learned about the pair’s alleged connection to the crime after receiving confidential information. Hippie told police that she and Staats were searching for cars to burglarize early on Dec. 29 when they came upon Gandler’s white Hyundai Sonata in a 24 Hour Fitness parking lot and observed Gandler sleeping. Hippie and Staats sat in their vehicle talking about robbing him for about 15 minutes, according to her statements and surveillance footage. Staats allegedly got out of the car with a gun in his hand and knocked on Gandler’s driver-side window. Hippie said she heard Gandler say, “Don’t do it.� She heard a gunshot moments later, and Staats got back into the car, according to the report. When Hippie asked what happened, Staats allegedly said, “I think I got him.� Q — Sue Dremann

County to fix Oregon Expressway flooding problem Commuters facing wintertime flooding at the Oregon Expressway underpass in Palo Alto could get a reprieve in future winters. The Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously approved $80,000 to fund an engineering design study to correct some of the deficiencies contributing to the problem. The supervisors approved the study by Stantec Consulting Services Inc., which will look at installing a permanent back-up generator that would start automatically, a screen system to protect the pumps from debris, remote pump monitoring and control, and early-warning systems for the public during floods. Winter flooding often snarls traffic and can cause some lanes of the busy commuter arterial’s underpass to close. The adjacent Alma Pump Station moves groundwater as well as stormwater into an overhead culvert to Matadero Creek. But if heavy rain is accompanied by a power outage, flooding can be severe, according to a staff report by Michael Murdter, director of the county’s Roads and Airports Department. Supervisor Joe Simitian has been working on getting the improvements approved. “This issue was raised during one of my visits with the Palo Alto City Council and I’ve been following up in an effort to see if we can’t at least mitigate the problem. I’ll be pushing for funding in the June budget process,� he said. Q — Sue Dremann

PALO ALTO PLANNING & TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26

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THE AGENDA WITH STAFF REPORT AND ATTACHMENTS CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/boards/ptc/default.asp

AGENDA–REGULAR MEETING– COUNCIL CHAMBERS

January 27, 2016 6:00 PM Study Session 1. :[\K`:LZZPVU+PZJ\ZZPVUHUK+PYLJ[PVU[V:[HŃ&#x153;9LSH[LK[V:LJVUK +^LSSPUN <UP[Z 0UJS\KPUN +PZJ\ZZPVU VM ,_PZ[PUN 9LN\SH[PVUZ *VUZPKLYH[PVUVM7VZZPISL(TLUKTLU[ZHUK6[OLY9LSH[LK;VWPJZ

Public Hearing

2. 2501 Embarcadero Way [File 15-PLN-00371]: 9LX\LZ[ I` 7\ISPJ >VYRZ MVY :P[L HUK +LZPNU 9L]PL^ VM H UL^ [^VZ[VY` ZX\HYLMVV[MVV[[HSSI\PSKPUNKLZPNULK[VOHUKSLZS\KNL KL^H[LYPUNHUK[Y\JRSVHKV\[Z^P[OHKQHJLU[Z[HUKI`KPLZLS NLULYH[VY[VILWSHJLKJLU[YHSS`VU[OL9LNPVUHS>H[LY8\HSP[` *VU[YVS7SHU[ZP[LHUKHUL^V\[KVVYLX\PWTLU[HYLHUL_[[V[OL L_PZ[PUNPUJPULYH[VY;OLWYVWVZLKWYVQLJ[PZ[OLJVUZ[Y\J[PVUHUK VWLYH[PVUVM[OLMHJPSP[`^OPJO^V\SKILHJHZ[Ď&#x17D;PUĎ&#x17D;WSHJLJVUJYL[L Z[Y\J[\YL ^P[O ZR`SPNO[Z HUK JVU[HPUPUN ILS[ Ă&#x201E;S[LY WYLZZLZ [Y\JR SVHKV\[ HUK V[OLY TPZJLSSHULV\Z Z\WWVY[ HYLHZ ;OL WYVQLJ[ PUJS\KLZTPUVYTVKPĂ&#x201E;JH[PVUZ[V[OL`HYKWPWPUNZ`Z[LTHUKM\LS Z[VYHNLPUHZ\IĎ&#x17D;IHZLM\LS[HUR,U]PYVUTLU[HS(ZZLZZTLU[!(U PUP[PHSZ[\K`HUKH+YHM[4P[PNH[LK5LNH[P]L+LJSHYH[PVUOH]LILLU WYLWHYLKPUHJJVYKHUJL^P[O[OL*HSPMVYUPH,U]PYVUTLU[HS8\HSP[` (J[*,8(AVUL+PZ[YPJ[!7\ISPJ-HJPSP[PLZ7-:P[LHUK+LZPNU *VTIPUPUN+PZ[YPJ[+-VYTVYLPUMVYTH[PVUJVU[HJ[(T`-YLUJO H[(T`MYLUJO'JP[`VMWHSVHS[VVYN

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*** Hillary Gitelman, Director of Planning and Community Environment www.PaloAltoOnline.com â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ January 15, 2016 â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9


Upfront

Police (continued from page 5)

Simulated persons with a mental health crisis change their responses based on the officer’s reactions. Former Palo Alto Police Chief Pat Dwyer led the development of the program. Palo Alto’s force is the exception rather than the rule, however. Most departments only have a small number of officers trained at the 40-hour level, law enforcement professionals and observers said. LaDoris Cordell, former Palo Alto City Councilwoman and San Jose’s former independent police auditor, is one of those observers who is concerned about the lack of widespread training. “In some departments all new officers have to take 20 to 40 hours of CIT, but the problem is that they are given the training before they have had any real experience on the streets,” she said. “They are so overwhelmed with all of their training that the CIT doesn’t stick. New recruits, in my view, should have CIT about six months after they have been on patrol with their field-training officers. “CIT should be mandatory, not voluntary, and retaken every two years, and I think that every officer should take it, from the top (chief) on down,” she said. Former Palo Alto Mayor Vic

Ojakian, president of the Santa Clara chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), said he believes that crisis training is effective, but a refresher training would be useful and valuable. “But no training is fool proof. ... Circumstances and situations can influence how the training is applied,” he said. To help departments prevent encounters with mentally ill persons from becoming crises, some departments are experimenting with teams that include mental health practitioners. Jason Albertson, a licensed clinical social worker with San Mateo County’s Behavioral Health and Recovery Services, is a member of the county’s new pilot psychiatric emergency response team, which was launched last March. Albertson partners with San Mateo County Det. Jim Coffman, and together they go out to advise police during incidents and also to aid the person in need once the situation is no longer considered dangerous. Coffman and Albertson can typically spend three to four hours with the person in distress, helping them to develop a care plan — medication renewals, finding a treatment program or sober housing — that will hopefully prevent further police contact or escalating crises. “That’s not something police officers are trained to do or will

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Historic Resources Board 8:30 A.M., Thursday, January 28, 2016, Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Plans may be reviewed at the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue or online at: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/ planningprojects; contact Alicia Spotwood for additional information during business hours at 650-617-3168. 300 Homer Avenue [15PLN-00290]: Request by Palo Alto History Museum for Historic and Architectural Review of the proposed historic rehabilitation of the existing 19,182 sq. ft. building, additions totaling 1,458 sq. ft., and landscape improvements to a Category 2 historic structure/site at 300 Homer Avenue, also known as the Palo Alto Medical Clinic and the Roth Building. Minor L_JLW[PVUZ HYL YLX\LZ[LK [V HSSV^ VɈZP[L WHYRPUN HUK H front yard encroachment of three feet for the proposed additions at the rear elevation. The application includes a request of a Conditional Use permit to allow Community Facility uses. Environmental Assessment: Categorically exempt from California Environmental Quality Act under Class 15301 (Existing Facilities) and Class 15331 (Historic Resource Restoration and Rehabilitation). Zoning District: PF (Public Facilities) in SOFA CAP I. HRB Retreat: Will be held following the conclusion of the HRB Hearing. The items for discussion include (1) By-laws and Procedures, and (2) HRB Work Plan Jodie Gerhardt Current Planning Manager The City of Palo Alto does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. To request an accommodation for this meeting or an alternative format for any related printed materials, please contact the City’s ADA Coordinator at 650.329.2550 (voice) or by e-mailing ada@cityofpaloalto.org.

Page 10 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

have the time to do,” Albertson said. Albertson can access the person’s medical records and find out why the person is behaving irrationally, such as if they have had treatment in the past or if they have run out of medication. Coffman and Albertson currently work daytime shifts in the unincorporated areas of the county, along the transit corridors and in cities that contract for law enforcement with the sheriff’s department: Woodside, Portola Valley, San Carlos, Millbrae and Half Moon Bay. The team scans dispatch calls and receives requests to come to crisis situations. Since March, they have responded along with police to 22 crisis situations and placed nine people on psychiatric holds. In total, they’ve aided 179 people, some multiple times. The pilot program was borne out of a 2014 tragedy very similar to the one in Palo Alto. A deputy sheriff responding to a 911 call asking for medical help by the family of Yanira SerranoGarcia shot and killed the Half Moon Bay teenager less than a minute after arriving. SerranoGarcia, who had severe mental illness, allegedly wielded a knife and headed toward the officer, according to news reports. Stephen Kaplan, director of the county’s Behavioral Health and Recovery Services, said that his department and law enforcement had been talking about the gaps in their overall crisis-response system, but Serrano-Garcia’s death was the catalyst for the pilot. Albertson and Coffman also try to get to people early, before a crisis erupts that would require police intervention, Kaplan said. “We know people with severe mental illness are going to have a

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session to discuss the status of the city’s negotiations with all of its labor unions. The council will also consider the sale of transferable development rights as part of the renovation of the Sea Scout Building; adopt new regulations for water-efficient landscaping; and hold a joint session with the Citizen Advisory Committee for the Comprehensive Plan Update. The closed session will begin at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 19, in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave. SCHOOLS TOWN HALL ... The school district will host a town hall to discuss the final report and recommendations of the Enrollment Management Advisory Committee. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 20, in the board room at district headquarters, 25 Churchill Ave., Palo Alto. It will also be streamed online. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board will consider 4175 Manuela Ave., a request by Kevin Davies on behalf of Congregation Kol Emeth to demolish an existing synagogue and construct a new one. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 21, in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave. BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will convene for a retreat to discuss governance, self-evaluation, district goals and other board operations. The retreat will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 21, at the Sheraton Hotel, 625 El Camino Real, Palo Alto. PUBLIC ART COMMISSION ... The commission will discuss acquisition of artwork; elect a new chair and vice chair; review artwork proposed for 1700 Embarcadero Road; hear an update on the U.S. Highway 101 overpass project; and hear an update on Susan Narduli’s artwork in the City Hall lobby. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 21, in the Community Meeting Room at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave.

crisis. Our goal is to prevent them from getting hurt or killed and to prevent law enforcement officers from getting hurt or killed,” he said. For example, Albertson said, if a 17-year-old has gotten into a fight with his mom and threatened to kill himself, he and Coffman will go to the home to assess if the teen needs care. If a weapon is involved or the person is a threat to themselves or others,

they can place the person under a 5150 hold. On Wednesday morning, Coffman and Albertson searched for a man with multiple physical and mental health issues and alcohol dependency who could be in crisis. It’s not the first time they have interacted with him. Looking for recognizable signs of his presence, they knew they were getting close when they spotted his backpack and possibly his wheelchair. Addressing his issues took most of the afternoon. The success of Coffman’s and Albertson’s preventive work is often measured in non-quantitative ways, they said. Arriving at the home of a man with schizophrenia who was becoming violent, they learned that he kept toy weapons. The toys looked like real weapons: a shotgun or rifle, knives and a handgun that fired BBs. The man’s father gave the toys to Coffman and Albertson to take away, a small act that may have prevented the man’s death. “If an officer had come to that door and he had displayed something that looks realistic, he could have been shot,” Albertson said. Q Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

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Upfront City of Palo Alto ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Labor

Join our team!

(continued from page 7)

would discuss the specific issues theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re debating behind closed doors, though Lutes said they include across-the-board salary increases and additional compensation for positions for which retention and recruitment have been most difficult. Assistant City Manager Suzanne Mason said the city has already held 12 bargaining sessions with union representatives (the 13th was scheduled for Jan. 13). While SEIU employees expressed some frustration with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest offer, Mason said, she expressed optimism about reaching agreement soon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are a number of economic issues that are still outstanding, but there have been a lot of productive tentative agreements,â&#x20AC;? Mason said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making progress. We earnestly would like to reach an agreement as quickly as possible.â&#x20AC;? The SEIUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roughly 600 employees arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only labor group currently negotiating a new contract. The city is also in talks with its largest police union, the Palo Alto Police Officers Association; its largest firefighters union, the International Fire Fighters Association; and the Utilities Management and Professionals Association of Palo Alto, which represents managers within the Utilities Department. It has also been working on new deals for the small unions representing top brass within the police and fire departments: the Police Management Association and the Fire Chiefs Association, respectively. Q Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared by the Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. In accordance with A.B. 886, this document will be available for review and comment during a minimum 30-day inspection period beginning January 19, 2016 through February 18, 2016 during the hours of 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. at the Development Center, 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for talented, highly-motivated and dynamic people

Embarcadero Media is a locally-owned and independent multimedia company based in Palo Alto for over 35 years. We produce the award-winning Palo Alto Weekly, Mountain View Voice and The Almanac on the Midpeninsula. In each of these markets our print publications and award-winning websites are the best-read and most respected news source in the area.

This item is tentatively scheduled to be considered at a public hearing by the Planning and Transportation Commission, Wednesday, February 10, 2016 at 6:00 PMPU[OL7HSV(S[V*P[`*V\UJPS*OHTILYZVU[OLĂ&#x201E;YZ[ Ă&#x2026;VVYVM[OL*P]PJ*LU[LYSVJH[LKH[/HTPS[VU(]LU\L Palo Alto, California. Written comments on the Negative Declaration should be provided to Margaret Netto, Department of Planning and Community Environment, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301, or via email at Margaret.Netto@cityofpaloalto.org, by 3:00 PM on February 18, 2016.

We are currently looking for talented and outgoing Multimedia Advertising Sales Representatives to join our team. In this position, you will work with local businesses to expand their brand identity and support their future success using our marketing platforms: print campaigns, website and mobile advertising and email marketing. The ideal candidate is an organized and assertive self-starter who loves working in a team environment to achieve sales goals. Be sure you have strong verbal, written and persuasive interpersonal skills â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and you thrive on exceptional customer service and hard work.

2515-2585 El Camino Real [14PLN- 00321]: Request by the Hayes Group Architects on behalf of ECRPA, LLC for Site and Design Review to allow a new 39,858 square foot, 3-story mixed use building including retail, VÉ&#x2030;JL  YLZPKLU[PHS JVUKVTPUP\T \UP[Z HUK VUL SL]LS of underground parking on a 39,638 square foot lot to replace a 9,694 square foot existing restaurant (Olive Garden). The project includes a request for a Conditional <ZL7LYTP[*<7[VL_JLLK[OLZX\HYLMVV[VÉ&#x2030;JL for the site by approximately 4,835 square feet. Zone Districts: CC (2) and CN.

Sales experience is a plus, but we will consider well-qualiďŹ ed candidates with a passion to succeed. Please email your resume and a cover letter describing why you believe you are the right ďŹ t with Embarcadero Media. No phone calls, please.

Submit your resume and cover letter to: Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales and Marketing tzahiralis@embarcaderopublishing.com

***

Hillary Gitelman, Director of Planning and Community Environment In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, listening assistive devices are available in the Council Chambers and Council Conference Room. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice.

450 Cambridge Avenue | Palo Alto, CA 94306 | 650.326.8210 PaloAltoOnline.com | TheAlmanacOnline.com | MountainViewOnline.com

Food Scraps Composting Collection Is Here! Where you put your food scraps makes a world of difference. You can now put all of your food scraps and food soiled paper directly into your green cart along with your yard trimmings. By doing this, you help Palo Alto turn your food scraps into rich soil and renewable energy, and help protect the climate.

For service call (650) 493-4894

www.cityofpaloalto.org/foodscraps zerowaste@cityofpaloalto.org (650) 496-5910

www.PaloAltoOnline.com â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ January 15, 2016 â&#x20AC;˘ Page 11


Upfront

Art (continued from page 5)

stalled at crime â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot spotsâ&#x20AC;? in the city to promote peace and unity.) Martinez said they organized workshops and â&#x20AC;&#x153;salonsâ&#x20AC;? in recent months to develop the new installation, and a sensibility emerged in reaction to developments that are created by and likely for â&#x20AC;&#x153;people (who) donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look like the folks in the community.â&#x20AC;? He came up with the vision of the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;FUTUREâ&#x20AC;? and symbols of creative activities that will take place in the new center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As opposed to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Coming soon,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; we wanted to change the language at every step of the way,â&#x20AC;? Martinez said.

high school students and all East Palo Alto residents â&#x20AC;&#x201D; working to support, engage and preserve the local community through arts, music and events. Youth Action Team was born several years ago out of a research project, initiated by the Goldman Foundation in partnership with Stanford Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities, to investigate whether or not East Palo Altans needed or wanted a community youth arts and music center. One of the youth recruited to assess this need, Isaiah Phillips, an East Palo Alto native who graduated from Menlo-Atherton High School in 2008, recognized the importance of getting his peers

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We need to be doing things, showing the community that the arts are here and we are alive and positive.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Isaiah Phillips, community arts liaison, Youth Action Team Local youth designed and created their own painted wooden panels that now hang below the â&#x20AC;&#x153;FUTUREâ&#x20AC;? letters. On one, bright orange and blue triangles are overlaid with black and white text that reads: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am the product of hard work and compassion. #dontletgoEPAâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a hashtag version of the desire to keep East Palo Alto the way it is. In the second phase of the art project, Martinez and youth will go out into the city, to places like the senior center and YMCA, to create more panels with other community members.

T

he Goldman Foundation acquired the land at Bay and Pulgas for Youth Action Team, a growing group of dedicated youth activists â&#x20AC;&#x201D; mostly

more actively involved in the community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to be doing things, showing the community that the arts are here and we are alive and positive,â&#x20AC;? he said, standing in front of the colorful sign at Pulgas and Bay on a recent rainy afternoon. So in 2012, Phillips â&#x20AC;&#x201D; himself an artist, a gregarious performer (both on and off the stage) and a clear leader â&#x20AC;&#x201D; formed Youth Action Team with the support of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gardner Center; Live in Peace, a grassroots East Palo Alto organization committed to empowering youth through music lessons, academic support and mentoring; and the Mural Music & Arts Project, a nonprofit that connects disadvantaged East Palo Alto and eastern Menlo Park

PALO ALTO UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposals will be YLJLP]LKI`[OL7HSV(S[V<UPĂ&#x201E;LK:JOVVS+PZ[YPJ[MVY! Bid # 16-P-01-MT: Renewable Energy Projects Proposals must ILYLJLP]LKH[[OL+PZ[YPJ[6É&#x2030;JL *O\YJOPSS(]LU\L7HSV(S[V*(  I`74ZOHYWVUFebruary 16, 2016. All questions concerning the proposals should ILKPYLJ[LK[V9VU,SSPZI`THPSVYLTHPSLK[V! rellis@pausd.org. BY ORDER VM[OL)\ZPULZZ+LWHY[TLU[ VM[OL7HSV(S[V<UPĂ&#x201E;LK:JOVVS+PZ[YPJ[ 7HSV(S[V*HSPMVYUPH +H[LK!1HU\HY` 1HU\HY` Page 12 â&#x20AC;˘ January 15, 2016 â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ www.PaloAltoOnline.com

youth with mentors to create art. In Youth Action Teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first year, its 10 members organized the first East Palo Alto Art and Music Fest, which is now mounted annually. The free event, to be held on May 28 this year, features musical performances (by acts including the East Palo Alto Hip Hop Orchestra and Polynesian dance groups), workshops (such as ones teaching how to do graffiti and decorate T-shirts), art displays, contests, food trucks, and even job and college resources. Attendance has grown from 91 in 2012 to 450 in 2015, Phillips said. Youth Action Team leader Yvonne Hamel, a senior at Eastside College Preparatory School, helped put on the first-ever Arts and Music Fest. She loved seeing community members of all ages come together to enjoy each other and local culture in a safe, peaceful setting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the â&#x20AC;&#x153;other side of East Palo Alto,â&#x20AC;? she told the Weekly, sitting on a couch inside the living room at a home on Bell Street that houses Live in Peace. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just enjoy seeing youth, older people, everybody come out and enjoy themselves. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of just, like, peaceful. You get to see the other side of East Palo Alto (thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) not in the news; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not something negative,â&#x20AC;? she said. Youth Action Team also created Block the Bells, an annual block party on Bell Street; organized a photography series called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Into the Eyes of East Palo Alto: Audio and photo portraits of East Palo Alto artists,â&#x20AC;? which was displayed at Cafe Zoe in Menlo Park and the East Palo Alto Library; and has continued to put one foot in front of the other to build a home for these and other efforts. Five years in, Youth Action Team has about 20 members, including students from East Palo Alto Academy, Everest Public High School, Gunn and Palo Alto high schools, Menlo-Atherton High School, Redwood High School, Sierra School and CaĂąada College, as well as working young adults up to age 22. Phillips is now the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community arts liaison and works alongside Director Mary Hofstedt, who was previously the Gardner Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior community-engagement associate. Youth Action Team is one of a growing web of youth programs in East Palo Alto, many of which overlap with Live in Peace. (Among them are StreetCode Academy, a nonprofit coding program for low-income and minority students; the Live in Peace College Initiative, which provides academic and emotional support for students who are typically not eligible for college-prep programs; the Live in Peace studio, where young musicians can nurture their talent; Students With Amazing Goals, or SWAG, which aims to combat truancy and boost graduation rates for East Palo Alto and Belle Haven youth; and the Mural Music & Arts Project.) The Goldman Foundation, which focuses its grants on youth, health and the arts programs in the Bay Area, has provided about

$70,000 annually to Youth Action Team since its inception in 2012, according to Amy Lyons, the Goldman Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director. The grants have covered staffing, training and general support, as well as youthled planning, research and analysis on opening a community arts center â&#x20AC;&#x153;to ensure that youth are full partners in the development of the center,â&#x20AC;? Lyons said. The foundation has also supported other local organizations with similar purposes, from a youth employment program at JobTrain in Menlo Park to an expansion of the Ravenswood Family Health Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pediatric dental clinic, and has made donations to major arts facilities and programs throughout the Bay Area. The Goldman Foundation also donated $100,000 toward Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inclu-

sive Magical Bridge Playground and the same amount for a pilot program that screens adolescent Palo Alto Medical Foundation patients for behavioral health problems and helps them get treatment. The Goldman Foundation recently purchased the Youth Arts and Music Center site for $3.5 million, according to Lyons. It sits kitty-corner to the new Ravenswood Family Health Center and is also down the street from nonprofit College Track, which guides underserved East Palo Alto students through high school and into college. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just such a great need in that community,â&#x20AC;? Lyons said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are not a lot of resources. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much wealth in the surrounding community that the Goldmans felt it was important those resources also be available in East Palo Alto.â&#x20AC;?

