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Vol. XXXV, Number 35

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June 6, 2014

Student says Stanford mishandled sexual assault case Page 5

Meet Max McGee, Palo Alto’s new schools superintendent PAGE 42

The

entrepreneurial

educator Transitions 17

Spectrum 18

Eating Out 34

Shop Talk 35

Movies 36

Seniors 38

Puzzles 70

NArts High-tech muralist goes with the ow

Page 21

NHome Emergency preparedness: Are you ready?

Page 48

NSports Final laps for prep track standouts

Page 72

    

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Upfront

Local news, information and analysis

Student challenges Stanford’s handling of sexual-assault case Senior alleges administration mishandled case after she was assaulted off campus by Elena Kadvany

A

21-year-old Stanford University student is challenging the administration’s handling of a sexual-assault case she reported at the beginning of this year, alleging the investigation has taken more than twice as long as the 60 days recommended under federal law and that the consequences imposed on her as-

sailant fall short of his crime. Leah Francis, an English major from Alaska, said she was sexually assaulted off campus Jan. 1 by another Stanford student, a man with whom she had a previous romantic relationship but was not dating at the time. She reported the assault to the university on Jan. 7 and for the next five months

waited for the administration to take action through its Alternative Review Process (ARP), a disciplinary procedure designated for serious allegations of misconduct relating to sexual assault, sexual harassment, relationship violence or stalking. “It’s been a five-month nightmare where I haven’t been able to do anything but either be in the process of frantically trying to produce a document or be in some kind of interim where I’m waiting for some kind of terrifying answer

or judgment,� Francis said. The male student, whom Francis has been instructed by the university not to name due to confidentiality issues, was formally notified on April 9 that he was being charged with violating the university’s sexual-assault policy, according to an appeal of his sanctions that Francis later issued. On April 25, a fivemember ARP panel reviewing the case issued its “determination of responsibility,� voting 4-1 for sexual assault, 5-0 for sexual misconduct and 5-0 for violating the university’s

Fundamental Standard, a policy that governs student behavior both within and outside of Stanford, according to Francis’ appeal. On May 6, the ARP reviewers handed down a determination of sanctions, suspending the student for five quarters beginning this summer as well as requiring him to complete 40 hours of community service and participate in an educational program on sexualassault awareness. Though it was ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂŤ>}iĂŠÂŁĂŽÂŽ

PUBLIC WORKS

City scraps neighborhood trash experiment Palo Alto looks to link trash collection to broader plan for a waste-to-energy plant by Gennady Sheyner and Sue Dremann

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Six-year-old Hadi Abukhadra laughs as he walks and holds hands with his members of his host family — Bayan Nada, left, and her mom, Salam Nada — at Stanford Children’s Health Specialty Services in Menlo Park. Abukhadra’s mom, Sherine, far left, looks on.

MEDICINE

Palestinian boy walks for first time after treatment at Lucile Packard Six-year-old suffered from extreme orthopedic deformities, can now walk and go to school

S

ix-year-old Hadi Abukhadra is able to walk for the first time in his life, thanks to surgery and rehabilitation at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital — treatment that he traveled 7,500 miles to receive. Hadi, who is from the Tulkarem refugee camp in the West Bank of Palestine, was born with arthrogryposis, which causes “stuck� joints and orthopedic deformities. His knees

by Christina Dong bent the wrong way and his feet faced upside down, but with help from the Palestine Children’s Relief Fund (PCRF), he can now take his first steps and begin attending school. Before treatment, Hadi’s condition left him the options of crawling or being carried. With his feet facing the wrong direction, standing created large abscesses on his ankles and his knees hyperextended such that

his lower leg could swing forward but not bend backward. Hadi and his mother, Sherine, arrived in the United States last fall in preparation for the lifechanging surgeries to be led by orthopedic surgeon Lawrence Rinsky of the Stanford School of Medicine. Hadi’s care — including surgery, rehabilitation and host stays — was arranged ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂŤ>}iĂŠÂŁxÂŽ

pilot program to reduce residents’ trash and make the sorting of waste simpler in one south Palo Alto neighborhood has concluded, and the results, according to a staff report, were decidedly mixed. The city last year experimented with trash carts in the Greenmeadow neighborhood, where residents were asked to switch from using black (garbage), blue (recyclables) and green (yard waste) carts to a new system with only blue and green carts. People placed both recyclable goods and landfill-bound trash in the blue bin, with the garbage bagged separately from the recyclables. The green cart took bagged yard trimmings and bagged food scraps. The black cart was eliminated. The goals of the experiment, which the City Council’s Finance Committee discussed Tuesday, was threefold: to divert more landfill-bound garbage into the compostables bin; to lessen greenhouse gases by reducing the number of trips by trucks picking up and hauling the garbage; and to make the sorting of waste simpler and thereby changing people’s behaviors. Among the program’s chief virtues was the fact that the city would, for the first time, collect compostable material like food and soiled paper separately from the rest of the waste stream, thereby reducing the amount shipped to a San Jose landfill. The pilot appears to have succeeded with the first goal, with the average volume of trash heading to the landfill from Green-

meadow falling from 5.07 tons per week to 4.17 tons. But the pilot also brought about a few surprising and unwelcome findings. The city did far less well when it came to reducing the number of truck trips. The collection of blue carts on the pilot route could not be handled in just one trip. Making a second trip to the Charles Street material-recovery facility in San Jose added an extra hour of driving time, the program’s summary report stated. It also took longer to pick up the garbage and recyclables at the curbs. The study noted that before the experiment, only about 60 to 70 percent of households put out their blue carts in a given week, compared with nearly every household during the pilot. Instead of an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes, it took 9 hours and 31 minutes to complete the blue-cart route during the pilot. As for the green carts, the pilot results suggested there was “virtually no change in the driving times, miles traveled, and fuel consumption for the green cart truck driver. However, this truck was only operated by one driver as opposed to two drivers prior to the pilot.â€? The third goal, simplifying things for residents, is where things really went sour. Many customers complained during the pilot about the requirement that garbage be bagged separately from recyclables and that food scraps and yard trimmings be similarly separated, the report stated. ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂŤ>}iĂŠÂŁĂ“ÂŽ

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Upfront

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450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505) EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516 Arts & Entertainment Editor Nick Veronin (223-6517) Express & Online Editor Elena Kadvany (223-6519) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Sam Sciolla (223-6515) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Ari Kaye, Kevin Kirby, Terri Lobdell, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Intern Benjamin Custer, Christina Dong ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Adam Carter (223-6573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Meredith Mitchell (223-6569) Digital Media Sales Heather Choi (223-6587) Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Assistant Design Director Lili Cao (223-6562) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Paul Llewellyn Designers Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Cathy Stringari (223-6541)

STYLE MEETS FUNCTIONALITY

ADMINISTRATION Assistant to the Publisher Miranda Chatfield (223-6559) Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza

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EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Zach Allen (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Š2014 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

It feels like something’s missing now. — student, Palo Alto High School, on the lack of streaking on campus this spring. See story on page 11.

Around Town

A CLEAN GETAWAY ... Police are searching for six women, between roughly 25 and 30 years old, who walked into Bath and Body Works at the Stanford Shopping Center last Friday afternoon and allegedly shoplifted $2,529 worth of lotions, shower gels and other beauty products. Agent Marco Estrada of the Palo Alto Police Department said that when the shoplifters arrived at 12:56 p.m., only two employees were working, one of whom was in the back of the store. According to Estrada, the women began “loading their handbags� with products. When the employee on the floor noticed the women’s behavior, she confronted them and tried to prevent them from leaving. One woman allegedly walked intimidatingly towards the associate, asking, “What are you going to do?� before chestbumping her. After the women left, the employee went to the back of the store and recounted the theft to her co-worker, who then called the police. The shoplifters were gone by the time police arrived. Estrada noted that it was not reported whether the women had shoplifted elsewhere in the shopping center or if any witnesses noted their direction when they left Bath and Body Works.

HE’S A GIANT ... Last week, Palo Alto resident Charlie Hughes’ dream came true: He stepped onto the field at AT&T Park before the San Francisco Giants game and threw the first pitch. The road to the mound for the 25 year old, who is developmentally disabled, began in May 2013 when he met iconic Giants first baseman Will “The Thrill� Clark at a benefit breakfast for Hope Services, a nonprofit that serves disabled individuals. After bonding with Hughes there, Clark asked if he could do anything for him. Hughes’ mother, Kathleen, said she remembers him telling Clark, “I’d love to throw out the first pitch some time.� About a year later, Clark followed through and nailed down the opportunity for Hughes. This is “the biggest and best thing that has ever happened to me,� Hughes said. His mother — who is the founder of Ada’s Cafe, a nonprofit Palo Alto restaurant that provides training and employment to people with disabilities — said that Giants baseball has long been

a part of her son’s life. Because of his condition, Hughes learned how to read and do math slowly. However, his desire to absorb articles and statistics about the team served as a powerful motivator. He was particularly driven to learn about favorite players such as Barry Bonds, Jeff Kent and J.T. Snow. Hughes also played baseball growing up and then as an adult in the Challenger league through Palo Alto Little League. When he got the call three weeks ago, Hughes started loosening up his mitt in practicing for the big-time pitch. On game day, nearly 100 friends, family and coworkers were present to root for Hughes. “It couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy,� Kathleen Hughes said. “And truly I think he’s still walking on air after the experience.�

SHE’S BACK ... A sculpture with strong local ties that was first exhibited in 2008 at the Palo Alto Art Center made its “triumphant return� last weekend. “We’re thrilled to have her back,� Elise DeMarzo, the city’s public art manager, said of the bronze statue by Nathan Oliveira, which was placed in the Art Center’s sculpture garden on May 30. At 8 feet tall, “Universal Woman� is unique in size among Oliveira’s work. Yet, while the statue’s height is imposing, the figure it forms appears feather light. The tall, slender woman treads softly, with one foot directly in front of the other, as if walking a tight rope or poised to pirouette. A longtime resident of Palo Alto and former Stanford University art professor, Oliveira finished the piece in 2008, the same year it was first shown at the Art Center. Over the course of his career, the local artist developed a strong relationship with the Palo Alto Art Center. After Oliveira’s death in 2008, his son, Joe, proposed that the statue be given to the City of Palo Alto’s Art in Public Places Collection (managed by the Public Art Program), and the city’s art commission accepted the donation last December. “Universal Woman� was “very popular� at the Art Center, according to Nadya Chuprina, a public-art program assistant. As such, it only feels right that the statue will now call the Art Center’s courtyard home. N

Upfront EDUCATION

In unanimous comments, school board challenges federal agency Good faith efforts to collaborate have failed, board members say by Chris Kenrick

P

alo Alto Board of Education members Tuesday signaled unanimous support for a resolution seeking redress against a federal civil-rights agency that is investigating the school district, saying the agency has refused to correct errors in its investigation processes, which board leaders called “purposely confrontational and disruptive.� Board members stressed that they fully agree with the mission of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights but, one by one, reiterated complaints that federal lawyers had failed to address contested facts, burdened the district with massive information requests and failed to complete investigations in a timely fashion. All members indicated support for a two-page resolution explained in a June 3 memo from board President Barb Mitchell, Vice President Melissa Baten Caswell and Superintendent Kevin Skelly. A final board vote on the resolution is set for June 17. In testimony before the board Tuesday, three current or former Palo Alto district parents criticized the strategy of challenging the Office for Civil Rights.

“It shocks the conscience that we would consider aligning our community with Alabama and other places of ignominy that have resisted the vindication of our civil rights by the federal government,� said Cathy Kirkman, a 1980 Paly graduate and parent of two Palo Alto students. “Palo Alto has always been an open and welcoming community, and it’s just shameful that we would even consider this course of action.� Marielena Gaona Mendoza, whose family has sought redress from the district and Office for Civil Rights due to the ongoing bullying of a child, told board members, “You can be hiring lawyers, blaming OCR, blaming the parents, but if you don’t take the issues seriously, they grow bigger and bigger and the more you get tangled in this big web.� Ken Dauber, a likely candidate for school board in this November’s election, said the board’s failure to publicly examine why its practices had drawn Office for Civil Rights scrutiny in the first place amounted to “a great missed opportunity on the part of the district.� “The reinvigoration of the OCR

by the Obama administration under Russlyn Ali and now Catherine Lhamon — Ms. Lhamon is a Paly graduate, in fact — is one of the signal achievements of the Obama administration,� Dauber said. “To see our school district setting itself against this work ...

same frustrations. “We absolutely share the same goals as the OCR,� board member Dana Tom said. “The issue we’re talking about tonight is over OCR’s practices and ensuring they are efficient, effective and fair. Like any organization, OCR has areas where it can and should improve.� Because of confidentiality restrictions, the district has been unable to correct “incomplete, misleading, and inaccurate� media accounts generated by Office for Civil Rights investigations, Tom said. “We can’t clear up the facts in public because we cannot comment about individual student matters. There’s a great asymmetry in what our district may communicate versus what others may communicate.� Under questioning from board member Heidi Emberling, lawyer Chad Graff, who has represented the district in Office for Civil Rights matters, said the federal agency had opened 277 investigations — three of them in Palo Alto — and signed 82 resolution agreements in California during the past year.

‘We absolutely share the same goals as the OCR. ... Like any organization, OCR has areas where it can and should improve.’ — Dana Toma, member, Palo Alto Board of Education puts us on the wrong side of that issue and probably on the wrong side of history.� Board members insisted that sincere efforts on their part to work collaboratively with Office for Civil Rights had led nowhere and that, by going public with their complaints, they hope to help other school districts and universities experiencing the

Graff said there’s been little or no media coverage of the agency’s activities in other districts. “OCR is very much used to operating under the radar,� he said. “It has come under a lot more scrutiny because of the media attention (here).� Typically, investigations are opened based on an individual complaint, prior to any input from the district, Graff said. “If any information they have from a complainant alleges a violation of civil rights, their standard practice is to open an investigation,� Graff said. “They won’t inform the district during that period (before opening the case); they won’t ask the district for any factual response.� In conversation with Office for Civil Rights attorneys at one point over a late response from the agency, Graff said a federal lawyer suggested that Graff could sue the agency. “I said, ‘That’s not what we want to do. We’d just like a response so we can move on on these issues,’� Graff said. N Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@ paweekly.com.

TRANSPORTATION

With Caltrain in mind, Palo Alto seeks larger sales-tax hike

P

alo Alto’s support for a countywide sales-tax increase to pay for an extension of Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) and a host of other transportation projects could hinge on a single question: What’s in it for Caltrain? The City Council raised this question in a letter to the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, an advocacy organization spearheading the tax measure, which would raise the Santa Clara County sales tax by a quarter cent for 30 years. The group estimates that the tax will raise about $3.5 billion for transportation improvements, including $1.5 billion for the extension of BART to San Jose. In the letter, which the council approved by an 8-0 vote Wednesday night (Mayor Nancy Shepherd was absent), Palo Alto officials argue that the salestax increase should be raised to three-eighths of a cent, with the added one-eighth cent going to Caltrain improvements. These would include, most notably,

by Gennady Sheyner grade separations along the Caltrain corridor, which city staff estimates would cost about $150 million at each crossing. Without these over- or underpasses, “increases to Caltrain capacity may be negatively offset by increased auto traffic delays at Caltrain grade crossings,� the letter states. “Caltrain is critically important to the overall success of Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) by helping complete the regional public transportation ring around the Bay,� the letter from Mayor Nancy Shepherd to Leadership Group CEO Carl Guardino states. “Caltrain provides essential service to Silicon Valley, the economic heart of the Bay Area.� The letter represents Palo Alto’s official response to Guardino’s request at a May 19 meeting that the city lend its support to the transportation measure. Guardino cited a recent poll that found 73 percent of county voters would support a new sales tax to fund infrastructure projects in Silicon

Valley. The $3.5 billion would be split roughly in three parts, with a third paying for BART’s extension to San Jose, another third paying for highway improvements and the remaining third paying for other services, including Caltrain. Guardino estimated that about $500 million would go to Caltrain improvements, a number that some on the council felt was too low given the proposed allocation for BART. During Wednesday’s discussion, council members acknowledged that an extension of BART is a worthy project, but stressed the importance of concurrently improving Caltrain so that the two systems can be linked. Councilwoman Gail Price, who chairs the council’s Policy and Services Committee, said she and her committee colleagues agreed during their May 20 discussion of the topic that support for Caltrain is critical. The council agreed that making the jump from a quarter-cent increase to a three-eighth increase would allow the county to

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City wants proposed tax measure to fund grade separations along rail corridor

Caltrian passengers wait for the train to stop at the downtown Palo Alto station. improve both systems. Councilman Greg Scharff called Caltrain “the spine of Silicon Valley� and enthusiastically supported adding the one-eighth cent. “By having the extra eight of a cent, we solve the issue of Caltrain for the most part,� Scharff said. “We get to have much more capacity, speed and efficiency.� Councilman Greg Schmid made the case for taking a more aggressive stance with the Leadership Group. He called the proposed letter a little “too polite� and said the city should request that Caltrain gets a share equal to BART’s, regardless of whether the higher tax rate would be pursued. Schmid proposed including the following sentence

in the letter: “Without a higher three-eighth cent tax rate, the share going to BART and Caltrain should be equalized.â€? The goal, Schmid said, “is to outline as clearly as possible that Caltrain is as important for ridership as the extension of BART is to Santa Clara County.â€? That proposal fell by a 2-6 vote, with only Councilwoman Karen Holman supporting it. Other council members advocated sticking to the original position of the letter and potentially revisiting the decision at a later date. Councilman Pat Burt said he was inclined to focus on advocating for a higher tax and ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂŤ>}iĂŠ9)

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Upfront

News Digest

EDUCATION

Paly algebra finals invalidated after cheating found

Measure AA still a nail-biter While the election result for Measure AA, a $300 million bond measure to fund recreation and wildlife preservation, was still too close to call Wednesday, Sheriff Laurie Smith was re-elected, and Julianne Sylva secured the county judgeship in a low-turnout primary election in Santa Clara County Tuesday, according to unofficial results. Votes continue to be counted in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties for Measure AA, and a two-thirds majority is required to pass. Supporters of the measure estimate that about 66.8 percent of voters in the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District favored it, Yes on Measure AA spokeswoman Alex Doniach said. However, mail-in and provisional ballots have yet to be counted, she said. As of Wednesday afternoon, 175,002 votes in Santa Clara County, or 21.71 percent of the 805,922 registered voters, had been counted, county registrar spokeswoman Michelle Shoates said. Unofficial results showed 31,531 voters, or 67.6 percent, voting for it. In San Mateo County, 11,848 voters, or 65.6 percent, favored it, according to election results reported on the county’s website. Smith garnered almost 60 percent of voter support on her way to a fifth term as sheriff, beating retired Sheriff’s Capt. Kevin Jensen, the favorite of deputy sheriffs’ and corrections deputies unions. Smith, 61, has said the top challenges for her next term will be managing the state-required transfer of low-level prison inmates to serve their time in the county jail, suppressing gang activity and preventing youths from joining gangs. Sylva won by a wide margin, with 80.80 percent of votes compared to Dennis Lampert’s 19.20 percent, according to the county. Tuesday’s primary election drew only 20.6 percent of Santa Clara County’s voters, according to preliminary data. N —Bay City News Service/Palo Alto Weekly staff

Principal offers students opportunity to retake test June 10 by Chris Kenrick

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alo Alto High School has invalidated the results of 112 final exams in Algebra 2 after two teachers noticed irregularities in the scores, Principal Kim Diorio said Thursday. After investigating, “We were able to determine that there were text messages and photos of answers to the final exam sent between students,� Diorio said in an email to families this week, notifying them that scores had been invalidated. Students were given the choice of retaking the exam Tuesday,

June 10, or leaving their algebra grade as is. Looking into the exams, teachers noticed many students had provided answers without showing their work and a pattern emerged of students finishing the test in record time, Diorio said. “It’s a two-hour exam that reportedly some students finished in under 30 minutes — this triggered a red flag,� she said. One of the teachers questioned several students, and students reported to him that a picture of the test had been taken and

BUSINESS

Happy Donuts to close on Friday Customers mourn loss of longtime, late-night Palo Alto hangout

Persis Drell to head Stanford engineering

Palo Alto VA reveals its wait times In light of the recent scandal involving false record-keeping and long wait lists at VA hospitals in other parts of the country, the Palo Alto VA is making efforts to encourage open dialogue about its stance on the issue, including a meeting this week with local elected officials. “A lot of vets are concerned, of course, but not all VA’s are the same,â€? spokesman Michael Hill-Jackson said. “That’s the message were trying to get out there: ‘If you’re in Palo Alto, you’re OK.’â€? A 35-page independent report conducted by the VA’s inspector general released May 28 found that 1,700 veterans using a Phoenix VA hospital were kept on unofficial, secret wait lists, a practice that helped staff hoping to cover up delays in treatment of patients. The report found that 84 percent had to wait more than two weeks to be seen. At least 40 veterans died waiting for appointments in Phoenix, according to CNN. Te report called the practices a “systemic problem nationwide.â€? Forty-two centers across the country are now under investigation for falsifying wait records. As of April, the Palo Alto VA is four days shy of the 14-day national metric for new patients seeking appointments for primary care, with an 18-day average, Hill-Jackson said. For mental health patients, the average wait in Palo Alto is one week. Hill-Jackson said these numbers are updated on a monthly basis. For established patients, Palo Alto accommodates them within five to six days of their requested appointment date, Hill-Jackson. N — Elena Kadvany Page 8ĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â˜iĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£{ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

by Sue Dremann

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ne of the two sit-down places in Palo Alto where one can satisfy a 3 a.m. craving, Happy Donuts, is closing as of June 6. Doughnut seekers who approached the establishment at 3916 El Camino Real Wednesday were stunned and saddened by the news, which was posted on signs that indicated the last cruller and jelly doughnut would be served at 10 p.m. Friday. Owner Soknea Hort said the store lost its contract but added that she is looking for a new location in Palo Alto to open soon. “Thank you for your support of us at this location,� she wrote in an email. The shop has been a lifeline of late-night sustenance for Stanford and high school students studying for exams, customers Tim Whiting and Julie Fife said. “Everybody from Stanford has a story about something they did in this place,� Whiting said. “A doughnut was a doughnut to me before. This is the first place where I thought, ‘Oh, I’ll have to get a Happy Donut.’� “I’m glad we’re moving,� Fife added, saying it would be sad to live in Palo Alto and not see Happy Donuts here anymore. The restaurant — which is one of Palo Alto’s last to be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week — the other is Subway on University Avenue — has been a hangout for insomniacs and other nighttime denizens. The store is packed on weekend nights. One businessman, Bill, who asked that his last name not be used, called the eatery “a landmark.� “They have the best doughnuts in

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Persis Drell, former director of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, will be Stanford University’s first female dean of engineering, the university announced Tuesday. Drell, 58, is currently a physics professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and of particles physics and astrophysics at SLAC. She headed the 1,600-employee U.S. Department of Energy SLAC Laboratory at Stanford from 2007 to 2012. Her new appointment is effective Sept. 1. Drell is replacing Jim Plummer, who is stepping down after serving as dean for 15 years, the longest tenure in the school’s history, the Persis Drell university said. The year Drell became the first woman director at SLAC, she was also named one of the “50 Most Important Women in Science� in the November 2002 issue of Discover Magazine. Drell is credited with overseeing SLAC’s transformation from a “laboratory dedicated primarily to research in high-energy physics to one that is now seen as a leader in a number of scientific disciplines,� the university release states. Drell is also a Gunn High School graduate and the daughter of Stanford University physicist Sidney Drell, who was the deputy director at SLAC for many years. N — Elena Kadvany

distributed. “Unfortunately, we were not able to determine specifically which students were involved with this breach,� Diorio said. “Since this is a discipline issue, it wouldn’t be appropriate to divulge other details regarding ‘suspects’ or consequences for students in this matter,� she said. “We can share that we conducted a thorough investigation and, unfortunately, we’ve had difficulty in specifically knowing how many students were directly involved with cheating in this specific incident.� N

Happy Donuts on El Camino Real in Palo Alto has been a bastion for insomniacs and cramming students alike for years. town — they really do,� he said. Barron Park resident Jean Doten has been a customer for 15 years. The wide tables were perfect for grading papers when Doten was a teacher, she said. She would hang out at Happy Donuts with her four daughters when they were in high school. The staff got to know the family and would sometimes add a few extra doughnut holes to their order. “One Easter Sunday I stopped by at 1:30 a.m. on my way home from the Vigil Mass and had a wonderful conversation about the Easter customs of the Philippines with the young man who has been doing the late shift for years,� she said. The congenial atmosphere has become an ideal spot for discussing and resolving stressful topics with her ex-husband, she said. “To this day if he has to hang around town he settles there with

his laptop and invites me over for a chat,� she said. Happy Donuts has had several owners over the years. There are a number of stores from San Francisco to San Jose bearing the name but with different owners, an employee at a San Jose location said. What will replace Happy Donuts at its current location remains unknown. Some workers indicated that a doughnut shop could reopen at the site under a different owner in a few days. Employees on the night shift said the store is closing forever. Hort did not elaborate on plans for the store. Calls to the property owner were not returned, though a relative of the owner said the family does not intend to sell the property. N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

Upfront

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ELECTION 2014

Two more announce bids for City Council seats Land-use watcher Tom DuBois looks to impact Palo Alto’s debate about growth by Gennady Sheyner

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om DuBois, a Midtown resident who jumped into Palo Alto’s land-use politics during last year’s heated battle over a housing development on Maybell Avenue, said Monday that he will seek a seat on the City Council in November. A technology executive who currently works in the videogame industry, DuBois became engaged in civic issues as part of a citizens referendum in opposition to Measure D. The referendum succeeded in shooting down an approved housing development on Maybell, which included 60 apartments for low-income seniors and 12 single-family homes. The referendum also gave birth to a new residents’ group, Palo Altans for Sensible Zoning, which includes DuBois and leading Measure D opponents Cheryl Lilienstein and Joe Hirsch. DuBois became the second non-incumbent to announce his candidacy in the past week, joining Claude Ezran, a former chairman of the city’s Human Relations Commission. While Ezran, as the founder of World Music Day and frequent advocate for human-rights issues,

Board to advocate for policies that protect residential neighborhoods from the impacts of commercial developments. Last year, he appealed a probrings a cosmopolitan touch to posal by Grocery Outlet to get the council race, DuBois’ focus sign exemptions — allowing for a has been exclusively local. He larger, illuminated sign — for its doesn’t live in the Barron Park Alma Village location, arguing neighborhood, which led op- that other business owners would position to Measure D, but he follow suit and seek exemptions. wrote on his campaign website Though his appeal faltered, his that he worked on behalf of the prophesy has proven somewhat referendum “because of accurate, with Tesla Mothe way that the city had tors, Wilson Sonsini approved high-density Goodrich & Rosati and development in a resithe new “Lytton Gatedential neighborhood way� building downwith 12-15 homes being town all subsequently packed in.� seeking exemptions. He emphasized in On his campaign an interview with the website, DuBois said Weekly on Monday that he became “very conhis opposition wasn’t to Tom DuBois cerned about what I affordable housing but saw happening to Palo to the city’s decision to approve Alto several years ago.� denser development in a residen“I noticed lots of construction; tial neighborhood. often large projects which didn’t Since then, DuBois has been fit the surrounding neighboran advocate for city policies that hoods. Traffic had become nomaintain existing zoning and ticeably worse,� DuBois wrote. limit office construction. He cur- “Beloved retailers were closing rently serves on the community their doors. It was clear to me panel that is helping the city draft that overdevelopment was hava new Housing Element. He has ing long-term adverse effects also made numerous appearanc- on our quality of life especially es at meetings of the Planning with respect to the roads, parks and Transportation Commission and schools.� and the Architectural Review In announcing his candidacy,

Palo Alto mayor looks to continue community conversation about growth

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by Gennady Sheyner ayor Nancy Shepherd has decided to run for a second term on the Palo Alto City Council. Shepherd, a former school board volunteer who has emerged as a strong proponent for regional cooperation and an advocate for improvements to Caltrain, is the second incumbent council member to seek a new term. Councilman Greg Scharff, who, like Shepherd, was elected in 2009, also plans to run again, while Councilwoman Karen Holman has yet to declare her intention. Councilwoman Gail Price has said she will not run for a second term, while Councilman Larry Klein will complete his second and final term this year. A resident of Palo Alto’s Southgate neighborhood, Shepherd became heavily involved in civic affairs in 2008, with tensions at the time running high over California’s proposed high-speed-rail program. During her five-year term, she has served as chair of the Finance Committee and,

life and help shape the future of Palo Alto,� Shepherd stated in a press release. “That’s why I’m running.� last year, as vice mayor, before She also said she wants to foher colleagues elected her to the cus on controlling density and council’s highest position. growth, completing the bicycle Shepherd’s entry into the race and pedestrian master plan, conbrings the total number of coun- tinuing the city’s commitment cil candidates to four, with five to environmental sustainability seats up for grabs. In addition to and “maintaining vigilance over her and Scharff, forcity revenues and exmer Human Relations penses.� Commissioner Claude One big challenge, Ezran and Midtown she told the Weekly, resident Tom DuBois will be making sure have declared in the Palo Alto is protected past week their deciagainst state mandates. sions to seek council One consistent source seats. of community anxiety Shepherd said in is a requirement by the a statement that her Nancy Shepherd Association of Bay Area priorities for the secGovernments that the ond term include solving Palo city zone for more housing — a Alto’s growing parking and mandate that further exacerbates traffic problems. This includes the city’s traffic and parking chaladopting a residential parking- lenges. It’s important, she said, to permit program and advancing “fight the good fight for cities and the city’s efforts to get drivers to municipalities.� switch to other modes of trans“It’s important to make sure portation, known as transporta- that Palo Alto continues to have tion-demand management. options and opportunities and “I want to continue the work I that the state doesn’t take away started to protect our quality of more and more and give us

he argued that Palo Alto is now “at a crossroads� and said his campaign “represents an opportunity to add an advocate for residents’ concerns to the City Council.� “How we grow is a choice,� DuBois said in the statement. “I believe in evolution not wholesale redevelopment.� He said he plans to focus on “sensible development, transparent government and balanced growth that considers cumulative impacts to traffic, parks, schools and other infrastructure.� A native of Warren, Ohio, DuBois lived in Washington, D.C., and Southern California before settling in Palo Alto in 1995. An engineer by training, he worked for numerous technology companies and led various startups. He currently works at Humble Bundle, a video-game company that allows customers to set their own prices and raises money for charity. He lives in Midtown with his wife, Erina, and two children, who are attending Palo Alto schools. In announcing his campaign, DuBois said he is “excited to have the chance to serve the people of Palo Alto.� “I look at it as public service,� DuBois told the Weekly. “I’m interested in being involved in the future of Palo Alto.� N more mandates to live under,� Shepherd said. In an interview Wednesday, she said she was particularly proud of her efforts to engage the community in a conversation about the city’s future. Though such discussion is messy, she said it’s important to her that Palo Alto is perceived more as a personable community and less as a big government imposing decisions. “It’s a real passion of mine that we don’t forget what it is to have a habitat,� Shepherd said. “I am trying to put a face to Palo Alto on many levels, both at the local community level but also at regional, county and state levels, so that Palo Alto has a seat at the table.� Shepherd’s re-election campaign has already received endorsements from the top officials in Palo Alto’s Democratic establishment, including Santa Clara County Supervisor Joe Simitian, Assemblyman Rich Gordon and State Senator Jerry Hill. Vice Mayor Liz Kniss is also backing Shepherd’s re-election bid. “She is smart, thoughtful and truly cares about the issues facing our city,� Kniss said. N

considering next steps after seeing the Leadership Group’s response to the city’s position. “What we’re requesting — if it was achievable, if it polled successfully and went successfully to the voters — would be truly transformative for Caltrain,� Burt said. Klein was more forceful in rejecting Schmid’s proposal, calling it “bad psychology, bad negotiating tactics and really a nonstarter.� The city, he noted, is not in a deadlock situation and has nothing to gain from taking a tough stance with the Leadership Group. “Many negotiations have to take into account what the other party wants so everyone’s interest is taken into account,� Klein said. “The main motivator of this is BART, and the formula being suggested would not provide for the $1.3 billion that is needed for BART to be completed. By suggesting something that undercuts the very motivation (of) this private agency, I think you’re undermining our credibility.� The council members are hardly alone in touting the virtues of an improved Caltrain. In its poll of 600 likely Santa Clara County voters, the Leadership Group found 73 percent of responders support increased Caltrain commuter rail service from Gilroy to Palo Alto. Meanwhile, 67 percent support the planned BART extension from San Jose’s Berryessa district to downtown San Jose and Santa Clara. More than 80 percent support improvements that would ease congestion on expressways, increase safety for walking and biking near schools and provide more transit services for seniors and the disabled. N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

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C A N T O R A R T S C E N T E R AT S TA N F O R D U N I V E R S I T Y

Carleton Watkins (U.S.A., 1829–1916), The Lower Yosemite Fall, Yosemite, 1865–1866, from the album Photographs of the Yosemite Valley. Albumen print. Lent by Department of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries.

CARLETON WATKINS The Stanford Albums April 23–August 17

Remarkable views of Yosemite and the northern Pacific Coast by America’s greatest 19th-century landscape photographer

328 Lomita Drive at Museum Way s Stanford

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museum.stanford.edu s Free Admission

We gratefully acknowledge the Elizabeth Swindells Hulsey Exhibitions Fund, the Clumeck Fund, and Cantor Members for support of the exhibition, and the Hohbach Family Fund for making possible the accompanying catalogue.

CityView A round-up

of Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (June 2) Sidewalks: The council voted to defer making any changes to the sidewalk ordinance on El Camino Real. The subject will be discussed as part of the city’s update of the Comprehensive Plan. Yes: Unanimous

Board of Education (June 3) Garland School lease: The board voted to extend the lease of the Garland school site to the independent Stratford School until June 30, 2016. Yes: Unanimous Substitute pay: The board voted to boost the pay for substitute teachers from $135 to $152 a day; to $202 a day for longer-term subs and to $296 a day for semester-long subs. Yes: Unanimous Paly Performing Arts Center: The board approved a $21.8 million contract with Alten Construction Inc. and also approved a budget increase of $4.975 million, bringing the total project budget to $29.4 million. Yes: Unanimous

Council Finance Committee (June 3) Sweeping: The committee discussed and supported a staff proposal to reduce the frequency of street sweeping in residential areas from weekly to once every two weeks. Yes: Unanimous Trash: The committee heard a report on a pilot study that required residents to sort their trash in blue and green carts. The committee supported staff’s proposal not to pursue this program on a citywide level but to link it to the Organic Facilities Plan. Action: None

Utilities Advisory Commission (June 4) Natural gas: The commission approved a staff recommendation that the city participate in a purchase of natural gas from Municipal Gas Acquisition and Supply Corporation. Yes: Cook, Foster, Melton, Waldfogel Absent: Chang, Eglash, Hall Incentive program: The commission recommended a resolution terminating the “Power from Local Ultra-clean Generation Incentive Program.� Yes: Cook, Foster, Melton, Waldfogel Absent: Chang, Eglash, Hall

City Council (June 4) Caltrain: The council approved a letter to the Silicon Valley Leadership Group that advocates a three-eighth cent sales-tax increase and requests a larger allocation for Caltrain improvements. Yes: Berman, Burt, Holman, Klein, Kniss, Price, Scharff, Schmid Absent: Shepherd Housing Element: The council approved an administrative draft of the 2015-23 Housing Element. Yes: Berman, Burt, Holman, Klein, Kniss, Scharff No: Schmid Absent: Price, Shepherd

Architectural Review Board (June 5) 261 Hamilton Ave.: The board approved the historic rehabilitation of 261 Hamilton Ave., which includes an addition to the rear of the building and the establishment of a mezzanine floor. Yes: Lew, Malone Prichard, Popp No: Gooyer Absent: Lippert 2555 Park Blvd.: The board discussed but did not vote on a proposal by FGY Architects on behalf of Tarlton Properties to build a three-story office building at 2555 Park Blvd. Action: None

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session with its labor negotiators to discuss the status of the city’s negotiations with the Utilities Management and Professional Association of Palo Alto. The council will then hold a joint meeting with the Architectural Review Board; review the funding proposal for infrastructure projects; consider approving the operating and capital budgets for fiscal year 2015; and hear an update on the city’s negotiations with the Palo Alto Unified School District over Cubberley Community Center. The first closed session will begin at 5 p.m. on Monday, June 9. Regular meeting will follow in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave. It will be followed by another closed session to discuss Cubberley negotiations. PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to hold a site and design review for 441 Page Mill Road, a proposal by Stoecker and Northway Architects for a four-story mixed-use building that would replace four single-family homes. The commission will also hear an update on the proposed residential parking-permit program in downtown neighborhoods. The meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. on Wednesday, June 11, in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave. COUNCIL REGIONAL HOUSING MANDATE COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to review the administrative draft of the 2015-23 Housing Element. The meeting will begin at 4 p.m. on Thursday, June 12, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave. HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION ... The commission plans to hear a presentation from Paul Rojas of the Palo Alto Housing Corporation as part of an ongoing “Housing Learning Series� and to discuss allocation of additional funds to nonprofits as part of the Human Services Resources Allocation Process. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 12, in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave.

