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Vol. XXXV, Number 13 N January 3, 2014

PAGE 22

Holiday Fund 8

Spectrum 17

Seniors 18

Eating Out 25

Shop Talk 26

INSIDE ENJOY CLASS GUIDE

NUpfront Plane route over Palo Alto eyed

Page 5

NHome Website offers remodeling ideas

Page 27

NSports Stanford loses 24-20 in the Rose Bowl

Page 44


LIGHT UP YOUR LIFE (AND POCKET THE SAVINGS) ÂŽ

RECEIVE ENERGY STAR DISCOUNT LED BULBS! City of Palo Alto Utilities is selling SWITCH InďŹ nia 60W equivalent LED bulbs for $9.99, and a 40W equivalent for $8.99. (Prices are about half of regular retail!) Take advantage of this great energy-saving offer while supplies last! * t Lifetime residential warranty t 25,000 hour/22 year life t Full 300o light distribution t Warm light (2700K) t Works with most dimmers (See switchlightingco.com/infinia) tUL rated for indoor, outdoor and damp locations Use the coupon below to receive your discounted energy efficient LED light bulbs, while supplies last at any of these three locations: Ace Hardware—875 Alma St. Fry’s Electronics—340 Portage Ave. Piazza’s Fine Foods—3922 Middlefield Rd.

LED DISCOUNT

COUPON

 

 

* 

 ""#$#  $ $$' %#$ "# ' %#$# &!"  "#'      &$ %! $$ !%"#  

650-329-2241 www.cityofpaloalto.org/lighting Page 2ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊÎ]ÊÓä£{ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“


Sellers Wanted Our Motivated Buyers Need Your Help Buyer 1

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3 Bed + | 2 Bath +

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3 Bed + | 2 Bath + | Views

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Palo Alto | Los Altos Hills

Palo Alto | Los Altos Hills

Fixer Upper Home Palo Alto | Menlo Park Los Altos

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Buyer 7

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Buyer 9

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3 Bed + | 2 Bath + | 1,400 sf

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Townhome, Condo

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Mountain View | Los Altos Near shopping

Palo Alto | Los Altos Menlo Park

Up to $1,400,000

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Palo Alto | Los Altos Hills with Gunn High

Up to $2,500,000

Call Jackie and Richard to Make Your Move Richard

Jackie

650-566-8033

650-855-9700

richard@schoelerman.com

jackie@schoelerman.com

BRE # 01092400

BRE # 01413607

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Welcome, The Dawn Thomas Team We are pleased to welcome Dawn Thomas and her team to our firm. Dawn’s professionalism, community ties and outstanding personal service match our core values. As part of Sotheby’s global realty network, Dawn has the ability to serve both global buyers and local sellers. We look forward to serving you and your family with the highest quality real estate service and advice.

Ellie Scott, Lead Buyer Specialist

BRE 01860743

The Dawn Thomas Team 650.701.7822 (SVAB) VIP@SiliconValleyandBeyond.com SiliconValleyandBeyond.com

As long as I have been aware of real estate, I’ve always known about the Sotheby’s brand and have been impressed with the truly global reach and partnerships across the planet that Sotheby’s International Realty Ž has built over decades to connect together the world’s most discerning buyers and sellers. The local knowledge and influence that Dreyfus has coupled with Sotheby’s is quite frankly, where my team and I want to be. It’s a delight to have the opportunity to meld the collective assets of The Dawn Thomas Team, Silicon Valley and Beyond and Dreyfus Sotheby’s International Realty to serve our Silicon Valley clients even better.

“

“

Dawn L. Thomas, Broker Associate

— Dawn L. Thomas Downtown Palo Alto

728 Emerson Street, Palo Alto 650.644.3474

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Sand Hill Road

2100 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park 650.847.1141

dreyfussir.com Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


Upfront

GOAL $350,000

See who’s already contributed to the Holiday Fund on page 8

As of Dec. 27 405 donors $317,012 with matching funds

Donate online at PaloAltoOnline.com

Local news, information and analysis

Drought could cost Palo Alto $5.46 million Market-rate power purchases would replace lost hydroelectric power by Sue Dremann

I

f California doesn’t get more precipitation, Palo Alto could end up paying at least $5.46 million more for energy supplies to make up for lost hydroelectric power, a city official told the Weekly. California’s seasonal forecast shows the state is heading into

its driest year on record, and even additional rain won’t be able to make up for two straight years of drought, according to the California Department of Water Resources. A funding reserve the city built up during wet years, when costs were lower, means the city doesn’t

expect the drought to affect customer rates this year, but a third dry year could change that. “If we have continuous three years in a row of very critically dry weather, it will be a problem at some point,� said Jane Ratchye, city Utilities Department assistant director for resource management. While most Californians will see the effects of the deficit as lower groundwater, river and reservoir levels, Palo Alto will feel

the hurt in its electrical budget, she said. Hydroelectric power in a normal year accounts for about 50 percent of the city’s power supply, and by contract Palo Alto pays the same amount of money for that power no matter how much power it gets, Ratchye said. But in 2014, the city expects that the proportion of power it gets from hydroelectric sources, such as the Calaveras and Shasta dams, will fall by about 10 percent. Purchas-

ing power from other markets to make up for the drop would take a 4 percent bite out of the city’s electricity budget. In addition to hydroelectric power, 20 percent of the city’s power came from landfill gas and wind in 2013; it purchased the remaining 30 percent from the open market. The drought means that in 2014, 40 percent will come from hydroelectric sources, with the balance ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂŤ>}iĂŠÂŁ{ÂŽ

NEIGHBORHOODS

Plan would send planes flying over Palo Alto Atherton residents propose Surf Air flights over Crescent Park, Duveneck/St. Francis neighborhoods by Sue Dremann

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pate), chance and a prize — is illegal under U.S. gambling law. All three elements must be present to deem something illegal; a game that charges a fee to play but doesn’t award prizes would not be violating the law. Pfeiffer’s two previous iterations are called “Hold ‘Em Blitz� and “Hold ‘Em Battle� and are connected to Thwart Poker Inc., a software company he founded with his son in 2001. Both games

alo Alto’s Crescent Park and Duveneck/St. Francis neighborhoods could find themselves under the flight path of a relatively new airline, if a proposal to the Federal Aviation Administration is cleared for takeoff. Surf Air, an airline that offers passengers unlimited flights on six-passenger planes for a monthly fee, started flying its turbine-powered Pilatus PC-12 planes in and out of San Carlos Airport in June. But it has rankled some Atherton residents, who have found the airplane noise overhead annoying. About 75 people attended a Dec. 9 community meeting about Surf Air, with many voicing their concerns, according to a Dec. 10 article in the Almanac, the Weekly’s sister paper. Surf Air’s current FAA-mandated flight path is aligned above Middlefield Road through Atherton, Menlo Park, Palo Alto and Mountain View and flies over Palo Alto’s Walter Hays Elementary School. But a proposed additional path would take planes 10 degrees to the east, passing directly over the Willows neighborhood in Menlo Park and the Crescent Park, Duveneck/St. Francis, Triple El and eastern Midtown neighborhoods

Into the new year A solo walker at the Stanford Dish trail heads west on Jan. 2.

TECHNOLOGY

Online poker, reinvented — and legal Local software engineer creates new version of skill-based poker

O

nline poker is a booming business. Millions of Americans play the card game online, circulating hundreds of millions of dollars each year. There are international tournaments, a growing number of gaming companies and a lot of money to be made. The only catch? Under federal and most state law, online poker is illegal. But one Palo Alto man claims his 100-percent skill-based version of the game, which involves

by Elena Kadvany no luck or chance, is totally le“You’re no longer working by gal. the mathematical principles of Arthur Pfeiffer, a local software randomness,� Pfeiffer explained, engineer who’s lived in Palo Alto “so it’s a matter of outwitting and since 1968, created his own ver- out-thinking your opponents in sion of poker years ago but plans a skill-based situation. Because to launch an upgraded version next it turns outs that everything that year called Texas Block ‘Em. The happens in terms of the cards is new game is very similar to two a function of what the players other poker variations he invented do, there’s no outside force givand patented in the early 2000s, ing one player an advantage over in which players privately select a another.� card from the same deck on each Any game that contains three round instead of being randomly particular elements — considdealt cards to play. eration (paying a fee to partici-

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Upfront 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505) EDITORIAL

Pinewood is an independent, coeducational, non-proďŹ t, K–12 college-prep school. Students beneďŹ t from small class size,

Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521)

challenging academic curricula, and a wide choice of enrichment activities.

Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Elena Kadvany (223-6519)

We offer an environment where each student is a respected

and vital member of our educational community. We invite you to explore the opportunity for your student to become

Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Terri Lobdell, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570)

a part of the Pinewood tradition of academic excellence.

Multimedia Advertising Sales Christine Afsahi (223-8582), Adam Carter (2236573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 223-6569), Brent Triantos (223-6577),

For more information, please visit our website.