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAlto Online.com/news.

City takes fresh look at paid parking downtown As Palo Alto prepares to expand and refine the new parkingpermit program for downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residential streets, the city is also taking a fresh look at another initiative aimed at alleviating the chronic car congestion: requiring drivers to pay for parking in areas that are currently free. (Posted Jan. 14, 7:38 a.m.)

Auto dealer Bernard Magnussen dies at 78 Auto dealership owner Bernard â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bernieâ&#x20AC;? L. Magnussen, 78, died on Jan. 3 at his home in Atherton after a 10-year battle with Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease. (Posted Jan. 14, 8:51 a.m.)

Government closures, hours for MKL Day Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a list of service closures and changes, as well as local events on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Monday, Jan. 18. (Posted Jan. 14, 7:54 a.m.)

School board urged to be â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;boldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; yet also exercise caution on new-school plan There was a mixed bag of reactions Tuesday night to Palo Alto Superintendent Max McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and his Enrollment Management Advisory Committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final report and recommendations, with at least one board member expressing enthusiastic support but others caution. (Posted Jan. 13, 9:57 a.m.)

Supervisors OK funding for housing, services The Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors approved Tuesday millions of dollars to address housing and homeless issues to aid people who are living on the streets. (Posted Jan. 13, 8:08 a.m.)

Masseur pleads no contest to sexual battery An East Palo Alto man who operated a massage business out of a shed in his backyard for up to 30 years pleaded no contest to sexual battery charges on Monday, San Mateo County prosecutors said Tuesday. (Posted Jan. 12, 1:25 p.m.)

Police: Hate crime reported was false An investigation by the Palo Alto Police Department has concluded that an East Palo Alto man who reported being stabbed in a downtown parking garage last July â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in a case that was probed as a hate crime â&#x20AC;&#x201D; made up the story and was actually stabbed during a fight that occurred in East Palo Alto with known acquaintances. (Posted Jan. 12, 1:18 p.m.)

City OKs revamp of former Facebook campus Blocks of concrete will make way for waves of glass at the former Facebook headquarters in Stanford Research Park under an ambitious and controversial redevelopment proposal that Palo Alto officials approved early Tuesday morning. (Posted Jan. 12, 3:12 a.m.)

Police: Man arrested after crashes, car theft An East Palo Alto man was arrested after allegedly causing a crash on U.S. Highway 101, fleeing and then stealing a car from a Palo Alto resident, according to the California Highway Patrol. (Posted Jan. 11, 9:59 p.m.)


Upfront

CityView A round-up

of Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Jan. 11)

Variance: The council approved a variance for 224 Churchill Ave., which reduces the required front setback from 37 feet to 32 feet. Yes: Unanimous 1050 Page Mill Road: The council voted 7-1, with Holman dissenting and DuBois recusing, to approve a proposed renovation of the 13.5-acre campus at 1050 Page Mill Road. The council also voted 5-3 to approve the Final Environmental Impact Report for the project. Yes: Berman, Burt, Kniss, Scharff, Wolbach No: Filseth, Holman, Schmid

Board of Education (Jan. 12)

Computers: The board approved an annual authorization for a refresh purchase of Apple and Dell Chromebook computers. Yes:Baten Caswell, Emberling, Godfrey, Townsend Absent: Dauber Committee assignments: The board approved committee assignments for its members for the 2016 year. Yes: Baten Caswell, Emberling, Godfrey, Townsend Absent: Dauber Policies: The board discussed new and revised policies on class size, student records, animals at school for non-instructional purposes, non-discrimination/ harassment, staff evaluating teachers and staff development. All will return on the consent calendar at the board’s next meeting. Action: None

Utilities Advisory Commission (Jan. 13)

Fiber: The commission heard an update about staff’s work plan relating to the Fiber-to-the-Premises project and the city’s wireless network. Action: None Electric: The commission discussed the current status of the city’s electric overhead to undergrounding conversion program. Action: None

Y

outh Action Team envisions that the center will not only be a place for music and art programs of all kinds, from theater and dance to digital media, but also a safe, inclusive gathering space with a cafe. Stan Logwood, Live in Peace’s student adviser for college admissions, said he hopes it will also house critical mentalhealth support and services. Phillips elaborated on the dual nature of the space: “The vision for the center is for it to be ... basically a community living room and a space where people can feel comfortable to come and be and work as themselves and then also a place where arts programming takes place on an entry level and a mastery level. “What that means on any given day (is) you can see a teenager (or) young adult that doesn’t really have any ambition towards some mastery of any instrument but does come to the cafe to buy a coffee and uses the facility to do some other work or pursue anything else (and) feels free to be himself there. And then also, you might see somebody that’s gung ho about becoming a violinist and playing in a symphony and he’s on a mastery track to become that — and then everything in between,” he said. Youth Action Team members say this kind of environment is needed more than ever in East Palo Alto, which makes headlines now as the last pocket of the Bay Area yet to be totally transformed by tech-driven wealth. “I feel like in the midst of all the building that’s going on in East Palo Alto, all the new stuff, (the center is) the thing that’s going to be for us, for East Palo Alto,” Hamel said. “There’s a golf store; we don’t have a golf course,” she added, referring to the PGA Tour Superstore on East Bayshore Road. “There’s a Nordstrom Rack; I don’t shop there; I don’t know anyone that works there, honestly. The Youth Arts and Music Center will be something that’s for us. A

lot of things that we talk about in our meetings is preserving East Palo Alto as it is now or as it was before gentrification and things started to happen. I feel like (the center) would be that safe haven for the East Palo Alto (community) and it will preserve that.” Hamel, an eloquent, self-possessed young woman who has hopes of attending the historically black Howard University next fall, grew up in East Palo Alto and has been involved with Youth Action Team for the past three years. Phillips got her involved (as he has with many of the other youth), and she refers to him as a mentor. Hamel said she was in a “bad place” with some “behavioral issues” when she came to Youth Action Team. She also participates in the Mural Music & Arts Project and credits both programs with helping her to turn her life around. She said they helped her develop her skills and voice as an artist and a leader. She described herself as a “blacktivist” who performs spoken-word pieces on topics like gentrification and the Black Lives Matter movement. This year, on her own initiative, Hamel is organizing a voter registration event. She’s also put together public debates with other youth on topics they chose, like gentrification and racism. This year, there will also be the fifth annual Arts and Music Fest and another Block the Bells, among other Youth Action Team events. “I have an idea of what my larger purpose is,” Hamel said, “and I’m dedicated to helping my community and doing things as a leader in the community now, not (as) a nuisance, not a juvenile delinquent.” At a Live in Peace open-mic night last Friday, Hamel performed a piece called “America the Brave” that captured the struggle of African Americans, ending with a piercing line: “Please don’t get me wrong, I know how much this world has changed / but a lot of y’all

Richard B. Rising are blind to progress we have yet to make / in this great big United States there are people struggling every day / in these hoods it seems that peace is only found beside a grave / this America’s been a hypocrite far more than it’s been brave.” The open-mic night, though hosted through Live in Peace, featured and was attended by many Youth Action Team members. Earlier in the evening, another young woman, a senior at Palo Alto High School, sang in Samoan, accompanied by a live band. Phillips’ talents were also on display throughout the night — as he hosted the evening, he would jump in to freestyle, sing or play the drums. For Casey Tupou, a softspoken 17-year-old Menlo-Atherton student who lives in East Palo Alto, Youth Action Team brings the community together in a rare way, and she wanted to be a part of that. “I liked the fact that they’re trying to gather the community together because you rarely see that in EPA,” she said. “We wanted more of that to happen in East Palo Alto because we felt like our community was falling apart, so we wanted to put it back together.” To Tupou, “falling apart” translates into the negative ripple effects of gentrification felt throughout East Palo Alto. Last April, she participated in a march, dubbed “Stand Up EPA,” to prevent displacement of the city’s low-income residents through gentrification. She appreciates that Youth Action Team is looking to achieve similar goals but through different means. Aiming to open the new facility by mid-2019, Youth Action Team is now in the midst of selecting an architecture firm to design the space. Some might ask, Phillips noted, why pour money into an arts and music center, rather than, for example, an affordable housing project? “Even if we solved gentrification — because that’s basically what this question is: ‘Why this center, and not solve gentrification? Why put any large amount of money into an arts organization or an arts building when you should be trying to figure out how to stop this gentrifying force?’ — but even if that issue was taken care of, for lack of better words, there’s still something that needs to be in East Palo Alto for the people to feel connected to East Palo Alto. “I think through the youth artmusic center, this can be something that the people can really put their hands in and own, and not just for art’s sake but for community’s sake,” he said. Q Staff Writer Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@ paweekly.com. About the cover: Scape Martinez, left, a visual arts consultant, and Isaiah Phillips, community arts liaison, stand outside of the site of the future East Palo Alto Youth Arts and Music Center on Jan. 5. Photograph by Veronica Weber.

January 3, 1938 – November 29, 2015 Richard “Dick” B. Rising was not only known for his name, but for his bon-vivant life style of great wines, fine food and music. He will be missed for his story telling and cynical sense of humor that often placed him in interesting situations that warranted many a further story! Born to Durward B. Rising and Martha Jens of Kansas and Iowa, respectively, he graduated from Lincoln High School in San Francisco and then attended UC Berkeley before being shipped off to the Pacific with the Navy during the Berlin Wall crisis. He returned to finish his education at San Francisco State and joined Chevron to establish a career in marketing. Dick married his lifetime love, Louise Buckwalter Rising in ‘67, and produced two wonderful sons, Victor Rising of Palo Alto and Todd Rising of Berkeley, all of whom will continue telling Dick’s stories punctuated by his sister, Barbara Hart, and extended family. In lieu of flowers, please dine and say “hi” to Michael from Richard Rising at St. Michael’s Alley in Palo Alto and/or the same for John at John Bentley’s in Redwood City. PAID

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Alfred G. J. “Al” Boissevain Al Boissevain was born February 7, 1923 in Brooklyn New York to Robert W. and Anne (Deterling) Boissevain. He was raised on the Adirondack Poultry Farm, now the Meadowmount School of Music in upstate New York. He attended Middlebury College, graduating in 1945, where he met his wife Hedvig “Hedy” Hogg. He completed an additional degree at MIT in 1946. Turning a life-long passion for flight into a profession, he was employed as an aeronautical engineer with Chance-Vought in Connecticut before accepting a position with the National Space Administration, (NSA, later NASA) at the Ames Research Center in Mt. View, California. While at NASA he worked on many projects including design work on the early supersonic test planes and the Mercury capsules for the early space missions as well as early development of equipment and procedures used in the initial Mars landing. At the end of his career with NASA he was back to airplanes, working on designs for Short Take-Off and Landing aircraft. Settling in Portola Valley, California, Al was active in the community, serving on the local school board for several years. He was a member of Ladera Community Church and active in the construction of the present church building. On retiring from NASA in 1978, Al and Hedy established Vinehill, a vineyard specializing in Chardonnay and Viognier, in Georgetown, California. Al became a wellrespected and award-winning winemaker, marketing his grapes to wineries within the El Dorado appellation as well as to home winemakers. Al retired a second time, thirty years later, to Bloomington, Indiana where he became a man of leisure. Al is survived by his children Claire (Philip Crooke) of Bloomington, Indiana; Paul (Margaret) of Hancock, Michigan; and Charles (Nancy) of Oakland, California; 4 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Sycamore Land Trust, PO Box 7801, Bloomington, IN 47407 (http://sycamorelandtrust.org/make-a-donation). You are invited to share a memory or leave an online condolence to Al’s family at www.allenfuneralhome.org PAID

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www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 13


Bruce Cameron McGregor

Richard (Rocky) Edwin Bridges

February 19, 1955 – December 8, 2015

May 10, 1958 – January 5, 2016

Bruce Cameron McGregor, age 60, passed away peacefully at home on December 8, 2015. Family and friends are deeply saddened by his unexpected passing. Bruce was born February 19, 1955 in Redwood City, CA. He was a 57year resident of Palo Alto. He attended Addison, Jordan and graduated from Palo Alto High School in 1973. Bruce received his AA degree from Foothill and his BA in Business Admin. Finance from Cal Poly. Bruce enjoyed the sport of riding motorcycles. He was in many flat track races in the 1970’s and received many trophies. He and Eileen went with friends every year to Laguna Seca. They enjoyed participating in the Palo Alto Concourse and other car shows with his 1958 Oldsmobile. Bruce’s career path ranged from a computer information technology technician to retail sales. In recent years he really enjoyed working for Peet’s Coffee & Tea. Bruce was predeceased by his parents Edith and Marvin (Mac). He is survived by the love of his life, Eileen, two brothers Bryan (Linda) and Neil (Shelly), his nieces, nephews, great nieces and great nephews, Gloria, and his many close friends. A chapel memorial service will be held on Saturday January 16, 2016 at 11:30 a.m. at Alta Mesa Cemetary, 695 Arastradero Road, Palo Alto, CA.

Rick “Rocky” Bridges passed away at his Stanford home after a short courageous battle with aggressive cancer. He is survived by his parents, Dr. Edwin and Marjorie Bridges of Stanford; his siblings, Becky (Rick Altman) of Pleasanton, Brian Bridges of Stanford, and Bruce Bridges (Cynthia Gaertner) of Los Altos; aunt Mary Pollock of E. Lansing, Michigan; uncle James Pollock of Macon, Georgia; and the nieces and nephews he so loved to spoil: Erica and Jamie Altman, and Anson and Nolan Bridges. Rick graduated from Stanford University in 1982 with a bachelor’s degree in economics and was an active member and alumnus of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. Golf was one of the focuses in Rick’s life. He was a member of his high school golf team, became a long ball champion, won a proam tournament, taught golf, ran a golf club building and repair business (The Clubfitter), and worked at the Stanford Golf Course and Driving Range. Many will remember the healthy but tasty omg! protein bars that Rick created for his dad and then later formed Uncle Rick’s Food Co. to package and sell them in local markets. Banana Mango, Cranberry, Mixed Fruit, Dates & Raisins … which was your favorite flavor? Wine was one of his passions … tasting, collecting, sharing and making. He loved learning about wine making with his vintner friends and helped with grape harvesting and crushing and champagne bottling and disgorgement. Above all, Rick will be remembered for his calling in life: helping others. He knew so many people through golf, wine and food and would take the opportunity to connect people to a better job, the right doctor, investors for new business ideas or a friend with similar interests. He made quite an impact on so many people. Please join us for a Celebration of Life: Saturday, Jan. 23, 10 a.m., Menlo Presbyterian Church, 950 Santa Cruz Ave., Menlo Park. The family requests that, in lieu of flowers, donations in memory of Richard Bridges be made to the Cancer Research Institute at www. cancerresearch.org.

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Bernard L. Magnussen May 8, 1937 – January 3, 2016 Bernard L. Magnussen passed away on Sunday, Jan. 3, after a valiant 10-year battle with Alzheimer’s. He died peacefully at home surrounded by his family: his wife, Sandra; his children, Kendall, Bo and his wife Heidi, Ryan, and Alicia and her husband Darren Phelan; and grandchildren, Zoe, Maggie, Ryan, Poppy and Zander. He is also survived by his daughter, Carey, and granddaughter, Rayne. Bernie touched many lives with his generous heart, playful sense of humor and positive outlook on life. Born in Chicago, Illinois, he attended New Trier High School and was an accomplished junior golfer. His talents and abilities earned him a scholarship at Stanford University where he was an outstanding collegiate golfer and received his bachelor’s degree in business administration. For almost 40 years, Bernie was an automobile dealer who owned many franchises. His flagship stores are Magnussen Toyota of Palo Alto and Magnussen Lexus of Fremont. He always ran his dealerships with a customer first mentality and conducted his business as he conducted his life: treating others as he wished to be treated. He was very successful over the years winning him many prestigious automotive business awards. Bernie was also a longstanding member of the Palo Alto Club and Sharon Heights Golf and Country Club. A memorial service will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 2, at Stanford Memorial Church at 4 p.m. (450 Serra Mall, Bldg. 500, Stanford, CA). The service will be followed by a celebration of Bernie’s life at Sharon Heights Golf and Country Club (2900 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA). In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to Alzheimer’s research at Stanford University. In the memo line of the check or with an accompanying memo, please write: “Gift for Alzheimer’s research in memory of Bernard Magnussen.” Mail check to Stanford University, Attn: Anne Longo, 3172 Porter Drive, Suite 210, Palo Alto, CA 94304. Your gift is 100 percent tax deductible. Donations can also be made to Rosener House, 800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025, or online at penvol.org. PAID

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Page 14 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

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POLICE CALLS Palo Alto Jan. 6-12

Violence related Arson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Credit card fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Residential burglary attempt. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Scam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle related Auto burglary attempt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . . . 7 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Lost/stolen plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Parking violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Reckless driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . . . 5 Vehicle accident/property damage . . . . . 2 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Alcohol or drug related Drinking in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Driving under influence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Smoking in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Miscellaneous Child abuse/emotional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Illegal lodging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Missing juvenile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Outside investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Public nuisance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Unattended death. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Warrant/other agency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Menlo Park

Alfred Ernest Werry Jr.

Jan. 6-12

December 10, 1924 – January 10, 2016 Alfred Ernest Werry Jr. passed away peacefully on Jan. 10, 2016. A second-generation Palo Alto native, Al attended Palo Alto High and Menlo College. Al was part owner of Werry Electric for 43 years. His father, Al Werry Sr., opened Werry Electric on University Avenue in Palo Alto in 1912. After retiring, Al and his wife, Ann, left Palo Alto and divided their time between Lake Tahoe in the summer and the desert in the winter. They also spent several years in Lincoln, California. Their hiatus from the Bay Area lasted 17 years until they returned to Palo Alto in 2010. Al had many interests and hobbies, including model trains and stamp and coin collecting. He enjoyed playing golf at Palo Alto Hills Country Club and was a loyal fan of the San Francisco Giants, 49ers and Golden State Warriors. Born and raised in Palo Alto, he passionately supported Stanford athletics. Al’s sense of humor was legendary and infectious. He was warm and friendly and a devoted husband, father, brother, son and uncle. His talent for electrical work was unsurpassed and he could, quite literally, fix anything. Al was preceded in death by his parents, Al and Frederica Werry, and his sister, Ellen Bergren. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Ann Werry; his sons Dave Werry of San Jose (Cynthia) and Scott Werry of Indio (Patti); his grandchildren, Sydney Werry, Chase Werry and Alex Werry; his sister, Kathryn Childress of Palo Alto; his nephew, Kevin Childress of Kansas City, Missouri (Lory); great nephews, Mark Childress of Beaumont (Melinda) and James Childress of Indian Wells and their mother, Patty Childress of Indian Wells. Services will be held on Friday, Jan. 15, at 11 a.m. at Alta Mesa Funeral Home, 695 Arastradero Road in Palo Alto. The family suggests donations in Al’s memory be made to the charity of your choice. PAID

Pulse

OBITUARY

Violence related Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vehicle related Abandoned auto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auto burglary attempt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Driving with suspended license . . . . . . . . Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lost/stolen plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parking violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vehicle accident/injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vehicle accident/no injury. . . . . . . . . . . . . Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alcohol or drug related Driving under influence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Possession of paraphernalia . . . . . . . . . . Sale of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miscellaneous CPS referral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gang info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Info case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parole arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Psychiatric evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . . . Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Violation of restraining order. . . . . . . . . . . Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warrant undefined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warrant/other agency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto

412 Emerson St., 1/8, 12:13 a.m.; battery/ simple. 3458 Kenneth Drive, 1/9, 6:19 a.m.; arson/ structure. Sutherland Drive, 1/10, 10:02 a.m.; family violence/misc.