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Upfront EDUCATION

Streaking crackdown at Paly yields results Principal credits students for respecting others, but some say they miss the ‘tradition’

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crackdown on streaking at Palo Alto High School has reduced the count of violators from more than 100 in the 2012-13 academic year to just two this year, the school’s principal said. On the first day of school, Principal Kim Diorio sent a warning to Paly families that students would face serious consequences for streaking. The communitywide notice came after a pair of male students had streaked that day at lunch, prompting two-day suspensions. Diorio renewed the warning this spring as the traditional “streak week� season approached, accompanying police officers to senior classes to remind students that the penalty for students caught streaking would be a twoday suspension. The warnings apparently were heeded as Diorio said the school has counted no streakers since the two students were suspended last August. “I’m really proud of this graduating class,� she said this week. “They did the right thing, which isn’t always the easy thing. There were a lot of adults who doubted that this tradition would end, but I just really believed in the kids.� In interviews on the last day of school May 29, students said the absence of streakers this year had been noticeable and not an entirely welcome development. “I think it’s a little sad that a lot of traditions had to change, but it is what it is,� said a junior named Sarah, who declined to give her last name for fear of offending Diorio. “Personally, (the streaking) wasn’t bothering me. People are

making it sound like it’s the students who decided to make this change — and it was a choice — but there were huge consequences for not complying.� Sarah said the campus atmosphere this year had been “very tense — kind of like a staredown (over streaking). “The senior class complied and it kind of worked out for everybody. I think a lot of students understood she was kind of forced into that position.� Diorio was named principal last July, a month after the school district learned that Paly was under scrutiny by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) for its compliance with federal Title IX laws designed to ensure an “educational environment free of sexual harassment, and whether (the school) responds promptly and effectively to complaints or other notice of sexual harassment.� That investigation — which apparently was initiated by the OCR as a broad compliance review not focused on a particular case or student — remains open. It’s unclear whether the probe had been sparked by reports of streaking, an April 2013 student magazine report describing a “rape culture� among students or other factors. OCR investigators visited Paly last month to interview staff members. Diorio said she mentioned the federal investigation in her warnings to students this spring about streaking. “I wanted them to understand why the streaking was considered offensive by many people and needs to end,� she said. But students interviewed last week said Diorio’s crackdown seemed like an overreaction.

“Going into class with police officers is excessive,� said a junior, who declined to give her name. “I understand a lot of stuff is going on with Paly and the Palo Alto Unified School District, but I just think it’s sad that a tradition had to end.� The student and her four friends, also juniors, agreed that streaking had gotten out of hand in 2013 — extending beyond the traditional “streak week� into “streak month� — but said a complete ban was no solution. “We’re a spirit-heavy school and streak week was part of that, and it feels like something’s missing now,� said one. Said another: “The idea of streaking was started by the generation that’s trying to stop it now. It’s like our parents are the ones who started streaking and now they’re not OK for us to do it,� he said, adding that his father told him he had streaked in libraries. Diorio, who spent six years as assistant principal at Paly before getting the top job, said she’d heard from alumni from the 1960s and 1970s what had been done, but typically by just one or two students. A longtime staff member said Paly hadn’t had a spring without streaking since 1991. “What changed is that in the last four years it grew to 40, 70, 100, 120 — it kept getting bigger and bigger,� she said. “It started as a tradition of one or two kids on the last day of senior classes, which was then called streak week. “But last year it started on April 29 and went to the last day of school — it was an entire monthlong event at brunch and lunch and was pretty out of control.� The numbers grew so large it

EDUCATION

Paly gym demo now slated for September Cost estimates also up for athletic center, performing-arts center projects by Chris Kenrick

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chool officials last week disclosed several lastminute changes in plans as Palo Alto High School prepares to embark on two new major construction projects. Demolition of the old gyms — originally expected to occur soon after last week’s graduation — is now projected for September. Cost estimates also have increased for the new athletic center that will replace the gyms, bringing the school district’s share from $5.47 million

to an estimated $12.57 million. The bulk of the $20 millionplus new, two-gym athletic center is being donated by the Peery family, which has sent three generations to Paly. Superintendent Kevin Skelly disclosed the change of plans in his May 30 Weekly Memo, and the gym project will be up for discussion by the Board of Education June 17. The completion date for the new athletic center is now projected for March 2016, Skelly said. He attributed the hold-up

to questions and clarifications over plans that arose from the Division of the State Architect in Sacramento, which must approve architectural plans for all public school buildings. In another development, cost estimates for Paly’s Performing Arts Center — also soon to break ground — went up nearly $5 million, bringing the project’s total budget to $29.37 million. The state-of-the-art performance center, to rise on the Embarcadero Road edge of campus, will include a 583-seat

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Palo Alto High School’s campus was devoid of streakers this spring. became impossible to catch all violators to issue suspensions, she said, although some did receive suspensions. Suspension and police summons are listed in the student handbook as possible consequences for streaking as well as for other activities, including throwing water balloons or eggs, climbing onto roofs or placing students in trashcans. Besides the streaking crackdown, Diorio launched other initiatives aimed at improving “school climate� this year, including a “shadowing� program in which teachers spend a day as a student on campus, going through a typical day. About 30 teachers, as well as she herself, participated, Diorio said, “developing that student empathy, understanding what it was like to be a student on our campus.� Borrowing an idea from Gunn High School, she also named longtime teacher Eric Bloom as a “teacher on special assignment� with the specific goal of improving school climate. She also expanded Paly’s participation — and participated herself — in two independent programs aimed at ad-

theater, a lobby with restrooms, tickets, concessions and a gallery area as well as classroom and storage space. The school board Tuesday unanimously approved the budget increase, authorizing the funds to come from two other Paly projects — Tower Building upgrades and Career Technical Education projects. Districtwide construction manager Tom Hodges told the board the trade-offs were approved by a Paly site committee, including parents, students and staff, overseeing campus construction. Officials attributed the cost increase to rising competition for construction workers in the area as well as costs associated with a new legal requirement that all mechanical, electrical and plumbing subcontractors be prequalified.

dressing student social-emotional concerns, Camp Everytown and Not In Our Schools Week. At Camp Everytown, where Diorio joined about 45 students for an overnight stay in November, kids discussed “diverse perspectives in campus, understanding stereotypes, bullying, harassment, understanding what it’s like to have a physical disability, understanding poverty and affluence and the extremes in our community,� she said. In her graduation speech May 28, Diorio thanked seniors for teaching her “the importance of empathy, courage and leading from the heart.� In a veiled reference to streaking, she praised students for having the “courage to choose a new path.� This week she said, “Our work will continue next year, but at least for this year the freshmen got to have a spring where they weren’t subjected to 100-plus streakers. Teachers came out of their classrooms in May, out onto the quad, participating in more events than before. It was a good end of the school year for many people.� N

Hodges — whose firm’s $1.1 million contract for 2014-15 also was discussed by the board Tuesday — expressed the hope that funds still will be available to modernize restrooms and install an elevator in the Tower Building. Two other major building projects at Paly recently were completed: a two-story, 27-classroom building for the math and social sciences departments and a two-story, 23,000-square-foot Media Arts Building. The Paly construction, as well as new construction and upgrades across the school district’s 17 campuses, is being funded by the $378 million “Strong Schools� bond approved by voters in 2008. N Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@ paweekly.com.

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Upfront

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A Palo Alto pilot program eliminated black bins and had residents using only blue and green bins for their food scraps, yard trimmings, recyclables and trash.

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Greenmeadow resident Bob Wachs told the Weekly on Wednesday that bagging the yard and food waste was the least pleasant part of the pilot, though he and his wife got used to putting their food scraps in the small household container the city provided. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I found the little wastebasket kind of a pain. We kept trying to find a place for it. It got to be a bit of a joke. I kept stubbing my foot on it,â&#x20AC;? he said. The program increased the amount of material the Wachses composted, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think we became better at creating less garbage,â&#x20AC;? he said. Resident Lisa Steinback already practiced composting at home prior to the pilot, so she personally found the two-cart system less practical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a lot of recyclables, and they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit into the blue toter. Adding another garbage bag on top, the cover couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t close because the bin was overflowing,â&#x20AC;? she said Wednesday. Resident Penny Ellson said some people had a hard time finding the compostable bags. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a lot of back and forth on the neighborhood email list,â&#x20AC;? she said. Eventually, she discovered them at Costco, where she purchased a large quantity, and she saw them at Piazzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, she said. According to the pilot report, the issue of bags â&#x20AC;&#x153;brought the ire of all residents.â&#x20AC;? When asked in a midpoint survey to comment on their experiences with bags, 72 percent of 165 respondents provided additional commentary, with more than half having negative comments. As for changing her behavior when it came to sorting the trash, Ellson said she was initially irritated, but she made a concerted effort and got the hang of it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As soon as I did .... I realized, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so bad,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she said. Ellsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family of four reduced their landfill-bound trash to a single 13-gallon plastic bag. Before the pilot program, she probably

tossed at least twice that much, she said. In the end, 80 percent of residents who responded to the pilot programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final survey said they were willing to continue the pilot to help the city gather data, the summary notes. Given the mixed results, the city no longer plans to spread the pilot program to other parts of the city. Instead, Public Works is proposing to gradually roll out new services, starting with the collection of food scraps. According to a report from the department, this could either mean bagging the food scraps separately or mixing them in with yard trimmings so that the two can be composted together. Ultimately, the city plans to build an anaerobic-digestion plant in the Baylands that would process food scraps and sewage sludge and generate energy. The facility, part of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Organics Facility Plan, is still years away from becoming a reality, however. Still, the new waste-to-energy plant poses a complication for the two-cart program. A report from Public Works noted that mixing residential food and yard trimmings together may prohibitively increase the cost of processing them. While the Finance Committee didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t vote on the issue Tuesday night, members generally went along with staffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal that any reconsideration of trash carts be linked to the Organics Facility Plan. Councilman Marc Berman, who chairs the committee, told the Weekly that the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thinking about organic waste has shifted in recent years and any citywide proposal to revamp the trash program should be coordinated with the new plan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to find out what kind of technologies we need to use out there (on the Baylands site) and get a little more details on that,â&#x20AC;? Berman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to have a lot of influence on what programs we roll out.â&#x20AC;? N Staff writers Gennady Sheyner and Sue Dremann can be emailed at gsheyner@paweekly. com and sdremann@paweekly. com.

Upfront EDUCATION

Expelling students for sexual violence has been proposed before Societal changes are putting pressure on Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policies, law professor says

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Stanford University studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call this week for more severe punishment by administrators of students found responsible for sexual assault is not new. But ironically, according to Stanford Law School Professor Michele Dauber, it was most recently the students, not administrators, who opposed stricter measures. Dauber â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who has been advising Leah Francis, a senior who recently appealed the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sanctions against a student who assaulted her â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has long fought for a policy under which students would be expelled for sexual assault, she said. While the university was drafting its Alternate Review Process â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a relatively new disciplinary procedure designated for serious allegations of misconduct relating to sexual assault, sexual harassment, relationship violence or stalking

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; she and many others supported making expulsion the default sanction, she said. However, students at the time strongly opposed the proposal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t still supposed to do the right thing, but I still say, in fairness to the university, the student government of 2013 is responsible for the fact that (suspension) is now the sanction,â&#x20AC;? she said. Dauber characterized Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initial efforts to reform its sexualassault policies in 2010 as â&#x20AC;&#x153;liberal and progressive.â&#x20AC;? However, there is now a disconnect between those practices and a growing demand on campuses across the nation for more stringent punishment of sexual assault. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a lag, basically, between the pattern that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had in the past and the cultural view in universities toward expulsion in the past and what you see in the

present,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t caught up yet with the social change that is underway.â&#x20AC;? Dauber said sanctioning for sexual assault at many universities has been informed, inappropriately, by the penalty for the most common instance of student misconduct: plagiarism. Student disciplinary processes, thus, are designed to deal with cheating and to protect a â&#x20AC;&#x153;less powerfulâ&#x20AC;? student from a â&#x20AC;&#x153;powerful faculty accuser,â&#x20AC;? Dauber said. Expulsion in plagiarism cases is viewed as a punishment reserved for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;worst of the worstâ&#x20AC;? and not for first offenses, Dauber added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;However, when you take that very sensible, very appropriate approach to cheating and then you drop rape into the middle of it, what you find is a real reluctance to expel, a cultural resistance to the idea of expulsion because the sanction of first resort that is cul-

Assault

should have an advocate, a case worker whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tenured professor at Stanford who ... is ccâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ed on every email, can hold (the administration) accountable, (can) explain the process to survivors and lay out the options and provide some help producing these documents on which their chances on justice rely,â&#x20AC;? Francis said. Francis has appealed the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommended sanctions. Her appeal provides exhaustive, intimate detail of the events leading up to the assault, the assault itself, her interaction with the male student afterward â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he at first acknowledged the assault and apologized before reversing his position on what happened â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and efforts sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made since then to seek disciplinary action. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urging that the male student be expelled, citing the physical, emotional and financial duress he inflicted on her (financial because she is now graduating next year instead of this June) as well as the danger he poses to other Stanford students. Her appeal also cites a May 7 incident in which a male student she did not know entered her room in the middle of the night and started screaming, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you think he would have been punished if he had actually done it?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was basically demonstrating the general expectation of people that punishments do match crimes, especially one being dealt with by an institution that they trust like a lot of students (who) trust that the administration will know how to handle these things,â&#x20AC;? Francis said. Lisa Lapin, associate vice president for university communications, wrote in an email:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Expulsion currently is one of a range of potential outcomes of the disciplinary process for cases of sexual assault at Stanford, and we are discussing the option of imposing it as the presumptive outcome when there is a finding of forcible sexual assault.â&#x20AC;? She also said that the university â&#x20AC;&#x153;take(s) very seriously the pain and trauma that are generated by sexual assault.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have strengthened our programs in the area of sexual assault response and prevention over the

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recommended that he be relocated from university housing â&#x20AC;&#x153;to a location at a reasonable distanceâ&#x20AC;? from Francisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; residence, he remained in housing down the street from her for the next two weeks, she said. Francis condemns the university for moving too slowly. The pace has exacerbated the intense emotional duress sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suffered as a result of the Jan. 1 assault, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have experienced psychological and physical symptoms including panic attacks, depression, anxiety, nightmares and inability to sleep,â&#x20AC;? she wrote in a May 21 appeal of the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sanctions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My education has been severely and detrimentally impacted, and my goals and plans have been derailed. My ability to trust people and to have satisfying relationships with men have been damaged, if not completely destroyed. I have lost my sense of personal safety and security.â&#x20AC;? It was not until Francis approached Stanford law professor Michele Dauber for help, hoping a tenured professor could aid her case, that the university removed the male student from campus housing, Francis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were a number of factors in her case that I felt were not up to the standard that Stanford should be achieving on these matters,â&#x20AC;? Dauber said. Dauber, who helped create the ARP in 2010, helped Francis wade through the process and draft documents she had to provide the university. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is why I think that every student that goes through ARP

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Every student that goes through ARP should have an advocate.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leah Francis, senior, Stanford University last several years, seeking to provide support to individuals in crisis, encourage reporting, ensure fair and thorough disciplinary processes, and educate the community to prevent future incidents,â&#x20AC;? she wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But we are always looking to improve what we do, and we genuinely welcome input from students on how we can do better.â&#x20AC;? Expulsion as a consequence for committing sexual assault is rare in Stanford history. Out of nine cases since 2005 in which sexual assault was established to have occurred, eight resulted in suspension â&#x20AC;&#x201D; usually for the time period the victim remained at school, ranging from as low as one quarter to as long as eight â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and only one in expulsion in the 2006-07 academic year, a case involving

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by Elena Kadvany

Stanford University students march back to White Plaza after assembling outside of Vice Provost Greg Boardmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office to demand better protections for victims of sexual assault on June 5. tural to Stanford and also cultural to Brown (University) and all these other schools too (is that) universities donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like to expel students for a first violation.â&#x20AC;? Dauber said that, historically, Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practice has been to suspend assailants until the victim is no longer on campus. Dauber said the typical sanction for sexual assault is a four-quarter suspension and can often include other restrictions such as housing bans, education requirements and community service. Between 2005 and 2011, one student was expelled in a case that

involved multiple victims and violations, she said. Eight other cases resulted in suspensions of one to eight quarters. Dauber, who is assisting Francis with her appeal, indicated she thinks Stanford is open to changing its policy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the university is receptive to the idea of making expulsion the default sanction in cases of sexual assault, but I think that the speed with which the change is happening nationally has caught the university somewhat flat-footed, and it has failed to adjust.â&#x20AC;? N

multiple victims and violations, Dauber said. Francis said that the expelled student was also allowed back to Stanford eventually. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe I figured out why only 13 people have gone through ARP and only nine have discovered responsibility, and of those nine, only one has been expelled, but they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really expelled because they were allowed back to Stanford afterward,â&#x20AC;? she said. The case is still ongoing, with the male student recently appealing the reviewersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; determination of responsibility. According to Francisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; appeal, he is claiming he committed the assault during his sleep. The assault took place during winter break at his home out of state. The student is no longer allowed on campus without a Department of Public Safety escort, cannot contact Francis under a no-contact order that was instituted since she reported the assault (though she said he violated it on at least one occasion) and cannot walk at commencement next weekend but will receive his diploma and return to Stanford for a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program after his suspension, Francis said. Francis said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speaking publicly now to shine light on not only the administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handling of her particular case but also on broader flaws in its sexual-assault procedures and policies. She and other students organized a rally in White Plaza Thursday, after the Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s press deadline, to demand reforms such as mandatory expulsion for individuals found responsible for sexual assault (a policy change that Dartmouth College, Amherst College and Duke University have recently made); better enforcement of sanctions for

assailants to comply with Title IX; expanded mandatory education on definitions, consent and bystander intervention for all undergraduates; increased staff at the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sexual Assault & Relationship Abuse Education & Response (SARA) office; and better resources for assault survivors throughout the process, including safety measures and academic support. Though Francis is urging expulsion as part of her sanctions appeal, she said what she wants is for Stanford to make its best effort to implement these reforms for future students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The more time went on the more I realized, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually matter if heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expelled. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually matter what happens to him. But what does matter is that instead of remaining silent because the university is holding any chance of justice I might have over my head, I must speak out so that no one has to go through the process that I went through again because I barely survived it,â&#x20AC;? Francis said. She said Thursday she has been told Vice Provost Greg Boardman will issue a decision on her appeal early next week. Francis joins many other college students who have spoken out in recent years to condemn their administrationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; handling of sexualassault cases. On May 1, the U.S. Department of Educationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office for Civil Rights released a list of 55 colleges and universities under investigation for possible violations of Title IX due to the schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; handling of sexual violence and harassment complaints. N Online Editor Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@ paweekly.com.

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Upfront

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAlto Online.com/news.

Hotel-tax bump a tough sell Polls suggest that most Palo Alto voters will probably support a November measure to raise the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hotel-tax rate to pay for a host of infrastructure projects. Winning the approval of merchants and hotel owners, however, is another matter, as a Wednesday debate on the proposed tax hike demonstrated. (Posted June 4, 11:48 p.m.)

June 2014

Mi Pueblo officially emerges from bankruptcy

Community Health Education Programs

Mi Pueblo Foods, the San Jose-based grocery chain that runs the only full-sized grocery store in East Palo Alto, announced its formal exit from Chapter 11 reorganization Wednesday. (Posted

For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/education.

Plan to widen El Camino sidewalks falters

Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real Mountain View (650) 937-7380

Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Night Out Skin Care Seminar June 11, 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 p.m. Sandra Odenheimer, N.P. PAMF Dermatology Join us for a discussion on how to care for our skin, sunprotection, prevention of photoaging changes and tips for younger looking skin.

June 4, 1:15 p.m.)

Faced with an uprising from property owners, conflicting recommendations from its advisory boards and deep ambivalence within its own ranks, the City Council on Monday night backed away from a staff proposal to revise the sidewalk rules on Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s congested and eclectic stretch of El Camino Real. (Posted June 3, 12:55 a.m.)

Three injured in East Palo Alto shooting Police are investigating a Sunday evening shooting in East Palo Alto -- the second this weekend -- that sent three people to the hospital. (Posted June 2, 7:55 a.m.)

Community service app wins challenge The City of Palo Alto announced the winners of its first-ever Apps Challenge Saturday evening, with the developers of Play Palo Alto -- a mobile application that encourages volunteer work in the city through games -- taking the top prize of $3,500. (Posted Sunnyvale Public Library 665 W. Olive Avenue Sunnyvale Registration is not required.

Test Your Eye-Q

June 1, 3:54 p.m.)

June 18, 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 p.m. Barbara Erny, M.D., PAMF Ophthalmology

Weekly wins 10 awards in local competition

San Carlos Library 610 Elm Street San Carlos Call Rhea Bradley at (650) 591-0341, ext. 237

The Ankle 101 Common problems and their treatments

An interactive session to learn about eye conditions including macular degeneration, dry eye and cataracts.

June 23, 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 p.m. Andrew Haskell, M.D., PAMF Orthopedic Surgery Dr. Haskell will discuss a broad range of ankle conditions affecting everyone from the athlete to the couch potato. Find about the anatomy of the ankle, diagnostic tools and non-surgical and surgical treatments options.

Palo Alto Center 795 El Camino Real Palo Alto (650) 853-4873

Medicare Basics June 30, 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 p.m. HICAP of San Mateo County A HICAP (Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program) community educator will explain the beneďŹ ts covered by Medicare Part A and B and how to choose a Part D plan that will save you money. Attend the presentation to learn the differences between a Medicare Advantage Plan and Medigap policies. HICAP is a non-proďŹ t organization that is funded by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid and overseen by the California Department of Aging. HICAP counselors do not sell or endorse insurance plans, companies or agents but provide objective information about Medicare and your options.

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Staff of the Palo Alto Weekly garnered 10 awards at the Greater Bay Area Journalism Awards dinner Saturday, May 31, including second place for overall excellence for non-daily newspapers. (Posted May 31, 11:32 p.m.)

Man shot Saturday in East Palo Alto A 38-year-old man from Union City was shot in East Palo Alto just before 3 a.m. Saturday, East Palo Alto police reported. (Posted May 31, 2:18 p.m.)

Upfront

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by the PCRF, a nonprofit that provides cost-free medical treatment abroad to children in the Middle East who are unable to receive it in their home country. His family connected with the organization at a clinic in the West Bank, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and from there, we were able to reach out to Dr. Rinsky. I emailed him and he was all for it right away,â&#x20AC;? said Nuha Shuman, medical coordinator for the nonprofitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Area chapter. Treatment of Hadiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feet began with a series of casts meant to gradually stretch the skin, ligaments, nerves and other soft tissue. In February, he had a small operation to lengthen his Achilles tendon, followed by a larger operation a month later to remove the middle bone in his ankle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This created enough slack to bring his feet to a near-neutral position,â&#x20AC;? Rinsky said. His knees were also treated with a surgery and a series of casts â&#x20AC;&#x153;to slightly lengthen the muscles that straighten his knees, allowing slightly more bending and preventing hyperextension,â&#x20AC;? Rinsky said. He can now bend his knees at about 45 degrees, allowing him to sit in places like the backseat of a car. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was a champ. It was painful, but he handled it like a pro. He was so thankful,â&#x20AC;? Shuman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first thing he said when they took off the cast was, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thank God,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;thank you,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and gave Dr. Rinsky a big hug, and he showed up in a suit wearing a plastic stethoscope because he wants to be Dr. Rinsky.â&#x20AC;? With feet that allow him to walk and wear shoes, he can now go to school, the first step in realizing this dream. When the casts were removed, he had walking braces almost right away. The custom AFO braces were donated by Hanger Clinic in Mountain View. Lucile Packard physical therapy clinical specialist Richard Gee was ready to get Hadi walking, while a walker donated by custom-wheelchair company Numotion provided support in the early stages. â&#x20AC;&#x153;None of the donors hesitated,â&#x20AC;? Shuman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right away, no questions asked, they were willing to help.â&#x20AC;? Hadiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother was â&#x20AC;&#x153;just in awe of all the support they have received,â&#x20AC;? Shuman added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an honor to help this family. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very humble and thankful for everything that was received.â&#x20AC;? Hadi has been walking on his own, no walker needed, for about a month now. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To understand what Hadiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feet looked like before, and what he does now, is almost night and day,â&#x20AC;? Gee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even just the standing process of getting his body over his feet is a new process for him.â&#x20AC;? Exercises included games like kicking a small beach ball while seated and throwing a ball at bowling pins while standing. With his new mobility, Hadi looks most forward to playing

soccer, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was his dream, to be able to wear shoes and play soccer someday,â&#x20AC;? Sherine said through an interpreter. During his time in the United States, Hadi has become a fan of the San Francisco 49ers, Chuck E. Cheeseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and the iPad. (He also enjoys taking selfies, mimicking the American teens he sees taking them.) He sings and dances often, even in his hospital bed right before going into surgery, IV already in place. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was not shy at all,â&#x20AC;? Samar Aburahma, his first host, said of Hadiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrival in the United States.

In fact, he insisted on going to the beach as soon as possible. Neither he nor his mother had seen the ocean before due to beach permit laws in the West Bank. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had only seen it in movies,â&#x20AC;? Sherine said. PCRF plans to keep in touch with Hadi and his family, since Hadi will likely need more AFO braces in the future. According to Rinsky, he will need to wear braces for walking for â&#x20AC;&#x153;at least a few years (and) will continue rehabilitation exercises to increase his range of motion and flexibility.â&#x20AC;? It is important for him to remain strong and active not just for

walking, but for growth as well, Gee added. Hadi will return home in late June to his father and siblings, bringing a bit of English, like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up, dude?â&#x20AC;? along with him. Most of all, he remains posi-

tive, always smiling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a very bright young man,â&#x20AC;? Rinsky said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think he has a good future ahead of him.â&#x20AC;? N Editorial Intern Christina Dong can be emailed at cdong@ paweekly.com.

Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District Notice is hereby Given that proposals will be received by the Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District for bid package: Contract No. JF-14 DESCRIPTION OF THE WORK: The work includes, but is not limited to: Grub and grade for a new DG pathway around the Jordan Middle School ďŹ eld area. Work includes concrete bands on both sides of an 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; wide DG walk surface and the replacement of existing plastic utility boxes with concrete utility boxes adjusting to ďŹ nish grade as may be necessary. Work will also include the supplying and installing of par-course station. Bidding documents contain the full description of the work. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit at 10:00 a.m. on June 5, 2014 at the site located at 750 N. California Ave. Palo Alto, California. Bid Submission: Proposals must be received at the District Facilities OfďŹ ce building D, by 10:00 p.m. on June 12, 2014. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful Bidder must comply with all prevailing wage laws applicable to the Project, and related requirements contained in the Contract Documents. Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District will maintain a Labor Compliance Program (LCP) for the duration of this project. In bidding this project, the contractor warrants he/she is aware and will follow the Public Works Chapter of the California Labor Code comprised of labor code sections 1720 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1861. A copy of the Districts LCP is available for review at 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D, Palo Alto, CA 94306. 1. A pre-job conference shall be conducted with the contractor or subcontractors to discuss federal and state labor law requirements applicable to the contract. 2. Project contractors and subcontracts shall maintain and furnish to the District, at a designated time, a certiďŹ ed copy of each payroll with a statement of compliance signed under penalty of perjury. 3. The District shall review and, if appropriate, audit payroll records to verify compliance with the Public Works Chapter of the Labor Code. 4. The District shall withhold contract payments if payroll records are delinquent or inadequate. 5. The District shall withhold contract payments as described in the LCP, including applicable penalties when the District and Labor Commissioner establish that underpayment of other violations has occurred. Bidders may examine Bidding Documents at Facilities OfďŹ ce, Building â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dâ&#x20AC;?.

All questions can be addressed to: Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D Palo Alto, CA 94306-1099 Attn: Ron Smith Phone: (650) 329-3927 Fax: (650) 327-3588

Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District Notice of Public Hearing on Increase in School Facilities Fees as Authorized by Education Code Section 17620 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that immediately following a public hearing on the matter, a proposed resolution will be considered by the Board of Education of Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District at its regular meeting on June 17, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. at 25 Churchill Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94306, which if adopted by the Board will increase developer fees established by the District against new residential construction to $3.36 per square foot and against new commercial or industrial construction to $0.54 per square foot, except for parking structures and self storage buildings which would be $0.17 and $0.50 per square foot respectively. The proposed fees are authorized by Education Code Section 17620 for the purpose of funding the construction or reconstruction of school facilities. Data pertaining to the cost of school facilities and the availability of revenue sources is available for inspection during regular business hours in the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business OfďŹ ce. Any interested party may make an oral or written presentation at the public meeting. The fee, if approved by the Board of Education, will become effective on August 18, 2014.

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 15

Michael Repka Before you select a real estate agent, meet with Michael Repka to discuss how his real estate law and tax back-ground beneďŹ ts Ken DeLeonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clients.

Managing Broker DeLeon Realty JD - Rutgers School of Law L.L.M (Taxation) NYU School of Law

(650) 488.7325 DRE# 01854880 | CA BAR# 255996

michaelr@deleonrealty.com

www.deleonrealty.com

Work in Downtown Palo Alto?

CITY OF PALO ALTO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council will hold a public hearing at the special Council meeting on Monday, June 23, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. or as near thereafter as possible, in the Council Chambers, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, to consider Council Approval of a Tentative Map to Subdivide Three Parcels Into 83 Parcels for the 1451-1601 California Avenue residential development on an approximately 17 acres site in the RP (AS2) zoning district, and (IF COUNCIL AGREES TO HEAR THE APPEAL on 6/9 and sets for Public Hearing on 6/23) Council Review of an Appealed Architectural Review Approval located at 1451-1601 California Avenue for the Demolition of Approximately 290,220 square feet of existing R&D/ofďŹ ce space and construction of 180 dwelling units, which includes 68 detached single family units and 112 multi-family units, as part of the 2005 MayďŹ eld Development Agreement. Environmental Assessment: City of Palo Alto/Stanford Development Agreement and Lease Project Environmental Impact Report (State Clearinghouse No. 2003082103)

DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC CITY CLERK

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB)

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Page 16Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

8:30 A.M., Thursday, June 19, 2014, Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Plans may be reviewed at the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue or online at: http://www.cityofpaloalto. org/planningprojects; contact Diana Tamale for additional information during business hours at 650.329.2144. 385 Sherman Avenue [13PLN-00528]: Request by Daniel Minkoff for major Architectural Review of a proposal to demolish the existing 21,600 sq. ft. one story ofďŹ ce building and construct a new 55,566 sq. ft. three-story mixed use building with two levels of underground parking for 103 spaces on a 27,783 s.f. site in the Community Commercial (CC(2)) zoned district. Environmental Assessment: A Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared and will be available for public review beginning June 6, 2014 through July 7, 2014. 411-437 Lytton Avenue [145PLN-00150]: Request by Hayes Group Architects, Inc. on behalf of Ehikian & Company, for a preliminary Architectural Review of a propoasl to construct (1) a new 3 story ofďŹ ce and residential building, (2) a 276 sq. ft. addition to an existing historic Category 2 residence, and (3) a two level underground parking garage under the new and existing buildings on a 15,031 s.f. site in the Commercial Downtown with Pedestrian Combining District (CD-C(P)). Preliminary Reviews are exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act. Amy French Chief Planning OfďŹ cial

The City of Palo Alto does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. To request an accommodation for this meeting or an alternative format for any related printed materials, please contact the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ADA Coordinator at 650.329.2550 (voice) or by e-mailing ada@cityofpaloalto. org.

Pulse A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto May 28-June 2 Violence related Strong arm robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Counterfeiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Credit card forgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Elder abuse/financial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Embezzlement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vehicle related Abandoned bicycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Driving w/ suspended license . . . . . . . 9 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Parking/driving violation . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . 5 Vehicle accident/prop. damage . . . . . . 3 Vehicle recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Alcohol or drug related Drinking in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Intoxication transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Possession of paraphernalia . . . . . . . . 1 Miscellaneous Casualty/fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . 1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Muni. code/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . 3 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Unattended death . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Menlo Park May 28-June 3 Violence related Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vehicle related Driving w/ suspended license . . . . . . . 8 False registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Reckless vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle accident/injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . 4 Vehicle accident/no injury . . . . . . . . . . 4 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Alcohol or drug related Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Drug registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Miscellaneous Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Gang info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Info case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Parole arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Warrant arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Welfare check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto 180 El Camino Real, 5/30, 12:56 p.m.; strong arm robbery.

Menlo Park 400 block Newbridge St., 6/3, 8:59 a.m.; domestic violence.

Transitions

Harry Shimizu

Births, marriages and deaths

Dolores Allen Dolores â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deeâ&#x20AC;? Allen, a longtime resident of Palo Alto, died on April 25 at her home at Stevenson House. She was 89. She was born Dolores Adeline Attanasi on Nov. 29, 1924, in Newark, New Jersey. She grew up with her two brothers in Union, New Jersey, and then attended college in Minnesota. Later she married Bernard Allen, with whom she had four children. In the early 1980s, she moved from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, to Palo Alto and became an executive assistant to the dean of the Stanford Medical School. Even after she retired around 2000, she helped out part-time in various roles at Stanford University and the Medical Center. She lived in Palo Alto for more than 30 years. In her free time, she loved entertaining her grandchildren and following sports â&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially tennis and football. She is survived by two brothers, Dominic Attanasi of Florida and Joseph Attanasi (Sandra) of New Jersey; her children, Mary Lou Allen of Berkeley, Joy Allen of Switzerland, Bernie Allen of Walnut Creek and Robin Allen (Bradley) of San Francisco; her grandchildren, Sean Allen of Walnut Creek, Nicole Borders of San Francisco and Jordan AllenDutton (Mesha) of Los Angeles; and her great-granddaughter Lavinia. She is also survived by an aunt and many cousins, nieces and nephews. A memorial service was held at Stevenson House on May 31, and a funeral will be held in Kenilworth, New Jersey, on June 14. Memorial donations may be made to Stevenson House, 455 E. Charleston Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94301.

Visit

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to:

PaloAltoOnline.com/ obituaries

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community

Harry Shimizu, age 77, passed away peacefully Monday, May 26, 2014. He was born in Seattle, Washington, grew up in Placer County, California, moved to San Jose where he graduated from High School & College. Lived in Mountain View and Fremont for many years and worked as an Engineer at Hewlett Packard and Trimble Navigation. He is survived by 5 children, 2 siblings and grandchildren. A Funeral Service will be held Friday, June 13, 2014 at 1:00pm at Alta Mesa Memorial Chapel, Palo Alto. PA I D

OBITUARY

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC ÂŁÂ&#x2122;nxĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;>`]Ă&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;­Ă&#x2C6;xäŽĂ&#x160;nxĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°vVVÂŤ>°Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;}Ă&#x160; Sunday Worship and Church School at 10 a.m.