K12 through

Preview Day

Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520)

January 11, 2014

Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Assistant Design Director Lili Cao (223-6562)

Lower Campus Open House (grades K–2) Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. 477 Fremont Avenue, Los Altos, CA 94024 650-209-3050

Middle Campus Open House (grades 3–6) Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. 327 Fremont Avenue Los Altos, CA 94024 650-209-3030

Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Paul Llewellyn Designers Rosanna Leung, Kameron Sawyer EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Assistant to the Publisher Miranda Chatfield (223-6559) Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505)

Register online at:

www.pinewood.edu

Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Zach Allen (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Š2014 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

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We think we’re close to having some takers. —Jane Ratchye, assistant director of City of Palo Alto Utilities, on finally getting participants in the PaloAltoCLEAN program nearly two years after its launch. See story on page 11.

Around Town

REVELING RESPONSIBLY ... Thousands of holiday revelers made responsible decisions this holiday season by taking cabs and public transportation, choosing from a myriad smartphone-enabled ridesharing services with annoying names, or just walking instead of driving while inebriated. It seems 32 unlucky folks did not. Santa Clara County’s “Avoid the 13� DUI crackdown started Dec. 13 with fanfare around a muchtweeted-about patrol with Palo Alto Police Chief Dennis Burns, who didn’t catch any drunken drivers. It ended on Jan. 1 with the final three of 32 people arrested over New Year’s Eve. BEST WISHES ... Only hours before the clock struck midnight to bring in 2014, Palo Alto Online staff decided to ask Town Square users what they hoped for in the New Year. One poster said they wanted “Cures for MS, ALS, MD, RA, and cancer.� Very noble. A common theme, though, was a desire to have city leaders who oppose development in Palo Alto, with one poster stating her wish as: “A new City Council populated mainly by Greg Schmid clones.� Another commenter chimed in: “If we start now we could have Greg’s 10 years apart in age.� Among other wishes, poster Craig Laughton enthusiastically hoped for a Stanford Rose Bowl win. Sorry, Craig.

ALLIANCE BY DESIGN ... Palo Alto’s architecture has been under a glaring spotlight in the last few months, with the modern design aesthetic of new downtown buildings grating up against the traditional tastes of many local residents. But now, architects are striking back. Early in December, more than 20 local architects submitted a letter to the City Council making the case against citizen appeals of building plans that the city has approved. The architects’ group includes former Councilman John Barton, former Architectural Review Board Chair Judith Wasserman, current architecture board member Randy Popp and local architect Tony Carrasco. The recent disagreement, they wrote in a letter to the council, isn’t between modern and

traditional styles. Palo Alto, they say, “has good examples of modern design and poor examples of traditional design, so this is not really a one-sided debate.� They also dispute the “compatibility� argument offered by the residents. The city’s goal in encouraging compatibility, they say, “does not strive to cause projects to be identical with or to imitate existing styles. Design compatibility refers to overall building massing, site organization, character of detailing and quality of materials and construction.� The architects agreed with residents, however, that the city could benefit from improvements in its designreview process and agreed that the city’s review boards should discuss how the city enforces its design standards. SHUTTLE DIPLOMACY ... As Palo Alto looks ahead to the long-awaited reconstruction of California Avenue, city officials are brainstorming ways to minimize the impact of construction on parking in the eclectic commercial district. Vice Mayor Nancy Shepherd had one suggestion: reaching out to Caltrain to see if the city can use the dozens of parking spaces in its lot that Shepherd said are unused each day. The lot, she told city planners in an email, is about “1/4 to 1/3 filled during the work day.� According to Assistant Planning Director Aaron Aknin, however, Caltrain officials said they would prefer to keep the parking spaces reserved for train riders. In response to Shepherd, he noted that the city already has other plans to accommodate cars while construction is in place. This includes making 48 additional parking spaces available on Birch Street and making use of a parking lot formerly owned by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) on the corner of El Camino Real and Page Mill Road. The city is also discussing with Stanford University the possibility of using parking lots between Bank of America and Wells Fargo Bank on El Camino Real and introducing a noontime shuttle between Stanford Research Park and California Avenue. N


Upfront TRANSPORTATION

Proposed parking program a tough sell downtown Residents, businesses concerned about Palo Alto’s citywide permit program by Gennady Sheyner

P

alo Alto’s residents and business owners rarely see eye to eye when it comes to downtown parking, but the city’s latest attempt to free up spaces for residents in their neighborhoods has achieved the seemingly impossible — bringing the two camps together in vehement opposition. In the early weeks of the new year, the city plans to unveil its proposed framework for a new “residential parking permit program� that would set parking restrictions on participating residential blocks. If the program goes into effect, the only cars allowed to park on these blocks without time limits would be those belonging to residents who chose to buy permits — or possibly a few non-residents with permits. While the program has yet to be fleshed out, it is already facing fierce resistance from both neighborhood leaders, who say

it is too complex, and from commercial property owners, who call it overly invasive and a “huge waste of money.� Property owners say they are concerned about where employees would park once the program starts. Downtown residents characterize the staff proposal as overly complicated and “doomed to fail,� according to a memo. Years in the making, the residential permit-parking program (RPP) is widely viewed as the most dramatic component of the city’s multi-pronged response to parking shortages in downtown and around California Avenue, a problem that was exacerbated over the past few years by accelerating commercial growth in the two business districts. In 2013, the City Council designated as its first of three priorities the “future of downtown and California Avenue,� with parking atop

the agenda. Over the past year, the council explored a wide array of initiatives, including new garages, valet parking at existing garages, and a robust “transportation demand management� program that would encourage downtown employees to ditch their cars in favor of bikes, trains, buses and other modes of transportation. The latest staff report on the subject describes community concerns about parking and traffic congestion as having “reached critical levels.� The problem will remain the council’s top priority in 2014. The council was scheduled to discuss the proposed framework for the parking-permit program on Dec. 16, but with the meeting running late, members agreed to take it up at a later date, most likely early in 2014. The framework outlined in the December staff report wouldn’t automatically pertain to any specific neighborhood. Rather, it would

allow neighborhoods to enroll if they suffer from parking congestion, provided they can get at least 70 percent of the residents to agree. Only blocks with a parking-occupancy rate of 75 percent or more (as verified by an independent consultant) would be eligible. Interested neighborhoods would have to submit an initial petition demonstrating support from 50 percent of the residents. The city would then conduct “occupancy surveys� to confirm the reported parking problem. Planners would then send all residents postcard surveys to gauge neighborhood support. At least 70 percent of the returned surveys would have to indicate support before the program is considered further, according to the report. Public hearings would follow in front of the Planning and Transportation Commission and, ultimately, the council. Only then

would the program be adopted on a trial basis. This would be followed by more data collection, further surveys and a decision by the council on whether the permit-parking district should be permanently established. Staff is still wrestling with several big questions, including the number of permits that should be issued to residents and non-residents; permit costs; and the method of rolling out the program. As part of the backlash against the proposed program, a coalition of more than two dozen downtown businesses have mounted the website paloaltoparkingsolutions.org, on which they call the proposed parking permit “massive, pervasive, and expensiveâ€? and warn visitors that a parking permit program “may be coming to your neighborhood soon even ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂŤ>}iĂŠ9)

HOLIDAY FUND

Foothill textbook program empowers students to succeed Program supports disadvantaged students, offers vouchers to pay for textbooks

C

ollege is expensive. But for many, a college education is the way out of a life of poverty. At Foothill College, which has campuses in Los Altos and at Cubberley Community Center in Palo Alto, the most vulnerable students receive financial help and academic support through Extended Opportunity Program and Services, a state-wide program. Nazy Galoyan, currently dean of enrollment services at Foothill, was herself an Extended Opportunity Program and Services student until 2007. “It was my family,� she said of the program. “I was a single mother at the time. They helped me; at the holidays they provided gifts and activities. I would not have been able to go through school without EOPS (Extended Opportunity Program and Services).� Galoyan also said she credits the program with contributing to her success in college and her current career. From Foothill, Galoyan transferred to San Francisco State University, where she majored in business management and minored in Russian. Galoyan graduated from San Jose State Univeristy with a masters degree in counseling and education before returning to Foothill as a dean. “It’s not just that EOPS provides; they also are empowering

(students),� Galoyan said. “They are giving you hope. They are making it possible for you, expecting you to achieve your goal.� In addition to counseling, tutoring and community, the program offers textbook vouchers to enrolled students. Deeply affected by cuts to state education funds, the program now relies increasingly on community funding to support eligible students, said A lex a nd r a Duran, who directs the Foothill program. The Extended Opportunity Program and Services received a $4,000 grant from the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund this past year to supplement the textbook vouchers. “In the past, we used to be able to support students with all of their required textbooks,� Duran said. “But after the 40 percent cut in funding from the state during the 2009-2010 academic year, we had to just offer a monetary number instead of buying all books.� Currently, enrolled students receive on average $250 to offset textbook costs, but this amount does not cover all required books, Duran said. “Tuition and fees run around