Menlo Park

200 block Market Place, 1/6, 11:24 p.m.; domestic battery.


Transitions Shuroma Herekar

Shuroma Herekar, a longtime Palo Alto resident, died on Nov. 18 following a long battle with cancer. She was 60. She was born on Oct. 19, 1955, in Mumbai, India. In 1983, she moved with her husband, Bakul, to Palo Alto. She worked as a senior technical publication manager at Oracle Corporation, and locally she sang with the Aurora Singers, a community chorus based in Palo Alto. A talented cook and artist, she greatly admired the elegant and beautiful in life, according to family and friends. She was predeceased by her parents, Manna and Sulochana Dey. She is survived by her husband, Bakul Herekar of Palo Alto, and her sister, Shumita (Jnan) Deb of Bangalore, India. A private memorial service was held on Nov. 24 at Alta Mesa Memorial Park in Palo Alto. A celebration of life for friends, family and colleagues will be held on Jan. 23 at 2 p.m. at the Mitchell Park Community Center, 3700 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Memorial donations can be made to the Foundation for Women’s Cancer at foundationforwomenscancer.org

Jack Davey Jack Proctor Davey Jr., a longtime Los Altos Hills resident, died on Oct. 28, after spending his last days surrounded by family at the Palo Alto VA’s hospice center. He was 88. He was born on Sept. 4, 1927, in Mineola, Long Island, New York. He studied at the Western Military Academy in Alton, Illinois, where he acquired a love of swimming that he passed on to his children. He then earned a bachelor of science degree in engineering at Purdue University and an MBA from The Ohio State University. He met Mary Curtis at a bridge party in Bexley, Ohio, and they married in 1951. After having been in the ROTC as an undergraduate and graduate student, he served as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force. In 1961, he moved with Mary and their three children to Los Altos Hills. There he started a career as a regional and national sales manager, traveling the country to sell missiles, flight simulators, electronic devices and smart traffic lights. In 1970, he started Automatic Telephone and sold answering machines and speed dialers before they became widespread. Over the years he involved his children in the

business, which was based in Palo Alto. His children also attended schools in the Palo Alto Unified School District. In his retirement, Jack shared his knowledge of marketing and business as a volunteer for Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) and was an English tutor for Russian immigrants through the Jewish Community Center in Palo Alto. He also supported his wife Mary, an activist for envi-

Lee Austin Otterson February 8, 1917– December 22, 2015

ronmental and social issues who was on the board of directors of the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, among other roles. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary Davey. He is survived by his son, John Davey of Atherton; daughter, Kit Davey of Redwood City; son, Curt Davey of Missoula, Montana; and grandchildren, John, Devon, Christopher and Callan. A memorial service for the family was held on Dec. 12.

Kay Moreing Roper September 12, 1927 – March 25, 2015 Kay Moreing Roper, 87, passed away on Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at her home in Menlo Park, surrounded by family and friends. She was the loving wife of the late Calvin B. Roper, her beloved husband of 59 years, and a devoted, loving mother, grandmother, and greatgrandmother, who cherished her family and friends. Kay was born on September 12, 1927 in Stockton, California to William and Edna Moreing. Her father helped build the first roads in Yosemite and was part of an early California baseball family. He died when she was 10 years old and her mother finished raising Kay and her two older brothers. After graduating from Stockton High School and studying fashion in San Francisco, Kay moved to New York City where she worked as a model and met her future husband before returning to Stockton to work as a buyer at Katten & Marengo clothing store. In 1948, Kay Moreing married Calvin Barclay Roper of Long Island, New York. Their three children were born in Greenwich, Connecticut, close to their home in rural South Salem, Westchester County, New York, where Cal built his first veterinary hospital. They enjoyed a busy and happy community life, occasionally taking trips into the city to take in a Broadway show. In 1961 after Cal’s mother passed away, Cal and Kay moved their family to California to be closer to Kay’s family and built the original Mid-Peninsula Animal Hospital in Menlo Park. Kay especially enjoyed planning family activities and vacations, celebrating holidays and birthdays, and encouraging and helping her family members and friends in all of their endeavors. She volunteered weekly at Allied Arts to help raise funds for the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, supported veteran’s organizations, and was active in the local Republican women’s group, where she was recognized and honored for her hard work, organizational skills, and ability to bring together people of different viewpoints. She treasured old friendships and making new friends wherever she went. She loved flowers and gardening, dancing with Cal, was an avid reader, and continued to enjoy reading the Wall Street Journal and biographies into her 80’s. She was always deeply grateful for her life, family, friends, home, and blessings. Kay will always be lovingly remembered and dearly missed. She is survived by her son, Calvin Roper Jr. (Leslie) of Atherton, daughters Kristine Baird (Gregory) of Santa Rosa and Linda Roper of Menlo Park, her six grandchildren, and eleven great-grandchildren. Her family will be forever grateful for her love, encouragement, friendship, wisdom, generosity, graciousness, expressive eyes and radiant smile. “She will be in our heart forever.” Donations in her memory may be sent to: The Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health – 400 Hamilton Ave. Suite 340 – Palo Alto, CA 94301 or made online at supportlpch.org or to: Canine Companions for Independence – Veterans Initiative – P. O. Box 446 – Santa Rosa, CA 95402 or online at cci.org. PAID

OBITUARY

Lee Austin Otterson, 98, passed away peacefully on December 22, 2015 in Palo Alto. He was a beloved patriarch who lived an incredibly rich life full of love, family, devoted friends, innovation, prosperity and world adventure. Lee was born on February 8, 1917, in Glenn County to Bert Harvey Otterson and Dorothy Gaines (LeValley) Otterson. His greatgreat grandfather, James Otterson, built the first gold rush hotel in 1853 in what was later to become Palo Alto. Lee was the second oldest of nine children raised on a farm and was a hard worker from a young age. He graduated cum laude with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1939, which would remain dear to his heart throughout his life, and he supported later generations of inventive engineers and scientists by endowing a professorship to the university. Early in 1941, Lee volunteered for military service in the Army Air Corps, earning his wings and serving as a flight instructor. His lifetime love of flying inspired him to pilot his PBY plane around the world in 1977 and to continue flying the skies until age 87. Lee’s love of adventures resulted in him being very active in Scouts (Eagle), sailing, shooting, fishing, and travel throughout the world (174 countries including Antarctica at age 90). On May 16, 1943, Lee married Grace Eleanor Schundler of Madison, New Jersey. They had three children: Dorothy (Didi), Bert, and Helen. Lee always said his children gave him such joy. After his military service, Lee engaged actively in farming and simultaneously co-founded a manufacturing company. This was the first of many companies he started that grew to be very successful. Lee’s companies have run the range from engineering, electronics, manufacturing, mobile communications, farming, food processing, warehousing and distribution, restaurant development, and industrial real estate. Lee had special relationships with all the people he worked with throughout his career. There are currently over 450 full time employees on Lee’s industrial park, Colusa Industrial Properties. Lee married Barbara Whitmore of Ceres, California in 1956. They traveled extensively together and shared many loving memories until her death in 1982. In 1984, Lee married Beverly Dixie Millie of Long Beach with whom he shared a love of traveling, skiing, and golf until her death in 2009, after moving to Palo Alto Classic Residence several years earlier. Although he could be quiet, Lee was big in so many ways: big in stature, in his forward-thinking vision, adventuring spirit, and support for others. His patience and determination in nurturing his big visions paid off and drew the respect and admiration of all who knew him. He helped individuals, families, businesses and communities thrive. He was curious about life and passed this gift of curiosity on to his extended family. Lee was kind, generous, quick witted, always with a twinkle in his eye, and had a distinctive big smile, which he shared easily. There was a wink at the ready, especially for his grandchildren and great grandchildren, and he greatly enjoyed serenading others with his favorite songs in his characteristic deep booming voice. Lee, you will be remembered for your enduring spirit, how you lived, and how you enriched so many lives as a beloved father, grandfather, great grandfather, husband, friend, engineer, farmer, entrepreneur, and life artist. In honor of Lee, feel free to wink, break out into song, or cheer on someone who shares a big vision with you. Plan your next big adventure or share a thick strawberry milkshake with someone you love. We love you Lee. Lee is predeceased by his siblings Louise Otterson Franzen, Lucile Otterson Danielson, Wayne Otterson and Lila Otterson Benjamin Robinson. He will be celebrated and deeply missed by his large and loving family: his siblings Dorothy Otterson Sexsmith, Amy Otterson Phelps, Nina Otterson Arbios, and Donald Otterson; his children Dorothy (Didi) Otterson Flint, Bert Otterson, and Helen Otterson Rodde; his grandchildren Brooke Otterson, Dana Otterson, Tara Otterson Church, Heather Rodde Akuiyibo, Brian Rodde, Tyler Rodde, and Ashley Rodde; and his great grandchildren Joshua, Zoe, Elizabeth, Austin, Owen, and Alexa. Memorial donations may be made to your local Boy Scouts: www.aplacetogive.scouting.org PAID

OBITUARY

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 15


A weekly guide to music, theater, art, culture, books and more, edited by Karla Kane

Gunn staff, students and alumni bring new life to ‘Death of a Salesman’ by Karla Kane

Joyce Goldschmid

American dreamers Paul Dunlap, Tim Farrell and Justin Brown play a family in crisis in Palo Alto Players’ “Death of a Salesman.”

A

Page 16 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

desperately to control his be- I living my own dream or am I living theirs?’ They really relate loved elder son. “Willy Loman is the original to that.” Despite the play’s 1939 and helicopter parent,” Lo said. “He’s the great dreamer: the 1948 settings, it still rings true man who commits himself to today. Farrell said it’s espethe dream of being a salesman cially relevant in an area such as Palo Alto, and, although where students he’s essentially feel pressure to a failure, never succeed acagives up on that demically from dream,” Farrell high-achieving said. “You don’t parents, many have to like Wilof whom have ly Loman, but struggled and you do have to sacrificed to supcare about him.” port their famiWhile Willy lies in such an puts a premium expensive area. on keeping up “It’s almost appearances timeless, the and grasping for war between the greatness, his young and the son Biff leans old. There’s altoward a differways going to be ent life, out of a clash,” Dunlap the rat race. said. Biff is “deeply Retired Gunn teacher Tim Farrell said conflicted be- Farrell stars as Willy Loman, Willy’s slow tween follow- the titular salesman. descent out of ing his father’s dream and what he wants for middle-class comfort is perhaps himself. He thinks, ‘I don’t know even more applicable to today’s what I’m supposed to want,’ American economy than to the which is so different from a relatively prosperous 1940s in dad who knows exactly what he which it was written, with corwants,” Dunlap said. He said that porate CEOs becoming more while adults may relate to Willy, wealthy while workers end up his high school students are often with less. Lo agreed. “Look at the Bay Area’s genmoved by Biff’s anguish. “When they see that struggle trification and what’s happening of the son living for his parents’ in San Francisco. The middle wishes — especially with se- class is getting pushed further niors, because they’re at a deci- out,” she said, also drawing a sion point — they wonder, ‘Am comparison with recent developJoyce Goldschmid

Ray Renati

rthur Miller’s Pulit- vinced Palo Alto Players’ artistic zer Prize-winning play director, Patrick Klein, that they “Death of a Salesman,” should bring the play to the stage about the dark side of in a full-fledged production. “We tried kind of a scene study the American dream, is frequently taught in high and it went really well. I thought, school English classes, local these two have been teaching this play for a comones included. bined 75 years, Palo Alto Playprobably. They ers’ new version would bring not of the theater only their acting classic boasts ability but also a ma ny Gu n n literary perspecHigh School tive,” Lo said. connections Because of the in the cast and demands of their crew: six curday jobs, the rent and former cast rehearsed teachers, three mainly during students, a chosummer vacareographer and tion. While Lo several alumni, has worked with plus a teacher at Palo Alto PlayTerman Middle ers before, as School. Their well as with the experiences Dragon and Pear with the play at theater compaGunn led to this Kristen Lo directs the latest production’s cre- production of Arthur Miller’s nies, among others, Farrell and ation. classic drama. Dunlap are relaTim Farrell, who stars as anti-hero Willy Lo- tive newcomers to community man, is a retired Gunn English theater. “It’s thrilling and exciting. I’d and drama teacher. Paul Dunlap plays the role of Willy’s son, love to do more,” Dunlap said. In “Salesman,” Farrell’s charBiff. Dunlap is a teacher at Gunn as well. He brings Farrell in to acter, Willy, has been working classes as a guest when teaching for decades to provide a de“Salesman,” and together they cent, middle-class life for his act out scenes for students. Di- wife and two children. Nearrector and fellow teacher Kristen ing what should be retirement Lo, a former Farrell pupil who age, he finds himself clinging runs a Broadway workshop at to his traveling-salesman job Gunn, saw their success with the by a thread, disrespected by his play in the classroom and con- young new boss. He also tries

ment booms to Willy’s wistful nostalgia for when green trees surrounded his Brooklyn home rather than apartment buildings. Their Gunn students have expressed interest in attending a performance, especially those who’ve studied it in class. “It’s enriching their experience, seeing it staged,” Lo said. And with so many years of teaching experience between him and Farrell, Dunlap joked, “If even one in every generation of students came, that’s a success.” He’s honored, he said, “to be able to work on a play that I love so much with people I care about and giving students a glimpse of that.” The rapport between the three is apparent. At interview’s end, they return to their enthusiastic discussion of blocking scenes (and where to pick up lunch). “There’s a lot of love in this play,” Lo said, turning to her two stars. “Everybody cares so much about each other, and with the script and your guys’ acting I feel like my job has been easy.” Q Interim Arts & Entertainment Editor Karla Kane can be emailed at kkane@paweekly. com. What: Palo Alto Players’ “Death of a Salesman” Where: Lucie Stern Theater, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto When: Jan. 16-31 Cost: $29-$43 Info: Go to paplayers.org


Arts & Entertainment

Udo Spreitzenbarth

They get around The current incarnation of The Beach Boys (from left, John Cowsill, Brian Eichenberger, Scott Totten, Mike Love, Jeffrey Foskett, Tim Bonhomme and Bruce Johnston) plays in Redwood City Jan. 21.

The Beach Boys bring good vibrations to Redwood City by Yoshi Kato ith songs such as “Surfer Girl” and “Fun, Fun, Fun,” The Beach Boys are known as the quintessential southern California band. Founded in Hawthorne in 1961 by brothers Brian, Dennis and Carl Wilson, their cousin Mike Love and friend Al Jardine, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees have embodied the SoCal sun, surf and cars lifestyle to which the world could aspire. With unforgettable melodies and achingly beautiful vocal harmonies, the group provided the soundtrack to a time and place that likely never existed. But the band also has many northern California connections. “We’ve performed there going back to the KFRC days, which had these big concerts in the Cow Palace and other places,” lead vocalist and bandleader Love reminisced by phone from southern California, coincidentally enough. (He currently resides in Incline Village, Nevada, but was visiting one of his daughters, who was celebrating her birthday at college.) “We also played two shows at the Circle Star Theatre in San Carlos,” he continued, with a chuckle. “With over 50 years of performing, we’ve managed to get to a lot of places, a lot of venues.” Coming off a year in which they

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played 175 shows at 170 stops, the group is looking forward to getting back on the road, he said. The Beach Boys continue their 2016 tour schedule with a concert on Thursday, Jan. 21, at The Fox Theatre in Redwood City. It’s appropriate that the band would play such a historic theater, which has hosted international treasures including B.B. King, Dave Brubeck, Tony Bennett and Neil Young: The Beach Boys songbook has become part of the collective consciousness, arguably joining the likes of Gershwin, Ellington and Dylan. “Yeah, it’s definitely getting that way, at least,” Love replied, when asked about The Beach Boys’ legacy in American song. Original fans of the group heard the songs in concert or as newly released singles on the radio. Subsequent enthusiasts could hear the music in advertising jingles (“Good Vibrations” was rewritten for Sunkist orange-soda commercials that started airing in the late ‘70s), in films such as “Cocktail,” and on TV shows (“Baywatch,” “Full House”). Uncle Jesse himself, John Stamos, is a longtime fan. “He’s the one responsible for getting us onto ‘Full House,’” Love explained. “Those were fun episodes to do. And we get recognized all the time from ‘Full

House’ fans.” Stamos has often joined the band on drums. In 2012, the animated Minions sang a version of “Barbara Ann” (albeit in their own “language”) in a teaser trailer for “Despicable Me 2.” That may have introduced The Beach Boys’ 1965 hit to a new pre-’tween generation. Now, multiple generations of fans attend shows throughout the world. “Sometimes you’ll see grandparents, their children and the grandchildren all at the show,” he said. “The entire family shows up.” Love is cognizant that someone will invariably be disappointed if he and his six bandmates don’t revisit all the hits — about an hour’s worth straight through, he reckoned. The nature of the venue and the format of the show determine other setlist decisions. “In the theaters, the audience tends to be just a little bit older on average, meaning more of our original fans,” he said. “That age group doesn’t really want to go to an arena. They’d rather go to a really nice theater and have a comfortable seat and maybe an intermission to go get something to drink.” If there’s an opening act, The Beach Boys will play for 90 min-

utes as headliners. When it’s an evening with The Beach Boys alone, as will be the case at the Fox, “We’re our own opening act,” Love joked. He predicted an hour opening set, a 20-minute intermission and another hour of music — possibly more, if the audience demands it. “When we have a couple of hours of music, we can tweak the setlist and draw from a wide variety of songs,” he said. “And we can put in a bit more subtle songs in a theater, like ‘The Warmth of the Sun’ or ‘’Til I Die.’” In addition to Love, the current live version of The Beach Boys features guitarist/vocalist Bruce Johnston. His history with the band goes back to 1965, when he replaced Brian Wilson on tour. Guitarist, vocalist and San Jose native Jeffrey Foskett and guitarist/vocalist Scott Totten round out the front line with keyboardist Tim Bonhomme, bass guitarist/vocalist Brian Eichenberger and drummer/vocalist John Cowsill comprising the rhythm section. The Beach Boys have long been involved in musical collaborations and have established many cross-historical ties. The current version of the group continues that tradition. For 18 years, Eichenberger was a member of a latter-day lineup

of the Four Freshman. The original Four Freshmen “highly influenced us in the vocal department,” Love said. “Their close and incredibly sophisticated four-part harmonies really influenced cousin Brian’s vocal arrangements.” Cowsill was a member of The Cowsills, another family band. “They had their own hits — some pretty big ones back in the late ‘60s, early ‘70s,” he said. In addition to the many Wilsons, Love also has talented relatives on the paternal side of the family. His nephew is the NBA star Kevin Love, who plays alongside LeBron James. His sister Maureen is a harpist and member of the hip Portland, Oregon, popchamber ensemble Pink Martini. “She played on ‘In My Room’ and ‘Catch a Wave,’” he said, with a brother’s pride. Q Freelance writer Yoshi Kato can be reached at yoshiyoungblood@earthlink.net

What: The Beach Boys Where: Fox Theatre Redwood City, 2215 Broadway St., Redwood City When: Thursday, Jan. 21, 7:30 p.m. Cost: $48-$108 Info: Go to foxrwc.com

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 17


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)LZ[PU[V^U!/VTL[V^U5VVKSL Redwood City Redwood City is best known for its taTXHULDVEXWLW¡VDFWXDOO\KRPHWRDKDQGful of Vietnamese restaurants. Top of your OLVWVKRXOGEH+RPHWRZQ1RRGOHDKLGGHQ gem sandwiched between a beauty salon DQG VKRH VWRUH RQ 0LGGOHILHOG 5RDG ,W GRHVQ¡W ORRN OLNH PXFK IURP WKH RXWVLGH (ignore the bars on the windows and giant photos of food), but its kitchen is turning RXWVRPHRIWKHEHVWSKĐ&#x2018;RQWKH0LG3HQLQVXOD2ZQHU-HQQ\+D1JX\HQVDLGWKH\ cook their broth from beef bones over 10 hours with ginger and yellow onion, controlling the temperature carefully to ensure DFRQVLVWHQWSURGXFW:KHQLW¡VUHDG\WREH served, the cooks drain all the liquid and add to a separate bowl with the noodles and already-cooked meat. For an authenWLF9LHWQDPHVHH[SHULHQFHDVNIRUDVLGH order of soup fat â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the leftovers from ZKDW LV GUDLQHG EHIRUH VHUYLQJ 1JX\HQ said in more than a decade of business at +RPHWRZQ QR QRQ9LHWQDPHVH FXVWRPHU KDV HYHU DVNHG IRU VRXS IDW  7KH SKĐ&#x2018; WiL chin with flank steak and slices of brisket is aromatic and flavorful. Other local UHVWDXUDQWV¡ SKĐ&#x2018; Jj SURQRXQFHG ´\HDKÂľ  RU FKLFNHQ SKĐ&#x2018; SDOH LQ FRPSDULVRQ WR +RPHWRZQ¡V ZKLFK FRPHV SDFNHG ZLWK MXLF\ VKUHGGHG FKLFNHQ EUHDVW 0D\EH LW¡V VR JRRG EHFDXVH LW¡V VWLOO PDGH ZLWK WKH VDPH EHHIERQH EURWK 1JX\HQ said they ditched a chicken-only broth some years ago after customers started asking for the beef broth.) Bowls come in three sizes: small ($7.95), medium ($8.95) and large ($9.95). The small is enough for a VDWLVI\LQJOXQFK/LNHPRVWSKĐ&#x2018;MRLQWVVHUYLFHDW+RPHWRZQLVTXLFNZLWKQRIULOOV There are numerous meat combinations, DQG1JX\HQVDLGLW¡VQRWTXLWHFUHDWH\RXU own-bowl, but customers can always ask IRUZKDWHYHUPL[RISURWHLQVWKH\SUHIHU 3151 Middlefield Road, Redwood City; hometownnoodle.com. Open daily 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. )HYNHPUTLHS!7OĎ´[V*OH\ 4V\U[HPU=PL^ *HW \RXU SKĐ&#x2018; ILOO DW OXQFK DW 3KĐ&#x2018; WR &KDXLQGRZQWRZQ0RXQWDLQ9LHZ7KH restaurant, clean, quiet and friendly, is