This Sunday: Here Comes Trouble

Marlene Ann â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snookieâ&#x20AC;? Douglas Feb. 16, 1932 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Apr. 2, 2014 Palo Alto

Rev. David Howell preaching An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ We celebrate Marriage Equality

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

Mildred Christine (Haibeck) Riveness September 6, 1921 - May 9, 2014 Beloved sister, aunt and loyal friend, Mildred lived a long and full life. Born in Lismore, Minnesota, she moved to the Bay Area in 1960. A dedicated patron of animal welfare and the environment, she was an independent woman with strong character, well read, intelligent and compassionate. She was always devoted to her cats, usually rescued by her. She loved house boating and tailgate picnics while exploring western back roads and historical places. She loved jazz and blues, classic old movies and modern art. She was a talented seamstress and a fabulous cook. Her loving generosity to people and animals in need was exemplary. Although retired for quite some time, she expertly managed the Montebello Apartments in Mountain View for over 40 years and will be fondly remembered by numerous former tenants. Mildred is survived by her sister Doris from Kansas City, Missouri, niece Candi (Michael), grand-nieces Aly and Kira, niece Jodi (Mitch), grand-nephew Justin and grand-niece Maddie, all from Sunnyvale. Nephew Marc (Susan), grand-nephew Bob and grand-niece Ann, as well as nephew Ron (Laurie), grand-nephew Kris and grand-niece Megan all live in the Chicago area. In lieu of ďŹ&#x201A;owers, please send donations to the Sempervirens Fund at www.sempervirens.org. PA I D

OBITUARY

Marlene Ann â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snookieâ&#x20AC;? Douglas of Palo Alto passed away April 2, 2014, in Lincoln, California, of liver failure. She was 82 years old. Snookie was born in Palo Alto, California, on February 16, 1932, to the late Lawrence and Eva Ethen. She went to Addison Elementary School, then Jordan Middle School and graduated from Palo Alto Senior High School in 1950. She went to the College of San Mateo and studied art. She worked at â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Camera Shopâ&#x20AC;? for several years in downtown Palo Alto until she married her now former husband, Richard Douglas, in 1957. Together they had four children. Snookie was a homemaker and a stay-at-home mom. She loved to cook and made sure there was a home-cooked meal on the table every night. She was always the room mother for all her childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elementary classrooms and was famous for her cupcakes. She made each holiday special and loved to decorate her home. Her friends loved to see the festive holiday displays especially at Christmas time. Snookie had a beautiful singing voice and had a gift for playing the piano by ear. She was also very talented in arts and crafts. She made many of her childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothes when they were young, needlepointed the seat cushions of her dining room chairs and spent many hours at Ethel Cheticleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bam Ceramics or at Studio D creating all sorts of useful household items. She used such talents as a chairman of the church bazaars at St Albert the Great church working late into the night at her dining room table with other ladies from the church. She would also make and sell beautiful old fashioned sugar eggs, the ones with the peep hole and different scenes in them. One of Snookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite things to do was to water the ďŹ&#x201A;owers and plants in her back yard. She loved being in her garden. She very rarely left her home without her makeup and perfume on and was almost as famous for her fake eyelashes as Lucille Ball. Snookie created many of the Christmas window displays and worked part-time as a sewing teacher at the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business, Douglas Fabrics and Sewing Machines in downtown Palo Alto, in the late 1970s and early 1980s. For several years she would babysit at her home for neighbors who became an extension of her family. She also loved working at Donaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hallmark in downtown Palo Alto in the 1980s. Snookie is survived by her sister, Jo Marie Day-Erck of Lincoln, and by her four children: LouAnn Milward of Applegate; Kathleen Douglas of Roseville; Scott Douglas of Chico; and Marlene DeMarchi of Foster City. She is also survived by four grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at St. Albert the Great Church on 1095 Channing Avenue in Palo Alto on Wednesday, June 18, at 1pm. The family is asking that in lieu of ďŹ&#x201A;owers a donation be made in Marlene Douglasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; name to the American Diabetes Foundation. PA I D

OBITUARY

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 17

Editorial A sadly misguided board Defiant school board goes public with its strategy of resistance, hatched a year ago

F

or more than two years, the Palo Alto school board has been very intentional in keeping everything about its dealings with the federal Office for Civil Rights (OCR) a secret. Back in early 2012, we now know, the board and its lawyers were so confident they chose to fight OCR over the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handling of a severe bullying case rather than reach an agreement prior to the conclusion of the investigation, a procedural option that would have spared the district harmful and embarrassing findings of fact. That decision turned out to be a costly and fateful one, financially and otherwise. It led to huge legal expenses and findings that the district had violated the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s civil rights. All of these consequences were avoidable had the district acknowledged mistakes and worked cooperatively with OCR instead of resisting. None of this would have ever been known to the public were it not for the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family releasing the documents, because Superintendent Kevin Skelly chose not to tell the board or public about the agreement or the findings. When the story broke in February 2013, a stunned board made promises of future public briefings and asked the public for patience while it gathered needed information. No such briefings were ever held. Nor did the board heed advice to initiate a neutral and independent inquiry, a move that could have informed the board and public about both the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and OCRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actions and behavior. Instead, the board retreated into numerous closed-session discussions and meetings with lawyers where strategies for challenging OCRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal authority were developed, and a decision was made to try and re-open the case and obtain investigatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; notes, documents and other evidence on which OCR relied in reaching its conclusions. Not a word about this, or the costs involved, was shared with the public, except a mistakenly released email last June when board Vice President Barb Mitchell expressed her view that the OCR was â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong arming policy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;agreementsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at the school districtâ&#x20AC;? and asked questions about what legal means the district might have to counter it. Throughout the last 18 months, the district has refused to release any of its correspondence with OCR regarding their disagreements and concerns. Selective letters finally made public last week show the district waited months to raise objections to the OCRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s findings in the initial case. In what little they have said, in public and private, board members and Superintendent Kevin Skelly have instead questioned the motives and veracity of complainants, other individuals in the community, the media and now OCR. They allege the Office for Civil Rights has been â&#x20AC;&#x153;purposefully confrontational and disruptive,â&#x20AC;? causing damage to the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reputation and morale and leading to distortion or misinterpretation of the facts by the public and media. There is great irony in the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complaints about OCR, because the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own practices suffer from the very same problems. The district protests delays in responses to public-records requests while its own responses to similar requests have extended for months, well past legal timelines. It complains of the lack of email responses from OCR while one of the most common complaints from families is the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s failure to respond to emails. It objects to gaps or ambiguities in OCR processes while the district has not had legally compliant policies and clear procedures for parents and administrators until being forced to develop them by OCR. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t question the sincerity of school board members in raising their concerns about OCR, but their energy and the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial resources are being squandered by this tactic. And it will simply prove to be ineffective, as it has been for more than a year. Our focus should be on improving our schools and constructively moving forward, not trying to reform a federal law-enforcement agency. The hard costs of the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actions are staggering. In 2013, more than $300,000 was paid to the law firm representing the district in special education and OCR matters, three times what was spent in 2012, which itself was a record-breaking year. The district now estimates that 2014 costs may very well top 2013. It is especially hard to fathom why, on the eve of welcoming a highly accomplished and eager new superintendent, the board would choose to launch a public attack on actions by OCR that took place over a year ago in a case that is now essentially closed. (Glenn â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maxâ&#x20AC;? McGee told us that he was informed, but not consulted, on Monday night about the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intended action.) Welcome to Palo Alto, Dr. McGee. To say you have a little cleanup to do is an understatement, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safe to say that right now 100 percent of the community is rooting for you. We desperately need some fresh eyes and new leadership in this great school district.

Page 18Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

More creative solutions

More expensive to not

Editor, Restore the Charleston/Arastradero corridor to four lanes. The present two-lane configuration has caused gridlock at busy times of the day, causing drivers to cut through the neighborhoods to avoid the slow traffic on this important traffic artery. Palo Alto has seen lots of new building both for residential and business use. ABAG has mandated additional residential construction. This has added more traffic to the city and will continue to add more traffic as we try to keep up with ABAG housing demands. To keep pace, we should be adding more lanes to our main arteries and corridors. What has been the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response? Eliminate two of the four lanes on the Charleston/ Arastradero Corridor! There has to be a better solution to the problem of bicycle safety than tying up traffic. We expect better, more creative solutions from Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traffic engineers. Rich Stiebel Talisman Drive, Palo Alto

Editor, Governor Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s failure to invest in preschool in his Budget Proposal is fiscally wasteful. He says he wishes to avoid expensive new programs. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more expensive, however, not to fund preschool. Every $1 spent on preschool saves $7 by reducing remedial education and criminal justice costs, and by increasing high school graduation rates and future taxpayer earnings. Since 1980, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve built 19 prisons but only one university. Half of the inmates in California prisons are high school dropouts. This fiscal wastefulness is magnified in California, where half our students grow up in poverty. Forty to 60 percent of second- and third-graders are not grade-level proficient; those same children were behind when they started kindergarten. Funding preschool is a wise investment to avoid far greater future expenditures and to grow an educated, tax-paying base. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to put preschool funding in the budget. Please

sign and share our petition: capta6.org/petition Nancy Krop McGregor Way, Palo Alto Wendy Akers-Ghose Park Boulevard, Palo Alto

70 years after D-Day Editor, My memories of the D-Day invasion are vivid to this day. I was a little English girl raised in what was then the rural, sleepy village of Chalfont St. Peter, Buckinghamshire, England. My mother decided that at 7 years old I was now old enough to walk the two miles to school by myself. It was perfectly safe, after all there was no gas so there were no vehicles, so off I went. As I approached the main road I could see there was a long convoy of troop carriers full of strange foreign (American) soldiers being driven through our village. I walked along the road to where I had to cross the street and climb the hill to school, but how was I going to cross the ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä)

A grim ride Editor, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no wonder that VTA buses have become refuges of the very needy. The majority of riders appear wretched souls of a dysfunctional economic system. The other day I decided to use public transport and my bicycle since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard the many arguments in favor of it. I rode Caltrain to downtown San Jose from downtown Palo Alto. The ride was quick and comfortable, and my bicycle was accommodated with lots of space. At the end of the day, I decided to return via line 522 of the VTA. What a horrendous mistake! I was unable to read, write or even drink a beverage experiencing much â&#x20AC;&#x153;turbulence.â&#x20AC;? The ride was jerky and bumpy. I guess, in the name of speed, stops were quickly arrived at but rapidly accelerated away from. Although El Camino Real (the majority of that route) is a state highway (82), it was mostly slow going due to many potholes. I was unable to board my scheduled bus as the two bicycle racks were already in use, but a compassionate driver allowed another two bikes on board. This grim ride was not only unpleasant but very inefficient. The gap between the â&#x20AC;&#x153;haves and the have notsâ&#x20AC;? appears to be increasing, not decreasing. Lorin Krogh Encina Avenue, Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

Do you think the school district should challenge the Office for Civil Rights? Submit letters to the editor of up to 300 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Sam Sciolla at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

Guest Opinion A closer look at Buena Vista by Donald Barr and Amado Padilla s social scientists who are part of the Palo Alto community, the proposal to close the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park raised a series of questions for us. Who are the people who live in Buena Vista? How would the park closure impact their lives? How do we balance the rights of the property owner with the human impacts of closure? Finally, what do other residents of Palo Alto, in particular the neighbors who live close to Buena Vista, think about the prospect of park closure? In order to answer these questions, we began by recruiting Stanford University students to join us in visiting Buena Vista to become acquainted with the residents. Subsequently, we proposed a research survey of the residents with children to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Stanford University, the oversight body charged with ensuring that all Stanford research meets federal guidelines for safety and confidentiality of informants. We found that, of the approximately 115 residential units at Buena Vista, 69 have families with at least one child age 18 or younger. These families have a total of 129 children. These children seem to be thriving, with parents reporting generally positive educational experiences in the Palo Alto schools, access to supplementary educational resources when needed, and no record among the 31 high school age teens of having dropped out of school. The children also enjoy excellent access to health insurance and medical care, with the exception of dental care. It seems apparent that the lives of 129 entirely low-income children would be pro-

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foundly and adversely affected if forced to move to a less affluent neighborhood in the Bay Area. Such communities typically have weak schools, worrisome high school drop out rates (25 percent in Santa Clara County) and fewer health care resources. We also learned that most of the adults worked in Palo Alto or in nearby communities. Having put a human face to the park families, how do we balance their needs with those of the property owner? Fortunately, this question has been answered, in both state and local law. The State of California and the City of Palo Alto have each enacted comprehensive mobile-home park-closure laws that spell out the rights of an owner to sell, if and only if the owner provides adequate compensation to displaced residents. In the case of Palo Alto, that compensation must be sufficient to ensure that all displaced residents are able to find alternative housing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;located within a community similar to that in which the park that is being closed is located and has similar access to community amenities. ...â&#x20AC;? (Palo Alto Municipal Code, Chapter 9.76.020b) To address the question of how Palo Alto residents view our responsibility as a community to Buena Vista residents, we focused on the Barron Park neighborhood, the community that immediately surrounds Buena Vista. On March 31, after obtaining IRB approval, we mailed a short survey to each of the 1,650 addresses in Barron Park, as identified by the City of Palo Alto. (We did not include Buena Vista residents in this survey.) By May 1, we had received 554 completed surveys â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a response rate of 33.6 percent, which constitutes a re-

  

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spectable response rate. In the cover letter explaining the purpose of the survey, we stated, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will keep your responses strictly confidential, and will not associate your identity with any of your responses.â&#x20AC;? There was a randomly assigned number on each survey, to ensure that only one survey was returned from each address. At all times, we adhered to this assurance of privacy and confidentiality. We have no way of knowing who sent in what response. We found that 77 percent of respondents agree with the idea that the Palo Alto community should work together to assist the

park families who wish to remain in Palo Alto. Eighty-one percent agreed that the Buena Vista children should be able to stay in Palo Alto schools. We then asked about the level of support for the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal to close the park. Thirty-eight percent supported this option, while 62 percent opposed it. By contrast, 71 percent supported the option of current Buena Vista residents purchasing the park for market value and keeping it a mobilehome park. However, given a price tag somewhere in the range of $30 million, ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;äŽ

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Where do you like to go for cheap local cuisine? Ă&#x192;Â&#x17D;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?>}i°Ă&#x160;+Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;}°

Jessica Hughes

Alexander Corrothers

Peter Weck

Gerardo Garcia

Theresa McNulty

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PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ***************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp JUNE 09, 2014 (COUNCIL CHAMBERS AT 6:00 PM CLOSED SESSION 1. THIS HAS BEEN CANCELLED STUDY SESSION 2. Joint Study Session with Architectural Review Board SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY 3. Palo Alto Apps Challenge 2014 - Finalist Recognition CONSENT CALENDAR 4. Request for Approval of Agreement No. XXXXXXXXX Between the City of Palo Alto and the Midpeninsula Community Media Center, Inc. for Cablecasting Services in the Amount of $125,000 per year from July 1, 2014 Through June 30, 2017 5. Approval of a One â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Year Extension of the Building Permit and the Option to Lease Agreement Between the City of Palo Alto and the Palo Alto History Museum for the Roth Building, 300 Homer Avenue 6. Approval of a Construction Contract with xxxx In The Amount of $xxxx, Approval of Amendment Number 2 to Contract No. C12144101 with WMB Architects, Inc in the Amount of $xxxx for a Not-to-Exceed Amount of $xxxx for the City Hall Remodel Project PE-12017, and Adoption of a Budget Amendment Ordinance (BAO) for Fiscal Year 2014 to provide an Additional Appropriation in the Amount of $xxxx 7. Utilities Advisory Commission Recommendation that the City Council Adopt a Resolution Terminating PaloAltoGreenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Full Needs Program for the Residential Electric Customers and Reinstating the Full Needs Program for Commercial and Mater-Metered Multi-Family Electric Customers by Repealing Rate Schedule E-1-G and Amending Rate Schedule E-2-G, e-4-G, E-7-G, and E-18-G 8. Approval of a Three Year Contract with Northwest Woodlands Services, Inc. in the amount not to Exceed $552,950 for Trail Maintenance in the Baylands Nature Preserve, Pearson-Arastradero Preserve, Foothills Park and Grounds Maintenance in Utility Reservoir Sites 9. Parks and Recreation Commission Recommendation to Adopt a Park Improvement Ordinance for Hopkins Park 10. Appeal of the Director of Planning and Community Environmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Decision Approving Architectural Review of the Demolition of Approximately 290,220 s.f. of Existing R&D/OfďŹ ce Space and Construction of 180 Dwelling Units which Includes 68 Detached Single-Family Units and 112 Multi-Family Units Located at 1451-1601 California Avenue, as part of the 2005 MayďŹ eld Development Agreement. Environmental Assessment: City of Palo Alto/Stanford Development Agreement and Lease Project Environmental Impact Report (State Clearinghouse No. 2003082103) 1. Parks and Recreation Commission Recommendation to Amend Section 22.04.270 By Adding Subsection 22.04.270(c) to Prohibit the Feeding of Wildlife and Feral Animals in Palo Alto Parks and Open Space Areas 11. Finance Committee and Utilities Advisory Commission Recommendations that Council Adopt the FY 2015 Electric, Gas, Wastewater Collection, and Water Utility Financial Plans with No Planned Rate Increase for FY 2015 12. Approval of Contract Amendment with SV8 Equinix, a Fiber Interconnection Data Center, in the Not to Exceed Amount of $95,000 Per Year 13. Approve and Authorize the City Manager or his Designee to Execute Contract Amendment No. 2 to Contract C10135025 in the Amount of $336,172 with Alta Planning + Design, for Preliminary Design and Environmental Assessment Services for the Pedestrian & Bicycle Overpass at Highway 101 (CIP PE-11011) 14. Approval of Amendments to Power Purchase Agreement with Brannon Solar LLC and Consent to Assignment of Agreement 20. Approval of Amendments to Power Purchase Agreements with Western Antelope Blue Sky Ranch B and Elevation Solar C 15. Award of Contract with Ross McDonald Company, Inc., in the Amount of $606,913 for Custom Casework for the Rinconada Library (CIP PE-11000 and LB-11000) 16. Adoption of an Ordinance Authorizing the Operation, Management and Control of the Palo Alto Airport by the City of Palo Alto and Amending Section 2.08.190 of Chapter 2.08 of Title 2 of the Palo Alto Municipal Code to Add the Palo Alto Airport to the Duties of the Director of Public Works ACTION ITEMS 17. Public Hearing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Annual Assessment for California Avenue Area Parking Bonds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Plan G: FY 2014-2015; Adoption of a Resolution ConďŹ rming Engineerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report and Assessment Roll, California Avenue Parking Project No. 92-13 (For Fiscal Year 2014-2015) 18. Public Hearing and Proposition 218 Hearing: Adoption of Budget Amendment Ordinance for FY 2014, including Adoption of Operating and Capital Budgets and Municipal Fee Schedule; Adoption of 6 Resolutions, including: Adopting a Dark Fiber Rate Increase and Amending Utility Rate Schedules EDF-1 and EDF-2; Adopting a Water Rate Increase and Amending Utility Rate Schedules W-1, W-2, W-3, W-4 and W-7; Amending Utility Rate Schedule D-1 (Storm and Surface Water Drainage) to Increase Storm Drain Rates by 2.2 Percent Per Month Per Equivalent Residential Unit for Fiscal Year 2014; Amending the 20112013 Compensation Plan for Management and Professional Adopted by Resolution No. 9282 to Change the Title and Salary of One Position; Amending the 2012-2013 Memorandum of Agreement for Local 521, Service Employees International Union (SEIU), Adopted by Resolution No. 9277 to Add One new ClassiďŹ cation and Amending the 2010-2014 Compensation Plan for the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) Adopted by Resolution No. 9204 to Properly Record the Top Step Salary for One Existing and Create One New Position 19. Review and Approval of the Revised Draft Infrastructure Project Funding Proposal, Preliminary Transient Occupancy Tax Ballot Measure 20. Cubberley Community Center Update (Could be taken up in whole or part as Closed Session) CLOSED SESSION 21. Cubberley Community Center

STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Regional Housing Mandate Committee meeting will be on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 4:00 PM and will discuss: Review of the 2015-2023 Housing Element Update Administrative Draft

Spectrum

Letters ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;ÂŁnÂŽ

street when the trucks were so close together and traveling so fast? Was I going to risk my life and try to run between them? I did not dare go home because my mother would be very angry with me. I stood on the curb with tears welling up in my eyes, and there to my relief was an outrider who spotted me. He got a few trucks to stop just long enough to let me cross the street. Oh what a relief! Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how I delayed the D-Day invasion by 30 seconds! Jean Wilcox Sutherland Drive, Palo Alto

Guest Opinion ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;ÂŁÂ&#x2122;ÂŽ

this option seems unlikely. We then described a third possible solution. This would involve redevelopment of the Park jointly by a nonprofit housing developer and a market developer, with the creation of approximately 180 new apartments, as originally proposed by the owner. In this case, however, about 80 of those apartments would be made available to current Buena Vista families at rates comparable to their current space rentals at the Park. We asked survey respondents to rank their support for these three options. Most respondents ranked either purchase by residents or joint redevelopment as their first or second choice. In light of the difficulty in raising sufficient funds to pay the owner full market value for the property, the option of joint redevelopment appears to have broad support. A parcel map encompassing Buena Vista shows that it actually sits on two separate parcels: a 3.7acre parcel towards the front of the Park and a 1.15-acre parcel in the back. In fact, the rear parcel is immediately adjacent to a lowincome rental apartment complex owned and operated by the Palo Alto Housing Corporation. Might the property owner and

Why run for Council? Editor, With the announcement of a Palo Alto community member running for City Council on Palo Alto Online on May 28, 2014, I was dismayed at the lack of a civil discourse on the blog attached to the article. With the upcoming election in November, I hope as a community we can engage in a more civil discourse with those who choose to run for City Council. We should all encourage respectful disagreement on issues as opposed to personal attacks. This bad behavior in some instances amounts to adult bullying. We deserve better. Susie Thom Maplewood Place, Palo Alto

the city willingly compromise, with the owner assured of approval to develop approximately100 new, market-rate apartments on the front parcel, in exchange for making the rear parcel available to PAHC to redevelop approximately 80 low-income apartments for current Buena Vista residents? The 80 new apartments would provide housing for all or nearly all park residents who want to remain â&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially those families with children. This would mean an increase in overall density, from the approximately 115 units currently at Buena Vista to 180 units. This increase is consistent with zone changes allowed in the City Code and would not exceed existing height restrictions. This solution would create what is often referred to as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;win-winâ&#x20AC;? outcome, in which both parties get enough of what they were hoping for, and neither party feels as though they came out the loser. Such a win-win outcome seems also to have substantial support among Barron Park households close to Buena Vista. We believe that it would also have broad support among the Palo Alto community more generally. We hope that all parties involved will consider the win-win option we describe. N Donald Barr and Amado Padilla are on the faculty of the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University.

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Ian Ross lets paint guide him on his mission to bring positive energy to high-tech offices



by Nick Veronin formed his developing style. While overseas he realized that his relationship was weighing him down, as were his commitments to the ceramics studio. He came home, broke off his relationship and put his pursuit of ceramics on hold. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t touched clay for 12 years,â&#x20AC;? he says. Ross, who now lives in Mill Valley, says he prefers painting to ceramics, because he likes working in the moment and allowing his creations to guide him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ceramics,â&#x20AC;? he explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is very tactile, very sensual. You have to be really patient. Painting can be the opposite â&#x20AC;&#x201D; really immediate and fast.â&#x20AC;? It also helps that he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bogged down by the fine-art theory that he attained working with ceramics in an academic environment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve sort of created a technique on my own,â&#x20AC;? he notes, referring to his painting. Ross works mainly with spray cans and brushes. His style, with its hard crisp outlines, is clearly informed by street art and graffiti. Growing up in the small and sleepy Larkspur, Ross was enthralled with the graffiti that he saw on trips to San Francisco and other bigger cities. The urban density and the art that was created there were alien and enticing to him. Yet the trees and open space of his home town had an impact on him as well. The natural world can clearly be felt in his pieces â&#x20AC;&#x201D; both overtly, as in the large

Rob Evans

ike so many of technologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best-known inventors and entrepreneurs, Ian Rossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; path to success was an unorthodox one. Though he has served as Facebookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in-house artist and tops the list of artists tapped by high-tech firms to paint in-office murals, he had never planned to be a painter. If you talked to Ross 20 years ago, he would have told you he planned to be a sculptor. Born in Larkspur, California, to a pair of graphic-designer parents, Ross left home at age 18 to learn to work with clay. He emerged from his time at Orange Coast Community College and Long Beach State University with a BFA in ceramics, a large personal investment in a ceramics studio and seven years into a long-term relationship. Instead of putting his nose to the grindstone and settling down, Ross decided to hit the road. During his time overseas, away from the clay and kilns that had become so ingrained in his life, Ross discovered a love for painting, while simultaneously becoming disenchanted with the path he had been following. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re traveling you have to live light,â&#x20AC;? Ross says. He couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take clay on the road with him, so he started to sketch and paint. He remembered the graffiti and street art, which he had loved so much as a teenager, and it in-

Ian Ross is known for his spray paint and brush work and has painted murals for Silicon Valley tech companies such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Lyft. Above, the artist stands in front of one of his murals at Googleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters in Mountain View. painting of a psychedelically colored buck he painted at Googleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters in Mountain View, and in the more abstract murals he creates, with their free-flowing lines, which suggest vines, leaves, branches and rushing water. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to use forms that relate to movement,â&#x20AC;? Ross says, explaining that he has studied the Chinese art of feng shui, a philosophy focused on orienting structures and placing furniture within rooms to maximize the â&#x20AC;&#x153;flowâ&#x20AC;? of a given building or space. When he is painting a mural on a wall within an office â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which he has done for Facebook, LinkedIn and Lyft, among others â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he considers the space he is working in and attempts to respond to it. He aims to create paintings that complement their surroundings. He seldom approaches any mural or painting with a firm plan in mind. Rather, Ross just begins drawing shapes, which, in turn, help inspire and direct him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I

intentionally try to be working in the moment, without a plan, and let the completion of a piece find its way as I go,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In this way, I learn from each piece.â&#x20AC;? His process is similar to that of some authors or actors, who engage in a kind of dialogue with the characters they are creating. And, in some ways, it is similar to the process of many of the high-tech firms that commission his work. While software engineers certainly approach projects with a plan, they often encounter unforeseen hurdles and challenges that inform the direction their code must take in order to work around the problems that pop up. Ross says he draws inspiration from the tech firms he has worked with. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has opened my eyes to the way the world is changing,â&#x20AC;? he says, explaining that he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just referring to the technologies Silicon Valley companies are creating, but also the ways in which

the workers interact with one another. Growing up, Ross remembers visiting the offices of his friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; parents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It seemed like the most painful place to spend your life,â&#x20AC;? he recalls. Rossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; parents worked out of their home as contract graphic designers, which likely contributed to his dislike of offices. However, he says, while he would never want to work in an office, he does appreciate the work spaces tech companies tend to create for their employees â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with open floor plans and lots of natural light. He sees himself and the work he does as part of that problem-solving process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m attempting to improve offices for the people who are stuck in them,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a part of their culture.â&#x20AC;? N Arts & Entertainment Editor Nick Veronin can be emailed at nveronin@paweekly.com.

Rob Evans

From left:Ian Ross wears a protective face mask while spray painting a mural in San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mission District; interior of the Ian Ross Gallery, located at 466 Brannan St., San Francisco; a mural of elephants at Facebookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters in Menlo Park. Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 21

Arts & Entertainment

G U I D E TO 2014 S U M M E R C A M P S F O R K I D S

Worth a Look Art

Pacific Art League revamped

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The Pacific Art League has been participating in Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monthly â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Fridayâ&#x20AC;? art walk for years. However, according to Seth M. Schalet, PALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director, this coming Friday is special. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because it is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;first â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;First Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? that the Pacific Art League will observe from within the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newly redesigned and renovated building. For the past 14 months, the 93-year-old PAL has been in temporary digs on Forest Avenue, while its long-time downtown headquarters at 668 Ramona St. underwent earthquake retrofitting and an interior redesign. Everything has been redone, according to Schalet. Brand new gallery lighting and a new floor plan, which will allow for more natural light to penetrate the building, mean the entire space will be brighter than ever before. This will be of benefit for visitors to gallery events such as the upcoming First Friday, as well as students who take art classes at the PAL. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be a much better experience,â&#x20AC;? Schalet says. The building has also grown by about 5,000 square feet, increasing in size from around 7,500 square feet to 12,500. All of this was done in coordination with the Palo Alto Historic Resources Board to ensure that the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;historic integrityâ&#x20AC;? was not dramatically altered. The Ramona Street building was constructed in 1926, and was occupied by the Windsor Cabinet Shop for many years before the Art League moved there in 1965. The facade demonstrates an interesting combination of architectural styles â&#x20AC;&#x201D; recalling Spanish Colonial Revival, Mission Revival and Craftsman aesthetics, according to the PAL website. Schalet says he is excited to be back in the building and hopes many will come to the June 6 First Friday event, which will feature three separate exhibitions. In honor of the recently finished renovation, a juried

exhibit, titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wet Paint,â&#x20AC;? focuses on two-dimensional works in various types of paint media, such as oil, watercolor and acrylic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Re|Structureâ&#x20AC;? features four Bay Area artists â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including a sculptor, an abstract painter, a mixed-media artist and a printmaker. And finally, the Corridor Gallery will feature a solo showing of abstract landscape painter Ron Andrews, who works mainly in watercolor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are thrilled for the membership to be able to continue our First Friday tradition in our beautifully renovated building,â&#x20AC;? Schalet says, adding that he anticipates plenty of people â&#x20AC;&#x201D; both PAL members and others in the community â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will want to see the new space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With our location and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunset IIâ&#x20AC;? is by Ron the visibility of Andrews, one of the painters our (renovation) featured at the Pacific Art project, we know Leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Fridayâ&#x20AC;? that community back in their refurbished interest will be building. high, in both seeing the building and experiencing our curriculum and programs.â&#x20AC;? The Pacific Art League, located at 668 Ramona St., will be open to the public on June 6 for the monthly First Friday art walk in Palo Alto. Admission is free. For more information visit pacificartleague.org or call 650-321-3891.

READ MORE ONLINE www.PaloAltoOnline.com/arts For more events that are â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worth A Look,â&#x20AC;? check out the Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A&E page online at paloaltoonline.com/arts

For more information about these camps, see our online directory of camps at www.paloaltoonline. com/biz/summercamps/To advertise in this weekly directory, call: 650-326-8210

Athletics Alan Margotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennis Camps

Atherton

Alan Margotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennis Camps provide an enjoyable way for your child to begin learning the game of tennis or to continue developing existing skills. Our approach is to create lots of fun with positive feedback and reinforcement in a nuturing tennis environment. Building self-esteem and confidence through enjoyment on the tennis court is a wonderful gift a child can keep forever! Super Juniors Camps, ages 4-6; Juniors Camps, ages 6-14. www.alanmargot-tennis.net

650.400.0464

Arts, Culture, Other Camps LEGO Maniac Master Builderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Camp â&#x201E;˘

Los Altos

Build It Again With Bricksâ&#x201E;˘ the only LEGO Master Building Camp â&#x201E;˘. Come build, create, learn parts, how to sort/store all using Master Building Techniquesâ&#x201E;˘. All ages, week-long camps: 9-12; 1-4. Girls especially welcome! www.Builditagainwithbricks.com

650.935.2166

Join us for 6th Annual Free Music Festival

Palo Alto World Music Day Sunday June 15 3:00 - 7:30 pm University Avenue 50 Musical Groups! Jazz, Blues, Classical, Pop, Rock, Greek, Klezmer, World Music, Choral, Dance www.pamusicday.org

   

at the Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center

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Good for Business. Good for You. Good for the Community.

WE BRING THE WORLD TO YOU

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a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

SOLD

Jane and Pat Kalish 650.823.4624

Sunnyvale - New On The Market! High style in and out; 3 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom light-filled, open living space; Lovely, private yard; Cupertino Schools. Represented buyer.

Terry Rice 650.207.4142 trice@apr.com

$949,950

pkalish@apr.com

Morgan Hill - Large Corner Cul-de-Sac LotAlmost 1/2 acre. Over $200K in upgradesincluding: Kitchen, Baths, Flooring, Heat & A/C/ Huge Master Suite w/Walk-In closet. Represented buyer. $950,000

SOLD

Greg Celotti 650.704.1580

COMING SOON

Belmont - Gorgeous 2bd/2.5ba townhome that shows like new in great location near Carlmont shops, restaurants.

gcelotti@apr.com

Judy Decker 650.799.4294

Mountain View - Rare, 4 bedroom townhouse with a large, open kitchen, private back yard, 2 car garage.

jdecker@apr.com

$819,000

$800,000

SOLD

Pam Page 650.400.5061 ppage@apr.com

Redwood City - Charming remodeled and beautifully landscaped home. 2/1 in main house with great Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen plus a detached in-law unit with bath.

Lori Buecheler 650.387.2716 Lorib@apr.com

$798,000

Palo Alto - Two bedroom light-filled condo with large balcony in desirable downtown location! Across from park and close to restaurants, shopping and transportation. Small complex with pool. Call for Price

COMING SOON

Arti Miglani 650.804.6942 amiglani@apr.com

Redwood City - 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath with 2 car parking spaces this home offers 1400 sq ft of living space. A quiet location with a gated community. Close to shops, freeways and other conveniences. Call for more info. $625,000

Pamela Rummage Culp 415.640.3293 pculp@apr.com

Menlo Park - Conveniently located, this 1 BR/1 BA condominium is in the heart of downtown. It has recently been remodeled with lovely finishes. 1 car parking and storage are included with the unit. Call for Price

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Page 24Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

SOLD

Sherry Bucolo 650.207.9909 sbucolo@apr.com

SOLD

Palo Alto - The best of OLD PALO ALTO! This 1925 Charles Sumner classic was lovingly restored & expanded in 2008 w/the highest of craftsmanship & artistic detail. Spectacular 5 bd home on a 20000 sf lot. $14,750,000

Greg Celotti 650.740.1580 gcelotti@apr.com

Atherton - Beautiful 5bd/5 bath estate with 6,660+/- sf on spectacular 1.15 level acre with pool, tennis court, and putting green on premium cul-de-sac.

$7,495,000

SOLD

Derk Brill 650.543.1117

SOLD

Atherton - Represented Buyer. Outstanding newly constructed home on a park-like lot in the heart of Lindenwood.

dbrill@apr.com

$6,995,000

Derk Brill 650.543.1117 dbrill@apr.com

Palo Alto - Remodel, expand, or build your dream home on this 15k sf park-like lot in the heart of Community Center. Possible full basement and guesthouse.

Call for Price

Kathleen Wilson 650.543.1094

Palo Alto - Stunning and new! 5 bed 4.5 baths, great room kitchen. 8200 lot.

kwilson@apr.com

Call for Price

Shelly Stevenson Roberson

Palo Alto - Gorgeous 4bd, 3.5ba tastefully remodeled home. 3141 sq ft on over a 9500 sq ft lot. Offering vaulted ceilings, chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen, spacious living, dining and family rooms.

650.464.3797

Call for Price

sroberson@apr.com

SOLD

Jennifer Buenrostro 650.224.9539 jbuenrostro@apr.com

Palo Alto - Brand new construction. A modern designed residence built by Camphor Bay Development. 3700 sf, 3 levels. High ceilings, open floor plan and an abundance of light. Co-listed with Avi Urban. Call for Price

SOLD

Arti Miglani 650.804.6942 amiglani@apr.com

Palo Alto - This home offers large 5900 sq ft that includes an expansive basement on a 15222 sq ft lot. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths with radiant heat and solar electric power. A MUST SEE! Call for Price

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 25

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

SOLD

Derk Brill 650.543.1117 dbrill@apr.com

SOLD

Los Altos - Represented Buyer. Newly constructed gem on a 20k lot in the heart of North Los Altos. Grace and sophistication in an outstanding location!

Catherine Shen 650.543.1075 cshen@apr.com

$4,288,000

Palo Alto - Beautiful brand new construction in Midtown Palo Alto. 4 bedroom 1 office 4 bath. About 3000sf living space include 1 car garage on a 7500sf lot. Sold with multiple offers. $4,280,000

SOLD

Jenny Teng 650.245.4490 jteng@apr.com

Palo Alto - 5bd, 3.5ba, completely renovated and expanded in 2013. Stunning design & exceptional Craftsmanship. Close to Lucie Stern Community Center Museum, library, Stanford & Downtown shops. $4,198,000

Dante Drummond 650.400.9390 ddrummond@apr.com

Palo Alto - Prime Crescent Park location! Rustic Contemporary design w/cathedral ceilings, skylights and large secluded backyard. Close to Lucie Stern Community Center. Call for Price

John Forsyth James 650.218.4337 John.James@apr.com

Lynn Wilson Roberts 650.255.6987

Los Altos - Designed for indoor/outdoor living & for the work-at-home lifestyle, this remodeled home offers what todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s buyers desire. Floor plan is ideal for large families.

lwilsonroberts@apr.com

Jenny Teng 650.245.4490 jteng@apr.com

Palo Alto - Beautiful contemporary style 6 bedroom, 4.5 bathroom home with natural stone. Located in desirable Midtown Palo Alto.

$3,998,000

Call for Price

SOLD

Dante Drummond 650.400.9390

SOLD

Menlo Park - Prime tree-lined cul-de-sac location. Tuscany inspired executive home with 4BR/3.5BA+office. Two masters, one downstairs. Grand back yard.

Denise Simons 650.269.0210 dsimons@apr.com

Palo Alto - Stunning 4 bed, 3 bath newly constructed (2012) GreenPoint rated home in desirable Southgate neighborhood. Sold with multiple offers.