$1,094 for the academic year,� Duran said. “Books and supplies raises that total to around $1,710, meaning books and supplies cost well over $500.� The Holiday Fund grant allows the program to give vital financial support to students enrolled fulltime who qualify for free tuition and meet the program criteria, Duran added. Duran said that students have to meet certain economic and educational disadvantage criteria, such as being a first-generation college student or speaking English as a second language. Extended Opportunity Program and Services students often enroll in basicskills courses — usually remedial English and math — when starting at Foothill, Duran said. Iris Kula, who is studying to become an ultrasound technician and is also working towards a degree in communication, said the Extended Opportunity Program and Services gives her hope. “When I started researching (going back to school), when I saw how much it was to register, how much the textbooks were, I was just going to turn around and leave,� Kula said. Kula — who cannot even afford a cell phone — said she talked with Extended Opportunity Program and Services counselors about the program and its resources. “I’m opening my eyes to op-

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by Kimberlee D’Ardenne

Alexandra Duran, left, director of Extended Opportunity Program and Services at Foothill College, mentors students Iris Kula, center, and Angela Rosendo on their academic and career goals and encourages them to become peer advisers. portunities I never knew existed,� Kula said. “EOPS is paying for my books. Without their program, I never would have come back (to start college).� Angela Rosendo also is grateful for the textbook vouchers. Working towards a sociology degree, Rosendo said her goal is to transfer to San Jose State University and become a police officer. “You get to take whatever class you want because you can get the book,� Rosendo said. “It helps me a lot because I don’t have to worry about not being able to buy the book.� Foothill’s Extended Opportunity Program and Support has a record of success, Duran said. “We create an environment that values each student’s individual potential,� she said, “so they may achieve their career goals and educational objectives.� Last academic year, the program served 433 students. As of

November, 303 students were in the program, and Duran said 95 percent of students who start with the program stay enrolled in college throughout the year. “The Holiday Fund has really helped in increasing the allocated textbook amount per year per student,� Duran said. “Most of our EOPS students cannot afford the purchase of textbooks. If our department was not able to provide a reasonable amount, these students would stop coming to school.� Galoyan said she also relied heavily on the program’s support when she was in school. “EOPS played a huge role in my life,� she said. “Book vouchers actually gave me the ability to stay in school.� N To read more about the Holiday Fund, and to make a donation, see page 8. Editorial intern Kimberlee D’Ardenne can be emailed at kdardenne@paweekly.com.

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Support our Kids with a gift to the Holiday Fund. Last Year’s Grant Recipients 10 Books A Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Abilities United . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Ada’s CafÊ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 Adolescent Counseling Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Art in Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Breast Cancer Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 California Family Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 CASSY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Cleo Eulau Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Collective Roots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Community School of Music & Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Community Working Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Creative Montessori Learning Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Downtown Streets Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 DreamCatchers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 East Palo Alto Kids Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Environmental Volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Family Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Family Engagement Institute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 Foothill College Book Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 Foundation for a College Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Friends of Palo Alto Junior Museum & Zoo . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Hidden Villa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 InnVision Shelter Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 JLS Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Jordan Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Kara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 Magical Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 Mayview Community Health Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Music in the Schools Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 New Creation Home Ministries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 New Voices for Youth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Nuestra Casa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 One East Palo Alto (OEPA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Palo Alto Art Center Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Palo Alto Community Child Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Palo Alto Housing Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Palo Alto Humane Society. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 Peninsula Bridge Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Peninsula College Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Peninsula Youth Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Project WeH.O.P.E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Quest Learning Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Racing Hearts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Raising A Reader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Ravenswood Education Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Silicon Valley FACES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 South Palo Alto Food Closet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 St. Elizabeth Seton School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 St. Francis of Assisi Youth Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 St. Vincent de Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,000 TheatreWorks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 YMCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Youth Community Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Youth United for Community Action (YUCA) . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000

E

ach year the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund raises money to support programs serving families and children in the Palo Alto area. Since

the Weekly and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation cover all the administrative costs, every dollar raised goes directly to support community programs through grants to non-profit organizations ranging up to $25,000. And with the generous support of matching grants from local foundations, including the Packard, Hewlett, Arrillaga & Peery foundations, your tax-deductible gift will

Give to the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund and your donation is doubled. You give to non-profit groups that work right here in our community. It’s a great way to ensure that your charitable donations are working at home.

be doubled in size. A donation of $100 turns into $200 with the foundation matching gifts. Whether as an individual, a business or in honor of someone else, help us reach our goal of $350,000 by making a generous contribution to the Holiday Fund. With your generosity, we can give a major boost to the programs in our community helping kids and families.

CLICK AND GIVE

Donate online at siliconvalleycf.org/ paw-holiday-fund

Enclosed is a donation of $_______________ Name _________________________________________________________ Business Name _________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________ City/State/Zip __________________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________________

Credit Card (MC, VISA, or AMEX)

All donors and their gift amounts will be published in the Palo Alto Weekly unless the boxes below are checked.

________________________________________ Expires _______/_______

Q I wish to contribute anonymously.

Phone _________________________________________________________

Q Please withhold the amount of my contribution. Signature ______________________________________________________ I wish to designate my contribution as follows: (select one)

Q In my name as shown above Q In the name of business above OR:

Q In honor of:

Q In memory of:

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_____________________________________________________________ (Name of person)

Non-profits: Grant application and guidelines at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/holiday_fund Application deadline: January 10, 2014 Page 8ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊÎ]ÊÓä£{ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Please make checks payable to: Silicon Valley Community Foundation Send coupon and check, if applicable, to: Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund c/o Silicon Valley Community Foundation 2440 West El Camino Real, Suite 300 Mountain View, CA 94040 The Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund is a donor advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization. A contribution to this fund allows your donation to be tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law.


Through Dec. 27, 405 donors have contributed $317,012 to the Holiday Fund 35 Anonymous.......................110,000 Newly Received Donations Rick & Eileen Brooks .....................300 Thomas Rindeisch ........................... * Marcie & Chet Brown ........................ * Veronica Tincher............................100 Diane and Brandy Sikic..................200 Bryan Wilson & Geri Martin Wilson 100 Russell Evarts...............................300 Ho John Lee ...................................... * Roland Hsu & Julie Noblitt ................. * Scott T. Wong ................................100 Craig & Susie Thom ......................250 Richard Ellson ...............................100 William Busse ...............................200 Dennis & Cindy Dillon ........................ * Merrill & Lee Newman ....................... * Marlene Arnold..............................500 Ellie & Dick MansďŹ eld........................ * Robert & Betsy Gamburd .................. * Richard Maser...............................150 Steve & Gayle Bruger .................1,000 Steve & Mary Chapel ....................250 Nancy & Jim Baer .............................. * Tony & Jan DiJulio ............................. * Sue Bartalo & Dave Fischer...........100 Susan Osofsky ................................50 In Memory Of Dr. John Plummer Steward ............100 David Christy ..................................... * Wanda Cooke.................................... * Willie Branch ..................................... * Tinney Family ................................500 Robert Lobdell .................................. * Foundations, Businesses & Organizations Palo Alto Business Park..............1,000 United Methodist Women, First United Methodist Church of Palo Alto..1,250 Previously Published Donors Charles & Barbara Stevens ............... * John and Margaret Monroe ...........250 Mark and Virginia Kreutzer................. * Marc and Ragni Pasturel ...............200 Ken Schroeder & Fran Codispoti ....500 Leo & Marlys Keoshian ..................... * Kingsley Jack ................................200 Hans & Judith Steiner....................100 Sue & Dick Levy ............................500 Shela Fisk .....................................100 Annette Isaacson ..........................100 Ann Mary Pine...............................300 Dennis Clark .................................100 Stephanie Smith ...........................100 Sandy Jain ....................................101 Daniel Chapiro ..............................500 Julie Norman.................................500 Carol Gilbert..................................100 Karen Ewart ....................................50 Dena McFarland ..............................50 Jenchyn Luh ..................................100 Margaret Tracy ................................75 John and Ruth Devries....................... * Harry and Diane Greenberg ...........500 Elisabeth Seaman .........................100 John Wilkes...................................300 Ron Wolf .........................................50 David Labaree ...............................200 Irene Beardsley & Dan Bloomberg..200 Michael & Marcia Katz ..................100 Bjorn & Michele Liencres............1,000 Robert & Connie Loarie ..................... * Rosalie Shepherd..........................100 Markus Asckwanden & Carol Kersten .........................150 John & Ruth Devries.......................... * Chris & Beth Martin .......................... * Bonnie Packer & Bob Raymakers...100 David & Karen Backer ...................250 Gerald & Joyce Barker ..................100 Bruce F. Campbell ......................1,000 Keith Clarke ..................................100 Constance Crawford ......................800 Boyce & Peggy Nute .......................... * David & Diane Feldman .................500 Matt Glickman & Susie Hwang ......500 Jane Holland .................................... * Bob & Joan Jack ...........................250 Eric Keller & Janice Bohman ..........250 Ms. Jan Krawitz ................................. * Lani Freeman & Stephen Monismith.................100 Laurie & Hal Luft ............................... * Sandra & Scott Pearson ................500