Page 18 â&#x20AC;˘ January 15, 2016 â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ www.PaloAltoOnline.com

3KĐ&#x2018;9L+RDRQ(O&DPLQR Real in Los Altos is incredibly popular at lunchtime, with a line out the door before noon hits. Above, the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SKĐ&#x2018;WiLZLWKH\HVRIURXQG steak. located on Villa Street, Street about a block removed from the weekday dining-hour KXEEXE RI &DVWUR 6WUHHW 3KĐ&#x2018; WR &KDX recently changed ownership and, diners say, its soup improved significantly. There are more than 20 meat combinations on the menu, from just rare steak (served on the side and dropped into the hot soup by the diner to cook) to brisket and meatballs. There are also seafood options (shrimp, tilapia, calamari, salmon). 3KĐ&#x2018; WR &KDX¡V SKĐ&#x2018; Jj FRPHV ZLWK WKLQ and pliant noodles and quality broth, but the sliced (rather than shredded) white chicken meat was less moist and fresh. ,I\RX¡UHIHHOLQJDGYHQWXURXVRSWIRUWKH tĂĄi gan, which comes with thick, flavorful chunks of beef tendon and paper-thin VOLFHV RI EULVNHW 3UR WLS &DQ¡W VWD\ IRU OXQFK" 3KĐ&#x2018; WR &KDX¡V ERZOV DOVR WUDYHO well via takeout containers. Just make sure you have your own Siracha on hand at home. A small goes for $6.70 (and is plenty for a full meal, though not available for takeout), medium for $8.95 and large for $9.95. Each size has the same amount of meat, according to the menu. 853 Villa St., Mountain View; photochau.net. Open Monday-Thursday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., and FridaySaturday, 10 a.m. to midnight. *YV^KMH]VYP[L!7OĎ´=P/VH3VZ(S[VZ This longtime Vietnamese restaurant on El Camino Real attracts big crowds, and despite the massive dining room, WKHUH¡V XVXDOO\ D OLQH RXW WKH GRRU IRU weekday lunch. Show up before noon

to snag a spot, spot or else face waiting for a WDEOH3KĐ&#x2018;9L+RDLVRQHRIVHYHUDOEXVLness at the Village Court shopping center in Los Altos; if you find yourself waiting, head into Teaspoon for a refreshing milk tea or peruse the meat options at 'LWWPHU¡V*RXUPHW0HDW :XUVW+DXV 7KH SKĐ&#x2018; WiL FKLQ ZLWK DQ H\H RI URXQG steak and lean brisket, has rich, deep flaYRUVWKHSKĐ&#x2018;JDGRHVQ¡WGLVDSSRLQWHLWKHU with heaping portions of al-dente nooGOHVDQGVKUHGGHGFKLFNHQ3KĐ&#x2018;9LD+RD also distinguished itself by serving the traditional garnish suitable for chicken SKĐ&#x2018; FLODQWUR 7KHLU VRXS KRZHYHU OHIW me feeling dehydrated for several hours â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a little bit like my veins were running ZLWKVRGLXPUDWKHUWKDQEORRG0\GLQing companion and Vietnamese-American coworker wondered whether the size of the restaurant, much larger than many others in the area, means compromised quality (and too much salt) when LW FRPHV WR WKH EURWK 3KĐ&#x2018; 9LD +RD RIfers two sizes of bowls, small ($9.50) and large ($10.50). 4546 El Camino Real A12, Los Altos; phovihoa.com. Open daily 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. <WZJHSLIV^S!;HTHYPUL7HSV(S[V Those seeking a higher-end bowl of SKĐ&#x2018;ZLWKDIXOOVHUYLFHGLQLQJH[SHULHQFH should opt for Tamarine in downtown 3DOR $OWR 7DPDULQH¡V SKĐ&#x2018; LV PDGH IURP a ginger-beef broth, served with noodles and slices of Kobe beef blanched with star anise and cinnamon ($15). For a less-tradi-


Arts & Entertainment

ShopTalk by Daryl Savage

COUPA TO OPEN SECOND DOWNTOWN CAFE ... The venerable Coupa Cafe will open its second location in downtown Palo Alto in a few weeks. Aiming for a late January-early February opening, the family-owned cafe, which is known for its Venezuelan coffee, is moving into the Survey Monkey building, 111 Lytton Ave., at the corner of Alma Street. The 1,500-square-foot-space will be much like the original Coupa at 538 Ramona, says Coupa owner Nancy Coupal. “It will have the same warm feel, but it will be very modern. It’s brand new. And some of the foods we’ll be serving are a little different,” she said, adding, “Since we’ll be right across from the train station, we’re gearing it toward fast-food service for the train passengers.” There will also be a small area set aside for outdoor seating. Following the upcoming soft opening of the new Coupa, a more elaborate grand opening is tentatively planned for March 7. “We chose that date because that’s when we opened our first Coupa in Palo Alto 12 years ago. March 7 is a lucky date for us,” she said. The new cafe on Lytton Street marks Coupa’s seventh location in the Palo Alto area. “We have four self-service cafes on the Stanford campus, a fifth full-service one at the Stanford Golf Course, which also does catering, and the original

tional take, minus the broth, there’s also the wok-flashed rice noodles tossed with Chinese broccoli, flank steak, eggs and soy sauce ($17). 546 University Ave., Palo Alto;

Ramona Street location,” she said. Coupa has also recently expanded, taking over the space next door at 536 Ramona St. “Our customers’ greatest complaint was that there was not enough space at Coupa, and a quieter spot was needed,” Coupal said. Seating capacity in the new area, unofficially referred to as “The Lounge,” is 36 people. Coupal describes the expansion as homey and comfortable. “It’s a mixture of metals and woods,” she said. Coupal personally painted the walls a soothing blue, and decorated them with an assortment of burlap coffee bags from Venezuela. The space, owned by Coupa, is also available to rent out for private events and meetings, and replaces a former retail store that sold jewelry and women’s accessories. JEWELS AND SHAVING CREAM ... Of the numerous shops that have opened in Town & Country Village this past year, one of the more unusual entries is a oneof-a-kind jewelry store. Dualitas, which opened in November, offers a striking selection of handcrafted jewelry, as well a number of exotic items. The founders of Dualitas are a husband and wife team with vastly different backgrounds. Atiq Raza has had a long career in the semiconductor industry, while Nandini Saraiya Raza’s experience was in fine jewelry

for private clients. A visit inside the small Dualitas shop is a bit overwhelming. While the overall layout is on the minimal side, with earrings, bracelets, rings and necklaces dominating the shelves on the wall, it’s the other merchandise — the wide array of curated items from around the globe — that sparks curiosity. For example, prominently displayed near the front door are several pairs of luxury sneakers from Paris, with one pair in gold-braided leather. Also on display is a box of high-end shaving cream and moisturizer for men, which contain ingredients called Horopito oil and Ponga fern extract. Who knew? And the plentiful collection of multicolored handmade soaps, which sit in an enormous glass vase on the floor, is stunning to observe. As for the jewelry at Dualitas, every gem is from Jaipur, India and has been handcrafted there, while the actual conceptualization and innovative design has been done in Palo Alto. “Beyond adornment, each piece includes stones that various cultures have believed hold various metaphysical qualities, which have a positive effect on the wearer,” according to the store’s website. “We’re selling a lifestyle here,” said store manager Holly Spence, who moved to the Bay Area from New Zealand just three months ago. “A lot of thought has gone into these products. And it works for Palo Alto,” she said.

Now Open on California Ave. “Bonne cuisine et bon vin, c’est le paradis sur terre” (Henry IV)

415 California Ave., Palo Alto • 650.561.3577 www.labohemepaloalto.com Hours: Tues - Sat: 11am – 2:30pm, 5:00pm – 9:30pm

Got leads on interesting and news-worthy retail developments? Daryl Savage will check them out. Email shoptalk@paweekly.com.

tamarinerestaurant.com. Open for lunch, Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and dinner, Monday-Thursday, 5:30-9 p.m., Friday-Saturday, 5-10 p.m. and

Sunday, 5-9 p.m. Staff Writer Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@ paweekly.com.

THE CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY presents

The Stein Visiting Writer

Larissa MacFarquhar Reading

M O N DAY , J A N U A RY 25, 2016 8:00 PM B E C H TE L C O N F E R E N C E C E N TE R , E N C I N A H A L L , 616 S E R R A S T R E E T “MacFarquhar’s book–daringly conceived, brilliantly executed–may change not just how you see the world, but how you live in it.” —Katherine Boo

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Information: 650.723.0011 http://creativewriting.stanford.edu Sponsored by Stanford University Creative Writing Program www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 19


Movies

DEBORAH’S PALM

MOVIE TIMES All showtimes are for Friday to Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. Movie times are subject to change. Call theaters for the latest. 555 Lytton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 650.473.0664

Counseling, Mentoring, Career and Relocation Support JANUARY CLASSES & ACTIVITIES Saturday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

Jan. 16 Jan. 19 Jan. 20 Jan. 21

11:00 AM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 11:00 AM

Thursday Thursday Saturday Monday

Jan. 21 Jan. 21 Jan. 23 Jan. 25

1:30 PM 6:30 PM 8:30 AM 7:00 PM

Thursday Friday Saturday

Jan. 28 7:00 PM Jan. 29 6:30 PM Jan. 30 10:00 AM

Saturday

Jan. 30 10:00 AM

New Year’s Cleanse Workshop Uncover Your Calling Job Search Strategy Group Newcomer’s to the Bay Area Welcome Coffee (FREE) Women 50+ in Transition Women’s Support Group Goal Setting Workshop (FREE) Volunteer Informational Coffee (FREE) Art Journaling (using mixed media) Book Club (FREE) Japanese Home Style Chicken Hot Pot Healing Your Grief 2 Minutes at a Time in the New Year

FEBRUARY CLASSES & ACTIVITIES Monday Tuesday Tuesday Thursday

Feb. 1 Feb. 2 Feb. 2 Feb. 4

7:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 12 Noon

Stress Management Workshop Uncover Your Calling Compassion Cultivation Training Memoir Writing Class

ONGOING FREE CLASSES & ACTIVITIES Tuesdays Wednesdays Wednesdays Thursdays Thursdays Fridays Fridays

1:00 PM 10:00 AM 12 Noon 10:00 AM 10:30 AM 10:00 AM 12 Noon

Open Art Studio Knitting Circle Lunch Time MeetUps Open Craft Studio Joyful Dance/Exercise Walking Group Gardening (Deborah’s Palm Gardens)

www.deborahspalm.com

13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (R) Century 16: 10 a.m., 1:15, 4:30, 7:45 & 11 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m., 12:35, 2:20, 3:55, 5:40, 7:15, 9:05 & 10:35 p.m. Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip (PG) Century 16: 10 a.m. Century 20: 4:35 p.m., Fri. & Sun. 11:15 a.m., 2 p.m. Anomalisa (R)

Aquarius Theatre: 1:30, 4:40, 7:20 & 10 p.m.

The Big Short (R) +++1/2 Century 16: 10:20 a.m., 1:25, 4:25, 7:40 & 10:40 p.m. Century 20: 10:25 a.m., 1:25, 4:25, 7:25 & 10:30 p.m. Brooklyn (PG-13) +++1/2 Palo Alto Square: 1:15, 4:15 & 7:15 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 9:55 p.m. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) (R) Century 16: Sun. 2 p.m. Century 20: Sun. 2 & 7 p.m. Carol (R) Century 16: 10:30 a.m., 1:20, 4:10, 7:15 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 10:50 a.m., 1:55, 4:45, 7:35 & 10:25 p.m. Concussion (PG-13) Century 16: Fri. & Sat. 7:20 p.m. Sun. 7:35 p.m. Century 20: Fri. 4:50 p.m., Fri. & Sun. 10:55 a.m., 10:45 p.m. Sat. 4:55 & 10:50 p.m. Creed (PG-13) +++

Century 20: 3:25 & 9:55 p.m.

Daddy’s Home (PG-13) Century 16: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:10 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 7:50 & 10:20 p.m. The Danish Girl (R) Aquarius Theatre: 2, 4, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:05 a.m., 2:45 p.m. The Forest (PG-13) Century 20: 10:30 a.m., 12:50, 3:15, 5:40, 8:10 & 10:45 p.m. The Good Dinosaur (PG) ++1/2 Century 16: 10 a.m. Century 20: 11 a.m., 1:30, 4:20, 6:50 & 9:35 p.m. The Hateful Eight (R) ++1/2 Century 16: 11:15 a.m., 3:10, 7 & 10:45 p.m. Century 20: 6:30 & 10:10 p.m. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (PG-13) ++1/2 Century 20: Fri. 1:45 & 7:40 p.m., Sat. 1:50 & 7:45 p.m.

Joy (PG-13) ++1/2 Century 16: Fri. & Sat. 4:05 p.m. Sun. 10:05 a.m., 4:40 p.m. Century 20: 7:20 & 10:15 p.m. Met Opera: Les Pecheurs de Perles (Not Rated) Century 16: Sat. 9:55 a.m. Century 20: Sat. 9:55 a.m. Palo Alto Square: Sat. 9:55 a.m. Nannaku Prematho (Not Rated) Century 16: 11 a.m., 2:45, 6:30 & 10:20 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 11:30 p.m. Norm of the North (PG) Century 16: 10:10 a.m., 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:05 & 9:30 p.m. The Revenant (R) ++1/2 Century 16: 10:45 a.m., 12:25, 2:15, 3:55, 5:45, 7:25, 9:15, 10:15 & 10:55 p.m. Century 20: 10:25 a.m., 11:55, 1:50, 3:30, 5:20, 7, 8:50 & 10:25 p.m. Ride Along 2 (PG-13) Century 16: 11:55 a.m., 2:35, 5:15, 7:55 & 10:35 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 12:01 a.m. Century 20: 10:40 a.m., noon, 1:20, 2:40, 4, 5:20, 6:45, 8, 9:20 & 10:40 p.m. Sisters (R) Century 16: 10:15 a.m., 1:05, 4, 7:05 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5, 7:55 & 10:40 p.m. Spotlight (R) +++1/2 Palo Alto Square: 4 & 7 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 10 p.m. Fri. & Sun. 1 p.m. Sat. 10:15 a.m. Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens (PG-13) +++ Century 16: 10:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 5:30, 8 & 8:50 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 10 a.m., 1:20 p.m. In 3-D at 11:40 a.m., 12:30, 3, 3:50, 6:20, 7:10, 9:40 & 10:30 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m. Century 20: 10:35 a.m., 12:10, 1:45, 5, 6:40 & 8:15 p.m. In 3-D at 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 5:50 & 9:10 p.m. In X-D 3-D at 4:15 & 10:40 p.m. In X-D at 1 & 7:30 p.m. In D-BOX at 10:35 a.m., 1:45, 5 & 8:15 p.m. In D-BOX 3-D at 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 5:50 & 9:10 p.m. Trumbo (R) +++ Guild Theatre: 1:15 & 7 p.m. Youth (R) +1/2 Guild Theatre: 4 & 9:45 p.m.

+ Skip it ++ Some redeeming qualities +++ A good bet ++++ Outstanding

Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (327-3241) Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264)

CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-0128) Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260) Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700)

ON THE WEB: Additional movie reviews and trailers at PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

ALICE WATERS

The following is a sampling of movies recently reviewed in the Weekly: The Revenant 001/2 Director Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s “The Revenant” frontlines Leonardo DiCaprio as a man who must battle nature and his fellow man to survive. In a faultless if unmoving performance, he plays Hugh Glass, a member of a fur-trapping

expedition set upon by native Arikara in Louisiana Purchase territory, circa 1823. With the group scrambling to make it back to an outpost, Glass has an unscheduled encounter with a grizzly bear. Glass is left for dead, but he survives to journey across harsh terrain to exact his revenge. Rated R for strong frontier combat and violence including

WHY EATING GOOD FOOD MAKES FOR GOOD ECOLOGY

gory images, a sexual assault, language and brief nudity. Two hours, 36 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed Jan. 8, 2015) The Hateful Eight 001/2 Those with a Quentin Tarantino fetish are likely to like the writer-director’s latest tribute to ‘60s and ‘70s film and TV in “The Hateful Eight.” Tarantino assembles a snappy ensemble: Samuel L. Jackson and Kurt Russell as bounty hunters, Jennifer Jason Leigh as a near-feral prisoner, Walton Goggins as a sheriff, Tim Roth as a hangman, Demián Bichir as a Mexican henchman, Michael Madsen as a brooding cowboy and Bruce Dern as a not-so-innocent bystander. But for all its amusements, “Hateful Eight” noticeably flounders in patches of bald exposition and clunky narration. Rated R for strong bloody violence, a scene of violent sexual content, language and some graphic nudity. Three hours, 7 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed Jan. 8, 2015)

READ MOVIE REVIEWS ONLINE For this week’s latest movie reviews, “Anomalisa” and “Ride Along 2,” visit PaloAltoOnline.com and click on A&E.

JA NUA RY 19, 7PM

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square

AT MENLO ATHERTON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

P U RCH A SE T I CK E T S O N L I N E AT OPENSPACETRUST.ORG/GETINVOLVED/LECTURE OUR SPONSORS Embarcadero Media, Noble & Lorraine Hancock, Pie Ranch, Sand Hill Global Advisors, Santa Clara Valley Water District, Sereno Group, TomKat Ranch and Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Foundation

Page 20 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

CAMPBELL Camera 7 PALO ALTO CinéArts at Palo Alto SANTA CLARA AMC Mercado 20 Pruneyard (408) 559-6900 Square (650) 493-0128 amctheatres.com

Friday 1/15 Brooklyn – 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55 Spotlight – 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Saturday 1/16 Brooklyn – 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:55 Spotlight – 10:15, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Met Opera: Les Pecheurs de Perles – 9:55 AM Sun, Mon, Tue, & Thurs 1/17, 1/18, 1/19, 1/21 Brooklyn – 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 Spotlight – 1:00, 4:00, 7:00 Wednesday 1/20 Brooklyn – 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 Spotlight – 1:00, 4:00 Met Opera: Les Pecheurs de Perles – 6:30 PM

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com


SUMMER 2016

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26

n n o e C c p tion m a C

******************************************************* THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE:

ATTENTION CAMP DIRECTORS!

http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/agendas/default.asp

AGENDAâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;SPECIAL MEETINGâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;COUNCIL CHAMBERS JANUARY 19, 2016, 5:00 PM Closed Session 1. CONFERENCE WITH LABOR NEGOTIATORS Authority: Government Code Section 54957.6(a)

Consent Calendar 3. Adoption of an Ordinance Amending Palo Alto Municipal Code Chapter 4.60 (Business Registration Program) to Exempt =LY` :THSS )\ZPULZZLZ =LY` :THSS 5VU7YVĂ&#x201E;[Z HUK 9LSPNPV\Z Organizations With no Ancillary Business on Site From the Business Registration Program, and Review of Policy and Services Committee Recommended Updates to Enforcement Approach and Questionnaire Action Items 4. Approval of a Request for Proposal (RFP) for the Sale of 2,500 Square Feet of Transferrable Development Rights for the Sea Scout Building (Without Parking Exemption) and Direction to Amend the 3LHZL)L[^LLU[OL*P[`HUK[OL,U]PYVUTLU[HS=VS\U[LLYZ[V9LĂ&#x2026;LJ[ Updated Obligations Regarding Restroom Construction 5. Adoption of an Emergency Ordinance Amending Chapters 12.32 (Water Use Regulations) and 16.14 (California Green Building Standards Code) of the Palo Alto Municipal Code and Adding H 5L^ *OHW[LY  >H[LY ,Ń?JPLU[ 3HUKZJHWPUN [V (KVW[ H 3VJHS>H[LY,Ń?JPLU[3HUKZJHWL6YKPUHUJL7\YZ\HU[[V() and the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Executive Order B-29-15

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6. Joint Session With the Citizens Advisory Committee for the Comprehensive Plan Update: Introduction to the Comprehensive Plan Update Draft Environmental Impact Report & Review of Next Steps in the Planning Process

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Live Music in Mountain View at Cucina Venti! Award Winning Guitarist Kenya Baker will perform this Thursday from 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:30pm Great Music, Great Food, Great Times!