Call for Price

ddrummond@apr.com

$3,300,000

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Page 26Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

SOLD

Pamela Rummage Culp 415.640.3293 pculp@apr.com

Los Altos Hills - Mid-century modern 4BR 2 BA home located on a 1.78 Acre lot provides a perfect opportunity for expansion or a new build. MFA 8454 MDA 18616.

Grace Wu 650.208.3668 gwu@apr.com

Palo Alto - Custom built home in Barron Park. 5bd, 4.5ba plus office. Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen opening to a great room, patio, expansive backyard. Close to all schools & park.

$3,295,000

$3,250,000

John Forsyth James 650.218.4337 John.James@apr.com

SOLD Menlo Park - Located in the desirable Eva Voskerician 650.996.1834

West Menlo Park, this property awaits your new home. Approved plans for the main residence are ready to build.

evav@apr.com

Desiree Docktor 650.291.8487 ddocktor@apr.com

$3,198,000

Palo Alto - Fabulous 4 bedroom 3 bath remodeled ranch! Featuring a Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen, hardwood floors, Formal living room, separate family room and dining room off the kitchen. Call for Price

COMING SOON

Christy Giuliacci 650.380.5989

Palo Alto - Charm abounds in this 4 bd/2 ba updated Dutch colonial located just 2 blocks to downtown on a premier street in the sought after Crescent Park neighborhood.

SOLD

Lori Buecheler 650.387.2716 Lorib@apr.com

Call for Price

Christy@apr.com

Palo Alto - Gorgeous 4bd/4ba home with cathedral ceilings, formal dining and living rooms. Remodeled kitchen opens up to family room. Resort pool with spa and beautiful landscaped grounds. Represented buyer. $2,980,000

SOLD

Supriya Gavande 650.556.3890 sgavande@apr.com

Palo Alto - 4bd, 3ba 2540sf Midtown Charmer sold with three offers. Please call me if you are interested in selling your home. Working with several pre-approved buyers. Represented buyer. Call for Price

Derk Brill 650.543.1117 dbrill@apr.com

Menlo Park - This private retreat on an enormous 25k sf lot gives one the feeling of a country home, but with all the conveniences of City life. Adjacent to Facebook, MP Schools. $2,895,000

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 27

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

SOLD

Janie and John Barman 650.759.1182

COMING SOON

Menlo Park - Located on one of the finest streets in Menlo Park, this sprawling home on a 15,000+sf lot offers superb space and a comfortable setting.

Sherry Bucolo 650.207.9909 sbucolo@apr.com

$2,805,000

janie@apr.com

Palo Alto - Very desirable location close to Midtown center with shopping and excellent schools Beautiful 2850+/- sf 2 story home with 4 BR/3 BA 2 story home + 2 Car garage. Large picturesque 8700 +/- sf lot. Call for Price

SOLD

Umang Sanchorawala 650.960.5363 usanchor@apr.com

SOLD

Palo Alto - Charming 3 BR/2 BA remodeled home in Crescent Park. An open concept living design w/ flowing layout & skylights. Excellent location and PA schools. Represented buyer. $2,660,000

Michael Hall 650.465.1651

Los Altos - Elegantly remodeled, chefs kitchen, four bedrooms, three baths, near Los Altos Rancho.

mhall@apr.com

$2,595,000

SOLD

Denise Simons 650.269.0210 dsimons@apr.com

SOLD

Palo Alto - Stunning 3 bed, 2.5 bath custom Craftsman home with chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen, hardwood floors and beautifully landscaped gardens. Sold with Multiple offers.

Nadr Essabhoy 650.248.5898

Palo Alto - Newly constructed Craftsman style home with 4 beds, 3 baths Located in downtown Palo Alto!

nessabhoy@apr.com

$2,650,000

$2,535,000

SOLD

Lynn Wilson Roberts 650.255.6987 lwilsonroberts@apr.com

Los Altos - Storybook charm built with exceptional, creative details throughout. 4 bed 2.5 baths. Built by artisan contractor for his own family. In wonderful North Los Altos neighborhood. $2,499,900

SOLD

Will and Ed 650.331.1860 ecao@apr.com

Portola Valley - Exquisite new LEED certified home conserves energy and promotes sustainability! The 2,600+/- sf home has 4bd/3.5ba including guest quarters.

$2,498,000

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Page 28Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

SOLD

Janie and John Barman 650.759.1182

SOLD

Palo Alto - This beautiful Palo Alto home showcases an open floor plan and granite and stainless kitchen. An exquisite backyard is your private oasis!

Grace C. Wu 650.208.3668 gwu@apr.com

$2,465,000

janie@apr.com

Los Altos - Located in a cul-de-sac, 4bd, 2.5ba home. Updated baths and kitchen. Mature landscaping: patios, fruit trees, rose garden and sparkling pool. Close to town and schools! $2,425,000

SOLD

Liz Rhodes 650.722.3000 lrhodes@apr.com

SOLD

Los Altos Hills - Fabulous 4bd/2.5ba home with vaulted ceilings, spacious decks and magnificent Bay views from almost every room

Denise Simons 650.543.1104 dsimons@apr.com

Palo Alto - Fabulous 1925 Tudor Revival in desirable Southgate neighborhood. Updated kitchen and baths, spacious master suite and hardwood floors throughout.

$2,395,000

$2,395,000

Arti Miglani 650.804.6942 amiglani@apr.com

SOLD

Lynn Wilson Roberts 650.255.6987 lwilsonroberts@apr.com

Los Altos - Close in location, nearly half an acre. Upgraded Ranch home. Great floor plan with 5 beds/ 3 baths. Beautifully updated to live in or build your dream estate. Sold with multiple offers. $2,320,000

SOLD Palo Alto - Captivating light-filled mission Leika Kejriwal 650.866.5345

style home in prestigious Old Palo Alto. Extensively remodeled while maintaining the charm of yesteryear.

leika@apr.com

Call for Price

SOLD

Judy Decker 650.799.4294 jdecker@apr.com

Palo Alto - Charming, traditional ranch house in prime Midtown location: wide plank hardwood floors, wall of French doors leading to a garden and patio, abundant storage, 3 bedrooms 2 baths. $2,200,000

SOLD

Ling Lau 650.269.6809 llau@apr.com

Woodside - Quaint home with 1900 +/-S.f. on 27,000+/-s.f. lot. Amazing views of rolling hills, pasturesâ&#x20AC;Ś close to the town of Woodside yet feels like Tuscany. Award winning Woodside schools. Represented buyer. Call for Price

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 29

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

Jeff Stricker 650.209.1552 jstricker@apr.com

Derk Brill 650.543.1117 dbrill@apr.com

Mountain View - Recently constructed, spacious 4BR/2.5BA in new development adjacent to Downtown. Generous lot, highend amenities, great schools! Call for Price

Steve TenBroeck 650.543.1050

Los Altos - Impressive, newly remodeled 4bd/2ba home with family room is located on a peaceful street with outstanding Oak Elementary School!

stenbroeck@apr.com

$1,998,000

SOLD

Jean-Luc Laminette 650.833.9336

COMING SOON

Menlo Park - Represented Buyer for this superb home located near the Willows. Call agent for details.

$1,950,000

jllaminette@apr.com

Michael Johnston 650.533.5102

Mountain View - 4 plex with 2 bedroom 1 1/2 bathroom townhouse style units. Call for Price

mjohnston@apr.com

SOLD

Shari Ornstein 650.814.6682 sornstein@apr.com

COMING SOON

Stanford - Sold over list price, this California 4 bd/2.5 bath light spacious ranch has Spanish flair and is encircled by beautifully landscaped parcel.

Ted Paulin 650.766.6325 tpaulin@apr.com

Los Altos - North Los Altos 4bd, 2.5ba Ranch style home. Open beamed ceiling great room with skylights and formal dining room. Close to Shoup Park and Downtown.

$1,900,000

Call for Price

SOLD

Lynne Mercer 650.906.0162 lmercer@apr.com

Sunnyvale - Amazing Cherry Chase Eichler with beautiful yard and classic indoor/ outdoor look and feel. 4BR/2BA plus office, family and dining rooms.

Kathleen Wilson 650.543.1094

Palo Alto - Comfortable and spacious 3 large bedrooms, FR great room. Mature entertainers grounds and more!

kwilson@apr.com

$1,850,000

Call for Price

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Page 30Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

SOLD

Betsy Dwyer 650.279.8116 bdwyer@apr.com

SOLD

San Mateo - Sold off market- a beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home in the prime San Mateo Park neighborhood with a guest cottage in the back.

Pam Page 650.400.5061 ppage@apr.com

$1,847,500

Palo Alto - Crescent park 1925 craftsman offers new kitchen and bathroom in main house. Detached studio with new bathroom(288 sq ft). Top rated Palo Alto schools. New Paint, landscaping, etc. A must see! $1,800,000

SOLD

Pamela Rummage Culp 415.640.3293

Redwood City - This contemporary style 4 BR 2.5BA home is approximately 2800 square feet. There is an open airy feel created by windows and vaulted ceilings.

Liz Rhodes 650.722.3000 lrhodes@apr.com

$1,795,000

pculp@apr.com

San Mateo - Stunning Baywood Park Home Elegant 1930s 4bd/2ba home offers hardwood flooring, vaulted ceiling, large picture windows and basement opening to a lush outdoor garden. Sold with multiple offers. $1,749,000

COMING SOON

Anna Park 650.387.6159

SOLD

San Jose - Gorgeous 4bd, 2ba Shapell home, meticulously maintained grounds, bright open floor plan and high ceilings

apark@apr.com

Call for Price

Jennifer Buenrostro & Nancy Mott

650.255.2325 nmott@apr.com

Palo Alto - Beautifully remodeled 1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bungalow. Large bedroom and updated en suite bath. Garage converted to bedroom/ study bonus room. Walk to downtown, parks and desirable Palo Alto schools. $1,658,000

SOLD

Anna Park 650.387.6159 apark@apr.com

SOLD

Palo Alto - Charming 3bd, 1 ba Eichler 1,118 sqft of living on 6020 sqft lot in desirable Greer Park Neighborhood in Palo Alto. Represented Buyer.

$1,630,000

Dante Drummond 650.400.9390 ddrummond@apr.com

Menlo Park - Remodeled townhouse with sophisticated indoor/outdoor living spaces in a park-like setting. Expansive living room with great light. Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen with granite counters, gas range, and rich custom cabinets. Call for Price

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 31

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

COMING SOON

Michael Hall 650.465.1651

SOLD

Palo Alto - Remodeled cozy bungalow in Community Center, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths.

mhall@apr.com

Call for Price

Jean-Luc Laminette 650.833.9336

Palo Alto - Spectacular in Sterling Park. Representing the seller. Call Agent for details.

$1,595,000

jllaminette@apr.com

SOLD

Jane and Pat Kalish 650 823-4624

SOLD

Menlo Park - Warm and inviting home in fabulous location near Atherton Border. Represented buyer.

Manjit Singh 650.690.5509 Manjit@apr.com

Menlo Park - Stunning contemporary in Fair Oaks. Completely remodeled 4 bed/ 3 bath home with chefs kitchen, ligh-filled entry and lush gardens.

$1,525,000

pkalish@apr.com

$1,495,000

SOLD

Andrea Schultz 650.575.3632 aschultz@apr.com

SOLD

Belmont - Beautiful home w/stunning views. 3bd, 2.5ba with many upgrades. Remodeled kitchen, master bath and gorgeous hardwood floors. Convenient location. Excellent Belmont Schools. Represented buyer. $1,470,000

Liz Rhodes 650.722.3000 lrhodes@apr.com

Emerald Hills - Sweeping Views of the Bay Beautifully remodeled 4bd/2ba with gourmet kitchen, high ceilings, great outdoor spaces with Bay views. Sold with multiple offers.

$1,459,000

COMING SOON

Greg Celotti 650.740.1580

Belmont - Beautifully remodeled 3bd/2ba single story home on quiet cul-de-sac with excellent Belmont schools!

gcelotti@apr.com

SOLD

Nadr Essabhoy 650.248.5898

Palo Alto - Beautiful, sun lit 2 bed, 2.5 bath free standing townhome with large back yard in downtown Palo Alto.

nessabhoy@apr.com

Call for Price

$1,365,000

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Page 32Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

a p r. c o m T h e r e i s a s p ir i t t h a t d i s t in g ui s h e s u s . To g e t h e r w e s e e k b o l d inn ova t i o n s in th e way we manag e t e c hn olo g y, or ganize our c omp any a n d a d van c e t h e s t a n d a r d s o f o ur in d u s t r y.

Liz Rhodes 650.722.3000 lrhodes@apr.com

SOLD

Liz Rhodes 650.722.3000

SOLD

Menlo Park - Light-filled 3bd/2.5ba townhome near Sharon Heights Golf Course with high ceilings and family room.

lrhodes@apr.com

$1,339,000

Betsy Dwyer 650.279.8116 bdwyer@apr.com

Mountain View - Immaculate remodeled custom home! Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen, open floor plan, solid oak floors, spacious back garden & fruit trees. Desirable Mountain View location. $1,325,000

SOLD

Pamela Rummage Culp 415.640.3293 pculp@apr.com

SOLD

Redwood City - Built in 1879 this 2-bedroom, 2-bath home features original 22-foot beamed ceilings, paneled walls, and a massive fireplace. It is a registered historic landmark. $1,295,000

John St. Clair and Lydia Kou 650.740.8363 jstclair@apr.com

San Carlos - 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths remodeled home in White Oaks, with granite counter tops and glass backsplash in the kitchen and a large master bedroom suite. Great backyard for entertaining. Represented buyer. $1,200,000

SOLD

Lynn Wilson Roberts 650.255.6987 lwilsonroberts@apr.com

SOLD

Mountain View - Just sold over asking with multiple offers. 3bd/3ba townhome in Mountain View, bordering Los Altos. Exciting upgrades in kitchen and baths. Wrap around patio with access to pathway. $1,148,000

John St. Clair & Lydia Kou 650.740.8363 jstclair@apr.com

Belmont - 3 bd, 2.5 ba completely remodeled and expanded throughout with vaulted ceilings, skylights, lots of kitchen cabinet and counter space and fully landscaped backyard. Sold with multiple offers! $1,150,000

COMING SOON Shelly Stevenson Roberson

650.464.3797 sroberson@apr.com

Los Altos - Experience downtown Los Altos living at this stunning 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath light filled end unit just minutes to chic shops & restaurants. $1,098,000

Charlene Chang 650.543.1108 cchang@apr.com

Menlo Park - Charming home on private street, near downtown Palo Alto. New stainless kitchen appliances & updated bathrooms. Converted garage plus large sunroom. Excellent Menlo Park Schools. $999,000

apr.com | Palo Alto Office 578 University Ave 650.323.1111 APR COUNTIES | Santa Clara | San Mateo | San Francisco | Alameda | Contra Cos ta | Monterey | Santa Cruz Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 33

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Eating Out Forest on Firstâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s butter lettuce salad with chicken.

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The lunch hour at Forest on First.

Farm to play Forest on First a haven for young families seeking high-quality seasonal fare by Sheila Himmel

O

nce upon a time, downtown Los Altos was all about antiques and senior citizens. Now, if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have small children and a City Select stroller to put them in, forget about it. Eatery Forest on First, with its in-restaurant jungle gym and farm-to-table fare, is the latest of the downtown businesses catering to young families who want a restaurant experience everyone can enjoy. Once there was only Linden Tree Books, a landmark in its fourth decade. Now, Mary and

Brian Heffernanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The H&H Company operates six familyfriendly or child-focused businesses in downtown Los Altos. They and their four daughters under age 7 can walk to all these shops from their home. Mary Heffernan was preparing for medical school when she opened Academic Trainers, a small tutoring and test prep company in Menlo Park. Brian Heffernan was an attorney. In 2011 they opened Bumble, a fullservice restaurant in Los Altos where families would feel wel-

come and the menu would not be dumbed down for kids. Also important â&#x20AC;&#x201D; given that both Heffernans are from farm families â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was that kids should know food comes from plants and animals, not stores. There are good and bad sides to this development, depending on your familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s age and income. On the one hand, are Los Altosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; public parks dangerous? Are young parents too important to pack lunches and meet in a park? Is this is another sad step in the relentless retreat of the wealthy behind pay walls? On the other hand, the food I sampled was quite good. If I had small children and wanted occasionally to meet a friend for lunch and actually have a chance to talk, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d probably consider Forest on First a haven.

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And as the popularity of farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; markets have shown, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to know whose hands have brought forth your food. Producers and their locations are listed on a chalkboard at Forest on First. They are as close as Hidden Villa in Los Alto Hills â&#x20AC;&#x201D; source of eggs, produce and sometimes a pig. It is a challenge to keep up the seasonal menu. Even in California, diners expect to eat avocados all year. Another challenge is changing the menu fast enough to keep up with produce availability. On our visit, a menu item called butter lettuce salad ($12) was made of

baby red romaine and green-leaf lettuces, not butter, and had Brazil nuts in place of almonds. Still, it was a large and luscious mix, studded with woodsy maitake mushrooms, mild ricotta salata and tomato vinaigrette. The tuna sandwich ($12) also had a minor case of false advertising: Instead of watercress there was arugula. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an expensive tuna sandwich, but you are paying for hunks of freshly toasted focaccia from Berkeleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Acme Bakery, not a couple thin slices of commercial bread. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also paying for celery heart, capers, Castelvetrano olives and tuna conserva (poached, not canned). Crispy baby artichokes ($8) are perfection with mint aioli. Toto, we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in fast food land anymore. My one complaint was that the iced coffee ($4) from San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Bottle had been sitting too long and was bitter. Others have complained that the drip coffee ($3) takes too long and that the smoothies cost $7. Other amenities include cold filtered water, garbage bins â&#x20AC;&#x201D; simplified into plastics and organic, dishcloth napkins and real tableware. During our lunch, the only kids eating were in round, woodsy high chairs. You have to be at least age

Enjoy the ride.

Name: Rudi Wever Position: Sales Last Book Read: The Art of Racing in the Rain Last Movie: The Icemen Last Ride: Highway 9, across Skyline Blvd., down Page Mill Rd, and into work.

Mt. Revard

Aix-les-Bains

Favorite Epic Ride: Mt. Revard via Chambery to Aix-les-Bains... amazing! Bike: LeMond Tete de Course

171 University Ave., Palo Alto

s

650.328.7411

s

www.paloaltobicycles.com

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s

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 10am - 7pm, Sat. 10am - 6pm, Sun. 11am - 5pm

Eating Out 2 to play in the tree house, a play structure that hugs the perimeter of the dining room, equipped with climbing ropes and walkways. Those playing were totally happy. We did see to-go boxes for leftovers, containing $6 sandwiches from the kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; menu. The kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; menu also offers spaghetti with meat ($7) or vegetarian ($6) sauce, macaroni and cheese ($6) and fish and chips ($6). You could argue that dining in a play area does not prepare kids for behaving in real restaurants. Also, online reviewers have complained about the menu prices and the $5 charge for children to use the play structure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have awesome and cheap,â&#x20AC;? Mary Heffernan said. If it were free, people would come just to use the play structure and crowd out the people who want to eat. On weekdays they have â&#x20AC;&#x153;happy hourâ&#x20AC;? from 3 to 5 p.m., when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just $1 to play. H&Hâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next project is a ranch in Fort Jones, up near the California-Oregon border. There they plan to raise cattle, chickens and pigs, and particularly focus on free-range pasteurized eggs. They also plan to utilize the ranch to educate children about sources of food. Once upon a time, before the antique stores, Los Altos was all about apricot orchards. H&H is bringing back a bit of that agricultural heritage.N

the Chocolate Garage space will reopen. In the meantime, it is business as usual for the chocolate shop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have moved into the conference room next door until we are bee-free,â&#x20AC;? de Tourreil said, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is not what we had planned for the summer.â&#x20AC;?

ShopTalk by Daryl Savage

MONIQUEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOCOLATES TO CLOSE ... Not all business who leave downtown Palo Alto do so because of rent increases. Such is the case with Moniqueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chocolates . â&#x20AC;&#x153;After a very successful five years, we have decided to take a break when our lease runs out,â&#x20AC;? said Moniqueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owner Mark West, who will be moving to Paris, France. The chocolatierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last day at 539 Bryant St. is June 15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was putting in 12 to 18 hours a day. My business has gotten so big and so crazy that even on my day off, I was still working,â&#x20AC;? West said. The chocolate shop was named after Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter, Monique. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we started this business, Monique was younger. Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s her last year at Paly. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to take some time off so I can spend more time with her,â&#x20AC;? West said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had the option to renew (the lease). It had nothing to do with the rent. That was not the problem. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking into starting a shop in Paris,â&#x20AC;? West said, adding that he is excited about the new undertaking he faces. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not naive. Moving to Paris and starting a chocolate shop is a challenge of huge proportions,â&#x20AC;? he said. Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to close up shop was not made because another chocolate shop moved in across the street. Alegio Chocolate hung out its shingles at 522 Bryant last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My decision had nothing to do with the guy that opened up across the street. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re totally different,â&#x20AC;? he said. Customers have been trying to persuade West

to reconsider and have urged him to stay put. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was great to be part of the local community here, but my wife and I are looking forward to our new adventure.â&#x20AC;? BEE INVASION AT CHOCOLATE GARAGE ... Another downtown chocolate shop took a bit of a hit when it was discovered that an estimated 5,000 honey bees had taken up residence above the ceiling of the Chocolate Garage, 654 Gilman St. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have been working with a bee specialist to carefully extract the hive, including the queen, and then to relocate these life-giving insects,â&#x20AC;? Chocolate Garage owner Sunita de Tourreil said. The extraction, which took place last weekend, included cutting through the ceiling of the chocolate shop to remove the bees and the hive. Although the bee experts were prepared to suck out the thousands of bees in a vacuum and then relocate them to a beekeeperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backyard in Palo Alto, they found the bees had already vacated the space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They had to poke around through the ceiling to see where the comb was, then cut out a square,â&#x20AC;? de Tourreil said. In preparation for this, de Tourreil had to get an air-conditioned van to move hundreds of pounds of chocolate out of her shop and into a temperature-controlled wine storage space in Menlo Park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the only chocolate in that storage facility; all the rest is wine,â&#x20AC;? she said. Once the ceiling is repaired,

THREE NEW CLOTHING BOUTIQUES AT T&C ... A few stylish boutiques have signed on at Town & Country Village in Palo Alto. J. McLaughlin , scheduled to open June 13, replaces the space of three-year-old Crimson Mim , which still has its original store in downtown Los Altos. J. McLaughlin, based on the East Coast and offering classic American sportswear and accessories, is the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 80th store and its second location in California. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were immediately attracted to the aesthetics of Town & Country Village. The unique architecture and diverse blend of tenants is compatible with the way our customer likes to shop,â&#x20AC;? said cofounder Jay McLaughlin. The store is hoping to become an active presence in the community, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Town & Country felt like the perfect place for us to do just that,â&#x20AC;? he said. Also new to the shopping center is Planet Blue, which took over the former San Francisco 49ers Team Store location. Planet Blue, which started in Malibu in 1995, is a Southern California-based retailer selling beach-inspired and bohemianstyle fashions. The third new clothing shop to move in is Intermix, a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boutique. The T&C location is the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first one in Northern California. Its philosophy is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mixing fashionable pieces in unexpected ways,â&#x20AC;? according to the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. N

Heard a rumor about your favorite store or business moving out, or in, down the block or across town? Daryl Savage will check it out. Email shoptalk@paweekly.com.

PENINSULA

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

New Tung Kee Noodle House

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

ITALIAN

INDIAN

Cucina Venti

Janta Indian Restaurant

254-1120 1390 Pear Ave, Mountain View www.cucinaventi.com

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

CHINESE

Read and post reviews,

Mingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

explore restaurant menus,

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark

powered by:

and ShopMountainView

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 35

Movies

Edge of Tomorrow ---

Help Shape the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Future Join the conversation today and be a part of the future of our City!

Community members are invited to attend the second in a series of three workshops planned as part of the visioning phase of the 2030 Comprehensive Plan update planning process. Growth Management Forum: What are the regional growth trends in Silicon Valley and how do we manage growth? We will discuss these questions, along with what happens if we do nothing about it, and also talk about growth â&#x20AC;&#x153;capsâ&#x20AC;? in the current Comprehensive Plan, and techniques that other communities are using to direct and manage the pace of growth.

What is Our Palo Alto? Fueled by input and participation from citizens, Our Palo Alto is a community conversation about our Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. These conversations will create opportunities for dialogue around Ideas, Action, and Design. Together we will discuss important ideas and programs, tackle the issues the community cares about, and design a long-term plan for the future. To learn more about the Comprehensive Plan update as the process moves forward, visit www.paloaltocompplan.org.

When: June 10, 2014, 6-8 p.m. Where: Palo Alto High School, English Resource Center 50 Embarcadero Road This event is sponsored by the City of Palo Alto #ourpaloalto

For more information about Our Palo Alto, visit www.cityofpaloalto.org/ourpaloalto or email ourpaloalto@cityofpaloalto.org

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EVENT

(Century 20) Game over. Restart. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an option familiar in the virtual worlds of video games but, alas, not in real life. The new sci-fi action movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edge of Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;? uses the narrative structure of a video game to present a â&#x20AC;&#x153;what-ifâ&#x20AC;? scenario: What if we could keep pressing â&#x20AC;&#x153;startâ&#x20AC;? every time we fail? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fantasy thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been dramatically explored before, in works like David Ivesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; playlet â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sure Thingâ&#x20AC;? and Harold Ramisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1993 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Groundhog Day.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edge of Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; based on Hiroshi Sakurazakaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s light novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;All You Need Is Killâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have anything new to contribute, other than wedding the concept to a different genre, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good fit, resulting in a fairly eye-popping futuristic war story with a clever (to a point) structure. Tom Cruise stars as Major William Cage of U.S. Army Media Relations. With Earth losing a war to powerful tentacular, mouthglowing aliens, Cage is content being just shy of a draft dodger, with little more than decadesearlier, never-applied ROTC training to fall back on should he find himself in combat. And find himself in combat he does when he ticks off General Brigham (Brendan Gleeson), gets busted down to private, and winds up on a suicide mission. Cruise nicely plays Cageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anti-heroic freakouts, which add flavor and stoke a rooting interest in his surviving long enough to redeem himself. In a sequence that suggests the alien-war equivalent of DDay, the Army lands on the West Coast of France and proceeds to get slaughtered by the aliens. But when Cage gets face-fried with alien goop, he reawakens with a start a day before the battle. As he repeatedly relives the day, he eventually discovers that Special Forces soldier Rita Vrataski (Emily Blunt) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; celebrated as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angel of Verdunâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; holds the key to the mystery of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening to him, and together, they may be the only two people who can save humanity. Basically, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edge of Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;? follows the same beats as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Groundhog Day,â&#x20AC;? but raising the stakes. Cage first must work through his Cassandra complex, then accept his lot and work to change his situation for the better. By nature of the plot device, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edge of Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;? also implicitly deals with some philosophical questions about how we live our lives: We only get one shot at any given interaction or situation, but if we could heighten our sensitivities, we could communicate much better, get much further, and even see strangers as they really are

William Cage (Tom Cruise) dodges an explosion in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edge of Tomorrow.â&#x20AC;? rather than writing them off in an instant. And, as in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Groundhog Day,â&#x20AC;? the protagonist learns selflessness and finds love. The acting is expectedly solid (Bill Paxton has some fun with the role of Cageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s befuddled master sergeant), and thanks to director Doug Liman (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bourne Identityâ&#x20AC;?), the impressively realized battle sequences are rip-roaring. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all a bit wearying by the home stretch, and a resolution that (like much of the film that precedes it) only sort of makes sense. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not supposed to think too much at the movies. This is a game worth playing once, though you probably wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be dying to push â&#x20AC;&#x153;Restartâ&#x20AC;? any time soon. Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi action and violence, language and brief suggestive material. One hour, 53 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese

Driving Miss Daisy on Broadway --(Aquarius) Culturally speaking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Driving Miss Daisyâ&#x20AC;? can be a bit of a touchy subject. Because race is front and center in this story of an elderly, wealthy Southern Jewish woman and her patient black chauffeur, this otherwise wispy two-hander-plus-one could easily collapse under a sociopolitical weight it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all that interested in lifting in the first place. And so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no surprise that the play has returned very much as a star vehicle for old-pro actors. Winner of the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for drama â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and immediately made into a Best Picture-winning 1989 film â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alfred Uhryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play â&#x20AC;&#x153;Driving Miss Daisyâ&#x20AC;? was originally produced off-Broadway in 1987 before at last enjoy-

ing a Broadway run with Vanessa Redgrave, James Earl Jones and Boyd Gaines in 2010. Last year, that same production â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with Angela Lansbury replacing Redgrave â&#x20AC;&#x201D; toured Australia, where it was â&#x20AC;&#x153;captured for cinema.â&#x20AC;? A partnership between Screenvision and the newly formed Broadway Near You brings this Stagecast to movie theaters this week. Lansbury plays imperious Atlantan widower Mrs. Daisy Werthan, a retired fifth-grade English teacher who makes life difficult for her son Boolie (a stalwart Gaines). When the play opens, Daisy is 72, and a car accident has rendered her all but uninsurable. Boolieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solution is to hire driver Hoke Colburn (Jones). Himself no spring chicken, Hoke immediately proves savvy in his people skills and, crucially, at maneuvering around white folks. But his ultimate test will be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Miss Daisy,â&#x20AC;? whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resistant partly out of prideful denial of her advancing age, partly in fear of the familiarity and intrusion this black man would seem to represent. In sketches spanning from 1948 to 1973, the play depicts Hokeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slow breakdown of Daisyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latent racism and her walls of self-defense to reach detente and something like an arranged marriage. There resides the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nominal tension: How close can these two come to making a soulful connection as something like equals? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no mistaking â&#x20AC;&#x153;Driving Miss Daisyâ&#x20AC;? as anything but a lean play, and its comfort zone is almost sit-comedic, coming to life most often in the odd-couple back-and-forths between Daisy and Hoke. As a white man, Uhry accepts the limitation of his perspective, telling the story from the privileged perspective of the Werthans. Being the great actor that he

Movies is, Jones takes this as a proper challenge, imbuing his character with his well-known booming voice but also with subtleties of conflicted feelings. His Hoke is clearly a moral man, but also one who has chosen optimism not only as a survival tactic for being around white folks but for living life. Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; genius is in occasionally cluing us in that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a onetime choice, but one that he must make over and over again, and not easily. Lansburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance may be a bit broader, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no less satisfying, from the verbal railroading that establishes Daisy to her reactions to benign attacks on her equilibrium and, eventually, her physical and mental diminution. The old Dame has impeccable comic timing and control of her instrument, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a beautiful refinement to how she delineates Daisyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s softening, for better and worse, into second childishness. Esbjornsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production skillfully moves from scene to scene while providing a bit of scale to the staging. Five cameras unobtrusively capture it all. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a terrific gift for American theater lovers who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just hop a plane to Melbourne to see the 87-yearold Lansbury play Miss Daisy opposite the 82-year-old Jones: For a fraction of a Broadway ticket price, Broadway Near You offers front-row seats. Not rated. One hour, 26 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese

MOVIE TIMES All showtimes are for Friday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. Movie times are subject to change. Call theaters for the latest. A Million Ways to Die in the West (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 9:15, 10:45 a.m., 12:05, 1:35, 2:55, 4:25, 5:45, 7:20, 8:45 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m., 12:45, 2:15, 3:40, 5:05, 6:35, 8, 9:30 & 10:45 p.m. The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 20: Fri: 12:25, 3:45, 7:15 & 10:25 p.m. Sat: 3:45, 7:15 & 10:25 p.m. Sun: 10:35 a.m., 7:15 & 10:25 p.m. Belle (PG) ((1/2 Century 20: 6:45 & 9:20 p.m. Guild Theatre: Fri: 4:30 p.m. Sat-Sun: 2 & 4:30 p.m. Blended (PG-13) (1/2 Century 20: 10:45 a.m., 1:35, 4:20, 7:20 & 10:10 p.m. (No 10:45 a.m., 1:35 on Sat) Chef (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 11:20 a.m., 2:10, 5, 7:45 & 10:30 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1:15, 4:10, 7:15 & 10 p.m. (No 10 p.m. on Sun) Edge of Tomorrow (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 9, 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8, 10:45 & 11:40 p.m. In 3D at 10:20 a.m., 1:05, 3:50 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m., 2:20, 5:05, 7:55 & 10:45 p.m. In 3D at 10:45 a.m., 12:30, 1:30, 3:15, 6 & 8:50 p.m. In XD at 4:10, 7:15 & 10:10 p.m. The Fault in Our Stars (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 9:10, 10:10, 11:10 a.m., 12:10, 1:10, 2:10, 3:10, 4:10, 5:10, 6:10, 7:10, 8:10, 9:10, 10:10, 11:10 p.m. & midnight. (No 11:10 p.m. or midnight on Sun) Century 20: 10:55, 11:50 a.m., 12:50, 1:50, 2:50, 3:50, 4:45, 5:50, 6:50 & 7:40 p.m. Stanford Theatre: Wed 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Century 16: 9:35 a.m., 12:50 & 7:05 p.m. In Godzilla (PG-13) ((1/2 3D at 4 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 11:05 a.m., 4:55 & 10:45 p.m. In 3D at 2 & 7:55 p.m.

1-Year Anniversary

30% off EVERYTHING Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x153;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;ÂŤÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;iÂ?Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; >}Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;-Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x192;

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The Grand Budapest Hotel (R) ((( Aquarius Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m. (No 1 p.m. on Fri) Aquarius Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m. (No 1 p.m. on Fri) Holiday Inn (1942) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat-Sun: 5:35 & 9:25 p.m. Ida (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Palo Alto Square: 1, 3:10, 5:15, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. (No 9:45 p.m. on Sun) The Immigrant (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Fri-Sat: 10:30 a.m., 1:20, 4:15, 7:30 & 10:25 p.m. Sun: 7:30 & 10:25 p.m. Century 16: 9:40 a.m., 12:20, 3:05, 5:40, Maleficent (PG) (( 8:20, 10:50 & midnight. In 3D at 11 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 10:20, 11:55 a.m., 12:55, 2:30, 3:25, 5:10, 6, 7:50, 8:30 & 10:25 p.m. In 3D at 4:20, 7:05 & 9:35 p.m. In XD at 10:40 a.m. & 1:25 p.m. Century 16: 10:15 a.m., 1:15, 4:15, 7:20 & Million Dollar Arm (PG) ((( 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 10:50 a.m., 1:45, 4:45, 7:40 & 10:35 p.m. Neighbors (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 9:25 a.m., 12, 2:35, 5:05, 7:45 & 10:15 p.m. Sat 9:25 a.m., 12, 2:35, 5:05, 7:45 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 5:15, 8:05 & 10:30 p.m. (No 11:45 a.m. on Sat)

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square

GARAGE

Night Moves (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:05 a.m., 1:55, 5, 7:50 & 10:35 p.m. Palo Alto (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed)

Guild Theatre: 7 & 9:30 p.m.

Fri and Sat 6/6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6/7 Chef â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:15, 4:10, 7:15, 10:00 Ida â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:00, 3:10, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45

Rio 2 (G) ((

Sun â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thurs 6/8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6/12 Chef â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:15, 4:10, 7:15 Ida â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:00, 3:10, 5:15, 7:30

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: Sat: Midnight.

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

Three Little Words (1950) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat-Sun: 3:40 & 7:30 p.m.

Century 20: Fri & Sun: 10:40 a.m., 1:15 & 4 p.m. Sat: 4 p.m.

Roberta (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri: 5:35 & 9:25 p.m.



 

  

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Swing Time (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri: 7:30 p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;LIKELY TO REMAIN THE BEST MOVIE OF THE YEAR.â&#x20AC;? -JOHN ANDERSON, NEWSDAY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026; REMARKABLE.â&#x20AC;? -WALTER ADDIEGO, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A MASTERPIECE IN ANY ERA, IN ANY COUNTRY.â&#x20AC;?