John and Lee Pierce ......................250 David & Virginia Pollard .................300 Don & Dee Price................................ * Barbara Klein & Stan Schrier ............. * Andrea Smith ................................100 Anne and Don Vermeil ....................... * Mrs. Marie Viezee ............................. * Lee & Judy Shulman.......................... * Lijun & Jia-Ning Xiang ....................200 Laurie T. Jarrett ................................. * Lorraine Macchello ........................100 Bryan & Bonnie Street....................... * Gary & Dee Ellmann ........................50 Les and Margaret Fisher................100 Judy Ousterhout ................................ * Mandy Lowell .................................... * Nina and Norman Kulgein..............100 Kathleen & Joseph Hefner .............250 Debra Satz and Don Barr................... * Tobye & Ron Kaye ............................. * Virginia E. Fehrenbacher ................100 Zelda Jury ......................................... * Edward Kanazawa ............................. * Donald and Bonnie Miller .................. * Michael and Lennie Roberts ..........150 Roger Smith ..................................200 Nanette Stringer ............................250 Ralph and Jackie Wheeler..............225 Bonnie Berg ...................................... * Lucy Berman ..............................2,000 Micki and Bob Cardelli....................... * Ted and Ginny Chu ............................ * Robyn Crumly ..................................50 Hoda Epstein .................................... * John & Florine Galen ......................... * Margot Goodman ............................. * Stuart & Carol Hansen ...................... * Myron and Linda Hollister ..............100 Jon & Julie Jerome ............................ * Kevin Mayer & Barbara Zimmer ......... * Joan B. Norton .................................. * Helene Pier ....................................... * Dick and Ruth Rosenbaum ................ * Mike & Ellen Turbow ......................250 Larry Baer & Stephanie Klein............. * Fred Kohler ...................................... * Amy Renalds ..................................... * Suzanne Bell .................................100 Sally Dudley ..................................200 David and Nancy Kalkbrenner ............ * Gretchen Hoover .............................25 Karen Sundback............................500 Marilyn, Dale, Rick & Mei Simbeck .... * Shirley Ely .....................................500 Patrick Radtke............................2,000 Ralph Britton .................................250 Charlotte Epstein...........................100 John Wang ........................................ * Cynthia Costell ................................50 Hal and Carol Louchheim .................. * Lee Sendelbeck ............................100 Faith Braff .....................................500 Anthony and Judith Brown................50 Luca and Mary CaďŹ ero ...................... * Mike and Cathie Foster .................500 Jean M. Colby ...............................200 David & Lynn Mitchell ....................300 Tom & Patricia Sanders .................100 Dorothy Saxe .................................... * John Tang.......................................... * Jerry & Bobbie Wagger ...................... * Annette Glanckopf & Tom Ashton...100 Theodore and Cathy Dolton ...........350 Eugene & Mabel Dong..................200 Herbert Fischgrund.......................125 Dena Goldberg ..............................100 Dr. & Mrs. Richard Greene.............250 Phil Hanawalt & Graciela Spivak ....500 Harry & Susan Hartzell..................200 Walt and Kay Hays ........................100 Christina Kenrick ........................1,000 Cathy and Howard Kroymann.........250 Eve & John Melton ........................500 Jim and Becky Morgan ...............5,000 Don & Ann Rothblatt.......................... * Dan and Lynne Russell..................250 Martha Shirk .................................500 Lawrence Yang & Jennifer Kuan ..1,000 Patti Yanklowitz & Mark Krasnow ...100 Denise Savoie & Darrell DufďŹ e ......... * Dr. Jody Maxmin .............................. * Van Whitis .....................................250 Don & Jacquie Rush ......................300 Michele and John McNellis .......10,000 J.D. & Renee Masterson ...............250 Martha Cohn.................................300 Laura & Bob Cory.............................. * Glenn & Lorna Afeck ....................100

Jone Manoogian..............................50 Felicia Levy....................................250 Gwen Luce ........................................ * Janis Ulevich .................................100 Solon Finkelstein...........................250 Eric and Elaine Hahn ......................... * Teresa Roberts ..........................2,000 Craig & Sally Nordlund...................500 Meri Gruber and James Taylor............ * Art & Helen Kraemer ......................... * Barbara Riper .................................... * Betty Gerard..................................100 Bob and Diane Simoni...................200 Carolyn and Richard Brennan ............ * Gerald and Donna Silverberg .........100 Hersh & Arna Shefrin......................... * Jim & Alma Phillips ........................250 Lawrence Naiman .........................100 Leif & Sharon Erickson ..................250 Mr. George Cator...........................100 Ray & Carol Bacchetti........................ * Rita Vrhel ......................................250 Steve & Karen Ross .......................... * Susan & Doug Woodman .................. * Tad Nishimura ................................... * Tom and Neva Cotter ..................2,000 Al & Joanne Russell ......................250 Alice Smith....................................100 Caroline Hicks & Bert Fingerhut .....100 Drew McCalley & Marilyn Green .....100 Jan & Freddy Gabus .......................... * Joe and Nancy Huber ....................100 John & Olive Borgsteadt .................... * Lynn & Joe Drake .............................. * Patricia M. Levin............................100 Robert and Josephine Spitzer ........100 George & Betsy Young ....................... * Harriet & Gerald Berner ..................... * Hugh O. McDevitt ..........................200 Mary Lorey ........................................ * Nancy Steege................................100 Sheryl & Tony Klein ........................... * Sue Kemp.....................................250 Andy and Liz Coe ............................... * Ben & Ruth Hammett ........................ * Hal & Iris Korol.................................. * Jessie Ngai ...................................100 John and Mary Schaefer................100 Mahlon and Carol Hubenthal ............. * Peter and Beth Rosenthal.................. * Maria Basch....................................55 Owen Vannatta ...........................5,000 Gennette Lawrence .......................500 The Havern Family ......................4,500 Brigid Barton .................................250 Donald & Adele Langendorf ...........200 Gil and Gail Woolley.......................300 Greg & Penny Gallo .......................500 Hugh MacMillan ............................500 Mike and Jean Couch ....................250 Nancy Hall..................................1,000 Page & Ferrell Sanders..................100 Peter & Lynn Kidder.......................100 Peter S Stern .................................... * Robert & Barbara Simpson................ * Scout Voll.......................................... * Stephen Berke .................................. * Tom & Ellen Ehrlich........................... * Art and Peggy Stauffer ..................500 Bill Johnson and Terri Lobdell ........500 Carroll Harrington ..........................100 Richard Zuanich ............................200 Daniel Cox ....................................200 Michael & Frannie Kieschnick ............ * Richard Hallsted & Pam Mayerfeld..100 Steve and Nancy Levy........................ * Xiaofan Lin ......................................50 Diane E. Moore ................................. * Ellen & Tom Wyman ......................200 Roger Warnke ...............................300 Stu & Louise Beattie ......................... * The Ely Family ...............................250 Bob & Ruth Anne Fraley ...................50 Ellen Lillington ...............................100 Jerry and Linda Elkind ...................250 Linda & Steve Boxer .......................... * Tony & Judy Kramer ........................... * Keith & Rita Lee ............................100 Roy & Carol Blitzer............................. * John & Barbara Pavkovich .............200 Tish Hoehl.....................................100 Don & Ann Rothblatt.......................... * In Memory Of Edda Cabrera .................................... * Bill Roth ............................................ * Robert J. Mullen............................100 Becky Schaefer ................................. * Emmett Lorey.................................... *