Cucina Venti 1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.CucinaVenti.com

The Voya Restaurant

Make your reservation on For information on future events, follow us on

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 386-6471 www.TheVoyaRestaurant.com

www.PaloAltoOnline.com â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ January 15, 2016 â&#x20AC;˘ Page 21


Support our Kids with a gift to the Holiday Fund Last Year’s Grant Recipients 10 Books A Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Acknowledge Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Adolescent Counseling Services . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Art in Action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Baby Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Bay Area Cancer Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Bayshore Christian Ministries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Beechwood School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Buena Vista Mobile Park Residents . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 CASSY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Children’s Health Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Common Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Community Legal Services in East Palo Alto. . . . . .$7,500 Computers for Everyone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Deborah’s Palm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Downtown Streets Team. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 DreamCatchers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 East Palo Alto Charter School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 East Palo Alto Children’s Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 East Palo Alto Kids Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 East Palo Alto Tennis & Tutoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Environmental Volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Family Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Foundation for a College Education . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Friends of Palo Alto Junior Museum & Zoo . . . . . .$5,000 Girls to Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Grace Lutheran Preschool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Grupo Palo Alto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Health Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Hidden Villa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 InnVision Shelter Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 JLS Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 Jordan Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 Kara. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Music in the Schools Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 New Creation Home Ministries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 New Voices for Youth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Nuestra Casa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Palo Alto Art Center Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Palo Alto Community Child Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,000 Palo Alto Friends Nursery School . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,000 Palo Alto High School Music Department . . . . . .$10,000 Palo Alto Housing Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Peninsula Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Project WeH.O.P.E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Quest Learning Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Ravenswood Education Foundation . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Silicon Valley Urban Debate League . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 St. Francis of Assisi Youth Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 St. Vincent de Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,000 TheatreWorks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 YMCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Youth Community Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Youth Speaks Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000

Thank you for supporting the Holiday Fund Through January 8, 479 donors have contributed $192,690; with match $342,690 has been raised for the Holiday Fund. 53 Anonymous .................. $118,690 Roger Smith ............................... 200 Reed Content ............................. 200 Bob & Jan Hermsen ........................ * Marilyn & Dale Simbeck.................. * Ralph Wheeler ............................ 300 Elaine Andersen.......................... 100 Robin & Don Kennedy ................ 100 Karen Sipprell ............................. 500 Sue Bartalo & David Fischer ........ 100 Gavin & Tricia Christensen .............. * Sherry Brown .............................. 100 Eileen & Rick Brooks ................... 500 Susan Osofsky .............................. 50 Werner Graf ................................... * W. Elizabeth Shepard...................... * Becky Spitzer .............................. 100 Judy & Jim Kleinberg ...................... * Bob Barrett & Linda Atkinson ......... * Rosalie Shepherd ........................ 100 Leannah Hunt................................. * Kay & Don Remsen......................... * Ellie & Dick Mansfield ..................... *

Page 22 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Susan Hyder ................................. 10 Marjan Wilkes ............................ 300 A.C. & Kathryn Johnston ............ 100 Elgin & Elizabeth Lee .................. 250 Romola Georgia ............................. * Madeline Wong............................ 50 Jan Kilner.................................... 200 David Thom .................................. 50 Alan Wachtel .................................. * Merele McClure .......................... 500 Timothy Collins........................ 5,000 Larry Baer ....................................... * Charles Williams ......................... 100 Robert Simoni............................. 200 Jill & Brian Bicknell .......................... * Georgie Gleim ............................ 500 David Labaree ............................. 200 Russell Evarts .............................. 300 Jocelyn Dong .................................. * Jonathan MacQuitty & Laurie Hunter .................... 1,000 Peter Beller ................................. 100 Daniel Chapiro ........................... 200

Timothy Wright ....................... 2,500 Anthony Cadena ......................... 50 Richard Ellson ............................. 100 Anne Houghteling ...................... 100 Ronold Morita ............................ 100 Barbara & Skip Shapiro ................... * Morton Maser ............................ 125 Jean Doble...................................... * Ellen Krasnow............................. 250 Charles Katz ............................... 500 Weil Family ................................. 250 Lynnie & Joe Melena....................... * Barbara Allen.............................. 100 Charles & Barbara Stevens .............. * Judy Ousterhout ............................. * Matt Glickman & Susie Hwang ... 500 Sally Hewlett............................ 2,000 Guy & Janet DiJulio......................... * Paul & Maureen Roskoph ........... 100 Harriet & Gerald Berner .............. 300 Diane & Harry Greenberg ........... 500 Dan & Lynne Russell ....................... * Marc & Margaret Cohen ............ 100


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John Tang ....................................... * Joanne Koltnow ......................... 300 Kathleen & Tony Hughes ............ 500 George & Ruth Chippendale .......... * Marilyn Slater ................................. * Claire & Ed Lauing ...................... 250 Cathy & John Fisher ...................... 75 Glenn & Lorna Affleck ................ 100 Annette Isaacson ........................ 100 Arden King ..................................... * Hoda Epstein .................................. * Dennis Kreiss ................................ 50 Diane & Brandy Sikic................... 250 Colleen Anderson ....................... 250 Debra Satz .................................. 150 John DeVries............................ 2,000 Dorsey & Katherine Bass ............. 500 John & Nancy Cassidy.............. 1,000 Steve & Gayle Brugler .............. 1,000 Richard Johnsson ..................... 7,000 Phil Hanawalt & Graciela Spivak... 500 Susan & Harry Dennis ................... 50 Jim Lewis ........................................ * Shirley Ely ................................... 500 Scott & Sandra Pearson .............. 500 Margot Goodman .......................... * Eugene & Mabel Dong ............... 200 Barbara Klein & Stan Schrier ........... * Robert & Constance Loarie ............. * Bobbie & Jerry Wagger ................... * David & Virginia Pollard .............. 300 Fred & Deborah Kurland ............. 300 Harry & Susan Hartzell ................ 250 Lawrence Naiman ....................... 100 Jacqueline Rush .......................... 200 Carolyn Williams & Mike Keeler...... * Jody Maxmin .................................. * Mary Jackman ................................ * Amy Harris & Joss Geiduschek .... 100 Susan Elgee & Steve Eglash ........ 500 Robert & Betsy Gamburd ................ * Gil & Gail Wooley ....................... 200 Nick & Betsy Clinch..................... 250 Ted & Frances Jenkins ................... 75 Barbara Sawyer .............................. * Tom & Patricia Sanders ................... * Mary Ann Webb ......................... 100 Bjorn & Michele Liencres ......... 1,000 Lee Sendelbeck............................... * Andrea Smith ............................. 100 Ann Reisenauer .......................... 100 Dena Goldberg ........................... 500 Michell Rosen ............................... 50 Ed & Linda Selden....................... 200 Janice Bohman & Eric Keller........ 250 Mary Lemmon ....................... 10,000 Bob & Edie Kirkwood ................. 500 Larry Breed ................................. 100 Judy & Lee Shulman ....................... * Lani Freeman and Stephen Monismith .............. * Constance Crawford .................. 750 Eleanor Settle ................................. * Nancy Moss .................................... * Mike & Ellen Turbow .................. 250 David & Lynn Mitchell ................. 300 Marcia & Michael Katz.................... * Mike & Lennie Roberts ............... 150 John & Florine Galen ...................... * Micki & Bob Cardelli ....................... * Felecia Levy................................. 150 Veronica Tincher ......................... 100 Elizabeth Kok ................................. * Lawrence Yang & Jennifer Kuan .................... 1,000 Sue Kemp................................... 250

Charles & Jean Thompson .............. * Luca & Mary Cafiero ....................... * Fran Codispoti & Ken Schroeder .. 500 David & Diane Feldman ........... 1,000 Ellmann Family ............................. 50 Mr. & Mrs. John McLaughlin....... 100 Bill Reller......................................... * Lodato Family ............................. 500 Anne & Don Vermeil....................... * Beth & Peter Rosenthal ............... 300 Carolyn Brennan ............................. * Linda & Ed DeMeo ..................... 150 Diane & Stephen Ciesinski .......... 500 Judith Appleby ........................... 200 Virginia Fehrenbacher ................. 100 Margaret & Les Fisher ................. 200 Judith & Hans Steiner ..................... * Ted & Ginny Chu ............................ * Don & Dee Price ........................... 40 Ron Wolf .................................... 100 Rathmann Family ............................ * Ken & Michele Dauber ............... 500 Amanda Steckler ........................ 500 Steve Eglash ............................... 500 Teresa Godfrey............................ 250 Sonya Bradski ............................. 100 Cora Schmid............................... 100 Duane Bay .................................. 100 Sarah Longstreth ........................ 100 Sarah Holt .................................... 50 Loren Gordon ............................... 50 Jennifer Carrico ............................ 50 Tyler Scott ..................................... 50 Tracy Rawlings .............................. 50 Simon Blake-Wilson...................... 50 Prarthna Advani............................ 25 Salim Fedel ................................... 25 Nadeshda Vargas .......................... 25 Christine Blasey ............................ 25 Peter Engar ................................... 25 Cecilia Ward ................................. 25 Wendy Eilers ................................. 25 Raminder Bajwa ........................... 25 Christine Klenow .......................... 25 Allen Lucas ................................... 25 Ashley Tsien .................................. 25 Courtney Behm ............................ 25 Sophia Trinh Ngo .......................... 25 Susan Kim .................................... 25 Andrew Dimock ........................... 25 John Miaulllis ................................ 25 Gaspard Van Koningsveld ............. 25 Corey Doermann .......................... 25 Peter Wang .................................. 25 Judi Lachenmyer ........................... 25 Laurie Winslow ............................. 25 Melissa Morwood ......................... 25 John Myers ................................... 25 Don Kenyon ................................. 25 Yumi Ando ................................... 25 Elizabeth Cowie............................ 25 Kathy McKennan .......................... 25 Karen Zak ..................................... 25 Elizabeth Petit ............................... 25 Christine Gandel........................... 25 Thompson Gawley ....................... 25 Nancy & Richard Alexander ..... 1,000 Betty Gerard ............................... 100 John & Mary Schaefer ................ 100 Amy Renalds .................................. * Steve & Mary Chapel ...................... * Ron Wolf .................................... 100 Eileen Brennan ........................... 300 Stephanie Martinson ...................... * Richard Mazze ............................ 150 Keith & Linda Clarke ................... 200

Helen Feinberg ........................ 5,000 Bonnie Berg................................ 150 Denise Savoie & Darrell Duffie ........ * Thomas Rindfleisch ......................... * Cynthia Costell ........................... 100 Kieschnick Family............................ * Stauffer Family............................ 500 Nancy Steege ............................. 100 Shiela Johansson ........................ 100 Diane Doolittle ............................... * Caroline Hicks & Bert Fingerhut .. 250 Karen & Steve Ross ......................... * Helene Pier ..................................... * Robyn Crumly................................. * Vic & Norma Hesterman ................. * Don & Bonnie Miller ................... 100 Don & Adele Langendorf ............ 200 Jerry & Linda Elkind ........................ * Ann & Don Rothblatt...................... * Al & Joanne Russell..................... 300 Patricia Levin............................... 100 Sallie & Jay Whaley ......................... * Cathy & Howard Kroymann........ 250 Dennis Clark ............................... 100 Solon Finkelstein......................... 150 Barbara Millin ............................. 300 Gwen Luce & Family ....................... * Ellen & Tom Ehrlich ..................... 300 Scott Wong ................................ 200 Marc Berman.............................. 100 Susan Pines................................. 100 Ruchita Parat .............................. 100 Hal and Iris Korol ............................ * Elaine Hahn .................................... * Julie Jerome ................................ 250 Cindy & Peter Ziebelman ................ * Theresa Carey ............................. 250 Harold Luft ................................. 100 Janis Ulevich ............................... 100 Xiaofan Lin ................................... 50 Roger Warnke ............................ 250 James Phillips .............................. 250 Teresa Roberts ......................... 2,000 Braff Family ................................ 500 Chris Kenrick ........................... 1,000 Mark Kreutzer ............................ 100 Havern Family .......................... 5,000 Bryan Wilson & Geri Martin Wilson .................. 100 Joan Regalado .............................. 50 Kevin Mayer ............................... 125 Mike & Jean Couch .................... 250 Boyce & Peggy Nute ....................... * Bill Johnson & Terri Lobdell ...... 1,000 Anna Olsen ................................ 250 Diane Moore .................................. * Hugh MacMillan ......................... 500 Peter Stern ................................. 250 Elizabeth Tromovitch................... 100 Merrill & Lee Newman .................... * Mary Lorey ..................................... * Elizabeth Salzer & Richard Baumgartner ............................... * Roy & Carol Blitzer.......................... * Bruce Campbell ....................... 2,000 John & Lynn Wiese ..................... 100 Susan & Doug Woodman ............... * Tony & Carolyn Tucher .................... * Marlene & Joe Prendergast ......... 100 Carol Kersten & Markus Aschwanden ............... 200 Page & Ferrell Sanders ................ 100 Norman & Nancy Rossen ............ 200 Suzanne Bell ............................... 100 John & Lee Pierce ....................... 250 Irene Schwartz ................................ * Sally & Craig Nordlund ............... 500

Robert & Joan Jack ..................... 250 Ruth Hammett............................ 500 Irene Beardsley & Dan Bloomberg... * Nancy & Joe Huber ..................... 100 Mike & Cathie Foster .................. 500 Linda & Steve Boxer ........................ * George Cator ............................. 100 Lijun & Jia-Ning Xiang................. 300 Charles Bonini ............................ 100 Penny & Greg Gallo Family ......... 500 Drew McCalley & Marilyn Green .......................... 100 Annette Glanckopf ......................... * Lorraine Macchello ..................... 100 Carol & Mahlon Hubenthal............. * Tony & Judy Kramer ........................ * Betsy & George Young ................... * Stuart & Carol Hansen .................. 50 Debby Roth ................................ 100 Leif & Sharon Erickson ................ 250 Jim & Nancy Baer............................ * Dorothy Saxe .................................. * Hal & Carol Louchheim ............... 400 Eve & John Melton ..................... 500 Michael & Ruth Lowy ................... 50 Maureen Martin ............................. * Chris & Beth Martin ........................ * Joan Norton ................................... * Arna & Hersh Shefrin...................... * Brigid Barton .............................. 500 John & Barbara Pavkovich............... * Ken Bencala & Sally O’Neil.......... 100 Kinsley Jack ................................ 250 In Memory Of Richard Van Dusen & Kaye Kelley...250 Patricia Bendigkeit ...................... 250 Edward & Elizabeth Buurma ........... * Marie Kieraldo & Ian Halliday.......... * Patty Demertious ..................... 1,200 Ryan ............................................... * Tinney Family.............................. 250 Mary Festinger................................ * Maria Serpa .................................. 25 Don & Marie Snow ..................... 100 Ted Linden .................................. 200 Leonard Ely ................................. 250 Dick Rosenbaum......................... 200 Emmanuel & Lucie Rudd............. 100 Dad, Mom and Louie...................... * Marilyn Tabb................................... * Ludwig Tannenwald ....................... * Ando & Barbara MacDonell ........ 100 Letty Bird ........................................ * Bob Markevitch .............................. * Philip Gottheiner ............................ * Mrs. Jacqueline Yen .................... 200 Yen-Chen and Er-Ying Yen ......... 250 Francine Mendlin ........................ 200 Dick Rosenbaum............................. * Ray Bacchetti .................................. * Bill Land.......................................... * August Lee King ............................. * Ray Bacchetti .................................. * Our loving parents Albert & Beverly Pellizzari ............. * Dick Rosenbaum............................. * John F. Smith .................................. * Steve Fasani ................................ 100 Becky Schaefer ............................... * Emmett Lorey ................................. * Helen Rubin................................ 150 Dr. & Mrs. Irving Rubin ............... 150 Max & Anna Blanker .................. 150 Pam Grady ................................. 250 Ruth & Chet Johnson ..................... *

Robert Lobdell ................................ * Abe and Helene Klein ..................... * Robert Spinrad ........................... 500 Ernest J. Moore .......................... 300 Charles Bennett Leib................... 100 Kathy Morris................................... * Bertha Kalson ................................. * Betty Meltzer .................................. * Mary Floyd...................................... * Bob Donald .................................... * Ledger Free & Jerry Spielman .......... * Zoe Allen & David Sager ............. 100 Dr. John Plummer Stewart .............. * Florence Kan Ho ............................. * Nate Rosenberg .......................... 100 Carol Berkowitz .............................. * Jean Law .................................... 200 Boyd Paulson, Jr. ............................. * Aaron O’Neill .................................. * Robert Raymakers & Bonnie Packer ...................... 100 Leo Breidenbach ............................. * Thomas & Louise Phinney ........... 200 David Zlotnick, MD ......................... * Frank & Jean Crist....................... 100 Elliot W. Eisner ................................ * Al & Kay Nelson.............................. * Jack Sutorius............................... 300 In Honor Of Susan & Carl Thomsen ............... 100 Barnea-Smith Family ...................... * Terry Shuchat’s birthday .................. * Syrian refugees ............................... * Alissa’s supporters .......................... * Maverick Maurice Levy ................... * Nancy & John Cassidy..................... * Jill Caddes .................................. 100 Scott Caddes .............................. 100 Polly Caddes ............................... 100 Hayley Caddes ............................ 100 Jake Caddes ............................... 100 Garrett Caddes ........................... 100 Rachel Feinstein .......................... 250 Maryilyn Sutorius ........................ 300 As a Gift For Roy Blitzer ...................................... * Sallie Tasto .................................. 125 Sandy Sloan................................ 125 Mark Zuanich ............................. 150 Organizations Palo Alto Weekly Moonlight Run & Walk ........................ 30,789 Sponsors of Moonlight Run: Palo Alto Medical Foundation ...7,500 Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Foundation ............. 5,000 Stanford Federal Credit Union...5,000 Pacific Union ........................ 5,000 Palantir ................................. 5,000 Whole Foods ........................ 5,000 Lakin Spears ......................... 2,000 Employees of Ladera Travel ......... 280 deLemos Properties .................... 200 Harrell Remodeling ......................... * Alta Mesa Cemetery & Funeral Home.................... 1,750 Palo Alto Business Park ................... * Good Bear and Co. Charitable Fund .................... 5,000 Attorney Susan Dondershine ...... 200 Bleibler Properties ....................... 500 Bank of the West..................... 1,000 Carl King/Mayfield Mortgage ......... *

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 23


Home&Real Estate

OPEN HOME GUIDE 26 Also online at PaloAltoOnline.com

Home Front WATER CHECK ... Help monitor the water quality along San Francisquito Creek on Saturday, Jan. 16, from 9 a.m. to noon, starting at the trailhead at The Dish on Alpine Road and Piers Lane in Portola Valley. Acterra’s staff and volunteers will be collecting data at five sites along the waterway. Volunteers will record pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance and turbidity. No experience is necessary to participate; training will be provided. Participants must coordinate their own transportation. Minors under age 18 must bring a waiver signed by a guardian. Info: erin.rusby@ acterra.org or acterra.org MILK BREAK ... Help milk Vida the Cow on Sunday, Jan. 17, 3:30-5 p.m., at Hidden Villa, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Participants ages 5 and older can learn about cows and practice proper handmilking techniques. This event costs $25 per person. Info: hiddenvilla.org/programs/ calendar-of-events

Seminar teacher Candace Simpson checks on her Cara cara navel orange tree in her backyard on Jan. 11.

20-YEAR CELEBRATION ... Join Canopy on Thursday, Jan. 21, 5:15-8 p.m., to celebrate during its 20th annual Palo Alto Mayor’s Tree Planting and Awards Ceremony at Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. A tree planting will honor the incoming mayor, and the 2016 Canopy Tree Award recipients will be recognized. Guests need to RSVP, either online or by emailing Shannon McDonald at shannon@ canopy.org. Info: canopy.org/ about-canopy/special-events/ annual-party-2016

partnership’

by Crystal Tai | photos by Veronica Weber

R

etired educator Candace Simpson continues to teach, but instead of chemistry, she is spreading science-based gardening knowledge. She will also be sharing homegrown lemons, limes, oranges and tangerines during her citrusgrowing seminar on Thursday, Jan. 21, at Rinconada Library in Palo Alto. “Citrus is a timely topic,” Simpson said. “Winter is when many citrus fruits are picked, and people think about how to protect their citrus trees from frost.” There are yellowish leaves on the mostly green Valencia orange tree in front of her Palo Alto home. She pointed at them recently and gave a piece of advice: “In winter, people may see frost damage on their citrus trees and be tempted to prune them, but pruning may stimulate

VEGGIE DINNER ... Enjoy miso soup, hibiscus tea and more at next week’s Monday Night Vegetarian Dinner on Monday, Jan. 18, at 6:30 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, 305 N. California Ave., Palo Alto. This week features a warming winter fiesta vegan menu prepared by chefs Michael Bauce and Marta Serda. Anyone is welcome to come and dine for $18. Guests must register by Monday at 9:30 a.m. Info: 650-599-3320 or yourhealthandjoy.com/dinners Send notices of news and events related to real estate, interior design, home improvement and gardening to Home Front, Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302, or email bmalmberg@paweekly.com. Deadline is one week before publication.