Words and Pictures (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 1:30, 4:15, 7 & 9:55 p.m. (No 1:30 p.m. on Fri) X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 9:05 a.m., 12:15, 3:40, 7:10, 10:20 & 11:45 p.m. In 3D at 10:40, 2, 5:20 & 8:40 p.m. Century 20: 10:25 a.m., 1:25, 4:25, 7:30 & 10:40 p.m. In 3D at 12:05, 3:10, 6:15 & 9:15 p.m. (No 12:05 & 3:10 p.m. 3D on Sat; No 12:05 p.m. 3D on Sun)

-GODFREY CHESHIRE, ROGEREBERT.COM

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A TOTAL MARVEL.â&#x20AC;? -DANA STEVENS, SLATE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;EXQUISITE.â&#x20AC;? -JOE MORGENSTERN, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

â&#x20AC;&#x153;BRIMMING WITH EMOTION.â&#x20AC;? -KELLY VANCE, EAST BAY EXPRESS

-'/84:385453(8') %2(+5%&%*5)6,%2( 7%67:082',%77,)  62)99))/0: ')57-;)(*%51)56 1%5/)7

58-76")++-)6 32): %1 %/)(33(6 33( 58'/6 #))/0:8545-6)6 )5*351%2')6

( -Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152; (( -Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i`iiÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;ÂľĂ&#x2022;>Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192; ((( A good bet (((( "Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}

Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264)

6,1%2%1-0:  %&-%2#%:%03073 9994%03%073.''35+1%5/)7

CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-0128) Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260) a ďŹ lm by

PAWEL PAWLIKOWSKI MUSICBOXFILM.COM/IDA FACEBOOK.COM/MUSICBOXFILMS

Š SOUTHPORT MUSIC BOX CORPORATION

NOW PLAYING CINĂ&#x2030;ARTS@PALO ALTO SQUARE 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (800) FANDANGO

Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700) Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto 94303 | www.paloaltojcc.org | (650) 223-8700

ON THE WEB: Up-to-date movie listings at PaloAltoOnline.com

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 37

JUNE 2014

LivingWell A monthly special section of news

Population by age group Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964)

& information for seniors

Looming generational showdown? In Stanford talk, author parses diverging attitudes, voting patterns of old and young

W

The United States has gone from 16 workers supporting every Social Security beneficiary in 1950 to just three today. With Baby Boomers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the â&#x20AC;&#x153;pig in a pythonâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; turning 65 at the rate of 10,000 a day, existing retirement programs will become unsustainable. Taylor described the demographic change as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a drama in slow motion.â&#x20AC;? And the United States is living out two such dramas at once: A record share of the population is going gray at the same time the nation is en route to become a majority nonwhite country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Either one of those things by itself would be compelling and dominant,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fact that they are happening on top of each other has created generation gaps ... with the potential to stress politics, families, pocketbooks, safety-net and entitlement programs, and indeed our

social cohesion.â&#x20AC;? Taylor reviewed a fast-changing American landscape on issues such as income, wealth, immigration, race, divorce, interracial and samesex marriage, social attitudes and voting patterns. A U.S. population that was 85 percent white in 1960 will be just 43 percent white by 2060. The nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;intricate racial tapestryâ&#x20AC;? is changing, he said, driven by the more than 40 million immigrants who have arrived since 1965, about half of them Hispanics and nearly 30 percent Asian. By midcentury, immigrants and their children will make up 37 percent of the U.S. population â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the highest share in history. Intermarriage, illegal in a third of the states just 50 years ago, is on the

Living Well TOOLS FOR POSITIVE AGING

Care Partners | help families cut through conďŹ&#x201A;ict and confusion

Lifelong Learning & Leisure | helps you strive for a higher level of personal growth

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Handyman Services | hammer out efďŹ cient home repairs

Volunteer Opportunities | ďŹ t you like a glove

Avenidas Village | helps you get a grip on aging-in-place

Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center | gives families a blueprint to follow for aging loved ones

www.avenidas.org

­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;{ä)

JUNE 2014

JUNE 2 UNA Film Festival: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stolen Childhoodsâ&#x20AC;? @ Avenidas, 2-3:30pm. Free. JUNE 3 AARP Smart Driver, Part 1 2-6pm @ Avenidas pre-registration required, $15/$20 call 650-289-5400 for details. JUNE 4 The Changing Healthcare Landscape: What Seniors Need to Knowâ&#x20AC;? 3-5pm, @ Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center in Mountain View, (270 Escuela) RSVP to 650-289-5498. Free. JUNE 5 Polewalking Workshop 2-4:45pm @ Avenidas. Pre-registration required. Call 650-289-5400 to register. $18 JUNE 6 Oral Health Lecture & Screening @ Avenidas, Lecture: 10-11, Screening: 11:15-12:30. No appt. needed. Free. JUNE 9 Chinese Classical Mah Jong 1-4pm @ Avenidas. Call 650-327-6216 to schedule. Free. JUNE 9 - JUNE 19 Free Hearing Aid Cleanings! Drop by PaciďŹ c Hearing Service for a free hearing aid cleaning and listening check, even if you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy them from us! Los Altos: 496 First St. 650-941-0664; Menlo Park: 3555 Alameda de las Pulgas 650-854-1980

Complete schedule or infoorabout Avenidas events, 650-289-5400 For complete schedule information about call Avenidas events, call 650-289-5400

Page 38Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Baby Boomers

Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;*iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;,iĂ&#x192;i>Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;

by Chris Kenrick ith widening gaps in wealth and attitudes between young and old, is America in for a war between the generations? That is the question addressed by Pew Research Center Executive Vice President Paul Taylor in a new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Next America: Boomers, Millennials and the New Generational Showdown.â&#x20AC;? Taylor, who spent decades writing for the Washington Post, drew on volumes of nonpartisan Pew polling data to describe generational trends, resources and attitudes. In a recent talk at Stanford University, he said the aging of the population â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with smaller cohorts of working adults financing the retirements of larger cohorts of older ones â&#x20AC;&#x201D; represents â&#x20AC;&#x153;uncharted territory, not just for us but for all of humanity.â&#x20AC;?

JUNE 10 Tuina Class 10-11am @ Avenidas. Free. JUNE 11 Reiki appointments 9am-12noon @ Avenidas. Call 650-289-5400 to schedule. $30/$35. JUNE 12 Drop-in Blood Pressure Screening 10-11:30am @ Avenidas. Free. JUNE 13 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything You Want to Know About Hoarding but are Afraid to Askâ&#x20AC;? 1:30-3pm @ Avenidas. RSVP to 650-289-5400. $10 Change your luck at the Avenidas Friday the 13th Membership Drive! 1-3pm. Refreshments & prizes! JUNE 16 Senior Adult Legal Assistance 10am-12pm @ Avenidas. By Appointment only. Call 650-289-5400 to schedule. Free. JUNE 17 Hearing Screening 9am-1pm @ Avenidas. By appointment only. Call 650-289-5400 to schedule. Free. JUNE 18 Mindful Meditation 2-3pm @ Avenidas. Free.

Calendar of Events JUNE 19 â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Music, Art & Horticultural Can Function as Therapyâ&#x20AC;? 7-8:30pm @ Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center in Mountain View (270 Escuela), RSVP to 650-289-5498. Free. JUNE 20 Lecture: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rheumatoid Arthritis: RA Answersâ&#x20AC;? 12:30-1:30pm @ Avenidas. Free. JUNE 23 Acupuncture appointments 9:15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:30am @ Avenidas. Call 650-289-5400 to schedule. $25. JUNE 24 Avenidas Walkers 10am @ Palo Alto Baylands. Call 650-387-5256 to schedule & for info. Free. JUNE 25 Drop-in Blood Pressure Screening 9:30-10:30am @ Cubberly Senior Friendship Day (4000 MiddleďŹ eld Rd). Free. JUNE 26 Movie: Lee Danielsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Butlerâ&#x20AC;? 1:30pm @ Avenidas. $0/$2 JUNE 27 Historical 16mm Film Presentation: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Adventures of Martin Edenâ&#x20AC;? 12:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:30pm @ Avenidas. Free. JUNE 30 Skin Cancer Screening 11am-12noon @ Avenidas. By appointment only. Call 650-289-5400 to schedule. Free.

FREE Hearing Aid Cleanings & Listening Check June 9 9 to June 1

Even if you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t purchase your hearing aids from us. At both of our ofďŹ ces. Just walk right in.

Ask The Audiologist First

Q:

My Dad says he only wears his hearing aids when he â&#x20AC;&#x153;needs them.â&#x20AC;? But we notice he is missing out on our conversations when he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have them in his ears. How often should he be wearing his hearing aids?

A:

Our happiest hearing aid users are the ones who wear them all day, every day. Consider this. If your brain is not ďŹ ltering out unwanted sounds in a quiet environment, how can it re-learn how to ďŹ lter out sounds in a noisy environment? Research has shown us that consistent hearing aid use can keep those auditory neurons in the brain active!

About hearing loss and the latest hearing devices.

Serving the Bay Area for over 35 years! Los Altos Open 2nd & 4th 496 First Street, Suite 120 Saturdays! (650) 941-0664

Los Altos:

www.PaciďŹ cHearingService.com Open Your Ears To New Possibilities!

Menlo Park: 3555 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 100 (650) 854-1980

Do you want the best in home care for your family? Call Home Care Assistance.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Named national winner of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Best of Home Care Awardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by Home Care Pulse.â&#x20AC;? It starts with our caregivers. We carefully screen nearly 25 applicants for each caregiver we hire. Only the best are good enough for Home Care Assistance! We follow this with extensive training. Finally we invite geriatric experts to meet with our caregivers so that they are up-to-date with the newest ideas about senior care. Hourly and Live-In Care. Our caregiving services focus on two basic types of care: hourly and live-in. The service you choose is determined by your particular needs.



Hourly caregiving works well for many families. In this situation we provide trained caregivers on an hourly basis. Here the caregiver focuses all her attention exclusively on the senior.

Live-in care differs from hourly care in that we provide personal aides on a daily basis. Live-in caregivers are often the best choice for those seniors who need the companionship of another person, but who do not have intense â&#x20AC;&#x153;all the timeâ&#x20AC;? personal needs. At Home Care Assistance we mean it when we talk about providing the best in senior careâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;whether it is on an hourly basis or a live-in basis.

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HomeCareAssistance.com 148 Hawthorne Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94301 Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 39

Living Well

Generations ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17D;nÂŽ

rise, with nearly one in six newlyweds today marrying across racial or ethnic lines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These days our old labels are

having trouble keeping up with our new weddings. By 2050, will our racial categories still make much sense?â&#x20AC;? he asked. For the sake of generational comparisons Taylor divided the population into four groups: the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silents,â&#x20AC;? born between 1928 and

1945; the Boomers, born between 1946 and 1964; Generation X, born between 1965 and 1980; and the Millennials, born after 1980. He particularly focused on the Boomers and the Millennials, whom he characterized as â&#x20AC;&#x153;stubbornly optimisticâ&#x20AC;? despite being

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;the first generation in modern times to be doing worse than their parents.â&#x20AC;? Millennials â&#x20AC;&#x201D; more than 40 percent of whom are nonwhite â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are â&#x20AC;&#x153;political and social liberals, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re social-media wizards, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re highly educated, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not very religious, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re slow to marry and have kids, and many are saddled with college debt and lousy jobs,â&#x20AC;? Taylor said. On any economic indicator â&#x20AC;&#x201D; income, wealth, poverty, employment or unemployment â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;if you compare them with older generations, adjusted for inflation, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing worse on every single one.â&#x20AC;? Only about a quarter of Millennials between age 18 and 33 are married, while 48 percent of Baby Boomers, and 65 percent of Silents, were married by that age. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we ask (Millennials), â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Would you like to get married?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; they say yes. When we ask why theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not married, the most common responses have to do with economic circumstances,â&#x20AC;? Taylor said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not sure of is

Skilled Nursing: Where the

only thing you have to worry about is

getting better. Recovery from surgery or illness can be difďŹ cult on patients and families. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NCPHS Medicare CertiďŹ ed skilled nursing care. At our facilities, patients beneďŹ t from 24/7 post-operative care, wound therapy, enteral care, pain management and an extra dose of compassion. Our team includes RNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, LVNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, CertiďŹ ed Nursing Assistants, Rehabilitation Therapists and Dieticians. We are dedicated to helping patients get well, both physically and emotionally. To learn more, call 415.351.7956, or email Janey Dobson, MPH at jdobson@ncphs.org.

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These not-for-profit communities are part of Northern California Presbyterian Homes and Services. License #210102761 COA #099 I License #410500567 COA #075 I License # 380500593 COA #097

Page 40Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

whether those marriage rates will increase. ... One consequence of the low marriage rate is a very high out-of-wedlock birth rate. Today, 41 percent of all births are outside of marriage.â&#x20AC;? A voting gap between young and old has emerged in recent elections, driven by the different social and political values and racial makeup of the generations, Taylor said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just as members of the Silent Generation are long-term backers of smaller government, Millennials, at least so far, are strong supporters of a more activist government.â&#x20AC;? The generations also differ on a range of other issues, such as whether gay couples raising kids is a good thing. The wealth gap among the generations also has grown, with current median net worth at $173,439 for the Silents; $118,426 for Boomers; $30,920 for Generation X; and $4,151 for Millennials. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you look back 30 years youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d see gaps only about half that size,â&#x20AC;? Taylor said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The growth of income and wealth inequality is true across the whole population and certainly true if you look at different age groups.â&#x20AC;? Despite their differences, Taylor sees little evidence of an intergenerational war on the horizon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A generational war needs combatants, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very little evidence that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen that these generations are spoiling for a fight,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we probe around the question of generational differences, how people feel about each other, we find that, across the board, young adults have a great deal of respect. They love their parents and their grandparents. If you ask which group has better moral values, the old or the young ... eight in 10 of the young say the old, as do the old. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be clear, they have very different political and social values.â&#x20AC;? Taylor said thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a growing realization of the problem, and expressed hope that Millennials will take the lead on finding solutions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is not going to be easy,â&#x20AC;? he said, predicting a â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;share the painâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; solution that ultimately involves more taxes and probably some benefit cuts. When you have the affected parties by cohort with such different political views, it makes it more difficult.â&#x20AC;? The saving grace, Taylor said, is that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the most important realm of peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives is their family lives, and we see a lot of evidence in attitudes, behaviors and living arrangements that generational interdependence has become the coin of the realm. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much more of it than there used to be.â&#x20AC;? Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s May 14 talk at Stanford was co-sponsored by the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center on Longevity, the Center on Advancing Decision Making in Aging, and the Center on Demography and Economics of Health and Aging. For more details, see pewresearch.org/next-america/. N Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@ paweekly.com.

Living Well

Senior Focus HOME SAFETY CHECKS ... A company that specializes in senior care is offering free home safety checks through the month of June. The Mountain View office of Home Instead Senior Care will send representatives to homes for free, on a time-available basis, or send a copy of its home safety checklist. Many seniors land in the emergency room with injuries from home accidents that could have been prevented, such as falls related to throw rugs or loose railings, the company said. To request an inspection, call 650-691-9671. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP ... Avenidas holds free support sessions for partners or spouses of people coping with medical, mental health or cognitive decline issues affecting their quality of life. This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sessions are June 9 and June 23. For more information, call Paula Wolfson at 650-289-5438.

Making the decision to move, selling your home, and moving is a big job. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be overwhelming. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to do it all alone.

Nancy and her experienced team will assist you from start to ďŹ nish. Planning Prioritizing Pricing and marketing your home Completing the myriad of forms Negotiating offers Managing the escrow process Packing Cleaning Estate Sales Donations Finalizing your sale while coordinating with you and your family

NANCY GOLDCAMP Seniors Real Estate Specialist CertiďŹ ed Residential Specialist

(650) 752-0720 www.nancygoldcamp.com DRE # 00787851

or advisors to assure a successful outcome

AT THE MOVIES ... Popcorn and drinks are served at Avenidas movie showings every Thursday. This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s selections are â&#x20AC;&#x153;RED 2â&#x20AC;? on June 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bucket Listâ&#x20AC;? on June 19 and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Butlerâ&#x20AC;? on June 26. Screenings begin at 1:30 p.m., and the price is free for Avenidas members, $2 for nonmembers. Also in June, Avenidas will hold free screenings of two older films. Join film historian Jim Chase for a brief discussion about the history of 16millimeter films and the screening of two such movies: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re My Everythingâ&#x20AC;? from 1949, to be shown June 13, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Adventures of Martin Edenâ&#x20AC;? from 1942, to be shown June 27. WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HOARDING ... Avenidas calls hoarding a serious problem â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;rife with misinformation, myths and unanswered questionsâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; affecting millions of Americans and their families. Learn definitions, risks, interventions and resources to help yourself and loved ones in a workshop Friday, June 13, at 1:30 p.m. Admission is $10, and preregistration is requested at 650289-5400. AFTER A DEMENTIA DIAGNOSIS ... A dementia researcher will discuss what people should do after a diagnosis of dementia in a public presentation June 21. David Troxel will cover steps to take, and local residents will share their personal experiences with managing dementia care in a gathering at Terraces at Los Altos, 373 Pine Lane, Los Altos. For more information, contact Terraces Executive Director Rae Holt at rholt@abhow.com or 650-948-8291. N

Introducing Your Style, Your

NEIGHBORHOOD Our Apartment Homes.

Welcome to Webster house, Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most gracious senior living community, now a member of the not-for-proďŹ t organization that owns and operates Canterbury Woods, Los Gatos Meadows, San Francisco Towers, Spring Lake Village, and St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Towers. Here, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll enjoy the rare combination of ideal location, dedicated staff, amenities, and services, all within walking distance of downtown Palo Alto, where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd a mix of shops, restaurants, and art galleries. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also ďŹ nd peace of mind and a welcoming community offering the advantages of continuing care. To learn more, or for your personal visit, please call 650.838.4004.

Your style, your neighborhood. Items for Senior Focus may be emailed to Palo Alto Weekly Staff Writer Chris Kenrick at ckenrick@paweekly.com.

401 Webster Street, Palo Alto, CA 94301

websterhousepaloalto.org

A not-for-proďŹ t community owned and operated by JTM/Lytton Gardens and Episcopal Senior Communities. License No. 435294364 COA #246. EPWH695-01AA 060614

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Cover Story

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Glenn â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maxâ&#x20AC;? McGee enjoys a moment with students at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy in Aurora, Illinois, where he was president until 2013.

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pend 48 hours at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy (IMSA) in Aurora, Illinois, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll start to hear from everyone â&#x20AC;&#x201D; students and faculty, the interim president and a longtime receptionist â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the same descriptors of former President Glenn â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maxâ&#x20AC;? McGee. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a charismatic, gregarious people person who seemingly knows all 650 IMSA students, as well as faculty and staff, by first name. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full of energy, with a larger-than-life presence and trademark beaming smile that revived the school â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and subsequently left a gaping hole after his early departure in 2013. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thoughtful (sending handwritten notes to staff at major milestones, like the birth of a child) and encouraging (so much so that one teacher who was considering leaving IMSA decided to stay after McGee came on board). Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a hands-on â&#x20AC;&#x153;ideas guyâ&#x20AC;? who loves experimentation and taking on new challenges. He has an open-door policy that made IMSA students, teachers and staff alike feel like they could go directly to him with any concern or idea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought long and hard about Max, and the best thing I can say is I have never heard anyone say a bad word against him,â&#x20AC;? said Peg Cain, who has taught English at IMSA for 12 years and known McGee for a total of 20. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an amazing thing at this place. He is loved.â&#x20AC;? Beyond his effervescent charisma, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also hear that he knows how to get things done. Programs that people had trouble implement-

The entrepreneurial

educator The new head of Palo Alto schools, Max McGee, comes with a long career in education by Elena Kadvany ing before his tenure were put into place after he came on board. He moved IMSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new strategic plan forward. Much-needed money for the state-funded school was brought in, with McGee, as former Illinois state superintendent, already wellversed at rubbing shoulders with legislators in Springfield. This beloved, accessible â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and ambitious â&#x20AC;&#x201D; administrator is the person the Palo Alto Unified School District has selected as its new superintendent, with the school board set to approve his hiring on June 17. McGee will replace Superintendent Kevin Skelly, who announced in an email in February that after seven years, he would resign effective June 30. The board officially offered McGee the job â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and he accepted â&#x20AC;&#x201D; after visiting IMSA on May 22. Board members met with McGee and his past colleagues, who said they were asked to provide concrete evidence as to the type of administrator and person he is. School board President Barb

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Mitchell said they left Illinois knowing that McGee â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who has held positions at almost every level of education, from teacher to principal to district and state superintendent â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was the right choice for Palo Alto. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was impressed by the fact that Dr. McGee knew the names of every student and staff member who walked by,â&#x20AC;? Mitchell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That would be hard to orchestrate. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been away for a year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That said a lot about the depth of his relationships. He likes people, and they like him.â&#x20AC;? She said she was impressed by his commitments to STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education and to innovative programs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; student research projects, international collaboration, new technologies, and a private, international boarding school in New Jersey that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headed for the past year. That, combined with his tangible efforts to support struggling students â&#x20AC;&#x201D; such as a reading initiative launched in

a district where boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reading levels in the public school were lower than female students â&#x20AC;&#x201D; make him a prime fit for Palo Alto. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The short answer is his values will resonate really well in our district community, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just talk,â&#x20AC;? Mitchell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of walk there, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s evident in his accomplishments.â&#x20AC;? Though he admits he has much to learn about the Palo Alto school district, McGee himself has identified three top priorities that mirror those parents and education officials have voiced along the way as necessary for the new superintendent. He told the Weekly in Aurora that he plans to look at Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s achievement gap and make sure all students, â&#x20AC;&#x153;especially those who are underserved and underrepresented,â&#x20AC;? have opportunities and access. Secondly, he wants to move the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic plan forward â&#x20AC;&#x201D; something he accomplished at IMSA in a way the previous president hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been able to,

board members there said. His third priority: open, transparent communication. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think at least from what I read in the papers, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to have transparent communication,â&#x20AC;? he said, referring to Palo Alto. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found out during your visit here that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m kind of about that. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really open, and I believe in that.â&#x20AC;?

An â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Energizer bunnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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hough McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s colleagues may never have heard a negative word spoken about him, one aspect of his career has caught peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention: McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tendency to move from job to job and organization to organization. From his start as a Missouri teacher in the 1970s to his three years as Illinois state superintendent and his headship of the private Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science, McGee has held at least 10 jobs throughout his career. His longest tenure in a job was seven years. In a March 2013 interview with IMSA student newspaper, The Acronym, McGee admitted that his greatest weakness is a lack of focus. (See https://www.YouTube. com/AcronymIMSA for video of interview.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I find it very easy to focus on too many things at once,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are times when I really need to sit and just focus on one topic and have two or three priorities versus five, six or seven priorities.â&#x20AC;? IMSA interim president Cathy

Cover Story â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was not really putting paper out and trying to find jobs all over the United States,â&#x20AC;? McGee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wow, this would be a tremendous fit.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I am 63 years old; I still have plenty energy and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m proud of the single school I started in Princeton, but what a great opportunity to serve and to lead in a high-performing district that still has room to improve.â&#x20AC;?

From a Missouri classroom to the Illinois capital

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cGee, who holds a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and doctorate in educational administration from The University of Chicago and a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in political science from Dartmouth College, started his career as a teacher in Southfield, Missouri. In 1975, he joined the Illinois school system, and he stayed until 2013, when he resigned from IMSA to launch PRISMS. McGee was a teacher in Darien, Illinois, for five years before becoming a principal in 1980. In 1986, he took a superintendent position at Aptakisic-Tripp District 102 in Buffalo Grove, followed five years later by the same job at a larger K-8 district â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Deerfield School District 109 in Deerfield. In 1998, McGee became Illinois state superintendent of education, an appointed position overseeing two million students in 900 school districts. His crowning achievements during that time include implementing new Illinois Learning Standards, much like the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Common Core; helping to put a new state assessment program into place; incorporating the ACT into the Prairie State Examination for the first time; and emphasizing and supporting through legislation and funding early childhood development and reading programs, in particular. Perhaps the more significant impact of his time as state superintendent was the political savvy and skilled familiarity he gained with the state legislature and the way things ran in the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here in Chicago, as Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure you know, politics is a blood sport,â&#x20AC;? said IMSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cain, who as president of a nonprofit education foundation in Chicago also worked with McGee when he was state superintendent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Max deals with it as well as anyone I know, and it looks like that skill set might come in handy (in Palo Alto).â&#x20AC;? Cain said the state superintendent who preceded McGee faced the challenging charge of implementing a new alternativecertification program but that McGee was â&#x20AC;&#x153;very supportive about spreading itâ&#x20AC;? when he came on board soon thereafter. In August 2001, McGee announced he would not seek renewal of his current contract as state superintendent, which ended in that December. A news article from the Daily Herald in Illinois said there had been speculation the board may have been considering firing him. McGee told the Weekly that the board faced pressure from

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Veal, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been with the school since its inception in 1986, observed: â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an) Energizer bunny. ... He loves ideas. You can throw 50 ideas at him, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be fascinated with all 50 and want to learn about it.â&#x20AC;? McGee characterized his career trajectory in terms of tackling new projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a guy that likes to get things done. ... When weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made some improvements ... I like to do new things and new challenges. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just who I am.â&#x20AC;? At times, he has left a job before his contract expired, catching some colleagues, but not all, off guard. He left the state superintendent job after three years. He left IMSA with one year to go on his contract. He is leaving his current school, Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science (PRISMS), after one year. Those closest to him at IMSA were surprised when he announced his resignation in 2013. Veal said she and McGee had often discussed â&#x20AC;&#x153;responsible succession planningâ&#x20AC;? and a staggered retirement schedule that would always leave someone well-prepared to serve in the top administrative positions. At the time, the principal and chief financial officer were also on their way out, and Veal herself was considering retirement. She said she reconsidered her plans after McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I reconsidered IMSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in my DNA, 20-something years,â&#x20AC;? she said. However, longtime IMSA board member Steven Isoye, currently a superintendent of another Illinois school district, said that McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision was not all that surprising, as he had finished his work in implementing the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic plan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always the potential that someone might decide at that point in time to do something else if the opportunity came forward,â&#x20AC;? Isoye said. McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career path has garnered notice from people with a vested interest in his future in Palo Alto. At the Palo Alto school boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s May 27 meeting, its first after the Illinois visit, former longtime Palo Alto High School college adviser Leslie Braun urged the board to think deeply about why McGee is interested in taking the helm in Palo Alto. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why is Dr. McGee interested in PAUSD, after only a year at this (PRISMS) school? Please consider carefully whether this candidate is the right fit for PAUSD,â&#x20AC;? she told the board. Mitchell was quick to tell Braun that McGee, like three out of four semi-finalists for the job, did not apply for the position but instead was recruited. A consultant at Leadership Associates, the firm the district hired to conduct the superintendent search, personally knows McGee and suggested they look at him as a candidate. McGee told the Weekly as much during an interview in Aurora the week before.

Glenn â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maxâ&#x20AC;? McGee, second from left, leads the Palo Alto Board of Education, district staff and parent volunteers on a tour of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy on May 22. then-Governor George Ryan after McGee successfully fought Ryan on a deal to funnel â&#x20AC;&#x153;a significant amount of public money into private and parochial schools.â&#x20AC;? However, in a letter announcing his resignation, he wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;At this point in my career, I believe that change needs to happen more rapidly, and in that vein I believe that the State Board would be better served by a new leader who can

bring different experiences and skills to the table.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has been frustrating not to give our agency and my employees the time and attention they need and deserve, and it has been frustrating trying to maintain the focus needed to excel while balancing far too numerous competing demands on my time,â&#x20AC;? he wrote. An announcement from the state board highlighted the prog-

ress made under his purview but expressed concern about Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ever-widening achievement gap and vast numbers of students still failing to meet state standards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During the past several months, we have talked extensively with State Superintendent Glenn W. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; McGee about our progress, which has been substantial; about ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iÂŽ

At a glance: Glenn â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; McGee Age: 63 Family: Wife, Jan Fitzsimmons (who also works in education); three children (two sons, one daughter) and four grandchildren Hobbies: Triathalons, reading (he recently finished â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of War for Managersâ&#x20AC;? by Sun Tzu and is now reading â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Wayâ&#x20AC;? by Amanda Ripley.) Number of books written: Two, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Every Superintendent and Principal Needs to Know: School Leadership for the Real Worldâ&#x20AC;? (2002) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Perfect Schoolâ&#x20AC;? (2007). Both were co-authored with two former Illinois superintendents. Nickname: McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official middle name is William, and he went by Bill McGee until his freshman year of college. A fateful interception he made during an intramural flag football game â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;quite by good luck,â&#x20AC;? he said â&#x20AC;&#x201D; earned him the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maxâ&#x20AC;? nickname, after Green Bay Packers wide receiver and 1967 Super Bowl hero Max McGee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It stuck permanently ever since then,â&#x20AC;? he said, adding that he has kept â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glennâ&#x20AC;? for job applications because it sounds more official.

1975-1980 s0RINCIPAL &AIRVIEW3CHOOL   s3UPERINTENDENT !PTAKISIC 4RIPP$ISTRICT in Deerfield, Illinois, 1986-1991 s3UPERINTENDENT $EERFIELD3CHOOL$ISTRICT in Deerfield, Illinois, 1991-1998 s)LLINOIS STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION 1998-2001 s3ENIOR RESEARCH ASSOCIATE .ORTHERN )LLINOIS University Center for Governmental Studies in DeKalb, Illinois, 2002-2004 s3UPERINTENDENT 7ILMETTE3CHOOL$ISTRICT in Wilmette, Illinois, 2002-2007 s0RESIDENT )LLINOIS-ATHEMATICSAND3CIENCE Academy, 2007-2013 s(EADOFSCHOOL 0RINCETON)NTERNATIONAL3CHOOL of Mathematics and Science, 2013-2014 McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full CV is also posted on PaloAltoOnline. Meet McGee: McGee will be in Palo Alto on Tuesday, June 17, for the school boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final meeting of the year. An informal â&#x20AC;&#x153;meet and greetâ&#x20AC;? will be held at district headquarters, 250 Churchill Ave., before the meeting, tentatively at 6 p.m.

VIDEOS OF MCGEE PaloAltoOnline.com

Resume: s4EACHER $ETROIT #OUNTRY $AY 3CHOOL IN Southfield, Missouri, 1972-1975 s4EACHER &AIRVIEW3CHOOLIN$ARIEN )LLINOIS

Links to two interviews with McGee by student journalists from IMSA have been posted online at PaloAltoOnline.com. Or go to https://www.youtube.com/ AcronymIMSA

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the challenges of the future; and about what will be necessary to meet those challenges,â&#x20AC;? the board stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have concluded that new leadership will be required for success in the next, much more difficult stage of school reform.â&#x20AC;? The statement concludes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Max is a marathon runner, but he and we understand that sometimes it is necessary to hand off the baton in order to accelerate the pace and master the next part of the course.â&#x20AC;?

Back to the local level Â?iÂ&#x2DC;>Ă&#x160;>`Ă&#x203A;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x17E;

The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy is a public boarding college preparatory school in Aurora, Illinois.

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Max McGee takes students on a trip to the Great Wall of China.

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McGee, whom colleagues praise for his positive relationships with students and faculty, takes a pie in the face as part of a school fundraising event. Page 44Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

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he following year, McGee stepped back to a familiar arena: district superintendent for a public school district in Wilmette, Illinois. For five years, until he was hired by IMSA, McGee headed Wilmette School District 39, which serves about 3,500 students with four elementary schools, one middle school and one junior high school (grades 7 and 8). Ray Lechner, the current Wilmette superintendent, was the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director of special education when McGee arrived. Lechner said McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tenure in Wilmette, at first, was shaped by union issues he inherited from his predecessor. But he developed a strong relationship with the union president and â&#x20AC;&#x153;helped calm that down,â&#x20AC;? Lechner said. Lechner said he also â&#x20AC;&#x153;put a lot of energyâ&#x20AC;? into resolving issues over teacher compensation and benefits. The result was a lasting legacy of strengthened relationships and a shifted culture in Wilmette, he said. Lechner also praised McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support for special education programs. Lechner had been recruited to help the district withdraw from an obsolete special-education cooperative that had been created because, at that time, individual districts didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel equipped to handle the needs of special-education students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was in the throws of getting all that organized,â&#x20AC;? Lechner said of the time when McGee was hired. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was not only supportive because he felt it was the right thing to do, he also empowered me to do so. He gave me the resources and tools to be able to be successful.â&#x20AC;? Alan Dolinko, president of the Wilmette Board of Education from 2001 to 2009, called McGee a â&#x20AC;&#x153;supremely qualified, highly knowledgeable, talented, professional leader.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Max was very visible in our schools,â&#x20AC;? Dolinko wrote in an email to the Weekly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was welcoming and accessible to parents and staff. I believe he had the respect and confidence of the board, staff and community at large during his time with us.â&#x20AC;? Palo Alto board President Mitchell said that the former president of the teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s association in Wilmette described a â&#x20AC;&#x153;turnaround that Dr. McGee led once he arrived in their district.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d had acrimonies, employee relations for some time before Dr. McGee arrived. That was important for us to hear, too, that he has a history of strong accomplishments but also of working well with a variety of individuals who have complex interests. ... (It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t) always easy for superintendents to succeed in the way he has.â&#x20AC;? Lechner said McGee â&#x20AC;&#x153;groomedâ&#x20AC;? him to become superintendent, making sure someone would be in place to take over his job once he left. McGee said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his habit to develop leaders who can succeed him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to do new things and new challenges. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just who I am,â&#x20AC;? McGee told the Weekly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been proud of (is) the people I have left in almost every job have retired in that job.â&#x20AC;?

The IMSA years

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hen he was state superintendent, McGee served as an â&#x20AC;&#x153;ex-officio,â&#x20AC;? nonvoting member on the IMSA board of trustees. He was put on a strategic-planning team to craft the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic plan for 2007 to 2012, IMSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veal said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were looking for people externally who understood Illinois education, politics, context, all of this kind of stuff. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when I really had my first working experience (with McGee).â&#x20AC;? Veal said the administration, at the time searching for a replacement for soon-to-retire founding president Stephanie Pace Marshall, wondered if the strategic-planning process might pique McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest in the president position. Eventually, it did. Teachers, students and administrators alike called McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrival at IMSA in 2007 a game changer. He brought an energizing presence to the school â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a stark contrast to Marshall, whom many said was almost a non-presence, unwilling to walk among the students or open her door in the same way he did. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Max came ... it was a big deal for IMSA because Stephanie was very cerebral â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not that Max isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but she was very quiet, not that people didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t listen when she spoke, but Max is bigger than life,â&#x20AC;? said Principal Branson Lawrence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very gregarious. People like to be around Max. It was a different atmosphere when Max came as far as the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office went.â&#x20AC;? On the day of the Palo Alto entourageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tour, McGee was repeatedly enthusiastically greeted in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hallways by nearly every person who walked by â&#x20AC;&#x201D; students, teachers, IT staff, a sports coach and special program directors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Max knows how to relate to the kings and the paupers,â&#x20AC;? Cain told the Weekly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He speaks everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s language.â&#x20AC;? The McGee legacy at IMSA, however, stretches beyond that relatable presence. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s especially lauded for expanding the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statewide reach. Though at first glance the boarding school seems to focus

McGee enjoys a bike ride with one of his four grandchildren.

president, and we were just two students.â&#x20AC;? Talluru said he would send them readings and talked to them about his experiences as a district and state superintendent. Chemistry teacher Jeong Choe said his level of interaction with students was unusual for an administrator at his level. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of my students, they were always excited to see him in the hallway,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know how high school kids are â&#x20AC;&#x201D; you see them in the hallway and they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always want to say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hi.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; That wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the case with him.â&#x20AC;? Also unusual was his direct response to student criticism of the administration. In November 2011, IMSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Acronym published an article, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Illinois Malnutrition and Sleep Deprivation Academy,â&#x20AC;? slamming the administration for its handling of student stress and an imbalance between student health and rigorous academics at IMSA. McGee sat down for a 30minute video interview with the student who authored the article, addressing the pieceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main points â&#x20AC;&#x201D; academic dishonesty, student life restrictions, academic changes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and also answering questions students submitted anonymously online. One student challenged the administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent implementation of measures such as required study hours and teacher meetings and remedial intersessions for atrisk students. The mark of a good teacher, McGee responded, is that they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let students fail. Citing IMSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rising attrition rate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; up 7 percent in five years, from 11 to 18 percent, he said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to disrespect or dishonor the student voice, but frankly, if the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; grades put them in difficulty, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our responsibility to help them succeed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I mean it when I tell students and parents that I want to treat everyone here like he or she were my own child. And Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not about to let them fail.â&#x20AC;? It was these students who took McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early departure the hardest, both the students and their teachers said. McGee announced early in 2013 that he was planning

to leave on June 30 of that year, citing family and personal reasons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The day Dr. McGee announced he was going to leave was (like) the day Michael Jackson died, honestly,â&#x20AC;? Leang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone was so disheartened. ... They actually were pretty negative on the future of IMSA. People were saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Without Dr. McGee, how is IMSA going to strive? How is anything going to happen?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? McGee issued a statement at the time, reminiscent of the statesuperintendent â&#x20AC;&#x153;passing of the batonâ&#x20AC;? reference: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe IMSA is now on a trajectory that will propel it to even greater success in the next quarter century because of a highly capable leadership team, a talented and dedicated faculty and staff, a solid alumni base, our incredible students and their grateful parents, a supportive IMSA Fund board of directors, loyal donors, a growing network of educational partners, and a board of trustees that shares both a big vision and a commitment to action.â&#x20AC;?