Mrs. Katina D. Higbee ....................... * Natasha Fong................................200 Dominic Greening.............................. * Our beloved son Samuel Benjamin Kurland ..........300 Our son Nick .................................500 Bob Markevitch ................................. * Ludwig Tannenwald ........................... * Bill Roth ............................................ * Dr. Cheryl Gold ..............................500 Dr. Virginia Lewis...........................250 Dr. Peter Kono...............................250 August Lee King ................................ * Marty Wood ....................................50 Joshua Alper .................................150 Harry Lewenstein ..........................500 Mary Floyd ........................................ * Betty Meltzer ..................................... * Our Dad Albert Pellizzari .................... * Jim Jarrett ......................................... * Amy Fletcher ..................................... * Phillip Gottheiner ............................... * Jim Byrnes ....................................100 Jack Sutorius ................................300 Robert Spinrad..............................500 Bill Lard ............................................ * Helen Rubin ..................................150 Mr. & Mrs. Max Blanker.................150 Dr. & Mrs. Irvin B. Rubin ................150 John F. Smith ................................150 Ben Swan ......................................... * Ryan ................................................. * Jean M. Law...................................... * Carole Hoffman................................. * Fumi Murai........................................ * Mary Floyd ......................................25 Tomas W. and Louise L. Phinney........ * Leo Breidenbach ............................... * Bertha Kalson ................................... * Nate Rosenberg ............................100 Frank & Jean Crist .........................200 Marie Hardin .................................100 Baxter Armstrong .............................. * Bob Makjavich................................... * Carol Berkowitz ................................. * Bob Donald ...................................100 Alan K. Herrick .................................. * Don and Marie Snow .....................100 Kathy Morris ..............................1,500 Helene F. Klein .................................. * Pam Grady ....................................150 Ruth & Chet Johnson ........................ * Robert Lobdell .................................. * Henry Radzilowski ............................. * John Davies Black ......................1,000 Yen-Chen and Er-Ying Yen ..............250 Ernest J. Moore................................. * Florence Kan Ho................................ * Joe, Mary Fran & Stephen Scroggs .... * Steve Fasani .................................100 David Sager ..................................100 William Settle ................................500 Dr. David Zlotnick ..........................200 Boyd Paulson, Jr................................ * Al and Kay Nelson ............................. * In Honor Of Darla Tupper ..................................... * The Martin children .......................100 Superintendent Skelly....................150 The Gang of 4 ................................... * Edna Farmer .................................100 Terri Lobdell ..................................250 Marilyn Sutorius ............................300 Sallie Tasto ...................................125 Paul Resnick .................................125 Sandy Sloan..................................100 The Barnea-Smith Family ................... * Barbara Zimmer ................................ * Gary Fazzino ..................................... * Karen Ross ...................................100 Shirley Sneath Kelley.....................100 Foundations, Businesses & Organizations Bleibler Properties.........................500 Rathmann Family Foundation............. * Carl King MayďŹ eld Mortgage ..........250 Harrell Remodeling............................ * Attorney Susan Dondershine .........300 Communications & Power Industries LLC ............................500 No Limit Drag Racing Team..............25 Packard Foundation..................25,000 Hewlett Foundation ..................25,000 Arrillaga Foundation..................20,000 Peery Foundation .....................20,000 The Milk Pail Market .......................... * Alta Mesa Improvement Company ................................1,200

Upfront

Parking (continued from page 7)

if you don’t live near the Downtown.� (It doesn’t mention the rigid qualification requirements.) “Do Palo Alto citizens really want to pay for Parking Officers to patrol streets in every residential neighborhood that’s near a business district?� the businesses ask. Instead of instituting a permit program, the businesses propose the city designate certain spaces on problematic residential blocks for residents only. They are also urging the city to mark the parking spaces on residential streets so that fewer cars can park on each street, alleviating the problem of overcrowding. Residents and local employees could continue to park on the blocks without buying permits, the businesses argue. The downtown businesses that support the marked-spaces proposal include Whole Foods Market, Watercourse Way, Palo Alto Creamery and Gordon Biersch. A group of neighborhood leaders from Downtown North, Professorville and Crescent Park are voicing their objections as well. Though they argue that the city should pursue a city-wide parking-permit ordinance and adopt it by March 31, the new law should come up with “objective metrics for quality of life in a neighborhood� and design a program around these goals, the residents wrote in a statement. “A permit program for any residential neighborhood must be based on quality standards such as degree of commuter intrusion, traffic, safety, etc.,� the statement reads. “A residential is not a commuter parking lot with homes.� The residents argue that the program designed by staff has “too many unreasonable hurdles and thresholds.� The program, they say, should be designed on a block-byblock basis, rather than by neighborhood, and the opt-in threshold should be 50 percent plus one. Though they are coming at the parking issue from the opposite side, the residents are just as clear as the businesses about their stance on the permit program currently on the table. “Leaders from three neighborhoods are completely unified in opposition and are prepared to speak out aggressively within the University Avenue neighborhoods and take the issues to four California Avenue residential neighborhoods and beyond,� they wrote in the statement. The proposed permit-parking framework isn’t the city’s first stab at such a program for downtown. In June 2012, planners unveiled a similar program limited to a section of Professorville. The council ultimately rejected this proposal, with council members and numerous residents arguing that this solution would only push the problem to other sections of downtown. At that time, the council directed staff to consider more comprehensive solutions. N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊÎ]ÊÓä£{ĂŠU Page 9


Upfront BUSINESS

News Digest

Off the Grid food trucks may come to Menlo Park

Man accidentally shoots himself in head An East Palo Alto man apparently shot himself in the head while intoxicated on New Year’s Eve, a police sergeant said. East Palo Alto police responded to a report of a shooting in the 900 block of Bay Road at 9:07 p.m., Sgt. Jeff Liu said. Officers found the 26-year-old man with a severe gunshot wound to his head and rendered immediate aid, Liu said. The man was then transported for additional treatment. Investigators learned the man had consumed alcohol while handling the loaded firearm, Liu said. The shooting appears to have been accidental. An update on the man’s condition was not immediately available. East Palo Alto Police Police are asking that anyone with any information on this incident call the department at 650-321-1112 or anonymously at 650-409-6792. Anonymous emails can be sent to epa@tipnow.org. N —Palo Alto Weekly staff

Driver, 90, responds to lawsuit over crash The 90-year-old driver of a car that reportedly pinned 6-year-old twin brothers against a wall on Santa Cruz Avenue has denied all responsibility for the resulting injuries, claiming the children were engaged in behavior that was reckless, careless and negligent. The driver, Edward Nelson of Woodside, made that claim in his response to the Cadigan family’s lawsuit naming him as the defendant. According to the lawsuit, filed on Nov. 14, the Cadigan twins and their 9-year-old brother were walking along Santa Cruz Avenue in Menlo Park when a BMW SUV with the license plate “EN ESQ� jumped on to the sidewalk, striking the twins. The Oct. 17 crash broke one twin’s arm and left the other 6-yearold boy in critical condition; he was released from Stanford Hospital following a five-week stay and multiple surgeries. The family seeks punitive as well as general damages on behalf of all three boys for their injuries, which the lawsuit describes as ranging from multiple, extensive skin grafts and damage to the lower body; orthopedic and soft-tissue damage to the upper body; and emotional trauma. Nelson states in his response to the lawsuit that the plaintiffs “carelessly, recklessly and negligently conducted and maintained themselves� in a way that contributed to the accident. Furthermore, “knowing the probable consequences thereof, (they) placed themselves in a position of danger and voluntarily participated in all the activities,� and so assumed any related risks. Finally, the plaintiffs failed to “reasonably mitigate� any damages they sustained. Nelson held a valid license at the time of the accident. After the accident, his license was confiscated, and he was ordered to schedule an examination within five business days with the DMV or risk suspension of his license. Due to the valid license and the determination that Nelson wasn’t under the influence of drugs or alcohol when the accident happened, he faces only a possible infraction, according to police. The District Attorney’s Office will make the final determination. Nelson was licensed to practice law from 1957 to 2001, according to the California State Bar. A team of two attorneys from Pedersen Eichenbaum & Lauderdale of San Jose and one from Dyer & White in Menlo Park is representing him in the lawsuit. Attorney Michael Kelly, representing the Cadigan family, did not respond to requests for comment on the defendant’s filing. The court has scheduled a hearing on Jan. 23 regarding Nelson’s motion to eliminate punitive damages. N —Sandy Brundage

Man in wheelchair injured in car collision A man in his 90s suffered minor injuries Monday when he was hit by a car as he crossed Hamilton Avenue in downtown Palo Alto in his motorized wheelchair. The car, which had stopped at a red light on the corner of Bryant Street and Hamilton Avenue at 11:10 a.m., crossed into the intersection when the light turned green, hitting the man, said Palo Alto Police Officer Sean Downey. The man complained of pain in his hip and had a bump near his left eye. He was transported to Stanford Hospital. Downey called the collision “low impactâ€? and said he didn’t know whether the driver of the car had accelerated into the man or if the driver had only released the car’s brakes as the light turned. The driver cooperated with police. The elderly man had been on his way to eat lunch at La Comida at the Avenidas Senior Center, said Betty Schneider, a friend with whom he often eats lunch. “A lot of us are out on the street around lunchtime, and drivers around Palo Alto do ignore crosswalks often,â€? she said. “When you’re elderly and you use a cane or a wheelchair, it takes a little longer to get across the crosswalk, and I think it’s good for young drivers to remember that.â€? N —Eric Van Susteren Page 10ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊÎ]ÊÓä£{ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Organization wants to hold weekly gatherings in Caltrain lot by Elena Kadvany