‘A fruitful

Master Gardener to share fruit, tips during library seminar

Above, a Variegated pink Eureka lemon grows in Candace Simpson’s backyard; frost damage shows on surrounding leaves. Below, Simpson also grows Meyer lemons.

Page 24 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

new growth that could be damaged by cold weather. You should wait until spring to prune your citrus trees.” While Simpson’s Valencia orange tree is laden with fruit, she said the oranges are unripe despite their golden color. “Navel oranges are harvested in winter, but Valencia oranges are different. They are not ready for picking until May,” she said. Simpson walked to her backyard and picked plump fruit from other citrus trees. Among them was a yellow lime. “The green limes you see at the supermarket are not fully ripe. They are actually juicier when they are ripe and yellow,” she explained. “Home gardeners can get a better harvest from their citrus trees if they know how best to care for them.”

The Citrus Leafminer pest has damaged Candace Simpson’s Mandarin tree, but the harm is purely cosmetic and does not affect the fruit.

That, according to her, is precisely the point of her citrusgrowing seminar. The 90-minute session, titled “Growing Fabulous Citrus,” is part of a series launched by the University of California Master Gardeners of Santa Clara County and the Palo Alto City Library. The head librarian of the Rinconada Branch, Karen Richins, calls the series of events “a fruitful partnership.” “Many Palo Alto homes are on generous lots, ideal for gardening,” Richins said. “This series of garden, landscape and pest-management programs pairs neatly with the City of Palo Alto’s overall strategy to advance the community’s sustainability goals. Outreach to the community is an integral part of the Palo Alto City Library’s services.” In the partnership, Simpson represents the Master Gardeners, a nonprofit organization sponsored by the University of California Cooperative Extension to distribute scientific information on home horticulture, pest management and sustainable landscape practices. The Palo Alto Demonstration Garden of the Master Gardeners is located at 851 Center Drive. Simpson has been giving hands-on lessons there since retiring in 2003 from the Palo Alto Unified School District, where she had worked her way from a chemistry teacher to director of professional development and then to assistant superintendent of human resources. The library seminars started at the Rinconada branch in October and are new in Palo Alto. The (continued on page 26)


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www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 25


Home & Real Estate

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Leaves on Candace Simpson’s Valencia orange tree show Chlorosis, a type of yellowing of the leaves that occurs during winter.

Growing citrus

$2,450,000

Alain Pinel Realtors

462-1111

4 Bedrooms 740 Whiskey Hill Rd Sun

$4,480,000

Alain Pinel Realtors

5 Bedrooms

5 Bedrooms

725 Center Dr $4,998,000 Sun Dreyfus Sotheby’s Realty 644-3474

6 Quail Meadows Dr

462-1111

$10,000,000

Sun 1-4 Pacific Union International

Page 26 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

314-7200

series is held on the third Thursday evening of every month, while the monthly demonstration garden lessons continue on the first Saturday morning of each month. “The two sets of workshops complement each other well,” Simpson said. “The demo garden provides hands-on practices, whereas the library setting enables us to show pictures of things that may not be available or easy to find in the garden, for example, beneficial insects and pests.” Simpson also teaches gardening at Palo Alto Adult School. One of her former students, Dexter Girton, has 25 citrus plants around his house in Palo Alto. “Candace came here and diagnosed an ailing Eureka lemon tree that simply wasn’t getting enough water,” Girton said. “I had failed to probe the soil for moisture content. She has given me other tips about growing citrus, too.” He added that he has also learned a lot from Simpson about growing other plants. A tomato plant of his has grown from a seed of the “Palo Alto variety,” which he obtained in a class, to 10 feet tall. Another Palo Alto resident, Sara Hart, said she has likewise benefited from Simpson’s knowledge. “Information from her helped me save some of my chard when it got loopers. My lettuce and tomatoes did much better. My Meyer lemon is producing much more fruit,” Hart said. “For my lemon, lime and orange trees, Candace helped me learn what to watch out for so I could start early in controlling pests before they took over.” To Anrica Deb, another former student of

BUILDING PERMITS Palo Alto

258 Middlefield Road secondstory addition and remodel of first story, includes new tankless water heater, relocate and upgrade electrical service, $257,946 755 Page Mill Road emergency replacement of main service breaker rated at 225 amps, $n/a 3815 La Donna Ave. install nine isolated piers in crawl space for additional support, $14,400 3960 Fabian Way install NEMA 14-50 outlet on exterior wall in parking lot, $n/a 102 University Ave., Suite #1A replace two damaged windows, $24,000 258 Middlefield Road remodel existing garage to reduce size to single car garage, $10,303 2500 El Camino Real deferred vehicle lift design, $n/a 936 Industrial Ave. Peninsula Party Rentals: use and occupancy only for tenant to occupy the entire building, $n/a 1550 Hamilton Ave. gas line for log lighter in existing woodburning fireplace, $n/a 3531 Emerson St. electric service upgrade, $n/a 2140 Yale St. copper re-pipe for kitchen and hall bathroom, $n/a 784 Loma Verde Ave. re-roof, $3,500 855 El Camino Real, Building 2 Scandia Homes: tenant improvement and use and occupancy for a tenant space, includes new storefront and electrical subpanel, $145,810 1539 Mariposa Ave. structural revisions to two shear walls and add a ceiling beam, $n/a 4099 Middlefield Road addition to single-story residence and interior remodel, includes service upgrade to 200 amps and reroof, $120,000 3813 Louis Road service upgrade to 200 amps, $n/a 228 Whitclem Drive re-roof, $12,000

Simpson’s, it was “the most fun” when the Master Gardner talked about the insects in the garden. “Candace went through all kinds of good predator insects and less helpful insects that destroy your plants,” Deb said. Simpson also once advised her to trim out the inward-facing branches of her lemon tree, and that really helped it to thrive, Deb said. Q Freelance writer Crystal Tai can be emailed at crystal2@stanfordalumni.org. What: Growing Fabulous Citrus Date: Thursday, Jan. 21 Time: 7-8:30 p.m. Where: Embarcadero Program Room, Rinconada Library, 1213 Newell Road, Palo Alto Cost: Free, no preregistration is required Info: mastergardeners.org/2016-01-21/ Growing-Fabulous-Citrus

READ MORE ONLINE

PaloAltoOnline.com

For a list of the workshops offered this year at Rinconada, as well as more Home and Real Estate news, visit PaloAltoOnline.com/real_estate.

3410 Hillview Ave. tenant improvement for existing tenant Bon Appétit improvement to existing servery space, includes new lighting, equipment and finishes, $60,000 1113 Tahoe Lane install rooftop PV system, $n/a 855 California Ave. structural revisions due to field conditions in ceiling repair of roof purlin, $n/a 1837 Park Blvd. sewer line repair, pipe burst, $n/a 159 Tennyson Ave. residential EVSE (NEMA 14-50) at exterior of garage, $n/a 1045 Alma St. re-roof, $28,870 251 Lincoln Ave. add skylight and Solatube, $n/a 311 Everett Ave., Unit #E multifamily kitchen and bath remodel, includes replacing receptacles throughout and replace subpanel in apartment, $12,000 3549 Julie Court re-roof, $18,900 259 Matadero Ave. install Level 2 EVSE on exterior wall and service upgrade, $n/a 1243 Parkinson Ave. re-roof, $12,600 610 Wellsbury Court re-roof, $8,900 1520 Page Mill Road commercial replacement of rooftop AC unit, $65,000 640 Kendall Ave. remodel two bathrooms, $9,000 800 Sycamore Drive add arbor with automatic louver system and outdoor heaters, increased valuation of main permit and collect associated fees, $n/a 1080 Tanland Drive, Apt. #104 kitchen and bathroom remodel, $43,000 3919 Grove Ave. new subpanel in attached garage with four dedicated circuits for plugs, $n/a 324 Channing Ave. bathroom remodel, $12,200 1800 Waverley St. bathroom remodel, $9,000 1075 Arrowhead Way replace radiant heating boiler, $n/a 345 Parkside Drive service up-

grade to 200 amps, $n/a 908 Moreno Ave. re-roof, $17,440 3136 Avalon Court roof-mounted PV system, $n/a 3454 Ashton Court temporary power, $n/a 816 San Antonio Ave. Hertz: electrical for two illuminated signs, planning approval under 15pln-00252, $n/a 4151 Middlefield Road improvements include new restrooms and mechanical, electrical and plumbing, enlarge existing stair opening, tenant improvements to be separate permit, $550,000 900 Arastradero Road existing firm minor office tenant improvement, includes constructions new wall and door, $14,672 1053 Lincoln Ave. new front covered porch and window replacements on second floor (Dec. 10, 2015, revised scope of work to replace all windows 11, replace garage door and patio doors, $20,000 445 Sherman Ave. use and occupancy and office tenant improvement for Quest Scholarship Program, educational finance firm to occupy Suite A-G on ground floor, $65,310 2300 Hanover St. remove/replace water heater, $n/a 308 Lincoln Ave. structural revision to covered patio and height of roof, $n/a 1053 Lincoln Ave. re-roof, $19,000 3101 Middlefield Road stucco one end of the building, structural plywood to remain, $n/a 698 Wildwood Lane flushmounted PV system, $n/a 410 Oxford Ave. roof-mounted PV system, $n/a 200 Lowell Ave. roof-mounted PV system, $n/a 3850 Fabian Way Building 1: Loral Space & Communications: new subpanel on the second floor and new electrical connections for newly constructed partitions, $24,900


108 Avon Terrace, Sunnyvale Offered at $1,488,000 Pristine Home in Perfect Location Built in 2013, this 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home of 1,831 sq. ft. (per county) has a lot of 3,101 sq. ft. (per county) and enjoys a location moments away from local shopping, dining, and recreation. Presenting a breezy, open floorplan and fine finishes like plantation shutters and hardwood floors, the home includes a private setting, a luxurious kitchen, an attached two-car garage, and a drought-tolerant backyard. Sunnyvale Community Center, local parks, and exceptional Cupertino schools are all nearby (buyer to verify eligibility). For video tour & more photos, please visit:

www.108Avon.com

OPEN HOUSE

®

Ken DeLeon CalBRE #01342140

Michael Repka CalBRE #01854880

Saturday & Sunday, 1-5 pm Complimentary Lunch & Lattes

6 5 0 . 4 8 8 . 7 3 2 5 | i n f o @ d e l e o n r e a l t y. c o m | w w w. d e l e o n r e a l t y. c o m | C a l B R E # 0 1 9 0 3 2 2 4

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 27


A Luxury Collection By Intero Real Estate Services

Sand Hill Estates, Woodside

5 Betty Lane, Atherton

11627 Dawson Drive, Los Altos Hills

$35,000,000

$24,800,000

$23,995,000

Listing Provided by: Dana Cappiello & Cutty Smith Lic.#01343305 & 01444081

Listing Provided by: David Kelsey, Tom Dallas, Greg Goumas Lic.#01242399, 00709019, 01878208

Listing Provided by: David Kelsey, Tom Dallas, Lic.#01242399, 00709019

Ano Nuevo Scenic Ranch, Davenport

91 Selby Lane, Atherton

291 Atherton Avenue, Atherton

$19,800,000

$16,900,000

$14,688,000

Listing Provided by: Dana Cappiello, Lic.#01343305

Listing Provided by: Catherine Qian, Lic.#01276431

Listing Provided by: Nancy Gehrels, Lic.#01952964

26880 Elena Road, Los Altos Hills

10440 Albertsworth Lane, Los Altos Hills

245 Mountain Wood Lane, Woodside

$12,888,888

$11,488,000

$7,750,000

Listing Provided by: Dan Kroner, Lic.#01790340

Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas & John Reece, Lic.#01878208 & 00838479

Listing Provided by: David Kelsey, Lic.#01242399

13075 S Alta, Los Altos Hills

1175 Barroilhet Drive, Hillsborough

40 Firethorn Way, Portola Valley

$7,500,000

$6,888,000

$6,888,000

Listing Provided by: The Troyer Group, Lic.# 01234450

Listing Provided by: Sophie Tsang, Lic.#01354442.

Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas, Lic.#01878208

1100 Mountain Home Rd.,Woodside

15345 Bohlman Road, Saratoga

1990 Valparaiso, Menlo Park, CA

$5,850,000

$3,999,888

$2,825,000

Listing Provided by: David Kelsey, Tom Dallas, Lic.#01242399, 00709019

Listing Provided by: Rusty Paap, Joe Velasco, Lic.# 01418326/01309200

Listing Provided by: Denise Villeneuve Lic.# 01794615

See the complete collection

w w w.InteroPrestigio.com ©2016 Intero Real Estate Services Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate and a wholly owned subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc. All rights reserved. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you are listed with another broker. Page 28 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

®

®


The Solution to Selling Your Luxury Home.

5698 La Seyne Place, San Jose, Ca | $3,730,000 | Presented by Will Chea, Lic. #01356171

Customized to the unique style of each luxury property, Prestigio will expose your home through the most influential mediums reaching the greatest number of qualified buyers wherever they may be in the world. For more information about listing your home with the Intero Prestigio International program, call your local Intero Real Estate Services office. Woodside 1590 Cañada Lane Woodside, CA 94062 650.206.6200

Menlo Park 807 Santa Cruz Avenue Menlo Park, CA 94025 650.543.7740

Los Altos 496 First Street, Ste. 200 Los Altos, CA 94022 650.947.4700

$22,000,000

®

®

2015 Intero Real Estate Services Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate and a wholly owned subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc. All rights reserved. www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you are listed with another broker.

Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 29


1175 Barroilhet Drive, Hillsborough, CA 94010 This lovely Hillsborough home offers 6 bedrooms and 6½ bathrooms across 5,950 square feet of living space. The grounds are beautifully manicured and lead to the grand entry with high ceilings. The Grand Master Suite on the ground floor includes a cozy fireplace and doors leading out to the patio, as well as an attached full study and a private master bathroom. An au pair or in-law suite is situated on a lower level, perfect for live-ins or guests. The large kitchen features an island and plenty of space for all your cooking needs. With a large family room, dining room, spacious backyard, and 3 car garage, this vibrant home is perfect for any family.

Sophie Tsang, MBA 650.947.4655 sophie@interorealestate.com www.SophieTsang.com WeChat ID:SophieTsangRealtor Lic.#01399145 © 2016 Intero Real Estate Services Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate and a wholly owned subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc. All rights reserved. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you are listed with another broker.

®

®

Page 30 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

List Price: $6,888,000

Call For More Property Information or to schedule a home tour. www.1175BarroilhetDrive.com


OPEN HOUSE SAT & SUN 1:30–4:30PM

MODERN DOWNTOWN CONDO

800 High Street #304, Palo Alto | 800HighUnit304.com Michael Dreyfus, Broker 650.485.3476 michael.dreyfus@dreyfussir.com License No. 01121795

Offered at $2,198,000 Beds 4 | Baths 2 | Home ±1,638 sf

Noelle Queen, Sales Associate 650.427.9211 noelle.queen@dreyfussir.com License No. 01917593 Downtown Palo Alto 728 Emerson St, Palo Alto 650.644.3474

Ashley Banks, Sales Associate 650.544.8968 ashley.banks@dreyfussir.com License No. 01913361

Downtown Menlo Park 640 Oak Grove Ave, Menlo Park 650.847.1141

dreyfussir.com )EGL3J½GIMW-RHITIRHIRXP] 3[RIHERH3TIVEXIH

O P E N S A T U R D AY & S U N D AY, J A N U A R Y 16 - 17, 1 : 0 0 - 4 : 0 0 P M

Just Listed at Menlo Commons

2 14 0 S A N T A C R U Z , B 2 0 1 , M E N L O P A R K

Beautifully updated 2 bedroom/2 bathroom condo at Menlo Commons. (55+ Community). Great corner location in Building “B”. Stylish kitchen and bathrooms, updated with custom cabinetry - soft close cupboards/drawers and warmed hued granite. Washer/Dryer in unit. Community heated swimming pool/spa. Gym. Elegantly appointed common rooms with kitchen. Close to 280 - Walk to Stanford. Offered at $678,000

CUTTY SMITH

Intero Real Estate Prestigio,

650-580-8286 cell cuttys@interorealestate.com BRE# 01444081

www.cuttysmith.com www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 31


Page 32 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


ColdwellBankerHomes.com Woodside

Sun 1:30 - 4:30

$16,995,000

155 Kings Mountain Road Country estate property renovated & expanded on 5 flat ac near town. 1BD/1BA guest house. 6 BR/6 BA + 6 half BA Erika Demma CalBRE #01230766 650.851.2666

Menlo Park

Sat/Sun 2 - 4

Los Altos

$5,000,000

Menlo Park

121 First Street Los Altos Vault & Safe Depository. www.121FirstStreet.com. BR/ BA Jan Strohecker CalBRE #00620365

650.325.6161

26 Mansion Ct 717 2780 sf of living space. Living room w/ high ceilings, gas burning fireplace & wet bar. 2 BR/2 BA + 1 half BA Lyn Jason Cobb CalBRE #01332535 650.324.4456

Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4

$1,575,000

$1,598,000

Woodside

$1,995,000

Sun 1 - 4

$1,349,000

2131 Avy Ave Rarely available stunning Menlo Heights End Unit townhouse w/attached 2car garage! Hurry! 3 BR/2 BA + 1 half BA Jan Strohecker CalBRE #00620365 650.906.6516

527 Cringle Dr Stunning loft style 3BD/2BA, with new kitchen, baths, roof, plumbing, landscaping. 3 BR/2 BA Elaine White CalBRE #01182467 650.324.4456

610 Woodside Wy This wonderful home has an open floorpln w/decks & spa w/vws of western hills. WDS Schls. 2 BR/1 BA Margot Lockwood CalBRE #01017519 650.851.2666

Redwood City

La Honda

Menlo Park l

Call for price

1022 Roosevelt Ave Charmingly updated 3bd/2ba home + Separate Studio w/ kitchenette & full bath. 6500sf lot. BR/ BA Dan Ziony CalBRE #01380339 650-814-4926

Sun 1 - 4

$779,000

3407 Jefferson Ave 2 BD/1 BTH. Refinished original hardwood floors, spacious rooms, & ample closet space. 2 BR/1 BA Steve Bulifant CalBRE #01940157 650.324.4456

$829,000

Pending

$798,000

9 Sequoia Dr Tahoe style home on large lot. Master suite wing with skylights. Separate in-law w/BA. 4 BR/2 BA Janis Friedenberg Grube CalBRE #01365341 650.851.2666

2140 Santa Cruz Ave A201 Popular 2 BD/ 2 BTH. Stylishly remodeled. Wonderfully convenient location in complex. 2 BR/2 BA Lyn Jason Cobb CalBRE #01332535 650.324.4456

Redwood City

San Jose

Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30

$769,000

4024 Farm Hill Blvd 6 Rarely available and beautifully updatded Emerald Hills townhouse with Roy Cloud school 2 BR/1 BA + 1 half BA Clara Lee CalBRE #01723333 650.325.6161

Sat/Sun 1 - 4

$500,000

1533 Mcginness Ave Desirable San Jose starter home or investment property with great curb appeal! 3 BR/1 BA Jane Jones CalBRE #01847801 650-271-2845

GIVE WHERE YOU LIVE There are few professions as closely tied to the community as real estate. That’s why Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage is committed to giving back to its local communities—and that extends beyond the walls of its real estate offices. Whether it’s helping groom the McKinley Rose Garden, pounding hammers for Habitat for Humanity, or making children smile with donations to Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Coldwell Banker’s mission is about much more than just real estate. It’s about making friends, enriching lives and enhancing communities.

Menlo Park

$5,000/mo

#GiveWhereYouLive ColdwellBankerHomes.com

504 Sand Hill Cir Executive townhome in prestigious Sharon Heights. Almost 2300sf living space, 400sf garage. 3 BR/2 BA + 1 half BA Julie Lau CalBRE #01052924 650-208-2287

californiahome.me |

/cbcalifornia |

/cb_california |

/cbcalifornia |

/coldwellbanker

©2016 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Real Estate AgentsReserved. affiliated with Coldwell Banker Brokerage licensed are Independent Contractor SalesEstate Associates are not employeesCompany. of Coldwell Banker Real Opportunity. Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC.isCalBRE #01908304. ©2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Coldwell Banker® is aResidential registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real LLC. and An Equal Opportunity Equal Housing Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Owned License by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. BRE License #01908304.