An entrepreneurial spirit

M

cGee left IMSA to serve as the head of school for PRISMS, which was backed by a Chinese foundation. He described the school as a unique opportunity to build an educational venture from the ground up, much like a startup. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get the opportunity to run a startup every day,â&#x20AC;? McGee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You get to hire all your own people. You get complete control over the operation. When do you have a chance to make education what you really believe it ought to be?â&#x20AC;? PRISMSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; student body is equal numbers of Chinese and American students but no more than 40 total. McGee said the offer to head the school arose after research projects he coordinated between IMSA students and students and faculty in Beijing â&#x20AC;&#x153;got some attention in China.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always had a little bit of an entrepreneurial itch and has always wanted the experience of the startup,â&#x20AC;? Veal said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and especially after being president here and meeting a lot of our kids and a lot of our

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on the 650 high-achieving sophomore, junior and seniors who live and study there, IMSA has since its inception been committed to serving all of Illinois. As a state-funded public school, IMSA also has a responsibility to a much broader constituency than just the residential students and their parents. The school runs a number of outreach programs; its two main initiatives are ALLIES, a servicelearning program that helps local high school students teach and learn STEM concepts; and FUSION, an after-school STEM program that targets underserved elementary and middle school students with particular talent in mathematics and science. It also supports teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; professional development, if they choose to participate. IMSA also opens its classrooms up during the summer with programs like green architecture, a science-oriented culinary school and medieval engineering. The school served an estimated 10,000 students and 1,000 teachers statewide last year through such programs, McGee said. McGee was instrumental in opening three new IMSA field offices, where the outreach programs take place, Veal said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was always about being better â&#x20AC;&#x201D; keep doing better, keep doing better. So we started some new things, like the field offices, to see if we could get more traction and serve better in communities (with) a permanent, physical presence,â&#x20AC;? she said. Expanding the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reach and impact throughout the state, especially in high-needs, hard-toserve areas, was McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;legacy No. 1â&#x20AC;? at IMSA, she said. He also accomplished this through heavy fundraising and many private partnerships, Veal said. And he had a lot of No. 2 legacies, she said, referencing his incredible rapport with students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. McGee is one of those people â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he steps into the room and the whole room lights up,â&#x20AC;? graduating senior Lakhena Leang told the Weekly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so wonderful. I can say so many positive things about Dr. McGee.â&#x20AC;? Other students describe him as more of a friend than an administrator, an adult on campus whom they felt comfortable approaching, talking to and working with, and as a positive, supportive presence in an often-stressful academic environment. Graduating senior Sai Talluru worked with McGee on a program called United Nations for Youth that connects IMSA students with international students in places like Singapore and China to discuss educational policies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think that project would have been as successful or effective or as much as a great experience as it has been without the help of Dr. McGee,â&#x20AC;? Talluru said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He drew in all the context he had, helped us plan through the logistics and really took time out of his day to help us. With my experience, I found he was really willing to listen even though he was the

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Cover Story

McGee, a triathlete, participates in an 8K run representing the Princeton International School of Mathematics and Science (PRISMS) in New Jersey. alumni who are the entrepreneurial kinds. I think he got even more of an entrepreneurial itch and to live the life of a founder.â&#x20AC;? McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first day on the job in Princeton was in July; the school opened in September. The very same day the Palo Alto education representatives visited IMSA, longtime IMSA English teacher Lee Eysturlid was at PRISMS, at McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s request, to give a presentation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clear that the Chinese are funding it because the Chinese really want to have more of their students go to American universities,â&#x20AC;? Eysturlid observed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to go (to) American universities without an American high school degree. If Chinese nationals can come get an American high school diploma and do well, they can go to Harvard and Yale and MIT.â&#x20AC;? He added that observations he made on a trip to Beijing with McGee indicate how the Princeton venture didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t turn out to be what McGee envisioned and why heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaving after one year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They ask a ridiculous amount from him. They wanted him doing stuff all the time. And I also think they were nickel and diming him to death. ... I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think they appreciated how hard he was working, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think they gave him the freedom to act how he wanted,â&#x20AC;? Eysturlid said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think they were really holding him back.â&#x20AC;? McGee wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go into that much detail but referenced challenges that came with building an international school from scratch.

The PRISMS board chair declined to be interviewed for this story, but McGee characterized the separation agreement as â&#x20AC;&#x153;mutually and amicably reached.â&#x20AC;?

The issues facing McGee

M

cGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract with the Palo Alto school district has an end date of June 30, 2018, and contains stipulations about insurance, relocation expenses and salary increases. McGee will be paid $295,000 for 224 days of service, but because he will only work 205 days in the first year, he will earn the lower $270,416, according to the contract. He will receive health, dental, vision and â&#x20AC;&#x153;other fringe benefitsâ&#x20AC;? paid by the district. The district will also provide him with a monthly automobile allowance of $750 to purchase, use, maintain and insure a car for district business. The district will reimburse McGee for expenses of up to $15,000 incurred as part of his move from New Jersey to Palo Alto. McGee will also be able to take advantage of a $1 million zero-interest loan to purchase a home within the district. Under the proposed contract, his first day as Palo Alto superintendent will be Aug. 1, giving him time he has said he needs to â&#x20AC;&#x153;ensure that PRISMS is in good hands.â&#x20AC;? An interim superintendent ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iÂŽ

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Cover Story Public hearing

Modification to the San Francisquito Creek Flood Protection Project Priority E0ROVIDEmOODPROTECTIONTOHOMES BUSINESS SCHOOLSANDHIGHWAYS

What:

Public Hearing on Modification to the San Francisquito Creek Flood Protection Project

When: June 10, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. Where: District Headquarters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Board Room 5700 Almaden Expressway, San Jose, CA 95118 Due to the level of external funding available, staff recommends modifying the program document to advise the public of the level of flood protection that can be achieved at this time. As stated in the Modified Project Description, the local-state-funding-only project will be the same as the preferred project downstream of Highway 101; but upstream of Highway 101, the project will remedy channel constrictions and modify bridges at Newell Road and Pope/Chaucer Street to allow the channel to contain flood waters equal to the channelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capacity of 7,000 cubic feet per second (cfs), approximately a 30-year flood event. Allowing this level of water to flow through the channel will protect approximately 3,000 parcels in Palo Alto from a flood event close to the February 1998 flood , the largest on record. Currently, the channel can only convey a 15-year flood event. If sufficient funding becomes available, a 1 percent (100-year) flood protection project upstream of Highway 101, including some combination of: modifications to the University Avenue and Middlefield Road bridges; upstream detention; underground bypass channels; and floodwalls, could be built.

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San Francisquito Creek,1950s flood event

Proposed modifications to key performance indicators: 1. Preferred project with federal, state and local funding: Protect more than 3,000 parcels by providing 1 percent flood protection. 2. With state and local funding only: Protect approximately 3,000 parcels from flooding (100-year protection downstream of Highway 101, and approximately 30-year protection upstream of Highway 101). The full board agenda memo will be posted online on May 30, 2014 at www.valleywater.org. For more information on the public hearing, please contact Melanie Richardson at (408) 630-2035, or by email at mrichardson@valleywater.org.

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will be appointed for the month of July, between Skellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last day and McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first. McGee will have to hit the ground running in August, with a range of issues that will demand his attention. High on that list is the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handling of the U.S. Department of Educationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of Civil Rights investigations, with two cases still open and the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent resolution alleging that factual errors and faulty investigation practices by the federal agency have â&#x20AC;&#x153;caused significant damage to the district and our dedicated educators.â&#x20AC;? McGee said he was informed about the resolution but was not involved at all in drafting it. Though he spoke about the topic this week with Mitchell and Associate Superintendent Charles Young, he said he does not want to comment until he has a more complete understanding of the issue. McGee said he has dealt with the Office for Civil Rights once, when an investigation related to hiring issues was opened during his first superintendency in Illinois. He said the administration â&#x20AC;&#x153;followed all the proper proceduresâ&#x20AC;? and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any findings. Also on McGeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desk will be the renewal of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lease of Cubberley Community Center, the sprawling 4000 Middlefield Road site that since 1989 has brought about $136 million in city payments to the school district and currently generates $7.1 million each year. The city and district have been at odds this year over the lease, which is set to expire in December, in particular over a â&#x20AC;&#x153;covenant not to developâ&#x20AC;? five school sites that were vacant at the time the lease was created. The City Council would like to eliminate the covenant, but the school district alleges that voters who in 1987 approved a utility userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax to help fund education â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in lieu of selling the five school sites for redevelopment â&#x20AC;&#x201D; intended it to continue. There is also the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longtime plan to open a 13th elementary school, an expansion the board again put on hold this March, citing slowed enrollment growth. A majority of board members agreed with Skellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendation at the time to let his replacement take a fresh look at the issue next year. Palo Alto Unified is also in the throes of major construction projects throughout the district, funded by the $378 million â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strong Schools Bondâ&#x20AC;? measure voters approved in 2008. Projects on the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 17 campuses include a media arts building at Palo Alto High School and two-story classroom buildings at Paly, Gunn, JLS Middle School and Duveneck, Fairmeadow and Ohlone elementary schools. Other projects, including a new performing arts center at Paly, have yet to break ground. N Online Editor Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@ paweekly.com.

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GraphicDesigner Embarcadero Media, producers of the Palo Alto Weekly, The

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Almanac, Mountain View Voice, Pleasanton Weekly, PaloAltoOnline. com and several other community websites, is looking for a graphic designer to join its award-winning design team. Design opportunities include online and print ad design and editorial page layout. Applicant must be ďŹ&#x201A;uent in InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator. Flash knowledge is a plus. Newspaper or previous publication experience is preferred, but we will consider qualiďŹ ed â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including entry level â&#x20AC;&#x201D; candidates. Most importantly, designer must be a team player and demonstrate speed, accuracy and thrive under deadline pressure. The position will be approximately 32 - 40 hours per week. To apply, please send a resume along with samples of your work as a PDF (or URL) to Shannon Corey, Creative Director, at scorey@paweekly.com

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Home&Real Estate

OPEN HOME GUIDE 68 Also online at PaloAltoOnline.com

SUMMER GARDENING ... Professional landscaper Sherri Bohan will offer a class on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gardening in Summerâ&#x20AC;? from 10 a.m. to noon on Wednesdays, June 11 to July 16, at Cubberley Community Center, A-2, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Emphasis is on growing vegetable and flower gardens, using watersaving techniques. Cost is $40. Information: 650-329-3752 or paadultschool.org LEARN TO SEW ... Christine Hopkins will teach a class on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beginning Sewingâ&#x20AC;? from 8 to 10 p.m. on Thursdays, June 12 to July 10, at the Arrillaga Family Gymnasium, 600 Alma St., Menlo Park. The class covers the basics, from selecting and reading a pattern to laying out, cutting and then sewing two projects in class. Cost is $85 for nonresidents, $64 for Menlo Park residents, plus a $5 materials fee payable to the instructor; rental machines are available for use during class for $20. Information: 650-330-2200, menlopark.org or csd@menlopark.org GARDEN LUNCHEON ... Gamble Garden, at 1431 Waverley St., Palo Alto, holds monthly â&#x20AC;&#x153;Garden Fresh Luncheonsâ&#x20AC;? between noon and 1:30 p.m. (next one is Wednesday, June 11), followed

­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;xä) Send notices of news and events related to real estate, interior design, home improvement and gardening to Home Front, Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302, or email cblitzer@paweekly.com. Deadline is one week before publication.

ARE YOU

READY?

A weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth of emergency supplies like clothing, food, water, lanterns, fuel, tents, first aid, flashlights and batteries are stored in large containers in the backyard of a Palo Alto resident who is an emergency services volunteer.

M

ost emergencies are completely unpredictable. Local authorities are required by law to prepare an emergency plan so that resources and experienced people are on standby to respond quickly and in the best possible way when a major crisis â&#x20AC;&#x201D; of whatever kind â&#x20AC;&#x201D; occurs. But how often does one think about setting up a plan for getting oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own family ready for emergencies? According to Esther Nigenda, Leland Manorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighborhood association leader and neighborhood resource coordinator, â&#x20AC;&#x153;after a disaster your biggest resource is the person standing next to you.â&#x20AC;? Nigenda, along with Leland Manor resident Kathleen Hughes, serve as neighborhood preparedness coordinators that are part of an Emergency Services Volunteer program organized by Palo Alto Neighborhoods (PAN) and the city of Palo Alto. The program consists of Block Preparedness Coordinators (BPCs), Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs), Medical Reserve Corps and Amateur Radio Emergency Services (ARES). â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are all neighbors who have signed up to help other neighbors in case the city or other resources should be overwhelmed or unavailable,â&#x20AC;? Nigenda said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After a disaster BPCs will check on all neighbors on their block and, when available, CERTs will be deployed to help neighbors as well.â&#x20AC;? Nigenda moved to Palo Alto in 1995 and is a full-time caregiver for her adult, autistic son. When she first moved here, she wondered who could help her and her family in case of an emergency. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when she met Kathleen Hughes, whose son was one of Nigendaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classmates. As neighborhood resource leaders, she and Hughes organize neighborhood meetings,

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NEED FIXING? ... The next Repair Cafe Palo Alto, where one can bring anything from bikes, computers and small appliances to ripped jeans or broken jewelry, will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, June 8, at the Museum of American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Information: www.RepairCafePaloAlto.org

Emergen prepared cy ness:

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PRUNING AS ART ... Arborist Brian Kempf will offer a free, twopart workshop on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Young Tree Pruning - Spanish & English.â&#x20AC;? Part I, from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 7, will include 1.5 hours of classroom training followed by 2.5 hours of hands-on field training. Part II, with a choice of Thursdays, June 12 or 19, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. or Saturdays, June 14 or 21, from 9 a.m. to noon, will take the form of field sessions with hands-on pruning practice at area schools, parks and neighborhoods, as well as coaching from arborists. Participants should bring their own gloves and pruning shears. Information: Canopy at 650-964-6110 or canopy.org

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Home Front

Annette Glanckopf pulls out a flashlight and candle from her emergency car kit, which also contains a radio, first-aid kit, water and MREs, utility knife, duct tape and other supplies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do1Thingâ&#x20AC;? campaign for emergency preparedness.

Twelve simple steps to be equipped for emergencies by Marion Hohlfeld hold potlucks or soup nights and send monthly newsletters to all neighborhood coordinators containing information about the volunteer program, free class offerings and other emergency preparedness resources. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Building community is (the) goal,â&#x20AC;? she said. One of the many resources used is a website, Do1Thing.com, which offers a 12-month program providing information on how to prepare for an emergency shown in steps. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This one is easiest for neighbors to follow,â&#x20AC;? Nigenda said of the website. Do1Thing focuses on one particular issue each month; for example, March highlights sheltering. The goal is to â&#x20AC;&#x153;know how to respond safely when instructions are given to evacuate or take shelter.â&#x20AC;? The page includes a fact sheet, video and a to-do list for the month. Besides writing newsletters to the community, Nigenda also visits all the neighbors in her block, going from door-to-door in a vest, hat and badge to inform them about emergency preparedness and give out â&#x20AC;&#x153;Help OKâ&#x20AC;? signs. People are supposed to display these in their windows, so in the case of a disaster, the block coordinator can help evaluate what problems there might be and whether it

is minor or major, requiring help from another neighbor or the city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some people say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You are wasting your timeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;; others say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to be prepared, I can come to your houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;; or people say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I pay my taxes, why should I do that?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Nigenda related from experience. She said her biggest concern was that nobody was open to or free to participate in the program. However, everyone on her block agreed to engage, she said. Her latest effort is to start up a program for seniors and individuals with disabilities. Anybody who is interested in joining or helping the Emergency Services Volunteer program can contact Esther Nigenda and her crew at epvolunteers@paneighnorhoods.org.N

12 things to do to prepare January: Start planning ahead for emergencies. It will be easier to make the right decisions when the worst happens. February: Make sure to have drinkable water during a power outage since your water supply depends on having power to operate the system. It is recommended to have at least a 72-hour supply of commercially bottled water. March: In a disaster you may be asked to either evacuate or shelter-in-place. Practice your emergency safety plans, e.g., in case of a fire, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll already know exactly what to do. April: A large duffle bag or plastic tub with a lid makes a great storage place for an emergency food supply. Make sure your family, including pets, will have what they need when disaster strikes. May: Know how to make sure you and your loved ones are safe in a disaster, no matter if ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;xä)

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Home & Real Estate

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you are at work and your children at school. Have a plan for people who count on you to know what to do if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reach them. June: Before disaster strikes, talk to your family about your householdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique needs. Make a list of special items you may need in a disaster. July: Make sure you have a working family communication plan. Cell phones, Internet and email may not be available. August: Community preparedness starts at home; find out how you can get involved to create a resilient community. September: Double-check that everyone in your household is able to receive, understand and act on emergency informa-

John Mori, member of the Community Emergency Response Teams, and Annette Glanckopf, who heads the Midtown emergency preparedness program, stand with their emergency car kits and Moriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dog Palance to illustrate some of the key things residents can do each month for emergency preparedness: assemble emergency supplies, coordinate block-wide emergency plan with neighbors, meet with emergency coordinators and create a plan for pets.

tion. Getting correct information during an emergency is the key to taking safe action. October: We count on electricity for heat, food and medical needs. Verify your family is prepared in advance for a power outage. November: Put together an emergency kit with important items to keep at home, and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;go bagâ&#x20AC;? with items you will need to take with you if you evacuate. December: Take a first-aid class. Actions you take in the first few minutes after an injury or other medical incident may save someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. N â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from do1thing.com

READ MORE ONLINE PaloAltoOnline.com

For more Home and Real Estate news, visit www.paloaltoonline.com/real_estate.

Page 50Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Home Front ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iĂ&#x160;{nÂŽ by a complimentary docent-led tour through the garden at 1:30 p.m. Cost is $25 for nonmembers, $20 for members, with reservations required; 60 percent of the cost is a donation. Information (and reservations): 650-329-1356

HOME SALES Home sales are provided by California REsource, a real estate information company that obtains the information from the County Recorderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office. Information is recorded from deeds after the close of escrow and published within four to eight weeks.

Atherton 37 Watkins Ave. J. & K. Edson to J. & K. Dempsey for $2,250,000 on 4/25/14; previous sale 10/08, $1,750,000

East Palo Alto

SUMMER PLANT CLINIC ... UCCE Master Gardeners will offer a free, walk-in plant clinic from 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 14, at Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Topics covered include choosing warm-weather veggies, caring for tomatoes, managing water, soil, plant nutrition, organic pest control and more. Information: Master Gardeners at 408-282-3105, between 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., Monday through Friday or mastergardeners.org

2520 Farrington Way R. Jamison to C. Fletcher for $430,000 on 5/1/14; previous sale 11/02, $420,000 2240 Ralmar Ave. A. Alvarez to J. Garate for $455,000 on 5/1/14; previous sale 3/09, $240,000 1265 Runnymede St. F. Lin to M. Dinan for $818,000 on 5/2/14; previous sale 6/02, $649,000 1166 Veronica Court Equity Growth Asset Management to R. & J. Smith for $710,000 on 5/6/14; previous sale 10/02, $519,000 255 Wisteria Drive F. Mora to J. Batista for $500,000 on 4/30/14; previous sale 7/09, $380,000

PALO ALTOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PAINTED LADIES ... Has someone done an outstanding job of painting their home in a unique manner? Does Palo Alto have its own version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;painted ladies,â&#x20AC;? a la San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pacific Heights? Send information (addresses) to Carol Blitzer at cblitzer@paweekly. com, and the Weekly will check it out. N

124 Bridgton Court J. & K. Buckley to Lauterbach Trust for $5,750,000 on 5/16/14; previous sale 8/94, $2,500,000 1240 Carmel Terrace Schwarz Trust to N. & D. Hod for $1,865,000 on 5/16/14 1534 Clay Drive CrowderZubrick Trust to Castaneda Trust for $2,030,000 on 5/13/14 29 Deep Well Lane Wilcox Trust to Hashfield Trust for $1,725,000 on 5/15/14; previous sale 4/93, $545,000 1265 Eva Ave. J. & E. Sangerloo

Los Altos

to K. Morajev for $1,980,000 on 5/14/14 601 Guadalupe Drive Austin Trust to D. Liu for $2,410,000 on 5/14/14 574 Panchita Way Kao Trust to Lee Trust for $3,050,000 on 5/16/14; previous sale 7/99, $1,450,000 1180 Runnymead Drive M. & S. Fang to Mccallion Trust for $2,305,000 on 5/16/14; previous sale 9/06, $1,510,000

Los Altos Hills 23260 Ravensbury Ave. Smith Trust to Boynton Trust for $3,088,000 on 5/14/14; previous sale 10/95, $1,030,000

Menlo Park 719 12th Ave. J. Wilkins to M. Galindo for $648,000 on 4/30/14; previous sale 9/05, $700,000 1138 Hollyburne Ave. A. King to WCAl3 Limited for $510,000 on 5/2/14 2016 Liberty Park Ave. J. Arnold to Arnold Trust for $865,500 on 5/6/14 2024 Liberty Park Ave. Arnold Trust to J. Arnold for $1,800,000 on 5/6/14; previous sale 10/92, $527,000 240 Ravenswood Ave. D. & R. Alves to ENC Holdings for $2,175,000 on 5/1/14; previous sale 4/03, $1,120,000 675 Sharon Park Drive #134 M. & E. Baker to S. Ray for $1,005,000 on 4/25/14; previous sale 8/11, $599,000

Mountain View 1912 Aberdeen Lane B. & H. Volkman to R. Bruns for $948,000 on 5/14/14; previous sale 6/09, $585,000 534 Drucilla Drive Fliess Trust to Szeto Trust for $2,055,000 on 5/14/14; previous sale 3/01, $810,000 78 Eldora Drive M. Geyer to

Home & Real Estate D. Hoffman for $1,275,000 on 5/16/14 241 Horizon Ave. Edwards Trust to A. Gueniot for $820,000 on 5/19/14 99 E. Middlefield Road #41 S. Vonzweigbergk to Q. Lin for $590,000 on 5/16/14; previous sale 11/11, $400,000 905 W. Middlefield Road #948 K. Chang to S. & L. Vuddagiri for $600,000 on 5/13/14; previous sale 10/07, $520,000 108 Minaret Ave. Tri Pointe Homes to Y. Na for $993,500 on 5/16/14 110 Minaret Ave. Tri Pointe Homes to S. Thomas for $1,023,000 on 5/16/14 112 Minaret Ave. Tri Pointe Homes to P. Lew for $1,054,000 on 5/15/14 1614 Montalto Drive Callaghan Trust to L. & J. Neumann for $1,880,000 on 5/16/14 3355 Newton Drive National Golf Fund of America to Y. Zhao for $2,370,000 on 5/15/14; previous sale 11/12, $1,900,000 133 Ortega Ave. J. Tank to N. Vinnik for $940,000 on 5/13/14; previous sale 7/03, $500,000 1857 Peacock Ave. J. Mandaf to Thai-Liao Property & Investment for $700,000 on 5/19/14 167 Sherland Ave. J. & J. Logan to Kelly Trust for $1,100,000 on 5/16/14; previous sale 7/02, $570,000 2255 Showers Drive #234 L. Campbell to X. Hui for $530,000 on 5/15/14; previous sale 6/05, $460,000 353 Whisman Station Drive #24 A. Liu to S. Kulkarni for $875,000 on 5/13/14; previous sale 6/10, $625,000

Palo Alto 3936 Bibbits Drive J. & B. Chung to A. Su for $2,202,000 on 5/16/14 149 S. California Ave. #A304

SALES AT A GLANCE Atherton

Los Altos Hills

Total sales reported: 1 Lowest sales price: $2,250,000 Highest sales price: $2,250,000

East Palo Alto

Total sales reported: 1 Lowest sales price: $3,088,000 Highest sales price: $3,088,000

Palo Alto Total sales reported: 5 Lowest sales price: $1,060,000 Highest sales price: $2,202,000

Menlo Park

Total sales reported: 5 Lowest sales price: $430,000 Highest sales price: $818,000

Total sales reported: 6 Lowest sales price: $510,000 Highest sales price: $2,175,000

Los Altos

Portola Valley Total sales reported: 1 Lowest sales price: $1,425,000 Highest sales price: $1,425,000

Mountain View

Total sales reported: 8 Lowest sales price: $1,725,000 Highest sales price: $5,750,000

Total sales reported: 16 Lowest sales price: $530,000 Highest sales price: $2,370,000

Redwood City Total sales reported: 23 Lowest sales price: $460,000 Highest sales price: $1,390,000 -Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Vi\Ă&#x160; >Â?Â&#x2C6;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160;, Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Vi

D. & N. Voloshin to D. Huber for $1,060,000 on 5/16/14 420 Fernando Ave. S. Hardenbrook to Harmin Investments for $1,375,000 on 5/16/14; previous sale 9/86, $140,000 235 Greenmeadow Way J. Claras to J. & K. Sytwu for $2,200,000 on 5/15/14 3341 Park Blvd. Shao Trust to J. Guo for $1,200,000 on 5/16/14

Portola Valley 240 La Cuesta Drive MOAB Investment Group to D. Tsai for $1,425,000 on 5/6/14; previous sale 6/93, $624,500

Redwood City 736 5th Ave. Sandoval Trust to F. Sandoval for $591,000 on 5/1/14 454 Buena Vista Ave. Patterson Trust to A. Tran for $1,001,000 on 5/2/14 808 Cape Cod Drive B. & V. Herbosa to A. Ramamurti for $1,200,000 on 4/29/14; previous sale 9/05, $1,160,000 40 Cape Hatteras Court

Wolf Trust to R. & H. Drake for $610,000 on 4/25/14; previous sale 5/91, $228,000 1307 Chelsea Way E. Missel to Gielow Trust for $900,000 on 4/24/14; previous sale 6/01, $620,000 425 Cork Harbour Circle #A P. Sassenberg to R. & J. Reed for $631,000 on 4/30/14; previous sale 6/04, $495,000 827 Fulton St. R. & K. Kreidler to Homes Fast for $520,000 on 4/30/14; previous sale 9/88, $200,000 2807 Hastings Shore Lane A. Roesch to D. Carrera for $750,000 on 5/6/14; previous sale 10/00, $520,000 311 Howland St. A. Laurel to P. & K. Hand for $725,000 on 5/6/14 525 Hurlingame Ave. A. Villanueva to C. Valencia for $530,000 on 4/25/14 188 Inner Circle M. & C. Rivers to E. & N. Campbell for $933,000 on 4/25/14; previous sale 10/09, $612,000 2115 Jefferson Ave. Cummings

Trust to Green Path Homes for $650,000 on 4/28/14 784 Mediterranean Lane #55f J. Wolff to G. Liemann for $1,050,000 on 5/6/14; previous sale 6/11, $729,500 47 Murray Court J. Sasaki to K. Nygaard for $751,000 on 4/25/14; previous sale 2/95, $219,000 152 Nevada St. C. Harter to S. Goswamy for $1,085,000 on 4/25/14 445 Oak Ave. #11 A. & N. Cuevas to M. Peter for $460,000 on 4/25/14; previous sale 6/03, $359,000 385 Quay Lane Torres Trust to S. Vivekanand for $1,350,000 on 4/30/14; previous sale 5/03, $569,000 1081 Rockport Ave. Aliabadi Trust to F. El-Saheb for $1,390,000 on 4/24/14; previous sale 3/00, $707,000 901 Round Hill Road Kreuzer Trust to A. Stoertz for $1,311,000 on 5/6/14 19 Spinnaker Place Newfield Trust to R. & A. Burger for

$1,295,000 on 4/29/14 1496 Valota Road F. & T. Samuelsson to Woohull Trust for $974,000 on 5/6/14 1716 Virginia Ave. R. & G. Davis to D. & L. Clausen for $975,000 on 5/6/14 1016 Warren St. P. Tennison to B. Colbert for $738,000 on 5/2/14; previous sale 9/10, $489,000

BUILDING PERMITS Palo Alto 1575 Hamilton Ave. re-roof, $15,000 4152 Thain Way remodel, replace light fixtures, $25,000 761 Wildwood Lane re-roof, $13,820 1690 Castilleja Ave. re-roof, $39,478 67 Encina Ave. install eight light fixtures, $n/a 520 Charleston Road remodel kitchen, two bathrooms, $60,000 879 Colorado Ave. remodel master bedroom, $20,000

Lan Liu Bowling

717 De Soto Drive remodel bathroom, replace windows in bath and master bedroom, $12,384 1005 University Ave. install seismic gas valve, $n/a 1530 Escobita Ave. new exterior barbecue structure, $2,400 696 Towle Way remodel kitchens, bathrooms in 33 units, $165,000 100 Forest Ave. two illuminated signs, $n/a 753 Alma St. re-roof, $59,000 490 California Ave. Poynt: tenant improvement, $38,933 3452 Alma Village Circle install Level 2 EVSE in garage, $n/a 4170 Coulombe Drive add two roof beams on first floor, $n/a 300 Pasteur Drive install construction trailer for Stanford Medical Center valet parking, $12,000 765 Chimalus Drive replace window and sliding glass door, $15,000 988 Embarcadero Road fire repair: partial demo of house to remove fire damage, remove roof, $n/a 4152 Thain Way add gas line for kitchen range, $n/a 1037 Waverley St. coated foam roofing overlay, $24,000 430 Kipling St. relocate conference room and bathrooms, $n/a 3175 Hanover St. revision to change seven doors with panic hardware to access controlled egress doors, $n/a 3364 Kipling St. remodel bathroom, relocate wall, change bifold door to pocket door, $30,371 429 Ruthven Ave. remodel bathroom, upgrade electrical service, $6,064 2570 W. Bayshore Road Bldg. 1145, Units 2-18, replace four staircases, handrails and deck boards,$38,520

John Chung

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 51

Open Sat & Sun 1:30-4:30

1915 Golden Way, Mountain View ❖ 4 bedroom, 2 bath spacious 2250 sq. ft. home

❖ Professionally landscaped with swimming pool

on a 7300 sq. ft. lot. ❖ Excellent floor plan includes a separate family room,

eat-in kitchen, living room / dining room combo with fireplace, laundry room with extra storage.

and hot tub ideal for entertaining. Close to schools and shopping. ❖ Schools – Springer Elementary, Blach and Mountain

View High School. (Buyer to verify availability)

Offered at 2,085,000

Alan and Nicki Loveless Office: 650.752.0751 Cell: 650.400.4208 alanloveless63@yahoo.com DRE# 00444835

Michael Repka Before you select a real estate agent, meet with Michael Repka to discuss how his real estate law and tax background beneďŹ ts Ken DeLeonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clients. Managing Broker DeLeon Realty JD - Rutgers School of Law L.L.M (Taxation) NYU School of Law

Residential real estate expertise for the mid-peninsula.

(650) 488.7325 DRE# 01854880 | CA BAR# 255996

michaelr@deleonrealty.com

NICKGRANOSKI

Broker Associate Alain Pinel Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club DRE #00994196

www.NickGranoski.com

ngranoski@apr.com 650/269â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8556

www.deleonrealty.com

(650) 346-4150 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Experience the Stanford Differenceâ&#x20AC;?

A variety of home ďŹ nancing solutions to meet your needs

Latest sales success: 25 De Bell, Atherton sold $750,000 over asking in 8 days. All Cash

Vicki Svendsgaard Sr. Mortgage Loan OfďŹ cer VP NMLS ID: 633619

650-400-6668 Mobile â&#x20AC;&#x153;I interviewed 10 top agents. Chuck listened carefully to my financial needs and created an impressive strategy to double my income and avoid taxes. I recommend him highlyâ&#x20AC;? Bob B.

Dr. Charles Fuery Stanford University, DMA Owner, DRE#00889106

www.stanfordpf.com

vicki.svendsgaard@bankofamerica.com Mortgages available from

Bank of America, N.A., and the other business/organization mentioned in this advertisement are not afďŹ lated; each company is independently responsible for the products and services it offers. Bank of America, N.A., Member Equal Housing Lender Š2009 Bank of America Corporation Credit and collateral are subject to approval. FDIC. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lead Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. ARHSCYE3 HL-113-AD 00-62-16160 10-2013

n tio s! a u ad r ad r G G py the p H a A ll to

969 University Ave., Palo Alto 5 BR plus OfďŹ ce | 4 BA | 3,800Âą sf | 18,800 Âą sf Lot

Crescent Park Estate on nearly Half Acre near DOWNTOWN PALO ALTO t-BSHFJOWJUJOH-JWJOH3PPNXJUIIBSEXPPEøPPSTBOEHMBTTEPPST MFBEJOHUPFYQBOTJWFSFBSZBSE t'PSNBM%JOJOHSPPN t#SJHIULJUDIFOXJUIFBUJOHBSFBPQFOUPTFQBSBUF'BNJMZ3PPN t#FESPPN#BUITVJUFPONBJOMFWFM JEFBMGPSHVFTUTPSOBOOZ t4FQBSBUF0óDFPONBJOMFWFMUIBUDPVMECFBUICFESPPN t-BSHF.BTUFS4VJUFQMVTUISFFPUIFSTQBDJPVTCFESPPNTVQTUBJST t'VMM#BUISPPNT t"UUBDIFETG(BSBHF t4FQBSBUF-BVOESZ3PPN t-BSHFTVOOZCBDLZBSEXJUIQPPMBOECPOVTTIFE t-PDBUFEJOQSFTUJHJPVT$SFTDFOU1BSL BTIPSUXBMLUP%PXOUPXO 1BMP"MUPBOEDPOWFOJFOUUPUIFGSFFXBZBOEUSBJO t0VUTUBOEJOH1BMP"MUPTDIPPMT

Offered at $3,899,000

Off Market Opportunity in West Menlo Park: 4QBDJPVT#3 TGUSBEJUJPOBMIPNFPO TGMPUPOEFTJSBCMF RVJFUDVMEFTBD-BT-PNJUBTTDIPPMT$POUBDUNFGPSNPSFJOGPSNBUJPO

STEPHANIE SAVIDES

Broker/Owner/Attorney

View Virtual Tour at www.969University.com

650.464.3581 SavidesRealEstate.com stephanie.savides@gmail.com

BRE #01177101

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A Luxury Collection By Intero Real Estate Services. 

655 Manzanita Way, Woodside

7292 Exotic Garden, Cambria

5 Betty Lane, Atherton

$58,000,000

$22,800,000

$10,800,000

Listing Provided by: Dana Cappiello, Lic.#01343305

Listing Provided by: David Kelsey, Tom Dallas, Greg Goumas Lic.#01242399, 00709019, 01878208

Listing Provided by: Linda Hymes, Lic.#01917074

280 Family Farm, Woodside

24680 Prospect Avenue, Los Altos Hills

10800 Magdalena, Los Altos Hills

$10,700,000

$10,500,000

$6,995,000

Listing Provided by: Dana Cappiello, Lic.#01343305

Listing Provided by: Renuka Ahuja, Lic.#01783141

Listing Provided by: Cutty Smith, Melissa Lindt, Lic.#01444081, 01469863

13195 Glenshire Drive, Truckee

187 Atherton Avenue, Atherton

302 Atherton Avenue, Atherton

$6,900,000

$6,895,000

$5,980,000

Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas, Lic.#01878208

Listing Provided by: David Kelsey, Tom Dallas and Sophie Tsang, Lic.#01242399, 00709019, 01399145

Listing Provided by: Albert Garibaldi & Giulio Cannatello Lic.# 01321299 & 01911402

12733 Dianne Drive, Los Altos Hills

6113 Blackpool Court, San Jose

12861 Alta Tierra Road, Los Altos Hills

$6,398,000

$4,998,888

$4,788,000

Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas, Lic.#01878208

Listing Provided by: Dominic Nicoli, Lic.#01112681

Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas, Lic.#01878208

5721 Arboretum Drive, Los Altos

1250 Miramontes Street, Half Moon Bay

301 Main Street #29A, San Francisco

$4,198,000

$3,499,000

$2,250,000

Listing Provided by: Gail Sanders & Denise Villeneuve Lic.#01253357 & 01794615

Listing Provided by: Dana Cappiello, Lic.#01343305

Listing Provided by: Melissa Lindt, Lic.#01469863

See the complete collection

®

w w w.InteroPrestigio.com

2014 Intero Real Estate Services, Inc. All rights reserved. The logo is a registered trademark of Intero Real Estate Services, Inc. Intero Prestigio is a division of Intero Inc. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you are listed with another broker.