O

ff the Grid, a popular Bay Area food truck gathering, might set up shop in Menlo Park this year. The organization has applied for a use permit to operate in the Caltrain parking lot at the corner of Merrill Street and Ravenswood Avenue. If the permit is approved, eight to 12 food trucks would convene on Wednesday nights from 5 to 9 p.m. by the Caltrain station, with live music from 6 to 8 p.m. Food vendors would rotate every week, bringing new faces and food — but no alcohol — to the market. Off the Grid currently coordinates 25 weekly markets, from San Francisco and Berkeley to Hayward and San Mateo. Many operate in parking lots or city gathering places, but this spring the city of Belmont approved an application for the mobile food truck extravaganza to take place on Monday evenings in that city’s Caltrain parking lot. “We were looking at other opportunities, and Menlo Park became tangible because the location is highly under-utilized,� said Ben Himlan, Off the Grid’s director for business development, about the organization’s decision to expand. “And we were interested in going further down the Peninsula.� Food trucks became a contentious topic in Menlo Park in 2012 when the City Council floated a proposal to bring them to the city’s downtown area. The idea met strong opposition from local business owners and residents. “As a restaurant owner on Santa Cruz Ave. for over 12 years, I have to voice my displeasure on the plan for food trucks to occupy an area near my restaurant,� Ali Elsafy, owner of Bistro Vida, wrote in a June 2012 letter to the Almanac, the Weekly’s sister paper. “Has anyone looked into the mess that these trucks will create? Are there going to be public toilets available? Is there going to be someone cleaning up the overflowing garbage cans at the end of the evening? Will someone be cleaning the mess off the stained sidewalks, or is it just going to look disgraceful until the morning? Who is paying for this clean up?� he asked. “Also think of the businesses, homes and apartments in the immediate area that have to suffer from hearing engines running for hours and general disturbance of their standard of living.� Another letter, written by resident Cherie Zaslawsky, asserted that food trucks would spoil downtown, the “jewel� of the Menlo Park community. Off the Grid mailed two notifications in late November and

early December to those living in the area near the Caltrain station. The first was a letter of intent from the city and notification of a public hearing to take place at the Planning Commission’s next meeting on Monday, Jan. 13. “There was some opposition from that,� Himlan said. “People (were) highly concerned about the music and noise.� He added that some residents also expressed concern about drug use and drinking, though the market will not serve alcohol. “It really is about those food trucks,� he said. “They are the star of the show. It’s not about partying. It’s activating a space that otherwise wouldn’t be activated on Wednesday nights and it actu-

‘It’s not about partying. It’s activating a space that otherwise wouldn’t be activated on Wednesday nights and it actually might deter any drug use that might be going on there.’ —Ben Himlan, director for business development, Off the Grid ally might deter any drug use that might be going on there.� Himlan said that after receiving critical response from the first mail notification, Off the Grid sent out a second postcard with further details to clarify what the market and music would be like. “People are assuming we are having a concert out there,� he said. “That’s really not what it’s about.� Off the Grid’s application, which was submitted in October and will be heard by the Planning Commission on Jan. 13, includes details that address the concerns. The application states that live music will be performed by typically one to two musicians playing mainly acoustic instruments for only a portion of the evening; the music will be heard via speakers facing the center of the market and with limited amplifi-

cation. Any noise from food truck generators will be at a “minimum.� However, the application acknowledges that the noise may exceed ordinance limits. The application also promises that Off the Grid staff will leave the market space “cleaner than (they) found it� and that vendors are required to provide garbage, recycling and compost cans in front of their vehicles. Setup would begin at 3:30 p.m. and cleanup would conclude around 10 p.m. Off the Grid would also provide necessary lighting and 200 chairs for customers. The event would initially be approved for only one year “so that its operations can be evaluated prior to any long-term approval,� according to the application. “What we’ve learned from every location that we go to and every permit we go after is that the outreach portion is really important and the notification process is really important,� Himlan said. “We don’t ever try to sneak these things in. ... We’re not looking to upset people; we’re looking to build relationships.� This would be Off the Grid’s first foray south of Belmont; it would join a scattered few other food-truck events in the area. The Willows Market in Menlo Park hosts a smaller-scale food truck night every Monday; many of those vendors also participate in Off the Grid. Popular food-truck event Edgewood Eats in Palo Alto was shut down in April after it was forced to leave Edgewood Plaza and unable to find a new home. Moveable Feast and Mobile Wednesday, two roaming food-truck markets similar to Off the Grid, continue to operate in Palo Alto for weekday lunches. In May Mountain View revamped its 57-year-old municipal code to allow food trucks in parts of downtown but also added various requirements. The Menlo Park Planning Commission is scheduled to review Off the Grid’s permit request at its Jan. 13 meeting, which starts at 7 p.m. in the council chambers at the Civic Center at 701 Laurel St. N Editorial Assistant Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@paweekly.com.

Correction The Dec. 27 article, “Palo Alto’s year of disruptions,� incorrectly stated that voters shot down a “superblock� proposed by the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. “Superblock� was the nickname for a development proposal involving two blocks between University and Lytton avenues and Ramona and Waverley streets. It was voted down in a 1971 referendum. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation proposal for a 18-story hospital in Professorville was voted down in a 1970 referendum. To request a correction, contact Editor Jocelyn Dong at 650-223-6514, jdong@ paweekly.com or P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302.


Upfront

Inspirations

UTILITIES

Solar program remains a challenge in Palo Alto

a guide to the spiritual community

PaloAltoCLEAN renewed, despite lack of participants by Gennady Sheyner

W

hen Palo Alto launched in spring 2012 a program that allows local businesses to sell solar energy to the city, officials lauded it as the latest example of the city’s commitment to green energy and, in the words of City Councilman Pat Burt, an “excellent example� for other utilities to follow. But more than 18 months later, the program known as PaloAltoCLEAN (Clean Local Energy Available Now) still has no participants, prompting utilities officials and council members to consider revisions. In December, the council’s Finance Committee

heard the latest presentation about PaloAltoCLEAN and recommended keeping it in place with few changes. “We still don’t have any takers in the program,� Assistant Utilities Director Jane Ratchye told the committee on Dec. 17. “We think we’re close to having some takers.� Approved by a unanimous vote in March 2012, the program enables commercial customers to build solar systems on their properties and sell power to the City of Palo Alto Utilities under a longterm, fixed-rate contract. The current rate for this energy is 16.5

cents per kilowatt hour for a 20year contract (the council raised it from 14 cents after getting no participants in its initial bid). Because this rate would entail a subsidy from ratepayers, the council agreed in December 2012 to cap participation to 2 megawatts. Even so, commercial customers have been reluctant to install solar panels for energy sales. In considering the future of the program, a staff report from the Utilities Department argues that the 16.5 cent/kWh price is “sufficient to attract projects and that

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

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(TENTATIVE) AGENDA – REGULAR MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBERS MONDAY, JANUARY 6, 2014 - 7:00 PM CITY MANAGER COMMENTS 1. 2013 Year in Review SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY 2. Election of Mayor for 2014 3. Election of Vice Mayor for 2014 4. Adoption of a Resolution Expressing Appreciation for Outstanding Public Service to Greg Scharff as Mayor A Special closed session meeting of the City Council will be held on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 at 6:00 PM to discuss Council Appointed OfďŹ cers compensation. STANDING COMMITTEES The Infrastructure Committee will meet on Thursday, January 10, 2014 at 11:00 AM to discuss: 1) Review Infrastructure Survey Findings and Recommendations and Provide Direction to Staff on Next Steps.

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Upfront

Learn the Guitar this Winter *“Starting to Play� meets for one hour each Monday night for nine weeks beginning January 13. Students are encouraged to bring their own guitar, but both nylon-string and steel-string loaner guitars are available. Other classes at more advanced levels are also offered. A full brochure is available at Gryphon.

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are available on the iPhone and iPod touch (not on a desktop computer) and neither award prizes. They come with single and multiplayer options (in the single, one plays against a computer). There’s are free versions of both games that accommodate smaller numbers of players and full versions. The full version of Hold ‘Em Blitz costs 99 cents and Hold ‘Em Battle costs $1.99 (players can place bets in the latter). The games require Wi-Fi or Bluetooth

Prenatal Yoga   !     This graceful program incorporates stretching, toning, posture and body mechanics most applicable in pregnancy and in the birthing process. Ongoing monthly classes can be started at any point in your pregnancy.     Preparing for Multiples Are you expecting twins, or triplets or more? With the potential for early delivery, expectant parents of multiples are encouraged to learn everything there is to know about carrying and delivering multiple infants.

Infant Safety Class     A room-by-room guide to preparing for a newborn and growing child, including environmental safety and the latest car seat recommendations. This class is ideal for new parents, grandparents and other care-givers of young infants. Infant Massage Workshop "     Learn the techniques of infant massage along with tips to relieve gas, aid digestion and soothe the soreness of vaccination sites on your baby. Recommended for infants from one month of age to crawling. Visit us at startstrongbaby.com

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Carol McComb’s “Starting to Play� workshop includes the FREE use of a Loaner Guitar for the duration of the classes.* Regular cost is just $160 for nine weeks of group lessons, and all music is included.