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 33


OPEN SATURDAY 1/16 AND SUNDAY 1/17, 1:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:30

100 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe Street, Menlo Park This stunning contemporary home is a synthesis of design thoughtfulness, structural integrity, and environmental sensitivity. Custom designed by an H^HYK^PUUPUNHYJOP[LJ[[OL^HYTHUKJVTMVY[HISLPU[LYPVYPZĂ&#x201E;SSLK^P[OHUHI\UKHUJLVMUH[\YHSSPNO[,TIYHJLKPUHTVKLYUPZ[PJVWLUKLZPNU[OPZ home provides a California lifestyle in a park-like setting. Private patios, lush grassy space, mature trees, and professional landscaping will allow you [VLUQV`[OLV\[KVVYZ`LHYYV\UK0UZPKL`V\^PSSĂ&#x201E;UK[OLOVTL^PYLKHUKYLHK`MVYHTVKLYUSPMLZ[`SL;OLZ[H[LVM[OLHY[RP[JOLUPZWHY[VM[OLVWLU Ă&#x2026;VVYWSHU[OH[LUJVTWHZZLZHYVVT`KPUPUNHUKSP]PUNHYLHMLH[\YPUNJH[OLKYHSJLPSPUNZ^PUKV^[YHUZVTZHUKHZSLLRHUKZ[`SPZOĂ&#x201E;YLWSHJL ;OLZWHJPV\Z4HZ[LY:\P[LVÉ&#x2C6;LYZHX\PL[YL[YLH[MYVT[OVZLI\Z`KH`ZHUKMLH[\YLZOPZHUKOLYJSVZL[ZHUKZVM[PUZL[3,+SPNO[PUN;OLTHZ[LYIH[O provides dual vanities with a granite countertop, a full size step-in tub, a walk-in shower with separate rainfall and massaging shower heads, and a private commode room. 8\HSP[`Ă&#x201E;UPZOLZOPNOLUKTH[LYPHSZHUKLULYN`LÉ&#x2030;JPLU[JVUZ[Y\J[PVUHYLHSSWHY[VM[OLS\YLVM[OPZIYHUKUL^OVTL

6É&#x2C6;LYLKH[ 

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NEW CONSTRUCTION | 4 BEDS | 3.5 BATHS | GENEROUS 2 CAR GARAGE | 2,794 SQFT* Home - 2202 SQFT | Garage - 592 SQFT | Trellis - 122 SQFT | Porches - 182 SQFT AT A GLANCE * * * *

(SSSPNO[PUNPZ3,+ Anderson Windows throughout the home Structural Foundation exceeds standard specs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cool Roofâ&#x20AC;? Standing Seam Metal Roof excels in LULYN`LÉ&#x2030;JPLUJ` * *\Z[VT)H[O;PSLZHUKĂ&#x201E;UPZOLZPUJS\KPUN.96/, faucets * ,_[LYPVY 0U[LYPVY^HSSZHYL?MYHTPUNHUK insulated * -HTPS`YVVTMLH[\YLZ3HJHU[PUH)P-VSKKVVYZ[V Trellised Patio

* *Va`HUKV]LYZPaLKNHZI\YUPUNĂ&#x201E;YLWSHJLHKKZ[V the warmth * 4\K9VVT^P[O>HZOLY+Y`LYHUKHTWSLZ[VYHNL with private entrance * 3HYNL*HY.HYHNL^P[O/PNO*HWHJP[`=LOPJSL Charging Station * *LU[YHS-VYJLK(PY/LH[PUNHUK(* * -\SS`3HUKZJHWLK^P[OKYV\NO[[VSLYHU[WSHU[PUNZ and â&#x20AC;&#x153;No Mowâ&#x20AC;? lawn * Just blocks from the New, Menlo Park Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ¸<WWLY3H\YLS*HTW\Zš

Tom Boeddiker

Realtor | BRE 00970807

 tboeddiker@yahoo.com ^^^JV^WLY[O^HP[LJVJVT

All information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All other information is acquired from public records or other sources. We advise the buyer to make their own investigations VY[VJVU[HJ[HWYVMLZZPVUHS[V]LYPM`[OLJVYYLJ[ULZZVM[OH[PUMVYTH[PVU7OV[VNYHWO`HUKĂ&#x2026;`LYKLZPNULKI`9PJR9V^SHUK7OV[VNYHWO`^^^9*9WOV[VJVT Page 34 â&#x20AC;˘ January 15, 2016 â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ www.PaloAltoOnline.com


Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com

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P  HONE

650.326.8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

INDEX QBULLETIN

BOARD 100-155 QFOR SALE 200-270 QKIDS STUFF 330-390 QMIND & BODY 400-499 QJ  OBS 500-560 QB  USINESS SERVICES 600-699 QH  OME SERVICES 700-799 QFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 801-899 QP  UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997 The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

fogster.com

TM

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice. Want Cash for Test Strips? Want cash for extra diabetic test strips? I Pay Top Dollar Since 2005! 1 Day Fast Payment Guaranteed Up To $60 Per Box! Free Shipping. www.Cashnowoffer.com or 888-210-5233. Get Extra $10: Use Offer Code: Cashnow! (Cal-SCAN)

Bulletin Board

Piano Lessons Quality Piano Lessons in Menlo Park. Call (650)838-9772 Alita Lake

115 Announcements Pregnant? Considering adoption? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 1-877-879-4709 (CalSCAN) Pregnant? Thinking of adoption? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/ New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN) Beginning Tai Chi Class

135 Group Activities Does dementia stress your family

140 Lost & Found Found: Metal Vice Large, heavy, metal vice found on Shoreline Blvd. end of Dec. To claim, call (650) 969-1551. Trumpet Found

145 Non-Profits Needs

Does dementia stress your family

Does dementia stress your family

FREE BOOK GIVEAWAY AFTER SALE

DONATE BOOKS TO SUPPORT LIBRARY

Learn Banjo, Mandolin, Bluegrass

WISH LIST FRIENDS OF PA LIBRARY

Stanford Museum Volunteer

150 Volunteers

130 Classes & Instruction

NEW YEAR, NEW AVIATION CAREER Get FAA approved Aviation Technician training. Financial aid for qualified. Career placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-231-7177. (Cal-SCAN)

COMMODE In Good Condition - $22.00 Fun! Ring! Toss! - $6.00 N-Scale Model Train 3 Buildings $22.00 each

For Sale Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to Heritage for the Blind. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 800-731-5042 (Cal-SCAN) I Buy Old Porsches Ferrari, Aston Martin, Mercedes and others. op $$ paid. Any condition. Finders™ Fee. Call 707-965-9546 (Cal-SCAN)

Adult Singles/Couples/Solo’s (partners not required)

Older Car, Boat, RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1-800-743-1482 (Cal-SCAN)

http://www.bowsandbeaus.org Info: 650-390-9261; 408-250-7934 Bring your friends!

210 Garage/Estate Sales RWC: 1228 Douglas Ave. Fri. 1/15, 11-2; Sat. 1/16, 9-1 BIG RUMMAGE SALE benefits Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford. (Just south of Woodside Rd., bet. Broadway and Bayshore Fwy.) CASH ONLY. (650) 497-8332 or during sale (650) 568-9840 Pilates Cardiocamp Are you ready for better posture, firm muscles, more energy and flexibility? Take a FREE WEEK on us! Visit: www. PilatesCardiocamp.com NEW Woodside:7amT,Th,F 9am M,W Los Altos: 6am M-Fri, 9am M,T,Th,Fr

133 Music Lessons Christina Conti Private Piano Instruction Lessons in your home. Bachelor of Music. 650/493-6950 Hope Street Music Studios Now on Old Middefield Way, MV. Most instruments, voice. All ages and levels 650-961-2192 www.HopeStreetMusicStudios.com

SAWMILLS from only $4397. Make and Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/ DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (Cal-SCAN)

Charming 1960’s Tin Doll House - $75.00

Fosterers Needed for Cats

CASH FOR CARS We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nationwide Free Pick Up! Call Now: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Classes begin Monday Jan. 18 7:30 p.m. Loyola School 770 Berry Ave., Los Altos Register January 18th or 25th January Classes are FREE!

HOME BREAK-INS take less than 60 SECONDS. Don’t wait! Protect your family, your home, your assets NOW for as little as 70¢ a day! Call 855-404-7601 (Cal-SCAN)

JOIN OUR ONLINE STOREFRONT TEAM

Does dementia stress your family

202 Vehicles Wanted

Learn to Square Dance! Great way to Socialize and Exercise

Dish Network Get MORE for LESS! Starting $19.99/ month (for 12 months.) PLUS Bundle & SAVE (Fast Internet for $15 more/ month.) CALL Now 1-800-357-0810 (Cal-SCAN)

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Become a nature volunteer!

NEW YEAR, NEW AIRLINE CAREERS Get training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Career placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

AT&T U-Verse Internet starting at $15/month or TV and Internet starting at $49/month for 12 months with 1-year agreement. Call 1800-453-0516 to learn more. (Cal-SCAN)

Switch to DirecTV and get a FREE Whole-Home Genie HD/ DVR upgrade. Starting at $19.99/mo. FREE 3 months of HBO, SHOWTIME & STARZ. New Customers Only. Don’t settle for cable. Call Now 1-800-385-9017. (Cal-SCAN)

ASST SECTION MGRS FOR FOPAL

Medical Office Assistant Medical billing skills in demand! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training can get you job ready! HS Diploma/GED and PC/Internet needed! 1-888-424-9412. (Cal-SCAN)

245 Miscellaneous

N-Scale Model Train Cars - $12.00 Each Nice! Like New! Transport Chair $150.00

Kid’s Stuff 330 Child Care Offered 345 Tutoring/ Lessons Did you know 7 IN 10 Americans or 158 million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6019 or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

Mind & Body 417 Groups

425 Health Services CPAP/BIPAP Supplies at little or no cost from Allied Medical Supply Network! Fresh supplies delivered right to your door. Insurance may cover all costs. 800-421-4309. (Cal-SCAN)

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS Up to $35/Box! Sealed & Unexpired. Payment Made SAME DAY. Highest Prices Paid!! Call Juley Today! 800-413-3479. www. CashForYourTestStrips.com (Cal-SCAN)

500 Help Wanted

ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-703-9774. (Cal-SCAN)

636 Insurance Health & Dental Insurance Lowest Prices. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888-989-4807. (CalSCAN)

640 Legal Services DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s hostile business climate? Gain the edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the FREE One-Month Trial Smart Search Feature. For more information call Elizabeth @ (916) 288-6019 or www.capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN) Xarelto Users have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don’t have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1-800-425-4701. (Cal-SCAN)

Dry Cleaners Experienced counter person needed immediately for Drycleaners in Palo Alto. Full time. Call (650) 329-0998. TECHNICAL Informatica LLC is accepting resumes for the following positions in Redwood City, CA: Technical Support Engineer (RCLGU): Serve as Technical Support champion for both internal and external customers. Please mail resumes with job title and reference Job Code # to Informatica LLC, ATTN: Global Mobility, 2100 Seaport Blvd., Redwood City, CA 94063. No phone calls please. Must be legally authorized to work in the U.S. without sponsorship. EOE.

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.TheIncomeHub.com (AAN CAN) New Year - New Career

Nice Repo Antique Wood Radio - $30.00

235 Wanted to Buy

Jobs

Drivers: OTR Drivers Federal Government Delivery Services is looking for exceptional OTR drivers. 2 years experience. Great employee benefits and 0.60/loaded, 0.40/unloaded. Call (574) 584-7253 x1110 (Cal-SCAN)

child care offered

N-Scale Model Train Cars - $12.00 Each Sweet Antique Bisque Doll + - $40.00

Safe Step Walk-In Tub! Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN)

Drivers - $2K Sign-On Bonus! Make $55k a Year. Great Benefits + 401K. Paid Orientation + Tuitiion Reimb. CDL-A Req - (877) 258-8782 drive4melton.com (Cal-SCAN)

N-Scale Model Train 3 Buildings $22.00 each

Charming 1960’s Tin Doll House - $75.00

Life Alert 24/7. One press of a button sends help FAST! Medical, Fire, Burglar. Even if you can’t reach a phone! FREE Brochure. CALL 800-714-1609.(Cal-SCAN)

560 Employment Information

Did You Know 144 million U.S. Adults read a Newspaper print copy each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6019 or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

215 Collectibles & Antiques

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a painrelieving brace -little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1- 800-796-5091 (Cal-SCAN)

Business Services 624 Financial Owe $10K+ to IRS? Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Call now 855-993-5796 (Cal-SCAN) Social Security Disability benefits. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-966-1904 to start your application today! (Cal-SCAN) Structured Settlement Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW. You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-673-5926 (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services 701 AC/Heating Every Business Has A Story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release - the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Elizabeth @ 916-288-6019 or http://prmediarelease.com/california (Cal-SCAN)

715 Cleaning Services Orkopina Housecleaning Celebrating 30 years cleaning homes in your area. 650/962-1536

748 Gardening/ Landscaping J. Garcia Garden Maintenance Service Free est. 21 years exp. 650/366-4301 or 650/346-6781 LANDA’S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maint. *New Lawns. *Rototil *Clean Ups *Tree Trim *Power Wash *Irrigation timer programming. 19 yrs exp. Ramon, 650/576-6242 landaramon@yahoo.com R.G. Landscape Drought tolerant native landscapes and succulent gardens. Demos, installations, maint. Free est. 650/468-8859

751 General Contracting A NOTICE TO READERS: It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

754 Gutter Cleaning Roofs, Gutters, Downspouts cleaning. Work guar. 30 years exp. Insured. Veteran Owned. Jim Thomas Maintenance, 408/595-2759.

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go to fogster.com to respond to ads without phone numbers www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 35


“Worst of Pop Culture, 2015”--a year to remember.

Matt Jones

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757 Handyman/ Repairs

781 Pest Control

(650) 453-3002

759 Hauling J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc. junk, office, gar., furn., mattresses, green waste, more. Lic./ins. Free est. 650/743-8852 (see my Yelp reviews)

Answers on page 37

Across 1 Muppet with an orange nose 5 Certain physical measurement, for short 8 “___ first you don’t succeed ...” 12 Short, shrill sound 13 ___ fro 15 “___ arigato, Mr. Roboto” 16 Poultry herb 17 Nomadic mob 18 Class with graphs, for short 19 2015 superhero film reboot with a 9% score on Rotten Tomatoes 22 Iggy Azalea/Britney Spears collaboration, listed on Entertainment Weekly’s Worst Singles of 2015 23 “Mission: Impossible” character Hunt 25 “Full,” at a theater 26 Hatha and bikram, for two 29 Weather map lines 31 Get hold of again 32 Feline tooth 33 President who’s thanked a lot? 37 College in New Rochelle, New York 38 “Oh, yeah!” 39 Santa-tracking defense gp. 40 Paper wounds 41 Canadian vocal tics that aren’t as commonplace as Americans think 42 Doesn’t say outright 44 Little ___ (“Languages for Kids” learning series) 45 Short-lived Rainn Wilson cop show, listed on Yahoo’s Worst TV Shows of 2015 47 Change places with one’s wrestling teammate 50 ___ of Sauron 51 Seafood selections 55 Power shake need 57 Rooster’s morning perch 59 Choir 60 Mix it up (var.) 61 2015 Adam Sandler movie that got an epic ten-minute review/ rant from “MovieBob Reviews” on YouTube

62 Much-maligned 2015 reality show which put contestant couples in the titular enclosure (later to be interviewed by therapists) Down 1 Some CDs 2 Nissan hybrid 3 Cones of non-silence? 4 Cattle site 5 Gives a leg up to 6 Sacrificial figure 7 Part of Roy G. Biv 8 Visionary 9 Market research panel 10 Love, in Xochimilco 11 Massive quantity 13 “Yeah, about ___ ...” 14 Prefix meaning “one-tenth” 20 It’s designed to stay up all night 21 “Punky Brewster” star Soleil Moon ___ 23 Trinket in “The Hunger Games” 24 Totally destroy 27 “___ a stinker?” (Bugs Bunny catchphrase) 28 Back twinge 30 Hedgehog of Sega fame 31 “M*A*S*H” character 34 Nutsoid 35 Like craft shows 36 High degree 42 “Messiah” composer 43 In the future 45 Go nuts with a whole season, e.g. 46 “Fantastic” character in a Roald Dahl novel 47 1/16 of a cup, briefly 48 Et ___ (and others) 49 Baby boomer followers 52 Get from ___ (make progress) 53 Doofus 54 Glasses, in comic book ads 56 Hosp. locations 58 Cries of surprise

Portola Valley - $5,200.00 Redwood City - $4,500.00 Attic Clean-Up & Rodent Removal Are you in the Bay Area? Do you have squeaky little terrors living in your attic or crawlspace? What you are looking for is right here! Call Attic Star now to learn about our rodent removal services and cleaning options. You can also get us to take out your old, defunct insulation and install newer, better products. Call (866) 391-3308 now and get your work done in no time!

771 Painting/ Wallpaper Glen Hodges Painting Call me first! Senior discount. 45 yrs. #351738. 650/322-8325 STYLE PAINTING Full service. Interior/exterior. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

775 Asphalt/ Concrete

Real Estate 805 Homes for Rent

Roe General Engineering Asphalt, concrete, pavers, tiles, sealing, artificial turf. 36 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703. 650/814-5572

Menlo Park - $5,000.00 Menlo Park, 3 BR/2 BA - $5,200.00 Menlo Park, 3 BR/2 BA - $5,000.00 Mtn View Townhome For Rent, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $3495 / mo

Classified Deadlines:

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845 Out of Area

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Since 1985 Repairs • Maintenance • Painting Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical Lic. #468963

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Redwood City (emerald Hills), 4 BR/3.5 BA - $5500 Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $4,800.00 Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $5,500

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

Fogster.com is a unique website offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly.

4 homes on 30 acres Vacation where you live in Nevada City!! Looks like Disneyland with rock walls, manicured gardens, private lake, HUGE outdoor entertaining area and even its own mining museum!! 15 car garages for all your toys!! Priced to sell only $2M!! Seller financing. Call Edie 530-913-0150 cell

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage Great Investment Opportunity !

855 Real Estate Services DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s highly competitive market? Gain an edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the Smart Search Feature. For more information call Elizabeth @ (916) 288-6019 or www.capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN)

THINK GLOBALLY POST LOCALLY THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE Fogster.com

This week’s SUDOKU

is a unique website offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in The Almanac, the Palo Alto Weekly, and the Mountain View Voice. To respond to ads without phone numbers Go to www.Fogster.Com Answers on page 37

www.sudoku.name

Page 36 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM

Public Notices 995 Fictitious Name Statement NextFlex Flexible Hybrid Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute FHE-IMI FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 611936 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: 1.) NextFlex, 2.) Flexible Hybrid Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute, 3.) FHE-IMI, located at 3081 Zanker Road, San Jose, CA 95134, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): FlexTech Alliance, Inc. 3081 Zanker Road San Jose, CA 95134 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 12/1/2015. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 10, 2015. (PAW Dec. 25, 2015, Jan. 1, 8, 15, 2016) GIG CRICKET FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 612044 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: GIG Cricket, located at 1111 Story Road, Unit 1077, San Jose, CA 95122, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Limited Liability Company. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): GIG TELECOMMUNICATIONS LLC 1225 Judah St. San Francisco, CA 94122 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 04/16/2015. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 15, 2015. (PAW Dec. 25, 2015, Jan. 1, 8, 15, 2016) 1 ACCEPTANCE TESTING FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 612019 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: 1 Acceptance Testing, located at 4410 Casa Madeira Ln., San Jose, CA 95127, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): PAUL SMITH 4410 Casa Madeira Ln. San Jose, CA 95127 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 11/09/15. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 14, 2015. (PAW Dec. 25, 2015, Jan. 1, 8, 15, 2016) Flight VC Flight Ventures FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 611985 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: 1.) Flight VC, 2.) Flight Ventures, located at 2625 Middlefield Rd. #880880, Palo Alto, CA 94306, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Limited Liability Company. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): UPRISING CAPITAL, LLC 2625 Middlefield Rd., #880 Palo Alto, CA 94306 GIL PENCHINA 2625 Middlefield Rd., #880 Palo Alto, CA 94306 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 10/01/2015. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 11, 2015. (PAW Dec. 25, 2015, Jan. 1, 8, 15, 2016) CAMRAN NEZHAT INSTITUTE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 612226 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Camran Nezhat Institute, located at 900 Welch Rd., Ste. 403, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): ENDOSCOPY AND FERTILITY CENTER, A MEDICAL CORPORATION

900 Welch Rd., Ste. 403 Palo Alto, CA 94303 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 17, 2015. (PAW Jan. 8, 15, 22, 29, 2016) Amity CrossFit FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 612439 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Amity CrossFit, located at 3516 El Camino Real, Palo Alto, CA 94306, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Limited Liability Company. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): HEIGHT PERFORMANCE, LLC 686 Emily Drive Mountain View, CA 94043 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on December 1, 2015. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 29, 2015. (PAW Jan. 8, 15, 22, 29, 2016) ZEST LIMOUSINE SERVICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 612356 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Zest Limousine Service, located at 2464 El Camino Real #250, Santa Clara, CA 95051, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): FODHIL ZERROUKI 1360 Jefferson St., Apt. #A Santa Clara, CA 95050 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 12/23/2015. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 23, 2015. (PAW Jan. 8, 15, 22, 29, 2016) SHARETEA PALO ALTO FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 612788 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Sharetea Palo Alto, located at 540 Bryant Street, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Limited Liability Company. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): KJY Brothers, LLC 507 15th Ave. San Francisco, CA 94118 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 8, 2016. (PAW Jan. 15, 22, 29, Feb. 5, 2016)