®

The Solution to Selling Your Luxury Home.

15231 Quito Road, Saratoga, CA 95070 | $2,650,000 | Listing Provided by: Rob Godar, Lic.# 01356357

Customized to the unique style of each luxury property, Prestigio will expose your home through the most influential mediums reaching the greatest number of qualified buyers wherever they may be in the world. For more information about listing your home with the Intero Prestigio International program, call your local Intero Real Estate Services office. Woodside 1590 Caùada Lane Woodside, CA 94062 650.206.6200

Menlo Park 807 Santa Cruz Avenue Menlo Park, CA 94025 650.543.7740

Los Altos 496 First Street, Ste. 200 Los Altos, CA 94022 650.947.4700

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   2014 Intero Real Estate Services, Inc. All rights reserved. The logo is a registered trademark of Intero Real Estate Services, Inc. Intero Prestigio is a division of Intero Inc. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you are listed with another broker.

190 Island Drive, Palo A lto

L

ocated in sought-after Crescent Park, this classic Spanish Colonial Revival home combines the aesthetics of an earlier era with accomplished modern luxury. Extensively remodeled in 2011, the original fine craftsmanship, designed by renowned architects Frederick

Confer and Morgan Stedman, and appeal have been respectfully preserved. Lush, manicured, wrap-around yard with stately palm trees and redwoods in a private setting; landscape design by Leslie Kiler. This home offers approx. 5000 sq. ft of living space that sets on a 15,107 sq ft lot.

Offered at $11,995,000 Shown by appointment only! For more info visit: www.190Island.com

ARTI MIGLANI

UMANG SANCHORAWALA

650.804.6942

650.960.5363

amiglani@apr.com www.ArtiMiglani.com

usanchor@apr.com www.UmangHomes.com

CalBRE# 01150085

CalBRE# 01471341

PA LO A LTO 5 7 8 U n i v e r s i t y Av e n u e 6 5 0 . 3 2 3 . 1111

YOUR DELEON TEAM IN PALO ALTO Palo Alto 2014: $65,538,501 Sold/Pending/Active

EXPERTISE:

The True Team Approach to Real Estate

Local Knowledge Global Marketing Professional Advice Comprehensive Solutions Exceptional Results

Surpassing Your Expectations

650-581-9899 650-513-8669 Homes@DeleonRealty.com www.DeLeonRealty.com

DeLeon Realty Inc. CalBRE 01903224

DISCOVER HALF MOON BAY, CALIFORNIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST KEPT SECRET 116 Birkdale Road Ocean colony of Half Moon Bay Live in prestigious Ocean Colony, home of the Ritz and 2 ocean front golf courses. This townhouse has dramatic high ceilings throughout with generous sized rooms and is ďŹ&#x201A;ooded with sunlight from several large skylights.. Oversized master suite with ďŹ replace. Additional bedroom has attached study. Enjoy the best Ocean Colony has at a great price. 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths.

Offered $874,000

Steve Hyman Broker & Owner

650-726-6346 www.century21sunset.com 700 Main St., Half Moon Bay Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 57

BEAUTIFUL ESTATE ON 19 ACRES 40 FOX HILL ROAD

Open Sunday 2:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00 pm OFFERED AT $7,495,000 WWW.40FOXHILL.COM

WOODSIDE

Extraordinary setting of 19 +/- acres with sweeping Bay views and cabernet sauvignon vineyard â&#x2013;  Just over 4 miles to Highway 280 for easy access to Silicon Valley or San Francisco â&#x2013;  5 bedrooms and 4.5 baths in the main residence â&#x2013;  Guest house with loft, 1 bath, and full kitchen â&#x2013;  Separate sommelier-worthy wine cellar and tasting/dining room â&#x2013;  Infinity pool, spa, outdoor fireplace, and barbecue â&#x2013;  Acclaimed Portola Valley schools

Terri Kerwin 650.868.0272 Terri@KerwinAssociates.com CalBRE# 01181550

w w w. K e r w i n A s s o c i a t e s . c o m

Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

O P E N S U N D AY

1:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:30 p.m.    

M E N L O

P A R K

Premier location in complex overlooking the 17th fairway of Sharon Heights County Club Completely remodeled, multi-level townhome 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths Approximately 2,060 square feet Brazilian cherry wood ďŹ&#x201A;oors Fabulous chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen and formal dining room Mezzanine-level master suite with sitting room Large, private terrace and rose garden Attached and ďŹ nished 2-car garage Community amenities include pool and spa

Offered at $1,795,000

www.202SandHillCircle.com

650.740.2970 edemma@cbnorcal.com erikademma.com

Coldwell Banker International Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premier Top 1% Internationally Top US Realtor, The Wall Street Journal, 2013

Page 58Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

CalBRE# 01230766

3390 Greer Rd. Palo Alto Open Sat and Sun 1:30pm to 4:30pm

morgan lashley distinctive properties

Morgan Lashley 5 Beds | 3 Baths MBA Completely Renovated Broker 650.387.5224 3390Greer.com morgan@morganlashley.com BRE# 01340271 $2,498,000

Page 60Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Palo Alto Office 228 Hamilton Ave 3rd Floor Palo Alto, CA 94301

JU

Atherton Jewel Box

36 Amador Avenue, Atherton | 36amador.com

ST

SO L

Offered at $4,995,000 | Beds 4 | Baths 3.5 Den | Home ±4,286 sf | Lot ±16,800 sf

156 Stockbridge Avenue, Atherton | SOLD

30 La Loma Drive, Menlo Park | SOLD

275 Verano Drive, Los Altos | SOLD

10 Valley Road, Atherton | SOLD

662 Berkeley Avenue, Menlo Park | SOLD

115 Gloria Circle, Menlo Park | SOLD

Sand Hill Road 2100 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park 650.847.1141

dreyfussir.com

)EcL 3J½ce is -nHeTenHenXP] 3[neH EnH 3TeVEXeH.

David A. Weil, Realtor ® 650.823.3855 | david.weil@dreyfussir.com davidweilhomes.com License No. 01400271

D

PALO ALTO Jennifer Anderson Brian Chancellor Judy Jarvis Ellis Davena Gentry Owen Halliday Leannah Hunt Lall Jain BOB KAMANGAR Kristine Kim-Suh R. Brendan Leary

      

Lori Lowe Kathleen Pasin Christine Perry Laurel Robinson Chris Trapani

photo by www.handsonphoto.com

Alex H. Wang Leslie Woods James Yang Edmund Yue Matt Zampella

Page 62Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

REDEFINING REAL ESTATE SINCE 2006 W W W. S E R E N O G R O U P. C O M

PROPERTY OVERVIEW Leland Manor Neighborhood 4 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms Remodeled Bathrooms Hardwood Flooring Dual Pane Windows Interior Space: 3,142± sq. ft. Situated on 9,514± sq. ft. lot Attached 2-car garage Excellent Palo Alto schools Welcoming Living Room with French Doors and Fireplace Oversized Dining Room Gourmet Kitchen with Professional Appliances and Granite Slab Social Family Room with Fireplace & Vaulted Ceiling 0DLQ/HYHO2IÀFH Main Level Master Bedroom Suite with Luxurious Bathroom Close Proximity to Rinconada Park, Lucie Stern Community Center, Commute Routes & Stanford

818 SEALE AVENUE, PALO ALTO

Open House Friday, 5:00-7:00PM, Saturday & Sunday, 1:00 - 5:00PM

SHELLY ROBERSON REALTOR ®

CALL FOR PRICE www.818Seale.com

650.464.3797 sroberson@apr.com www.ShellyRoberson.com CalBRE # 01143296

Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • June 6, 2014 • Page 63

PALO ALTO WEEKLY OPEN HOMES EXPLORE OUR MAPS, HOMES FOR SALE, OPEN HOMES, VIRTUAL TOURS, PHOTOS, PRIOR SALE INFO, NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDES ON www.PaloAltoOnline.com/real_estate UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ALL TIMES ARE 1:30-4:30 PM 3 Bedrooms - Condominium

ATHERTON 4 Bedrooms 65 Fairfax Av Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

$3,400,000 325-6161

59 Nora Wy Sat/Sun 1-5

$2,998,000 543-8500

523 Oak Grove Av Sat/Sun 2-4 Coldwell Banker

3 Bedrooms

5 Bedrooms

1341 University Dr Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker 1337 Sherman Av Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

91 Fleur Pl $9,400,000 Sun Alain Pinel Realtors 462-1111

4 Bedrooms

Deleon Realty

105 Reservoir Rd Sat 1-4 Coldwell Banker

$5,798,000 323-7751

2 Mercedes Ln $7,995,000 Sun Alain Pinel Realtors 462-1111

6+ Bedrooms 65 Selby Ln $12,300,000 Sun Coldwell Banker 324-4456 2 Serrano Dr Sun Coldwell Banker

$7,200,000 324-4456

303 Atherton Av Sat/Sun 12-5 Coldwell Banker

$7,300,000 324-4456

1 Ridge View Dr Sat/Sun 1-5 Deleon Realty

$13,998,000 543-8500

HALF MOON BAY 3 Bedrooms 1250 Miramontes Rd Sun 1-4 Intero-Woodside

$3,499,000 206-6200

$1,078,200 323-7751 $1,795,000 851-2666 $1,275,000 324-4456

624 9th Av $1,398,000 Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker 323-7751 321 Vine St $2,598,000 Sun Coldwell Banker 323-7751 72 Politzer Dr $2,998,000 Sat/Sun 1-4 Alain Pinel Realtors 462-1111 428 8th Ave Call for price Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker 324-4456 1847 Camino De Los Robles $2,750,000 Sat/Sun 1-4 Pacific Union 314-7200 2123 Sterling Av $2,999,000 Sun 2-4 Alain Pinel Realtors 462-1111

5 Bedrooms 1015 San Mateo Dr. Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker 1010 Sharon Park Dr Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker 850 Cambridge Ave Sun Pacific Union

$4,695,000 324-4456 $3,998,000 323-7751 $4,100,000 394-7271

1440 Dana Av $3,625,000 Sun Zane Macgregor & Company 324-9900

607 Lakemead Wy Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

1050 N. California $2,088,000 Sat/Sun 1-5 Intero Real Estate Services 543-7740

SAN CARLOS

381 Lincoln Ave Sun Miles McCormick

$3,100,000 400-1001

1130 Middlefield Rd Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$2,480,000 325-6161

626 Wellsbury Way $1,795,000 Sat/Sun 1-5 For Sale By Owner 477-6520

5 Bedrooms 3390 Greer Rd $2,498,000 Sat/Sun Morgan Lashley Properties 326-5700 3532 Ramona St $3,988,000 Sun Alain Pinel Realtors 323-1111

6 Bedrooms 969 University Av $3,899,000 Sun 2-4:30 Stephanie Savides, Broker 464-3581

PORTOLA VALLEY 75 Valencia Ct Sun Coldwell Banker

$3,895,000 851-1961

20 Holden Ct Sun Coldwell Banker

$2,150,000 851-1961

4 Bedrooms Coldwell Banker

LOS ALTOS

MOUNTAIN VIEW

6+ Bedrooms

3 Bedrooms

1 Bedroom

316 Golden Hills Dr Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

800 S El Monte Av Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$1,999,000 941-7040

2188 Stanford Ave Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$599,000 325-6161

5 Bedrooms

4 Bedrooms

607 Nandell Ln $6,495,000 Sat/Sun 1-4 Alain Pinel Realtors 941-1111

1915 Golden Way $2,085,000 Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker 325-6161 944 Rincon St $1,798,000 Sat/Sun 1-5 Alain Pinel Realtors 323-1111

LOS ALTOS HILLS 4 Bedrooms 26513 Weston Dr Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$3,000,000 941-7040

5 Bedrooms 11640 Jessica Ln $4,850,000 Sun 1-5 Alain Pinel Realtors 941-1111 12861 Alta Tierra Rd Sat/Sun 2-5 Intero-Woodside

$4,788,000 206-6200

6+ Bedrooms 25701 Lomita Linda Ct Sun Deleon Realty

$5,998,000 543-8500

2 Bedrooms 2030 Liberty Park Av Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$1,295,000 324-4456

SAN JOSE 2 Bedrooms - Condominium 880 Catkin Ct Sun Coldwell Banker

$408,000 324-4456

5707 Makati Ci #C Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$377,000 325-6161

SAN MATEO 3 Bedrooms 1710 Dale Sun

Coldwell Banker

$725,000 324-4456

2 Bedrooms 318 America Av Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$575,000 325-6161

WOODSIDE 3 Bedrooms 13830 Skyline Bl $1,575,000 Sun 1-4 Alain Pinel Realtors 529-1111 13956 Skyline Bl $1,450,000 Sun 1-4 Alain Pinel Realtors 529-1111 52 Morse Ln Sun 1-4 Alain Pinel Realtors

$1,597,000 529-1111

4 Bedrooms 410 Star Hill Rd Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

460 Alameda De Las Pulgas Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$799,000 851-2666

38 Hacienda Dr $4,995,000 Sun 2-4 Dreyfus Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Realty 847-1141

$1,125,000 394-7271

3 Bedrooms

PALO ALTO

1524 Virginia Ave Sat/Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

2 Bedrooms - Condominium

4 Bedrooms

1424 Hamilton Av $3,750,000 Sun Alain Pinel Realtors 462-1111

MENLO PARK

$2,149,000 323-7751

$849,000 462-1111

3 Bedrooms

3 Bedrooms

27 Madera Av Sun Coldwell Banker

1562 James Av Sat/Sun 1-4 Alain Pinel Realtors

3653 Jefferson Ave Sun Pacific Union

280 Waverley St $698,000 Sat 11-5/Sun 1-5 Alain Pinel Realtors 323-1111

$4,800,000 941-7040

2 Bedrooms

2 Bedrooms - Townhouse $1,399,000 324-4456

$2,750,000 851-1961

REDWOOD CITY

ORINDA 57 Davis Rd Sun 1-4:30 Coldwell Banker

4 Bedrooms

SUNNYVALE

3 Bedrooms

8 Acorn St Sun

$1,599,000 851-2666

851 Bayview Wy Sun Coldwell Banker

$899,000 323-7751 $1,625,000 323-7751

2038 Hull Av $1,498,000 Sun Alain Pinel Realtors 462-1111

95 Roan Pl Sun Intero-Woodside

$2,595,000 206-6200

8 Skyline Dr Sun Coldwell Banker

$1,388,000 323-7751

228 Eleanor Dr Sun 1-5 Deleon Realty

$2,988,000 543-8500

320 Hillside Dr Sun Coldwell Banker

$2,495,000 851-2666

401 Rapley Ranch Rd $3,125,000 Sun 1-4 Alain Pinel Realtors 529-1111 17125 Skyline Bl $2,395,000 Sun 1-4 Alain Pinel Realtors 529-1111

4 Bedrooms

1026 Lakeview Wy $2,498,000 Sun 2-4 Oliver Luxury Real Estate 321-8900

5 Bedrooms

818 Seale Ave Call for price Sat/Sun 1-5 Alain Pinel Realtors 323-1111

830 Mohican Wy Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

1170 Godetia Dr Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

$1,675,000 851-2666

$1,449,000 323-7751

$3,595,000 851-2666

Carmel Valley Mountain Retreat

Knowledge and Experience. Applied. For Sale by Owner - Excellence in design, location, and ďŹ nishes. Custom rebuild in 2009, this 1400 sq. ft., 3 bedroom 2 bath second home on a 90+ year land lease is an exquisitely comfortable wilderness retreat. Quality materials, workmanship, and attention to detail throughout. Located within the San Clemente Rancho where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd activities for every member of your family. For Rancho information go to www.mountain-cabins.com, for pictures go to www.vancamp.zenfolio.com. To arrange a showing, email wcvancamp@gmail.com or call Wendy @650-269-7501.

36865 Dormody Road, Cabin #60, Carmel Valley, CA

650.766.6325 tpaulin.com

Asking $575,000

Good for Business. Good for You. Good for the Community. Page 64Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

The online guide to Palo Alto businesses

Coldwell Banker

#1 IN CALIFORNIA

Atherton Sun 1:30 - 4:30 $12,300,000 65 Selby Ln Must see! Exceptional 12,000 SF hm, infused w/of-themoment technology & sleek contemporary styling. 7 BR/8 full BA + 3 half Bonnie Biorn CalBRE # 01085834 650.324.4456

Atherton Sat/Sun 12 - 5 $7,300,000 303 Atherton Av Elegant Georgian estate. 11,000 sf home on 1.13 acres with 8 BR incl nanny suite. Exceptional layout. 8 BR/8.5 BA

Portola Valley $6,400,000 Built in 2012, 5BR/4.5BA home + sep. gsthse sits atop 9.3 +/- acs w/bay, valley & city vws

Alice Wang

Ginny Kavanaugh

Palo Alto $5,500,000 Resort-like life style. Nearly ½ acre spectacular grounds with tastefully remodeled home. 4 BR/3.5 BA

Palo Alto $4,798,000 By Appointment Only This 7BR/7.5BA 10year new English Tudor is a timeless delight.

Julie Lau

Judy Shen

CalBRE # 01052924

650.325.6161

CalBRE # 01742652

CalBRE # 01272874

650.324.4456

650.325.6161

Atherton Sun 12 - 4 $3,400,000 65 Fairfax Av Awesome remodel completed in 2008. Comfort, style, convenience inside and out. 4 BR/4.5 BA

Menlo Park Sun 1:30 - 4:30 $2,598,000 321 Vine St Gorgeous home w/ elegant L/R, gourmet kitchen opens to spacious F/R. Las Lomitas schools!

Nancy Goldcamp

Keri Nicholas

CalBRE # 00787851

650.325.6161

Menlo Park $2,095,000 New listing! Great location, fabulous street. Larger lot; build your dream home! Near town and schools. 2 BR/2 BA

CalBRE # 01198898

650.323.7751

CalBRE # 00884747

650.851.1961

Menlo Park Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30 $4,695,000 1015 San Mateo Dr New listing! Transitional farmhouse-inspired new construction. Approx 3,800SF hm; approx 10,000SF lot. 5 BR/3.5 BA Pam Hammer & Katie Riggs CalBRE # 01216437/01783432 650.324.4456

Palo Alto Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30 $2,480,000 1130 Middlefield Rd New Construction! 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath. Home is approx. 2,212 sq.ft. Alan & Nicki Loveless, CalBRE # 00444835 & 00924021 650.325.6161

Menlo Park Sun 1:30 - 4:30 $1,795,000 202 Sand Hill Cir. Remodeled & stunning townhouse on the 17th Fairway of SHCC. Best location in complex. 3 BR/2.5 BA

650.324.4456

Mountain View Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30 $2,080,000 1915 Golden Way 4 bedroom, 2 bath home in quiet MV location. Separate FR, LR/DR combo, pool and hot tub. Alan & Nicki Loveless CalBRE # 00444835 & 00924021 650.325.6161

Redwood City Sun 1:30 - 4:30 $1,625,000 851 Bayview Wy Newer, traditional home in Emerald Hills. Views & Roy Cloud school! 4 BR/2.5 BA

Redwood City Sat/Sun 1 - 4 $899,000 1524 Virginia Ave. Ranch-style home w/ updates throughout! Located on a beautifully landscaped large lot! 3 BR/1 BA

Mountain View Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30 $599,000 2188 Stanford Ave Charming cottage in MV, tastefully updated with entertainers dream backyard. 1 BR/1 BA

Valerie Soltau

Jennifer Alfaro

Tim Trailer

Tory Fratt

CalBRE # 01441654

CalBRE #1223247

650.323.7751

CalBRE # 01721877

650.323.7751

Erika Demma

CalBRE # 01230766

CalBRE # 00426209

650.851.2666

650.325.6161

©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License #01908304.

Page 66ÊUÊ՘iÊÈ]ÊÓä£{ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

PALO ALTO OFFICE

650.323.1111

OPEN SATURDAY PALO ALTO 190 Island Dr 5bd/3.5ba Spanish Colonial-style home in desirable Crescent Park. Remodeled in 2011. $11,995,000

LOS ALTOS OFFICE

650.941.1111

OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY LOS ALTOS 650 Covington Rd Exquisitely built 5bd/3.5ba home with chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kitchen. Features quality finishes throughout. $2,998,000

WOODSIDE OFFICE

650.529.1111

OPEN SUNDAY REDWOOD CITY 313 Hillview Ave Remodeled 3bd/2ba home offers quality finishes. Gourmet kitchen and granite counter tops. $998,000

LOS ALTOS OFFICE

650.941.1111

BY APPOINTMENT PALO ALTO Stately 5bd/3.5ba home blends European and Asian influences. Pool, spa and tennis court. $5,388,000

LOS ALTOS OFFICE

650.941.1111

BY APPOINTMENT LOS ALTOS Remodeled 3bd/2.5ba home with private office, spacious living room and family room. Deck and pool. $1,895,000

PALO ALTO OFFICE

650.323.1111

BY APPOINTMENT MENLO PARK 2bd/2ba home on the top floor of a quiet 12 unit complex. Remodeled master bathroom. $850,000

PALO ALTO OFFICE

650.323.1111

BY APPOINTMENT PALO ALTO 5bd/4.5ba elegant modern home. Designed by award winning architect. Spans over 3 levels. $3,998,000

MENLO PARK OFFICE

650.462.1111

OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY MENLO PARK 135 Loyola Ave 4bd/3ba, 2669+/-sf of living space. Ground floor junior suite leading to backyard. $1,000,000

MENLO PARK OFFICE

650.462.1111

BY APPOINTMENT MENLO PARK Very popular 2bd/2ba stretch unit that shows beautifully. Ideal floor plan. Close to everything. $619,000

MAKE YOUR MOVE ##!"#!#"!#&&%"$!$" $) $(!"!(#*!($!#&#$"#( '!# *!!($!"

PALO ALTO 650.323.1111 | MENLO PARK 650.462.1111 | WOODSIDE 650.529.1111 | LOS ALTOS 650.941.1111 APR REGIONS | Silicon Valley | Peninsula | East Bay | San Francisco | Marin | Wine County | Monterey Bay | Lake Tahoe

Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com

E-MAIL ads@fogster.com

P HONE

650/326-8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

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Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 800-731-5042. (Cal-SCAN)

115 Announcements Pregnant? Thinking of adoption? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois /New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN) Fall Prevention & Preparedness MEET LOCAL AUTHOR new Holiday music original ringtones Stanford Introduction to Opera Stanford music tutoring substitute pianist available

Lost Cat from Belmont Have you seen our sweet Felicity, Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a short hair,white and black, spayed senior cat. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only 7 lbs. and has been missing for awhile from Belmont Hills near Alameda. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly white, nose/blaze/mouth/chin/neck/stomach. all 4 legs. She has a black mask over her eyes/ears, and a black mantle over her back, and a black tail. Please e-mail joandbil@msn.com if you see her, or call 650- 576-8745. Will run and is skiddish. See her photos. Thank you so much.

145 Non-Profits Needs

130 Classes & Instruction Airline Jobs Airline jobs start here. Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935 (AAN CAN) Medical Billing Trainees needed! Become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience Needed! Online training gets you Job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC needed! 1-888-407-7063 (Cal-SCAN)

DID YOU KNOW Newspaper-generated content is so valuable it's taken and repeated, condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted, copied, edited, and emailed countless times throughout the day by others? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN) Be an At-Risk Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Role Model DONATE BOOKS/HELP PA LIBRARY WISH LIST FRIENDS PA LIBRARY

German language class

150 Volunteers

Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

Learn Bridge in a Day??!! Yes! After just 5 hours you will be able to play this great game with friends. Saturday, June 14, 9:30 - 3:00 Bridge Center, 432 Stierlin Rd, MV $25 per student ($20 if you come with a friend; $10 for youth age 15-25) Sign up at www.paloaltobridge.com American Contract Bridge League

Having Sleep Problems? If you are 60 years or older, you may be eligible to participate in a study of Non-Drug Treatments for Insomnia sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, and conducted at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Medical Center. Participants will receive extensive sleep evaluation, individual treatment, and reimbursement for participation. For more information, please call Stephanie at 650/849-0584. (For general information about participant rights, contact 866-680-2906.)

Lego Masterbuilding Camps LEGO Master Builder LEGO camps start 6/16.We buy and sell new and used LEGO.Magic The Gathering events too! http://www.builditagainwithbricks. com/#!classes-and-camps/ctzx

Paid Studies at Stanford GSB

133 Music Lessons

155 Pets

Christina Conti Private Piano Instruction (650) 493-6950

Pet Insurance Keep your pet Happy, Healthy, and Protected. Call 800-675-7476 Now and get a free Pet Insurance Quote for your Dog or Cat. Choose Up to 90% Reimbursement. Get Special Multiple Pet Discounts. (Cal-SCAN)

Hope Street Music Studios In downtown Mtn.View. Most Instruments voice. All ages & levels 650-961-2192 www.HopeStreetMusicStudios.com Piano Lessons Senior Special! Fulfill your dream! Start from scratch or refresh skills you learned as a child. Enjoy a relaxed, fun time. Dr. Reneeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Piano 650/854-0543

For Sale

Piano Lessons in Palo Alto Call Alita at 650.838.9772

La Comida Senior Lunch Program

201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts

music theory course

Chevrolet 1969 Camaro - $5800

Thanks St, Jude

Mazda 2010 5S EXCELLENT 36k mi. auto, near-new tires; occasional use; Non-smoking pet&accident-free 650-8896292

Laces Soccer Camps Youth summer soccer camp in Palo Alto. All proceeds donated to Right to Play Charity. $100 per week for 1/2 day camp. www.lacessoccercamps.com.

Martial Arts Summer Day Camps

Palo Alto, 1030 Fife Avenue, Sat, June 7 from 830a-3p Multi-family sale including furniture, housewares, clothing, footwear, electronics and bedding

Piano Summer Camp

Palo Alto, 280 El Verano Avenue, Jun 7, 9-2 Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss this sale! Two-families. Highend dining room and bedroom furniture, athletic equipment, stereo equipment, holiday tableware, top of the line cookbooks, kitchen equipment, quality men and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing and more! Palo Alto, 286 Walter Hays Dr, Sat June 9, 9:00 am Palo Alto, 670 E. Meadow Drive, June 7, 2014, 9 to 3 Palo Alto, Escondido Village, Stanford, June 7

SonWorld Adventure ThemePark VBS Summer Chinese Program

ARE YOU

The Palo Alto Weekly Marketplace is online at: http://www.fogster.com CONNECTED?

FINAL FREE STUFF - FREE FREE IKEA BED - FREE LAST BUT NOT LEAST FREE STUFF - FREE

Furniture - $0

245 Miscellaneous DirectTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-291-0350. (Cal-SCAN) DISH TV Retailer Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-357-0810. (Cal-SCAN) Reduce Your Cable Bill* Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW 1-866-982-9562. (Cal-SCAN) Sawmills from only $4397.00- Make and save money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (Cal-SCAN) FAST, FUN CATAMARAN SAILBOAT IDEAL for sailing on the bay. Carbon mast, upgraded sails & electronics. Great for sailing w/ friends & fun for family bonding on the water w/ room to weekend for 4-6. Visit justcatamarans. net for more info!

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stuff 330 Child Care Offered Nanny Available All ages. 15 years exp., good refs. CPR. 650/921-0833

403 Acupuncture

Outdoor Painting Summer Camps

230 Freebies

240 Furnishings/ Household items

152 Research Study Volunteers

Fun Programming Summer Camp

Menlo Park, 921 Lucky Ave., June 7 & 8; 9-4

Fosterers Needed for Moffet Cats JOIN OUR ONLINE STOREFRONT TEAM

Alan Margotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennis Camps tennis camp

LEGO Maniac Master Builderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Camp los altos

Storage cart - FREE

FRIENDS OF THE PALO ALTO LIBRARY

350 Preschools/ Schools/Camps

210 Garage/Estate Sales

Be A Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Role Model!

Survived Infidelity?

135 Group Activities

Nissan 1990 300ZX - $3400

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

N BULLETIN

The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

THE PENINSULAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.

INDEX BOARD 100-155 N FOR SALE 200-270 N KIDS STUFF 330-390 N MIND & BODY 400-499 NJ OBS 500-560 NB USINESS SERVICES 600-699 NH OME SERVICES 700-799 NFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 801-899 NP UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997

fogster.com

TM

Jobs

Acupuncture in Los Altos If you are bothered by any health condition and havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t found effective treatments, call Jay Wang PhD 650-485-3293. Free consultation. 747 Altos Oaks Dr.

425 Health Services LOSE WEIGHT & KEEP IT OFF! Up to 30 pounds in 60 days. Once Daily, Maximum Prescription Strength - No Prescription Required! Free Shipping. Call 877-761-2991 (AAN CAN Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN)

Classified Deadlines: NOON, WEDNESDAY

500 Help Wanted Multimedia Sales Representatives Embarcadero Media is headquartered in Palo Alto and operates diverse media enterprises, including the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most respected and award-winning community newspapers and specialty publications, websites and e-mail marketing products. Locally-owned and independent for 34 years, we publish the Palo Alto Weekly, Mountain View Voice and Almanac on the Peninsula and the Pleasanton Weekly. In each of these communities our papers are the dominate, best-read and most respected among its various competitors. We also operate extremely popular interactive community news and information websites in all of our cities, plus unique online-only operations in Danville and San Ramon. Our flagship website, Palo Alto Online (http://paloaltoonline.com), attracts more than 150,000 unique visitors and 600,000 page views a month. As the first newspaper in the United States to publish on the web back in 1994, the Palo Alto Weekly is recognized throughout the state and nation as a leader in transforming from a print- only news organization to a innovative multimedia company offering advertisers and readers new and effective products. In 2013, the Weekly was judged the best large weekly newspaper in the state by the California Newspaper Publishers Association. Its web operation, Palo Alto Online, was judged the best newspaper website in California. The Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media are seeking smart, articulate and dedicated experienced and entry-level sales professionals who are looking for a fast-paced and dynamic work environment of people committed to producing outstanding journalism and effective marketing for local businesses. As a Multimedia Account Executive, you will contact and work with local businesses to expand their brand identity and support their future success using marketing and advertising opportunities avail-

able through our 3 marketing platforms: print campaigns, website advertising and email marketing. The ideal candidate is an organized and assertive self-starter who loves working as a team to beat sales goals and possesses strong verbal, written, persuasive and listening interpersonal skills and can provide exceptional customer service. Duties, responsibilities and skills include: * Understands that the sales process is more than taking orders * Has a strong understanding of how consumers use the Internet * Can effectively manage and cover a geographic territory of active accounts while constantly canvassing competitive media and the market for new clients via cold calling * Can translate customer marketing objectives into creative and effective multi-media advertising campaigns * Ability to understand & interpret marketing data to effectively overcome client objections * Understands the importance of meeting deadlines in an organized manner * Can manage and maintain client information in our CRM database system, is proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel and has knowledge of the Internet and social media * Ability to adapt objectives, sales approaches and behaviors in response to rapidly changing situations and to manage business in a deadline-driven environment Compensation includes base salary plus commission, health benefits, vacation, 401k and a culture where employees are respected, supported and given the opportunity to grow. To apply, submit a personalized cover letter and complete resume to: Tom Zahiralis, Vice President, Sales and Marketing, Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306. E-mail to: tzahiralis@embarcaderopublishing.com

go to fogster.com to respond to ads without phone numbers Page 68Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flippinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Digitalâ&#x20AC;?--wow, will you look at the time? Matt Joness

MARKETPLACE the printed version of

fogster.com

475 Psychotherapy & Counseling DID YOU KNOW I7 in 10 Americans or 158 million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Answers on page 70

Š2014 Jonesinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Crosswords

Down 1 Put to ___ 2 In a fervent way 3 Promise too much 4 Celebrity news site 5 Man ___ mission 6 Rob Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s province: abbr. 7 Like a manly man 8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Am ___ only one?â&#x20AC;? 9 Middle East desert region 10 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Apocalypse Nowâ&#x20AC;? setting, for short 11 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jingle Bellsâ&#x20AC;? vehicle 12 Spenserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ___ Queeneâ&#x20AC;? 13 Went the way of old roses 19 Div. for the Yankees and Red Sox 21 Agreements 25 Chapman of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dog the Bounty Hunterâ&#x20AC;? 26 Elevator innovator Elisha 28 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Frankensteinâ&#x20AC;? actress Teri 33 Make a kitten sound 34 Magazine copy 36 Go by yacht 37 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rabbit, Runâ&#x20AC;? novelist 38 Georgia ___ 39 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Allow me...â&#x20AC;? 40 Ninnies 44 Charm with flattery 45 Make changes to 46 Kindle seller 47 Shellfish soup 49 Place for pigs 50 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Science Kidâ&#x20AC;? on PBS 52 Kicks out 53 As 56 Proofreading mark 59 Beehive State native 60 Cordoba cheer 61 Soccer zero

Across 1 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Terribleâ&#x20AC;? age 4 Get a closer shot 10 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfit to view at your deskâ&#x20AC;? abbr. 14 Target of vaccine research 15 Evident since birth 16 Jai â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (fast-moving sport) 17 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Automneâ&#x20AC;? preceder 18 Show with celebrity panelists filling in blanks on a Chicago railway? 20 Pound, like a headache 22 Shoe support 23 NYC subway line since 1904 24 Product that makes it a cinch to slide around? 27 ___ burger 29 Shows to the door 30 Oohed and ___ 31 â&#x20AC;&#x153;øQuĂ&#x2C6; ___?â&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Howâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it going?â&#x20AC;?) 32 Go for a target 34 A neighbor of Syr. 35 Beanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s L.A.-based catalog distribution center? 41 Jane Goodall subject 42 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grand Budapest Hotelâ&#x20AC;? director Anderson 43 Bend the truth 45 Foaming at the mouth 48 Regional eats 51 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Breakfast Clubâ&#x20AC;? name 53 The point at which people will see me as â&#x20AC;&#x153;The War of the Worldsâ&#x20AC;? author Wells? 54 Existed 55 Hindu ___ 57 Fond farewell 58 â&#x20AC;&#x153;How did the Wizard project his image?â&#x20AC;? and others? 62 Moo goo ___ pan 63 Disastrous defeat 64 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go ___ on the Mountainâ&#x20AC;? 65 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goodâ&#x20AC;? cholesterol, briefly 66 ACL injury locale 67 ___ Dan 68 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Waste Landâ&#x20AC;? poetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monogram

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SUDOKU

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Part Time Drivers Part time drivers in the Palo Alto area wanted to driver older adults to various appointments for Avenidas. Average hours are 7 to 15 per week for a competitive hourly rate. You need a clean driving record and agree to a background check. You will drive your own car so you need complete insurance coverage. You are reimbursed for mileage. Drivers receive a schedule via email the day before their assigned shift identifying the passenger locations, pick up time and destinations. This is a good way to serve your community while getting paid. If you are interested, contact Phil Endliss at pendliss@avenidas.org to learn more.

550 Business Opportunities AVON: Earn Extra Income with a new career! Sell from home, work, online. $15 startup. For information, call: 888-770-1075 (M-F 9-7 and Sat 9-1 central.) (Ind Sls Rep) Coupon Clippers Needed! Trade extra grocery coupons for $$$$$. All national brands requested. Free details. Please visit www.cashforcashoffs.com (AAN CAN) Medical Alert Company! Own your own Medical Alert Company! Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small investment required. Call toll free 1-844-225-1200. (Cal-SCAN)

560 Employment Information $1,000 WEEKLY!! Mailing brochures from home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No experience required. Start Immediately. www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN) Drivers: Experienced Driver or recent grad? With Swift, you can grow to be an award-winning Class A CDL driver. We help you achieve Diamond Driver status with the best support there is. As a Diamond Driver, you earn additional pay on top of all the competitive incentives we offer. The Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;LiĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;vĂ&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; rĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x2021;Â&#x153;`iÂ?Ă&#x160; ÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x203A;>Â&#x2C6;Â?>LÂ?iĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;,i}Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>Â?Ă&#x160;"ÂŤÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Great Career Path UĂ&#x160;*>Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x160;6>V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160; Ă?ViÂ?Â?iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;ivÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Please Call: (866) 837-3507 (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: Prime, Inc. Company Drivers and Independent Contractors for Refrigerated, Tanker and Flatbed NEEDED! Plenty of Freight & Great Pay! Start with Prime Today! Call 877-736-3019 or apply online at driveforprime.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: Start with our training or continue your solid career. You Have Options! Company Drivers, Lease Purchase or Owner Operators Needed! (877) 369-7126 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com (Cal-SCAN) Caregiver Silver Point Plaza, Inc. dba Canyon House seeks Caregivers to join its dynamic team of caring and compassionate individuals that enjoy working with the elderly. If you would like to work for a company that is passionate about healthcare then please email your resume today!