Arthur Pfeiffer demonstrates “Texas Block ‘Em,� his online poker game, in December. to operate, meaning that if there are multiple players, everyone has to be in the same room together — even though everyone is playing on their own devices. When the game starts, everyone is shown five face-up “community� cards, similar to popular poker game Texas Hold ‘Em. Each player is then prompted to privately choose a card from a limited deck that’s randomly generated fresh for each new hand. Players aim for the same hands that are desirable in poker (royal flush, full house, four of a kind, etc.). The second round of selections are made public, introducing the skill element: once a player sees what another player is aiming for (say there’s a jack of spades in the community cards and one sees another player selecting a jack of clubs), he or she can strategize to “block� that player. If two players select the same card, they’re dealt a “thwart� card that has no value. “This adds a whole dimension on top of poker because card selection now becomes a very important feature,� Pfeiffer said. “And when you play you can play to try to improve your hand, to try to block somebody or when you’re trying to improve your hand, you have to consider they might be trying to block you, so you might not make the best selection to avoid (that). So there’s a whole different dynamic involved.�

Texas Block ‘Em will be based on the same concept but will involve either fee- or subscriptionbased online tournaments that award cash prizes. So the elements consideration and prize will be present, but not chance, meaning the game does not violate gambling laws, Pfeiffer claims. Pfeiffer’s games also have potential educational value, he said. They can be used to teach strategy and negotiation skills, for example. “When you play this game, it makes you a better thinker, strategist and poker player,� he said. Pfeiffer is not the only one trying to reinvent the world of Internet poker. PurePlay, a San Francisco-based company, broke into the scene in 2005, claiming its legality based on the absence of consideration. PurePlay users don’t have to pay to play in its online tournaments, but instead pay a monthly $25 subscription fee to join the website. It’s a different business model, but the game that users play remains the same as regular poker. Pfeiffer’s company has been compared to PurePlay, but he said the two aren’t in competition. “It’s really a totally different thing because our game basically is a game of skill,� he said. “Their game is not a game of skill by the definition of skill where there’s no outside force intervening.� David Levine, an affiliate scholar at the Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, said: “The argument that this is more a game of skill and therefore it wouldn’t run afoul of laws certainly seems probable.� Levine, himself a poker player, added that learning how to read other players’ “tells,� bluffs or potential next moves involves a “high degree of skill.� But both Thwart Poker and

CityView A round-up

of Palo Alto government action this week

City Council The council did not meet this week.

Heart to Heart Seminars on Growing Up           

Informative, humorous and lively discussions between parents and their pre-teens on puberty, the opposite sex and growing up. Girls attend these two-part sessions with their moms and boys attend with their dads.

      .

    

 

Call (650) 724-4601 or visit calendar.lpch.org to register or obtain more information on the times, locations and fees for these and other courses.

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Upfront

Clean ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠvĂ€ÂœÂ“ĂŠÂŤ>}iĂŠÂŁÂŁÂŽ

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PurePlay are operating during a difficult time for online poker, during which many companies have come under major legal fire. In 2011, the U.S. Justice Department shut down two of the world’s biggest online poker companies, PokerStars and Full Tilt Poker, charging their founders with fraud. The next year, PokerStars paid the government a $527 million gambling fine and an additional $184 million to reimburse customers outside the United States. Pfeiffer also recalled in the early 2000s when offshore poker sites were formed so that American players could take part in the lucrative game. In response, Congress passed the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act in 2006, making it illegal for businesses to knowingly accept payment in connection with illegal online gambling. At the state and local level, there’s variation between enforcement and abatement. Some states explicitly categorize online gambling as illegal; others don’t. Some states consider online-poker related violations felonies, and others as misdemeanors (including California). Under California law, legality depends largely on the rake, or the commission fee taken by the person or company operating the game. If the rake is taken as a percentage of the total sum of

Arthur Pfeiffer, creator of the “Hold ‘em Blitz� and “Texas Block ‘Em� online poker games, shows the iPhone app while in his Palo Alto home in December. money that players gamble during a single hand or game, the game qualifies as a “percentage game� and is illegal. But a flatrate or non-percentage rake could be considered legal. Only three states — New Jersey, Nevada and Delaware — have completely legalized Internet poker. Proponents of legalization point to the millions of dollars in tax revenue that could be collected from the game. A recent study conducted by Academicon, a Germany-based law and economics research team, and PokerScout, a website that collects online poker

data, found that the California market alone could generate between $217 and $263 million in its first year of operations. Pfeiffer said he thinks it’s only a matter of time until online poker becomes legal. “Several states already allow (it) and just simply as a source of tax revenue, it’s going to happen. It’s going to happen in the next couple of years.� Levine however, disagrees. “I don’t think I’d go that far. I don’t see (legalization) happening immediately,� he said, citing gambling’s unavoidable association with personal im-

further education of property owners about the program will yield program participation.� The report touts behind-thescenes progress. “The program prompted developers to take a serious look at the cost of developing solar projects in Palo Alto, and some of them shared that information with CPAU staff.� Utilities Director Valerie Fong stressed the value of all parties in the discussion picking up experience in what is known as a “feed-in tariff� program. “Staff would like to gain experience working with this tariff and working with developers,� Fong said. “I think the market place needs this experience as well so that they can understand how to do projects under these sorts of opportunities.�

morality as well as organized crime, money laundering and other illegal activity. However, he added, there’s a lot to be said in terms of the other elements associated with gambling: strategy, thinking, tactics and logic. “You could convince policy

Coming Up at Family JCC O S H the M A N FOshman A M I LY J C C

The committee voted unanimously to keep the program going under the rate of 16.5 cents per kilowatt hour, though members agreed with Burt’s suggestion to raise the cap from 2 megawatts to 3 megawatts. Burt, who chairs the committee, noted that the city has received some proposals for solar projects on city-owned properties, including at the Palo Alto Airport and at a cityowned garages. Though neither plan has materialized to date, the possibilities are still there, Burt said. “We do have the possibility that we can go from ... waiting, waiting to where a couple of these pop and we have to say ‘no’ to one of them because we didn’t have the allotted capacity in the program that would allow (them),� Burt said. N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@paweekly.com.

makers that ... this is no different than playing chess where you’ve got all the pieces on the board and now it’s all about who’s the better player. That, I could see happening.� N Editorial Assistant Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@paweekly.com.

2014 SEASON

Keyboard ConversationsÂŽ with Jeffrey Siegel

Jewish Women’s Theatre

Jeffrey Siegel’s unique “concerts with commentary� are a joy for piano aficionados and novices alike. His series includes three concerts at the OFJCC.

A series of three plays produced and performed by the Los Angeles based Jewish Women’s Theatre.

Series cost $60 Members & students, $70 Non-Members

Series cost $50 Members & students, $65 Non-Members

Per concert cost In advance: $25 Members & students, $30 Non-Members At the door: $35

Per concert cost In advance: $20 Members & students, $25 Non-Members At the door: $30

Great Jewish Composers

Hold Me, Heal Me

Thursday, January 16 | 7:30 PM

Monday, January 27 | 7:30 PM

Russian Rapture

Sex, Lies and Virtual Relationships

Thursday, April 17 | 7:30 PM

Monday, March 31 | 7:30 PM

Mistresses and Masterpieces

Unknown Stories of Biblical Proportions

Thursday, May 15 | 7:30 PM

Monday, June 2 | 7:30 PM

American Jerusalem: Jews and the Making of San Francisco A documentary about the epic story of the pioneering Jews of San Francisco during the Gold Rush. The film will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by the documentary’s producer, Jackie Krentzman.

Saturday, January 25 | 7:30 PM In advance: $10 Members, $12 Non-Members At the door: $15 18 & under: free Made possible by the Koret Foundation and co-sponsored by the Taube Center for Jewish Studies at Stanford.

For more information visit www.paloaltojcc.org/arts Oshman Family JCC 3921 Fabian Way | Palo Alto, CA | (650) 223-8700

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in Palo Alto before crossing above U.S. Highway 101 just south of the Palo Alto Animal Services Center. From there, the flights would travel over the Palo Alto Baylands Nature Preserve and above the Shoreline Golf Links in Mountain View. It would not replace the current flight path but would provide another option, Cory Cozzens, Surf Air’s vice president of business development, stated in an email to the Weekly last week. Surf Air currently serves 371 members with about 350 more waiting for new routes to their communities, Cozzens told the Almanac. About half of its members live in the Bay Area, and 31 reside in San Mateo County. The airline has 16 daily flights from 8:20 a.m. to 9 p.m. connecting San Carlos to Burbank, Santa Barbara and Hawthorne, Calif., according to its website. Cozzens said the company does not have any immediate plans to add flights to San Carlos airport. “However, our long-term plans have included as many as 20 daily flights to San Carlos. We plan to provide service to airports throughout California over the coming years, including Tahoe, San Diego, Palm Springs and more,� he said. The membership-based airline charges a flat rate of $1,350 per month, plus a $500 one-time initiation fee. The new flight path was formally requested by a working group of Atherton residents, Cozzens said. Surf Air and the San Carlos Airport provided minimal technical and feasibility guidance, he said. Cozzens defended Surf Air planes, which he said are not exceptionally noisy. “Surf Air flights comprise only a small number of the total daily flights into San Carlos airport and is similar or smaller/ quieter than many other aircraft that have long been operated from San Carlos, including 20

Drought ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠvĂ€ÂœÂ“ĂŠÂŤ>}iĂŠxÂŽ

coming from renewable sources and the open market, Ratchye said. Palo Alto would purchase the additional power from an existing stable of eight to 10 suppliers, she said. The city won’t know until March if its drinking-water supply, which comes from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, will be affected, Ratchye said. But if the drought affects the Sierra snowpack or continues for an extended period, water supply could be impacted. The city has underground emergency-water supplies, she said. “It’s very early in the water year. Supplies in storage are looking OK, and water use has gone down,â€? she said. N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com. Page 14ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊÎ]ÊÓä£{ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

daily operations with identical aircraft (Pilatus PC-12s). Unfortunately noise from other operations, including louder Coast Guard operations, are often attributed to Surf Air. All of that said, we want to be welcome in the community, so we have made many changes to our operations to minimize our noise impact, and we continue to work with all concerned parties to obtain this goal,� he said. Crescent Park Neighborhood Association President Norman Beamer sent an email to City of Palo Alto officials requesting immediate action so that the proposed route does not materialize. “It’s certainly appropriate for people to weigh in on this with the City Council,� he said, but he did not know what legal mechanisms might be in place to address the trans-Palo Alto flights. “I’m hoping people will get organized and look into it,� he said. Palo Alto officials are looking into the matter, said city spokeswoman Claudia Keith.