997 All Other Legals Trustee Sale No. : 20130015000746 Title Order No.: 130057825 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 01/06/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 01/12/2006 as Instrument No. 18766170 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of SANTA CLARA County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: EDWARD J MORTON, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/ CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 01/28/2016 TIME OF SALE: 10:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE GATED NORTH MARKET STREET ENTRANCE TO THE SUPERIOR COURTHOUSE AT 190 N. MARKET STREET, SAN JOSE, CA.. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2040 W MIDDLEFIELD RD # 32, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIFORNIA 94043 APN#: 153-07-032 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by

said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $775,501.07. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 916-939-0772 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site www. nationwideposting.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20130015000746. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: NATIONWIDE POSTING & PUBLICATION A DIVISION OF FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 1180 IRON POINT ROAD, SUITE 100 FOLSOM, CA 95630 916-939-0772 www.nationwideposting. com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 12/22/2015 NPP0268020 To: PALO ALTO WEEKLY 01/08/2016, 01/15/2016, 01/22/2016 T. S. No: B547168 CA Unit Code: B Loan No: 0535446269/STASKUS/RICHARD J. Min No: 100242400000162345 AP #1: 175-24-001 13721 ROBLEDA ROAD, LOS ALTOS HILLS, CA 94022 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.D. SERVICE COMPANY, as duly appointed Trustee under the following described Deed of Trust WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (in the forms which are lawful tender in the United States) and/or the cashier’s, certified or other checks specified in Civil Code Section 2924h (payable in full at the time of sale to T.D. Service Company) all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property hereinafter described: Trustor: Richard J. Staskus, An Unmarried Man Recorded March 14, 2007 as Instr. No. 19341828 in Book —- Page —- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Santa Clara County; California , pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded March 4, 2015 as Instr. No. 22873190 in Book —- Page —- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Santa Clara County California. You ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED MARCH 1, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. 13721 ROBLEDA ROAD, LOS ALTOS HILLS, CA 94022 (If a street address or common designation of property is shown above, no warranty is given as to its completeness or correctness).” Said Sale of property will be made in “as

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TM

is” condition without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest as in said note provided, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. Said sale will be held on: JANUARY 28, 2016, AT 10:00 A.M. *AT THE NORTH MARKET STREET ENTRANCE OF THE SUPERIOR COURTHOUSE, 190 N. MARKET STREET, SAN JOSE, CA 95113 At the time of the initial publication of this notice, the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the above described Deed of Trust and estimated costs, expenses, and advances is $534,559.41. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (888) 988-6736 or visit this Internet Web site: salestrack.tdsf. com, using the file number assigned to this case B547168 B. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Date: December 29, 2015 T.D. SERVICE COMPANY as said Trustee Cheryl L. Grech, Assistant Secretary T.D. Service Company 4000 W. Metropolitan Drive, Suite 400 Orange, CA 92868-0000 The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (888) 988-6736 or you may access sales information at salestrack.tdsf.com, TAC# 985962 PUB: 01/08/16, 01/15/16, 01/22/16 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RICHARD BEYER WITSCHONKE Case No.: 115 PR 177735 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of RICHARD BEYER WITSCHONKE. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: HEIDI L. BECKER in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: HEIDI L. BECKER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take

many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 1, 2016 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept.: 10 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request

for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Robert J. Lanzone 1001 Laurel Street, Suite A San Carlos, CA 94070 (650)453-3117 (PAW Jan. 15, 22, 29, 2016) NOTICE OF DEATH OF HORACE CULMER BANKS, II To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of HORACE CULMER BANKS, II, who was a resident of Santa Clara County, State of California, and died on November 26, 2015, in the City of Palo Alto, County of Santa Clara, State of California. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim within four months from the date of first publication with the DERMER LAW FIRM, 15720 Winchester Boulevard, Suite 200, Los Gatos, California 95030 (408) 395-5111. Joseph D. Dermer, Esq. DERMER LAW FIRM 15720 Winchester Boulevard, Suite 200 Los Gatos, CA 95030 Tel (408) 395-5111 Fax (408) 354-2797 (PAW Jan. 15, 22, 29, 2016) Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy The Children’s Center of the Stanford Community admits children of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to children at the center. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its education policies,scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other center administered programs. (PAW Jan. 15, 2016)

Answers to this week’s puzzles, which can be found on page 36.

Free. Fun. Only about Palo Alto. C R O S S W O R D S

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 37


Sports Shorts

WOMEN’S WATER POLO

Stanford all set to defend

A NO. 3 FINISH . . . The ugly loss to Northwestern to start the season is all but forgotten by the Stanford football team, which climbed to No. 3 in the final Associated Press Top 25 Poll on Monday night. It was the Cardinal’s highest finish since the poll has been conducting post-bowls (1968) and the secondhighest in program history to the No. 2 mark achieved in 1940 by Clark Shaughnessy’s 10-0 squad. While Jim Harbaugh’s 2010 Stanford team finished 12-1 for the best 12win season in program history, the Cardinal finished No. 4 in the final AP Top 25 that year. Thus, this season’s 12-2 finish and No. 3 national ranking is the perhaps the third best only to the national titles won in 1926 and 1940 when Stanford went 10-0-1 under Pop Warner and 10-0 under Shaughnessy. There was no AP rankings in 1926, though, and Minnesota was named No. 1 in 1940 by AP while Stanford was regarded as No. 1 by three other polls. Bottom line, 2015 was historic for Stanford football as head coach David Shaw guided the Cardinal to its third 12-win season, the second time he has done so. He also was 12-2 in 2012 when Stanford finished No. 7 according to AP.

ON THE AIR Sunday Women’s basketball: Stanford at Oregon St., 6 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks; KZSU (90.1 FM)

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, visit www.PASportsOnline.com

A

Pederson and Emily Tomz. Queen got the winner, off an assist from Preising. The Paly boys, meanwhile, remained in sole possession of first place in the SCVAL De Anza Division following a 3-1 win over host Gunn in a night match. The Vikings moved to 3-0 in league (8-0-1 overall), the lone tie coming in the championship match of the Oak Grove Tournament that Paly won in penalty kicks. Against the Titans, senior Dami Bolarinwa got

s far as junior driver Jamie Neushul and coach John Tanner are concerned, the women’s water polo season that begins Saturday morning against Pacific at San Jose State’s Lou Strong Memorial Invitational is just another season. So what if Stanford (25-2 last year), the two-time defending NCAA champion, will be without senior All-Americans Maggie Steffens and Gabby Stone, and so what if one of its top recruits deferred her enrollment for a year? Steffens, Stone and future Cardinal Makenzie Fischer are all with the U.S. National Team as it prepares for the 2016 Rio Olympics and defending its Olympic gold medal. “We haven’t talked about losing people,” said Neushul, an AllAmerican honorable mention the past two years. “It’s more about gaining people who will step into new roles. I think we’ll be finding out about ourselves along the way.” Tanner, in his 18th season at the helm, has been through it before. He won a national championship in 2012 in virtually the same situation. At that time it was Steffens who deferred and All-Americans Annika Dries and Melissa Seidemann who took the year off. “If you look through our games last year, you’ll find that we used 12 to 14 players throughout the early part of the season,” Tanner said. “It’s not like we got to the fall of 2015 and looked at the roster. There’s always a mix of the future and present. These guys have earned the opportunity and they come here knowing more and more will be expected of them each year.” The returning players have been through it at least once, and the freshmen were at Stanford when the Cardinal beat UCLA, 7-6, in last year’s championship match. “They’ve spent seven or eight years getting themselves in position to get here,” Tanner said. “When Jamie was a freshman going through the NCAA experience, she was not overwhelmed by the big stage.” Stanford went 14-0 at home last year, extending its home winning streak to 29 games. The Cardinal has not lost an Mountain Pacific Sports Federation game since 2009, a stretch of 39 straight regular-season conference outings. Stanford opens the year as the nation’s top-ranked team and the choice to win the MPSF title.

(continued on next page)

(continued on next page)

Palo Alto junior Tess Preising (7) prepares to leap over the prone Milpitas keeper during first-half action Wednesday as the Vikings posted an 8-0 win. Preising had one goal and one assist for the unbeaten Vikings.

It’s a near-perfect start Palo Alto soccer teams are a combined 16-0-1 with shots at very special seasons by Keith Peters he Central Coast Section soccer playoffs have been held for nearly four decades, but the Palo Alto boys and girls have played in a championship match in the same year only once. That was in 2009. The Paly boys settled for a cotitle with Bellarmine after the teams battled to a scoreless stalemate. Instead of taking penalty kicks, it was decided that the teams share the crown. The Paly girls, meanwhile, lost to Monta Vista, 2-1, in their CCS Division I finale. If the two Palo Alto teams are ever going to win section titles in the same year, this would be a good time. The boys are loaded with veteran experience, including 10 seniors, while the girls have UCLAbound Jacey Pederson for one final time. Perhaps not too surprisingly, the Vikings are off to a near-perfect start to the 2015-16 season with the teams combining for 16 victories and just one tie following another pair of victories on Wednesday. The Paly girls scored six times in the first half on the way to an 8-0 romp over visiting Milpitas as senior Alison Lu scored three goals and assisted once. The Vikings improved to 3-0 in the SCVAL De Anza Division (8-0 overall) heading into Friday’s showdown at co-leader Mountain View at 3:30 p.m. The game is a rematch of last season’s CCS Division I title match that was won by the Spartans, 3-2. Palo Alto will bring a high-scoring offense into the match, one that has outscored the opposition by 34-2 this season. In addition to Lu’s standout effort against last-place Milpitas, Paly got single goals from Ansley Queen, Tess Preising, Claire Moley,

T

Page 38 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Keith Peters

SOCCER DRAFT . . . Stanford senior captain Brandon Vincent became the second-highest Cardinal selection in MLS SuperDraft history when he was tabbed with the fourth overall pick by the Chicago Fire at the Baltimore Convention Center in Baltimore, Md., on Thursday morning. Vincent is the seventh Stanford player taken in the first round and second under head coach Jeremy Gunn, following JJ Koval going ninth to the San Jose Earthquakes in 2014. Chad Marshall, who went No. 2 to the Columbus Crew in 2004, and Ryan Nelsen, another fourth overall selection by D.C. United in 2001, are the only other Cardinal to go in the draft’s top five.

by Rick Eymer

Keith Peters

SANDERS TO LEAVE . . . Stanford senior Barry J. Sanders has announced his intention to transfer and use his final year of college eligibility elsewhere, with his father’s alma mater — Oklahoma State — prominently mentioned as the frontrunner. Sanders (5-10, 198) rushed for 315 yards and four touchdowns on 51 carries this season for the Cardinal, which won the Rose Bowl Game and finished 12-2. He rushed for 672 yards on 115 carries in his three years. He used his redshirt year as a freshman.

Despite loss of players to national team, Cardinal is optimistic

Palo Alto senior Alison Lu (left) had three goals and an assist.


Stanford women hope to build basketball momentum on the road by Rick Eymer aylee Johnson may have a special place in her basketball heart for starting, though she gives No. 11 Stanford all the right answers whether starting or coming off the bench. Cardinal women’s basketball coach Tara VanDerveer hopes that trend continues. Stanford (3-1 in the Pac-12) opens a four-game road trip Friday at Oregon (0-4, 11-4) at 6 p.m., a game to be televised by the Pac-12 Networks. The Cardinal plays at No. 12 Oregon State at 6 p.m. Sunday. Johnson will be looking to continue her recent success. She’s produced all four of her doubledigit scoring games — and both of her double-doubles — in the past eight games, all while coming off the bench. Johnson scored a career-high 17 points and had 11 rebounds in Sunday’s 71-56 victory over Colorado. She also blocked two shots and recorded a team-leading four assists. “When I start on the bench I can see what is going on,” Johnson said. “I just try to bring energy and to be aggressive.” Johnson averaged 1.1 points on 22.2 percent shooting, 4.5 rebounds and 14.4 minutes in her seven starts. Since coming off the

K

Prep soccer (continued from previous page

Paly on board first after he picked up a deflection off a shot by junior Jack Stoksik that had hit the post. In the second half, junior Michel-Ange Siaba took a pass from Stoksik and placed it past a diving Gunn keeper. Momentum then swung in Gunn’s favor after a Paly defender and Gunn forward got tangled up just outside the penalty box. The referee gave Gunn a direct kick and the Paly player a red card. Jacob Steinman took the direct kick for Gunn and placed a nice cross to Aymon Klem, who headed it past Paly keeper Eli Friedlander. With Paly a man down, Gunn temporarily grabbed the momentum and pushed hard for the equalizer. Paly regrouped and took the attack to the Titans once again. Max Hallberg took a shot by Bolarinwa that was deflected and found the back of the net for a 3-1 lead. “This was a good, overall effort and we played much better, and with more intensity, in the second half,” said Paly coach Don Briggs. In the West Bay Athletic League, the Menlo School boys charged into the second half and rolled past visiting Harker, 3-0. The Knights (1-1-1, 5-3-1) broke a 0-0 halftime tie when senior striker Will Chisholm took a feed from junior Daniel Hausen six minutes into the second half to give the Knights all the scoring they would need. Chisholm scored his second goal six minutes later on a beautiful pass from

bench, she’s averaging 7.4 points on 81.3 percent shooting, 5.4 rebounds and 18.4 minutes. Lili Thompson scored 12 points, which included her 1,000th career point. The Cardinal heads to Oregon having won seven of its last eight games. Men’s volleyball No. 11 Stanford continues its road trip, playing at top-ranked BYU on Friday and Saturday, with both matches scheduled for 6 p.m. starts. The Cardinal (2-0) opened the year with a pair of victories at Ball State and IPFW, matching last year’s total for road wins. The Cougars also won their first two matches. Senior James Shaw controlled the offense, which hit .360 as a team, averaging 11.29 assists per set over the weekend. Senior Madison Hayden recorded 4.43 kills, 2.29 digs and 5.29 points per set to pace the squad. Redshirt junior Gabriel Vega added 3.71 kills per set, while Conrad Kaminski notched 2.43 kills and 1.43 blocks per set. Men’s gymnastics Juniors Akash Modi and Taylor Seaton each won two individual events and the third-ranked Stanford men’s gymnastics team the left side from Will Bleicher. Sophomore Dylan Williams posted his third goal of the week when he sent a pass from Chisholm into the net with 19 minutes left in the game. Williams scored twice against Terra Nova on Monday. Also in Atherton, the Sacred Heart Prep boys remained in the thick of the WBAL race following a 1-0 victory over visiting Eastside Prep. The Gators (1-1-1, 4-43) to the winning goal in the first half from Josh Lin, following an assist from Connor Johnston. In the PAL Bay Division, the Menlo-Atherton boys remained tied atop the standings following a 3-1 victory over host Sequoia. The Bears (3-0, 7-1) grabbed a 1-0 halftime lead on a goal by Ethan Oro, with Kyle Smith assisting. Smith made it 2-0 on an assist from Quinn Rowland before Jean Claverie tallied M-A’s final goal with Oro assisting. The victory was the sixth straight for the Bears. Girls soccer Sacred Heart Prep and Menlo School both had rough soccer preseasons as the local rivals combined for a very lackluster 4-6-3 record. Fortunately for both, preseason matches are behind them. The WBAL Foothill Division season opened for both on Tuesday and each squad responded in kind with shutout victories. The defending champion Gators rolled to an 8-0 victory over visiting Harker while the Knights posted a 2-0 triumph over nemesis King’s Academy in Sunnyvale. Sacred Heart Prep (1-0, 4-4)

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

beat visiting No. 7 California, 436.650-423.900, Monday night in the season-opening match for both schools. Modi set a career best in floor, scoring 15.700, en route to the all-around title for the Cardinal, which will be in action again Saturday at the Cal Benefit Cup in Berkeley. Women’s gymnastics Stanford’s Elizabeth Price was named the Pac-12 Gymnast of the Week for her outstanding performance this past weekend at the season-opening NorCal Classic at San Jose State. Performing in the all-around for the second time in her career, Price swept the individual event victories with meet-best scores in vault (9.850), bars (9.900), beam (9.850) and floor (9.900). She earned the all-around title with a final score of 39.500. Wrestling No. 18 Stanford won two matches Saturday, beating host San Francisco State, 30-11, and then stopping off at Menlo College for a 42-6 win. The Cardinal also took down Cal Baptist, 25-10, on Friday. Stanford (5-2) hosts Utah Valley on Friday at 6:30 p.m. and Duke on Saturday at 1 p.m. Q took care of business quickly as senior Tierna Davidson scored the first of her three goals in the ninth minute, off an assist from sophomore Mia Shenk. Junior Cameron Gordon added a pair of goals while Shenk scored once and assisted three times. Menlo (1-0, 2-2-3) also put things away in the first half against King’s Academy as junior Claire McFarland took a volley from senior Zoe Enright in the 30th minute to give the Knights all the scoring they would need. Enright scored six minutes later on a free kick. In another WBAL Foothill Division match, Castilleja (0-1, 1-52) dropped a 2-1 division opener to host Notre Dame-San Jose at Watson Park in San Jose. Sarah Abramowitz tallied the Gators’ goal on an assist from Julia Lodoen. In WBAL Skyline Division play, host Priory (1-0, 3-1) handed Eastside Prep a 4-2 loss in Portola Valley. Freshman Stephanie Sanchez had two goals, including the game-winner. Brenda Uribe scored in the first half and assisted on both goals by Sanchez. At Skyline College, Mercy-Burlingame defeated visiting Pinewood, 2-0. The Panthers dropped to 0-1 in league (4-5-1 overall). In the PAL Bay Division, Menlo-Atherton battled host Burlingame to a 1-1 stalemate. In other girls’ soccer action, Gunn fell further back in the SCVAL El Camino Division soccer race following a 1-0 loss to host Lynbrook on Wednesday. The Titans dropped to 1-2 in league (3-5 overall). Q

Chelsea Wilson

Jack Stoksik

MENLO-ATHERTON HIGH

PALO ALTO HIGH

The junior wrestler compiled a 5-0 mark with four pins and a 5-0 decision in the finals while not allowing a single point on her way to winning the 106-pound division at the prestigious girls’ Napa Valley Classic.

The junior forward scored the winning goal in a 1-0 soccer victory over host Los Gatos and added both goals in a 2-0 triumph over Homestead as the Vikings grabbed control of the SCVAL De Anza Division race.

Honorable mention Riley Hemm* Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Greer Hoyem Menlo-Atherton basketball

Hannah Jump Pinewood basketball

Ofa Sili Menlo-Atherton basketball

Nika Woodfill Palo Alto soccer

Zoe Zaharias Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Nathan Beak Pinewood basketball

Lucas Fioretti Menlo-Atherton basketball

Eli Friedlander Palo Alto soccer

Andy Maltz Gunn wrestling

Mason Randall* Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Miles Tention Palo Alto basketball * previous winner

Watch video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to PASportsOnline.com

Water polo (continued from previous page)

Neushul, along with junior Dani Jackovich, is the Cardinal’s top returning scorer. The two are among six players who scored at least 20 goals and are back this year. The list also includes senior co-captain Gurpreet Sohi, sophomore honorable mention AllAmerican Jordan Raney, senior Anna Yelizarova and sophomore Katie Dudley. “We’re going to see different players step up on different days,” Neushul said. “We’ll go with the hot hand. That could be anybody.” Senior co-captain Rachel Johnson also reached double figures in scoring and five others return with at least one goal scored: sophomore Shannon Cleary, junior Sophia Monaghan, junior Cassidy Papa, sophomore Natalie Chun and sophomore Lauren Norheim. Redshirt sophomore Julia Hermann, who has 12 career saves, will step in as the goalie in the absence of Stone and the graduation of M-A grad Emily Dorst. “She hasn’t played in a while but she is stepping up every day,” Neushul said. Stanford represented the United

States in water polo at the World University Games in South Korea over the summer, giving the players time to get to know each other. “It helped shift our mindset to focus on the new players,” Neushul said. “We learned a lot about each other. We didn’t do as well as we hoped but in the long run, it will help.” Neushul’s older sister, Kiley, who graduated from Stanford (with Ashley Grossman and both are with the national team) after a superlative career that included a Player of the Year honor and All-American accolades, was a freshman in 2012, when the Cardinal won a national title with Dries, Seidemann and Steffens in attendance. While Fischer is a year away, a five-member freshmen class certainly enhances Stanford’s chance to return to the NCAA title match. Madison Berggren and Kat Klass were teammates with Raney and Fischer on the U.S. Youth National Team that earned a gold medal at the world championships in 2014. Berggren joined Fischer on the national team this past summer. Sophia Stefan, Mackenzie Wiley and Cassidy Wiley have each been involved in the U.S. national program. Q

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 15, 2016 • Page 39


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Page 40 • January 15, 2016 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Palo Alto Weekly January 15, 2016  
Palo Alto Weekly January 15, 2016