Business Services

R.G. Landscape Yard Clean-ups, debris removal, maintenance, installations. Free est. 650/468-8859 Salvador Godinez Landscaping Maintenance, landscaping and clean-up work. 20 years exp. 650-716-7011

Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Service

624 Financial Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Get tax relief now! Call BlueTax, the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full service tax solution firm. 800-393-6403. (Cal-SCAN) Identity Protected? Is Your Identity Protected? It is our promise to provide the most comprehensive identity theft prevention and response products available! Call Today for 30-Day FREE TRIAL 1-800-908-5194. (Cal-SCAN) Reduce Your Past Tax Bill by as much as 75 Percent. Stop Levies, Liens and Wage Garnishments. Call The Tax DR Now to see if you Qualify 1-800-498-1067. (Cal-SCAN) Trouble With IRS? Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, and resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-761-5395. (Cal-SCAN)

640 Legal Services Auto Accident Attorney INJURED IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT? Call InjuryFone for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don`t wait, call now, 1-800-958-5341. (Cal-SCAN)

General CleanuGardening PrunTrimming New LawnSprinkler Systems

 Planting (650) 969-9894 Tired of Mow, Blow and Go? Owner operated, 40 years exp. All phases of gardening/landscaping. Ref. Call Eric, 408/356-1350

751 General Contracting

DID YOU KNOW that not only does newspaper media reach a HUGE Audience, they also reach an ENGAGED AUDIENCE. Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services 703 Architecture/ Design Bright Designs. Barbie Bright Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2DC;°Ă&#x160;,iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;6>Â&#x2C6;Â?]Ă&#x160; Beaver Creek, CO. SF, WDS, Monterey, Carmel. 970/926-7866. brightdesigns1@gmail.com

715 Cleaning Services A Good Housecleaning Service Call Orkopina! Since 1985. Bonded, Ins. Lic. #20624. 650/962-1536 Isabel & Elbiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housecleaning Apartments and Homes. Excellent References. Great Rates 650.670.7287/650.771.8281 TD Carpet Cleaning and Jan serv.

748 Gardening/ Landscaping HOME & GARDEN

LANDSCAPE

Ya       Tree Trim & Removal, Palm & Stump Removal

650.814.1577  J. Garcia Garden Maintenance Service Free est. 21 years exp. 650/366-4301 or 650/346-6781 LANDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maint. *New Lawns. *Rototil *Clean Ups *Tree Trim *Power Wash *Irrigation timer programming. 18 yrs exp. Ramon, 650/576-6242 landaramon@yahoo.com

Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477.

783 Plumbing Be & Be Plumbing Locally owned. 20 years exp. Drains cleaned and repairs. Small jobs welcome. Lic., bonded, insured. #990791. 650/422-0107

Real Estate 803 Duplex Midtown Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA $4250

805 Homes for Rent Atherton, 5+ BR/3.5 BA - 13950/ month Atherton, 5+ BR/3.5 BA - $13,950

A NOTICE TO READERS: It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

754 Gutter Cleaning

663 Storage

30 Years in family

TM

THE PENINSULAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM

DID YOU KNOW 144 million U.S. Adults read a Newspaper print copy each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

757 Handyman/ Repairs Fast and Reliable Handyman One call, does it all! Call ServiceLive and get referred to a pro today: Call 800-958-8267. (Cal-SCAN) !CompleteHome Repair ! modelin !Professional inting !Carpentr  FRED 30 Years Experience !Plumbing !Electrical 650.529.1662 !CustomCabinets 650.483.4227 !Decknces

ABLE

HANDYMAN

759 Hauling J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc. junk, office, gar., furn., mattresses, green waste, more. Lic./ins. Free est. 650/743-8852 (see my Yelp reviews)

771 Painting/ Wallpaper Glen Hodges Painting Call me first! Senior discount. 45 yrs. #351738. 650/322-8325 H.D.A. Painting and Drywall Interior/exterior painting, drywall installed. Mud, tape all textures. Free est. 650/207-7703 Italian Painter Residential/Commercial, interior /exterior. 30 years exp. Excel. refs. No job too small. AFFORDABLE RATES. Free est. Call Domenico, 650/421-6879 STYLE PAINTING Full service painting. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

775 Asphalt/ Concrete Mtn. View Asphalt Sealing Driveway, parking lot seat coating. Asphalt repair, striping, 30+ years. Family owned. Free est. Lic. 507814. 650/967-1129 Roe General Engineering Asphalt, concrete, pavers, tiles, sealing, new construct, repairs. 36 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703. 650/814-5572

779 Organizing Services End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)390-0125

Menlo Park, 3 BR/3.5 BA - 5950 Palo Alto Home, 4 BR/2 BA - $4800 .mon Redwood City - $4,200.00 Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $4,200.00

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms Downtown Palo Alto, 2 BR/1 BA $1650 Redwood City, 1 BR/2 BA - $800/mo +

825 Homes/Condos for Sale Atherton, 5+ BR/4+ BA - 2949988 Atherton: Grand Estate in Prime West Atherton Location. Custom built in the MidNineties on over Two Level Acres featuring a Full Sized Tennis Court, Beautiful Solar Pool, Guest House Featuring in-Suite Bedroom, Full Kitchen, Great Room, Gym and Sauna. Garages for Five Cars with Room for More. Contact: Grant Anderson Cell: 650-208-0664 or Email: timmckeegan@sbcglobal.net. Offered at $15,200,000 Menlo Park, 3 BR/2 BA - $1099000 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $899000 Sunnyvale, 3 BR/2 BA - $599999

855 Real Estate Services Roommates.com All areas. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;itĂ&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;ÂŤ\Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°,Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;° com. (AAN CAN)

Public Notices 995 Fictitious Name Statement FULL MOTION DYNAMICS KINETIC DESIGN DESIGN IN MOTION FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 591901 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: 1.) Full Motion Dynamics, 2.) Kinetic Design, 3.) Design in Motion, located at 1 Somerset Place, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A General Partnership. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): TYLER KROYMANN 1 Somerset Place Palo Alto, CA 94301 ASHLEY GOMEZ 1 Somerset Place Palo Alto, CA 94301 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 12, 2014. (PAW May 16, 23, 30, Jun. 6, 2014)

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CHRISCOM FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 591623 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Chriscom, located at 1088 Colton Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94089, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): CHRISTENSON COMMUNICATIONS 1088 Colton Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 07/04/1984. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 6, 2014. (PAW May 16, 23, 30, Jun. 6, 2014) NASIAN FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 591860 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Nasian, located at 655 South Fair Oaks Avenue, Apt. #C113, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): FOOD ASPECTS INC. 655 South Fair Oaks Avenue, Apt. C113 Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 9, 2014. (PAW May 16, 23, 30, Jun. 6, 2014) MODEL VIEW CULTURE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 591191 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Model View Culture, located at Cooley LLP, 3175 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): FEMINIST TECHNOLOGY COLLECTIVE 3175 Hanover St. Palo Alto, CA 94304 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on April 24, 2014. (PAW May 16, 23, 30, Jun. 6, 2014) JOHN Eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CATERING FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 591974 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: John Eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catering, 3261 Ash St., Palo Alto, CA 94306, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): JOHN ELDER 19 Irving Ave. Atherton, CA 94027 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 13, 2014. (PAW May 16, 23, 30, Jun. 6, 2014) PlanIt9 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 592114 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: PlanIt9, located at 848 Boyce Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94301, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): Lawrence E. Doxsee, Jr. 848 Boyce Ave. Palo Alto, CA 94301 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 16, 2014. (PAW May 23, 30, June 6, 13, 2014) PHOTONICA PDC FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT File No.: 592204 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: PHOTONICA PDC, located at 1441 Dana Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94301, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): MICHAEL JANSEN 1441 Dana Ave. Palo Alto, CA 94301 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 5/19/2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 19, 2014. (PAW May 23, 30, June 6, 13, 2014) THE MINDFULNESS ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 591273 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: The Mindfulness Arts & Cultural Center, located at 21406 Aldercroft Heights, Los Gatos, CA 95033, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): WENDY DANDO 21406 Aldercroft Heights Los Gatos, CA 95033 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on April 28, 2014. (PAW May 23, 30, June 6, 13, 2014) CAFPS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 591693 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: CAFPS, located at 1430 Harker Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): FUTURE PROBLEM SOLVING PROGRAM OF CALIFORNIA, INC. 2012 W. Mountain St. Glendale, CA 91201

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Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 04/11/2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 7, 2014. (PAW May 30, June 6, 13, 20, 2014) ELYSIAN BASEBALL GLOVES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 592302 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Elysian Baseball Gloves, located at 1400 Coleman Ave., Ste. G 15-1, Santa Clara, CA 95050, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): JUNO SYSTEMS INC. 912 Clement Street San Francisco, CA 94118 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 22, 2014. (PAW May 30, June 6, 13, 20, 2014) WWW.VINTAGESWAG.NET FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 592510 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: www.vintageswag.net, located at 21820 Almaden Ave., Cupertino, CA 95014, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): VINTAGESWAG.NET 21820 Almaden Ave. Cupertino, CA 95014 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 3-18-2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on May 29, 2014. (PAW June 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: GRETTA E. WESTENBERGER Case No.: 1-14-PR174510 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of GRETTA E.

WESTENBERER. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JEANINE L. YOUNG in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: JEANINE L. YOUNG be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on , July 3, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept.: 12 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of

any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: /s/ Jeanine L. Young 11670 Timber Springs Ct. Cupertino, CA 95014 (PAW May 30, June 6, 13, 2014)

court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 21, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept.: 12 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ Eli Coffino-Greenberg 150 Spear St., Suite 1800 San Francisco, CA 94105 (415)541-0200 (PAW June 6, 13, 20, 2014)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DIANA E. STEEPLES Case No.: 114PR172785 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of DIANA E. STEEPLES. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: ALAN B. STEEPLES and ANN S. RANDOLPH in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: ALAN B. STEEPLES and ANN S. RANDOLPH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the

Answers to this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s puzzles, which can be found on page 69.

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Sports Shorts

ON THE AIR Friday College baseball: Stanford at Vanderbilt, 10 a.m.; ESPN2; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Saturday College baseball: Stanford at Vanderbilt, noon; ESPN2; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Sunday College baseball: Stanford at Vanderbilt (if necessary), noon; ESPN2; KZSU (90.1 FM)

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www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, visit www.PASportsOnline.com

It has been trial by fire Stanford freshmen head into Super Regional well-tested by schedule by Rick Eymer

F

is a TEAM sport). Maddy is the best athlete at Menlo in the past decade and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m lucky and honored to be her coach.â&#x20AC;? Gunn coach PattiSue Plumer says she, too, is fortunate to have been able to coach an athlete like Robinson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will likely never work with an athlete like her again,â&#x20AC;? said Plumer, who was a nine-time All-American at Stanford and a two-time Olympian and obviously knows a great athlete when she sees one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) light years ahead of me at this stage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just look at the Gunn record board. It is populated by girls who have gone on to run D1 in college. Now, Sarah has the school records in three events, plus cross country, plus several meet records, and is on the board in 400 and would likely make the board in the 200 and 300 hurdles if she had been given the chance. And she did this while playing soccer and going to

reshmen like Tommy Edman and Cal Quantrill are the reason Stanford baseball coach Mark Marquess likes to schedule some of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top programs during the preseason. Marquess had some concern that a pitching staff with three freshmen in the starting rotation could become overwhelmed. Instead it became a positive learning experience. Edman opened the season batting ninth and playing second base (a decision that sent Menlo School grad Danny Diekroeger to first base). Edman since has been promoted to the leadoff spot and moved to shortstop, taking over when Drew Jackson went down with an injury. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotten steadily better and currently owns an eight-game hitting streak. Because they survived such a wicked schedule, Edman had no problem stepping into the batterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box in the bottom of the ninth inning with the Cardinal losing by a run and Quantrill had no problem pitching on two days rest with the season at stake. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were starting three freshmen and werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hitting,â&#x20AC;? Marquess said of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 11-16 start. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They go to Indiana, with the noisy crowds, and arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t intimidated. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already seen that at Texas and Vanderbilt.â&#x20AC;? Edman hit a two-run homer, his first batting left-handed at any level, and Stanford walked off with a 5-4 victory over the top-seeded Hoosiers in the championship game of the NCAA Bloomington Regional on Monday. Edman was named the Outstanding Player in the Bloomington Regional for batting .417 (10-for-24) and played sparkling defense. Quantrill, named to Collegiate Baseballâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All-American Freshman team, recorded the final seven outs to gain his second victory of the regional. He was also the winning pitcher in Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening victory over Indiana State. He is 7-5 with a 2.69 ERA in 100plus innings. The Cardinal (34-24) earned a returned trip to Vanderbilt this weekend at one of eight NCAA Super Regional sites. The survivors meet in Omaha for the College World Series. The Commodores (47-18) swept Stanford, 4-1, 5-1 and 4-2, in Nashville Feb. 28-March 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are a completely different team,â&#x20AC;? Quantrill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great

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GOLF NOTES . . . It has been a big year for Stanford freshman Maverick McNealy. The 18-year-old from Portola Valley helped the Cardinal to a highly successful season that ended in the NCAA semifinals last week. That, however, did not mark the end of his season. On Monday, McNealy posted two eagles, seven birdies, 23 pars and four bogeys to shoot a 7-under 136 and qualify for the 114th U.S. Open set for June 12-15 at Pinehurst Resort & Country Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Course No. 2 in the Village of Pinehurst, N.C. McNealy shot a 5-under 67 in the morning round of sectional qualifying at Lake Merced Golf Club in Daly City, tying him for the lead with PGA Tour veteran Alex Cejka. McNealy shot a second-round 69 at the Olympic Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ocean Course in the afternoon. McNealy earned one of five qualifying spots in the field of 110. It was the only sectional qualifying tournament in California. Cejka, who played in his first U.S. Open 17 years ago, earned medalist honors with an 11-under 132. McNealy, who played in the shadows of teammates Patrick Rodgers and Cameron Wilson this season, accomplished something Wilson wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t able to do. Wilson, the NCAA individual champion, missed qualifying for the U.S. Open by one stroke in his tournament in Purchase, N.Y. He will be the first alternate out of that sectional. Rodgers, the NCAA Player of the Year, also missed the cut while playing in a local qualifier earlier in Carmel . . . Sacred Heart Prepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Derek Ackerman wrapped up his golf season with a tie for 29th at the CIF/CGA State High School Championships on Wednesday at the par-71 San Gabriel Country Club in Southern California. Ackerman shot a 5-over 76, nine strokes behind the 4-under 67 by individual champion Justin Suh of Evergreen Valley. The Central Coast Section produced a one-two finish as Jimmy Castles of Bellarmine shot a 3-under 68 and tied for second. Ackerman was 3-over on the five toughest holes while recording two birdies, 10 pars, five bogeys and one double-bogey, on the 183-yard, par-3 ninth hole. Ackerman started on the 10th and was 2-over, despite a birdie on the 329-yard, par-4 15th. He never got it under plus-3 on the front nine as he shot a 3-over 39. The double-bogey at the ninth knocked him out of a tie for 21st.

NCAA BASEBALL

Gunn senior Sarah Robinson (left) and Menlo School senior Maddy Price both will have two events to earn medals in at this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CIF State Track and Field Championships in Clovis. Both are among the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their final laps Menloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price, Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Robinson head into CIF State Track and Field Championships looking to close out their memorable prep careers by Keith Peters

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wo memorable high school track careers are coming down to their final hours as seniors Maddy Price of Menlo School and Sarah Robinson of Gunn prepare for their final races at the CIF State Track and Field Championships. They are among 18 local athletes who will be competing at Veterans Memorial Stadium on the campus of Buchanan High in Clovis this weekend. The weather will be hot, with temperatures expected to reach 101 for Friday trials and 104 for Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finals. Getting loose for events will not be an issue. Both Price and Robinson have rewritten their schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record books during their standout careers. Both have left their marks on the Central Coast Section alltime list with Price No. 2 in the 400 (53.43) and Robinson No. 4 in the 1,600 (4:44.07) and No. 5 in the 3,200 (10:16.98). Currently, Price is No. 4 in the

nation in the 400 while Robinson is No. 4 in the 1,600. Price is No. 2 in the state while Robinson is No. 3 in addition to ranking seventh in the 3,200. The two, however, have brought more to their sport than just numbers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only is Maddy a 400/200 runner, as you can see, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shot putter, hurdler, cross country runner, along with a basketball, soccer, lacrosse, volleyball player along with motorbike rider, swimmer, and the list goes on,â&#x20AC;? said Menlo coach Jorge Chen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maddy is what I call a pure athlete, and if I dare say it a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;phenomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; who not only is athletic but fiercely competitive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, at the same time, what people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t notice about Maddy is that she has a huge heart and is an awesome teammate since the past seasons sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been doing multiple events in order to score points for Menlo School for the TEAM (since I always tell parents/kids that at Menlo, Track

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 71

Sports WATER POLO

USA WATER POLO

Playing with the big boys

Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s following in some big footsteps by Rick Eymer

player returning to high school this fall, quite an honor for a player who didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start playing the game until the seventh grade. Last summer, he played on the Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cadet National Team â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Double A ball on the scale of Major League Baseball. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s profoundly excited about this,â&#x20AC;? Bowen explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He has achieve a tremendous amount in a short time. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tremendous player and has a great head on his shoulders.â&#x20AC;? Bowen said the combination of Biscontiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body type, positive attitude and how his plays the game gave the USA coaches good reason to believe Bisconti has a bright future with the program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just playing with these guys is phenomenal,â&#x20AC;? said Bisconti, who has been getting great advice from 2012 Olympian John Mann on how to play defense, among other things. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just thrilled to be along for the ride.â&#x20AC;? Bisconti has been training with the senior team this past week at Sacred Heart Prep. The bulk of the squad just returned from winning a gold medal at the FINA Intercontinental Tournament that

wrapped up Sunday in Shanghai, China. Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alex Bowen and Bret Bonanni combined for three goals to help the Americans defeat Brazil, 11-7, in the title match for their sixth straight victory. Also on the team are Stanford players Jackson Kimbell and Conner Cleary. By reaching the medal round of the event, Team USA clinched a berth in the upcoming FINA World League Super Final, set for June 14-21 in Dubai. Bisconti isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t planning on making that trip. In fact, he figures he wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be on the senior team at that time. Instead, he could be training for the 13-man team that travels in August for the FINA World Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Youth Water Polo Championships in Istanbul, Turkey. That event is for players 18-under. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the U.S. Junior National Team, which will be competing at the Junior Pan American games in Riverside this July. Since Bisconti is still in high school, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eligible to play on both teams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not trying to worry about what team Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m on,â&#x20AC;? Bisconti said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just hoping to take my game to the next level.â&#x20AC;? N

Vargas said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best waophomore Bret Bonanni, ter polo player the United States one of four current Stanford has ever produced. He makes his water polo players on the teammates better. When he deroster of the United States Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cides its time to stop playing, I Senior National Team, is on pace see him involved in the sport at to accomplish the unthinkable: the highest level. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the surpass four-time Olympian Tony special ones.â&#x20AC;? Azevedo as the Cardinalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most Vargas points to Olympian Peprolific scorer. ter Varellas as a better compariBonanni (6-4, 205) surpassed son for Bonanniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career. Varellas Azevedo as the top freshman came to Stanford weighing 165 scorer in school history, netting 73 pounds. He weighed 190 pounds in 2012, five more than Azevedo as a senior and continued to descored as a freshman. velop through the professional Bonanni added a ranks. Mountain Pacific â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bret is a better Sports Federation player now than Perecord 97 goals as ter was at the same a sophomore. With stage,â&#x20AC;? Vargas said. 170 total, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more â&#x20AC;&#x153;So many people than halfway to come into play in Azevedoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school a playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s developrecord 332. ment.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never thought The U.S. senior anyone would break team arrived in the Tonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record,â&#x20AC;? Bay Area earlier this Stanford coach John week after winning Vargas said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But the FINA Interconathletes are better, tinental Tournament bigger and stronin Shanghai, China ger.â&#x20AC;? on Sunday. BonanBonanni, along Bret Bonanni ni and Bowen were with Cardinal juamong the teamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; niors Alex Bowen and Conner leading scorers. Cleary, and freshman Jackson The Americans are training Kimbell, will be at Stanford when with Serbia in preparation for the the United States and Serbia com- FINA Super World League Finals plete a four-game friendly series in Dubai, which begin June 14. with a match Sunday at 3 p.m. Hosting the USA-Serbia match The Americans dropped a at Stanford is a big deal. The 13-6 decision to the Serbians on Americans are relatively young Wednesday night at Pacific in on the international stage and a Stockton. Bowen scored twice for packed house at Avery Aquatic the USA. The teams next will play Center helps create excitement. at California on Saturday. The two teams are co-hosting a Freshman goalie Drew Holland two-hour clinic Sunday morning would have been a fifth Stanford at 9 a.m., with more than 200 kids product on the USA team, but is already signed up. out four weeks because of monoEntertainment, including on site nucleosis. food trucks, music, vendor tents, Azevedo (as well as Stanford and promotional giveaways, opens grad Janson Wigo) remains on the at 1 p.m. Sunday. Gates open at 2 American roster, but is currently p.m. For information and pricing, taking it easy for a year before visit http://www.usavserbia.com/ returning next year to gear up for tickets.html. his fifth Olympics team. Fund-raising for Serbian Flood â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no one else like him,â&#x20AC;? relief also will take place. N

as many now.â&#x20AC;? Edman, who grew up with a father who coached baseball, said the rough preseason toughened the team up a bit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was great for us,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It made us stronger to play the best teams possible. Nothing is a shock when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing good teams. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen that before.â&#x20AC;? Perhaps nothing signifies Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s improvement than its success in close games. Over the first 27 games, the Cardinal was 6-9 in games decided by three runs or less. Stanford is 16-5 in those games since. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team has been resilient all year,â&#x20AC;? Edman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come from behind, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had walk-

off wins and we played well this weekend.â&#x20AC;? Edman said he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have much trouble moving to shortstop when Jackson went down, having spent his high school career there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not really that much different,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was not too hard of a transition.â&#x20AC;? Stanford also experienced some difficulty as the Pac-12 season opened, losing eight of its first 11 conference games. The Cardinal was on a five-game losing streak in conference play when junior John Hochstatter took the mound against Washington on April 13. It was Hochstatterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first start of the season and ended the streak of freshman starters over the first

27 games. Zach Hoffpauir and Austin Slater combined to go 5 for 7 with three RBI, something that became common the rest of the way. They are the top two Cardinal hitters over the past 31 games. Freshman Jack Klein, whose grandfather Bud Klein played baseball for Stanford and has the field at Sunken Diamond named after him, hit a three-run home run in Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening win over Indiana State to break open a close game last week. Klein was the first of nine different Cardinal players to hit a home run in the regional. Slater, Diekroeger, Hoffpauir, Alex Blandino, Dominic Jose, Brant Whit-

S

Menlo senior Bisconti a member of U.S. Senior National Team by Keith Peters

N

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opportunity to see how much a difference of a couple months can make.â&#x20AC;? Quantrill, who grew up watching his father, Paul, pitch in the major leagues and once was a bat boy for the Los Angeles Dodgers, said the biggest difference is not making as many mistakes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;High school is so different from college and coming from Canada, it is not remotely close,â&#x20AC;? Quantrill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You are not going to get away with mistakes. College hitters take advantage of them more often. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not making

Menlo School senior Nick Bisconti has a busy summer ahead of him with various USA Water Polo teams.

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NCAA baseball

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ormally at this time of year, Nick Bisconti is getting ready for the summer water polo season. That, actually, hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed. What is different is which team the Menlo School senior-to-be is playing on. Bisconti will not be training with his club team this summer and will miss Menloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual trip to Coronado to train with Navy Seals. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good reason for that. Bisconti is currently on the roster of the U.S. Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Senior National Team, which will wrap up a four-game exhibition series with Serbia with matches Saturday at Cal and Sunday at Stanford, both at 3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is really exciting stuff,â&#x20AC;? said Menlo water polo coach Jack Bowen. After he spent a week with the national team at the Olympic Training Center (in March), I realized that this was really a reality. He has a goal of playing in the 2020 Olympics and this is the beginning of that goal coming to fruition.â&#x20AC;? Bisconti was one of six junior players â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the only one from Northern California â&#x20AC;&#x201D; invited to train 10 days with the senior team in Colorado Springs. His size (6-foot-6, 200 pounds) and work ethic caught the eye of new USA head coach Dejan Udovicic,who is pushing youth development in USA Water Polo. Bisconti received a phone call a month ago from a team assistant, notifying him that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been placed on the senior team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was through the roof,â&#x20AC;? Bisconti said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how better to describe it. This has been a dream of mine for a long time.â&#x20AC;? Bisconti is the only senior team

ing and Wayne Taylor (a three-run pinch-hit shot in the ninth against Youngstown State) also went deep before Edman ended things. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just as I was walking up to pinch hit they changed pitchers,â&#x20AC;? Taylor said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They brought in a guy I had faced the night before (and hit a double) and I felt good because I had seen him.â&#x20AC;? Taylor, a high school quarterback in Texas, says Stanford has something to prove this weekend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like we have some unfinished business there,â&#x20AC;? he said. The second game of the Super Regional will be Saturday with a third game, if necessary, set for Sunday. N

Sports

State track

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Scott Chisam

a highly competitive, stressful public high school.â&#x20AC;? Price and Robinson can add to their legacies this weekend as both seek their first state title. Priceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best opportunity will be in the 400, where she finished sixth last year. Since then, she made it a goal to win the state crown. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to beat freshman Kaelin Roberts of Long Beach Poly to achieve that goal. Robinson was third in the 1,600 and fifth in the 3,200 last year. She could improve upon both finishes, with the 1,600 perhaps being her best shot at a gold. Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school record and personal best of 4:44.07 from finishing second to state leader Anna Maxwell at the CCS Championships last Friday gives her the No. 2 seed behind Maxwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4:43.82. In the 3,200, the four runners who finished ahead of Robinson last year are gone. Defending champ Sarah Baxter is injured and Maxwell (third in 2013) dropped the event before CCS. Two others graduated. Freshman Bethan Knights of Northwood in Irvine is the odds-on-favorite with her top qualifying time of 9:54.89. Joining Robinson and Price from the local area will be Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1,600 relay team of Nick Sullivan (also in 400), Eli Givens (also in 100 and 200), Charlie Badger and Dami Bolarinwa; Menlo-Athertonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1,600 relay team of Annalisa Crowe, Annie Harrier, Miranda Simes and Jordan Olesen plus pole vaulter Kathryn Mohr; Menlo Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paul Touma (triple jump); plus Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 400 relay team of Amy Chen, Robin Peter, Maya Miklos (also in 300 hurdles) and Jenae Pennywell (also in 100); plus teammates Gillian Meeks (3,200) and Adriana Noronha (shot put, discus). The trials begin with field events at 3 p.m., followed by running at 5 p.m. Saturday, field events open at 4:30 p.m. with running at 6 p.m. For the Gunn girls, the state meet is icing on the cake after they won their first-ever CCS team title last week at San Jose City College. Despite losing to Los Gatos in a dual meet and finishing second to the Wildcats at the SCVAL De Anza Division finals and the SCVAL Championship Meet, Gunn made up for that in a big way at the section finals by defeating the defending champs, 73-70. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is absolutely the best day I ever had as a coach,â&#x20AC;? Plumer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fantastic, wonderful and surreal night.â&#x20AC;? Gunn had all of its seven girls score and had all seven qualify in seven events for the state meet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be so fun,â&#x20AC;? Plumer said of the state meet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Usually you have a person or two that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re taking and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very solitary experience. We have a chance to score points certainly. Anything can happen, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

Gunn coach PattiSue Plumer (bottom right) joined with her coaches and athletes to celebrate their first-ever CCS title. not going for the team title there for sure.â&#x20AC;? Robinson was a major factor in the CCS title as she ran a rare triple â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 800, 1,600 and 3,200 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and scored 22 points. The key event was the 800 meters. Despite coming in ranked No. 3 in the state, Robinson finished fifth in 2:12.97, well off the school record of 2:09.72 she ran at the CCS trials. Nonetheless, she surpassed the automatic qualifying time for the state meet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We realized we were in the hunt,â&#x20AC;? Plumer said on having Robinson run the 800. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was awesome. She was dead after the mile (1,600) and really wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t excited about running the 800. Without her doing that, we would have been second. We needed those points.â&#x20AC;? With the team title at stake, Robinson was fine with a third race. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team title was really close, and (coach Plumer) said I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to try and win it, but if I was able to get a few points in the 800 it would help out,â&#x20AC;? Robinson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She encouraged me to do it and I said â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Yeah, might as well do it for the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.â&#x20AC;? Robinson also took second in the 1,600 with Meeks fourth in a personal best of 4:56.98. That gave the Titans 13 points. In the 3,200, Robinson defended her CCS title with a 10:42.02 while Meeks raced home third in a personal best of 10:47.64 (ranking No. 4 in school history). That finish gave Gunn 16 points â&#x20AC;&#x201D; enough to wrap up the team title as neither the Titans nor the Wildcats had a 1,600 relay team. Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 400 relay got the running portion of the meet under way by racing to second place in 48.64, the second-fastest in school history, despite nearly dropping the baton on one exchange. Pennywell returned to the track for her first individual event and earned another state meet berth by taking third in the 100 in a wind-aided 12.09. Miklos added eight points to

Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total by taking second in the 300 hurdles in 42.87. While she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t defend her section title, Miklos earned a second event for the state meet while tying her school record. Noronha gave the Titans some early points as she finished third in the discus with a personal-best throw of 127-7, earning her first trip to the state meet. Her previous best was 125-8 this season. Noronha followed that up by finishing third in the shot put with a mark of 38-10 1/2 to make her state meet experience doubly worth it. For Menlo, Price defended her section titles in the 400 and 200 with times of 54.67 and 24.33, respectively. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It feels really good to get the double again,â&#x20AC;? Price said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Definitely pleased to be a back-toback CCS champ. That was one of my goals.â&#x20AC;? Touma, a junior, continued his highly successful season by taking second in the triple jump with a legal jump of 45-9 1/2 to earn his first trip to the state meet. The Palo Alto boys, who finished fourth in the team scoring with 39 points, got off on the wrong foot early as their 400 relay team finished fourth in a season-best 42.64 with the team of sophomore Austin Cox, Givens, junior Alec Sullivan and Nick Sullivan. Nick Sullivan came back strong in the 400 finale as he finished third in 48.82 and earned is second trip to the state meet. Givens also bounced back from the relay finish and won the 100 in a windaided 10.83. He leads the CCS with a 10.77 this season. In the 200, where Sullivan has been edging Givens all season, it was Givens earning a second state berth by taking third in 22.10. Sullivan finished fifth in 22.39. While Menlo-Atherton sophomore Mohr finished sixth with a clearance of 11-7 in the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pole vault, she matched the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;at-largeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; qualifying mark for the state meet with her personal-best effort. N

Maddy Price

Eli Givens

MENLO SCHOOL The senior defended her Central Coast Section titles in the 400 (54.67) and 200 (24.33) to become only the second girl in CCS history to win back-to-back titles in those events while qualifying for the state meet.

PALO ALTO HIGH The sophomore earned his first individual berths for the CIF State Meet by winning the 100 in 10.83, taking third in the 200 in 22.10 and running a leg on the second-place 1,600 relay that clocked a season best of 3:22.30.

Honorable mention Angela Lin Gunn badminton

Adriana Noronha* Gunn track & field

Gillian Meeks Gunn track & field

Maya Miklos Gunn track & field

Jenae Pennywell Gunn track & field

Sarah Robinson* Gunn track & field

Erik Amundson Menlo-Atherton baseball

Zach Plante Menlo-Atherton track & field

Graham Stratford Menlo baseball

Nick Sullivan Palo Alto track & field

Paul Touma Menlo track & field

Michael Xiong Gunn badminton * previous winner

Watch video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to PASportsOnline.com

CITY OF PALO ALTO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council will hold a public hearing at the special Council meeting on Monday, June 23, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. or as near thereafter as possible, in the Council Chambers, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, to consider Review of a Proposed Historic ReclassiďŹ cation from a Category 3 Historic Resource to a Category 2 Historic Resource and Historic Rehabilitation Project Located at 261 Hamilton Avenue (University Arts building) that could Generate 15,000 Square Feet of Transferable Development Rights for Off-Site Development. The Rehabilitation Project Includes Renovations to the Existing Building And Relocation of Floor Area to Make A 5,910 Square Foot Addition at the Rear of the Building. Environmental Assessment: Exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act per Sections 15331 Historical Resource Rehabilitation and 15301 Existing Facilities

DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC CITY CLERK Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;U Page 73

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PALO ALTO | OPEN SAT/SUN

1130 MIDDLEFIELD RD $2,480,000 ALAN & NICKI LOVELESS New Construction! 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath. 650.400.4208 Home is approx. 2,212 sq.ft. Dual zoned AlanLoveless63@yahoo.com heating & cooling system. Separate laundry CalBRE #00444835 & 00924021 area.

HELEN & BRAD MILLER 650.400.3426 helenhuntermiller@gmail.com CalBRE #01142061/00917768

jennifer.alfaro@cbnorcal.com CalBRE #01721877

1524 VIRGINIA AVE. $899,000 Ranch-style home w/ designer wall colors, gleaming hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors, & a stylish, updated kitchen. Move-in ready & located on a large landscaped lot.

289 KINGS MOUNTAIN RD $7,395,000 Traditional 4BR/6.5BA sun-ďŹ lled home in spectacular Central Woodside setting on 3.6 ac close to Town Center shopping & the acclaimed Woodside School.

GINNY KAVANAUGH 650.400.8076 KavanaughGroup.com CalBRE #00884747

GINNY KAVANAUGH 650.400.8076 KavanaughGroup.com CalBRE #00884747

8 ACORN ST $2,750,000 Private & expansive 2-level home w/ spacious master suite, additional storage, decks and spa. Portola Valley Ranch amenities 8Acorn.com

320 HILLSIDE DR $2,495,000 MARGOT LOCKWOOD 4BD/2.5BA built in late 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on 1/3 acre. 650.400.2528 WDS Schl. Recently remodeled Tri-level, Bohomes@margotlockwood.com nus work/ofďŹ ce area w/sep entrance. Level CalBRE #01017519 grassy area. 2 car grg.

MENLO PARK | COMING SOON!

CENTRAL PORTOLA VALLEY | OPEN SUNDAY

GINNY KAVANAUGH 650.400.8076 KavanaughGroup.com CalBRE #00884747

20 HOLDEN CT $2,150,000 Original mid-century home on 1+/- acres with Windy Hill and treetop views. Scenic setting in central Portola Valley on cul-de-sac. 20HoldenCourt.com

LYN JASON COBB 650.464.2622 lynjason.cobb@cbnorcal.com CalBRE #01332535

CUPERTINO | OPEN SATURDAY, 1:30-4:30

TERRIE MASUDA 650.917.7969 www.terriemasuda.com CalBRE #00951976

22330 HOMESTEAD RD #213 $689,000 Tastefully updated 2-story unit in the Woodspring complex. Conveniently located close to shops and desirable Cupertino schools.

75 VALENCIA CT $3,895,000 This 3BR/3.5BA home w/1 BR guest apt on 1.6+/- acre epitomizes indoor/outdoor living with decks, gardens, pool house, pool & spa â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 75Valencia.com

WOODSIDE | OPEN SUNDAY

PORTOLA VALLEY RANCH | OPEN SUNDAY

REDWOOD CITY | OPEN SAT/SUN 1-4

JENNIFER ALFARO 650-888-8338

PORTOLA VALLEY | OPEN SUNDAY

WOODSIDE

1985 OAK AVE $1,895,000 Lovely 3BR/2.5BA ranch-style home. Large lot with fenced pool. Stanford land lease with 47 years remaining. Oak Knoll School.

MENLO PARK | COMING SOON!

ELAINE WHITE 650.566.5323 ewhite@cbnorcal.com CalBRE #01182467

109 SEMINARY DR Price Upon Request Vintage Oaks 4 Bedroom/3 Bath with custom touches throughout, sparkling pool, gorgeous grounds.

Š2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell BankerÂŽ is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License #01908304. Page 76Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;


Palo Alto Weekly June 6, 2014