“The city is aware of the issue. We are working to ensure that the city is able to participate in any discussions on potential changes that could impact our community and continue to monitor the situation to ensure that the city’s position is adequately represented,� she said. Karen White, president of the Duveneck/St. Francis Neighborhood Association, said she has not heard the planes, but neighborhood concerns regarding aircraft are not new, she said. “Many years ago there was an uproar over the noise of the LifeFlight helicopters, but those concerns subsided,� she said. White said she would be more concerned about the planes flying at a safe altitude. “We need to wait and see what happens. Flights during the day are not as problematic as flights at 2 a.m. waking people up,� she said. N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to hear a “year in review� presentation from City Manager James Keene and elect its mayor and vice mayor. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 6, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session to discuss the salaries of council-appointed officers. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 8, at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). UTILITIES ADVISORY COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the proposed Utilities Reserves Management Practices and Financial Plan Templates; and the Water Utility Cost and Consumption Benchmarking Report. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 8, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss a proposal to move Avenidas and Palo Alto Community Child Care out of the Human Services Resource Allocation Process; hold a panel discussion with local human-service case managers; and review the commission’s subcommittee workplan. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 9, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL INFRASTRUCTURE COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to continue its discussion on a potential revenue measure for the November 2014 ballot to pay for infrastructure improvements. The meeting will begin at 11 a.m. on Friday, Jan. 10, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAlto Online.com/news.

Referendum threatens transgender student law A law that articulates the rights and treatment of transgender students at schools across the state goes into effect Jan. 1, but it could be in jeopardy if a referendum for its repeal makes it onto the November ballot. (Posted Dec. 31, 9:57 a.m.)

Hypothermia killed woman at Heritage Park The Palo Alto woman who died in Heritage Park on Saturday, Dec. 21, succumbed to complications from hypothermia, the Santa Clara County Coroner’s Office said today. Gloria Bush, 72, had spent her life helping persons with mental illness before being overtaken by her own, her family said. (Posted Dec. 31, 4:23 p.m.)


Pulse POLICE CALLS Palo Alto Dec. 18-30 Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Sexual assault. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft related Checks forgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Embezzlement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Possession stolen property . . . . . . . . . 1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Vehicle related Abandoned bicycle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Driving w/ suspended license . . . . . . . 4 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Traffic/Evade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle accident/mnr. injury . . . . . . . . . 9 Vehicle accident/prop. damage . . . . . . 5 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Possession of paraphernalia. . . . . . . . . 5 Miscellaneous Animal call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Casualty fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Penal code/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . 3 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Unattended death. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Menlo Park Dec. 17-30 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Domestic abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Domestic disturbance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Elder abuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vehicle related Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Driving w/ suspended license. . . . . . . 17 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Recovered stolen vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle accident/injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Vehicle accident/mnr. injury . . . . . . . . . 2 Vehicle accident/no injury. . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Alcohol or drug related Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Minor in possession of alcohol . . . . . . . 1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Miscellaneous Coroner case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Gang validation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mental evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . 3 Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Forest Ave., 12/20, 12:36 p.m.; Battery/ Sexual 700 blk High St., 12/27, 11:53 p.m.; Battery simple

Menlo Park 400 blk Pope St., 12/17, 10:07 a.m.; Battery 1900 block Santa Cruz Ave., 12/19, 9:51 p.m.; Domestic abuse 1100 block Willow Road, 12/21, 1:11 p.m.; Battery

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB)

JAN. 2014

COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/healtheducation.

DR. TOM MCDONALD MEMORIAL LECTURE SERIES AT THE PALO ALTO CENTER FOOT AND ANKLE PAIN Palo Alto Center 795 El Camino Real Hearst Center for Education 3rd Floor, Jamplis Bldg. Palo Alto (650) 853-4873

Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real 3rd Floor Conference Room Mountain View (650) 934-7380

Amy French Chief Planning OfďŹ cial

JAN. 14, 7 – 8:30 P.M. SIMRAN SINGH, M.D. PAMF PSYCHIATRY AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Join us for this free, informative lecture to gain an understanding of the common symptoms of anxiety and depression. PAMF psychiatrist, Dr. Simran Singh, will discuss the basics of the conditions, as well as provide practical techniques for managing them.

GO WITH THE GRAIN: FLAVORFUL AND INSPIRING WAYS TO ENJOY WHOLE GRAINS Foster City Community Center 1000 E. Hillsdale Boulevard Foster City Registration is not required.

2609 Alma Street [13PLN-00463]: Request by CKAArchitects on behalf of Valley One Investment, LLC for Preliminary Architectural Review of a new three–story, four unit multifamily residential condominium project on an 8,063 sq. ft. site in the RM-30 zone district. 601 California Avenue [13PLN-00460]: Request by Dave Musgrave, Toeniskoetter Construction on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University for Architectural Review of a sign exception to allow one additional freestanding sign along the California Avenue frontage of the existing Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati legal advisor ofďŹ ces in the RP zoning district.

Please join us for this lecture which will cover a variety of common causes of pain in the lower extremities and treatment options for these problems.

MANAGING ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

8:30 A.M., Thursday, January 16, 2014, Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review ďŹ led documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. 2209-2215 El Camino Real [13PLN- 00396]: Request by Karen Kam on behalf Tai Ning Trading & Investment Co. for Major Architectural Review of a new 9,580 sq. ft. three story, mixed use development on a 5,204 square foot lot to replace an existing 3,803 sq. ft. restaurant and retail use. Environmental Assessment: Exempt from the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) per CEQA Guidelines Section 15332. Zone District: CC (2).

JAN. 14, 7 – 8:30 P.M. WILLIAM CABELL ADAMS, DPM PAMF PODIATRY

JAN. 23, 6 – 8 P.M. LINDA SHIUE, M.D. PAMF INTERNAL MEDICINE Dr. Linda Shiue will discuss the role whole grains play in enhancing your health and teach you new ways to enjoy them. This lecture will include a cooking demonstration and tasting.

MINDFUL EATING Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real 3rd Floor Conference Room Mountain View (650) 934-7380

FEB. 11, 7 – 8:30 P.M. JULIE FORBES, PH.D. MINDFULNESS CONSULTANT

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Michael Repka Before you select a real estate agent, meet with Michael Repka to discuss how his real estate law and tax back-ground beneďŹ ts Ken DeLeon’s clients.

Transitions Births, marriages and deaths

Sarah Kathryn “Kate� Yang Sarah Kathryn “Kate� Yang, a resident of Palo Alto for more than 25 years, died on Monday, Dec. 9, in Santa Rosa, Calif., after a five-year battle with breast cancer. She was born on April 7, 1976, to Harold and Georgia Yang and grew up in Palo Alto. She attended Duveneck Elementary School, JLS Middle School and Palo Alto High School, where she was a member of the Madrigal Singers, Mock Trial and named a National Merit Scholar Finalist. In her youth, she had a passion for

(650) 488.7325 DRE# 01854880 | CA BAR# 255996

michaelr@deleonrealty.com

www.deleonrealty.com

Donald Nils Granholm enjoyed the Advanced Placement course he helped initiate and the science department coordinator role he held for a number of years. After Cubberley closed, Don taught for several years at Palo Alto High School, where he retired in 1982. During his teaching career, Don was actively involved in the major chemistry curriculum changes that the National Science Foundation funded in the post-Sputnik era. He also served on the board of the California Science Teachers’ Association, including one year as its president. Don and Mary shared a passion for building international relations, especially one person at a time. Their hosting of international students began while their son Dean was in high school, with a one-year stay by Ethiopian exchange student Eabisa Guteta, who remains (with his family) a close part of their circle. For many years thereafter they opened their home to students through Stanford University’s international student program, where Don was an active volunteer. In their wide-ranging travels throughout the world, Don and Mary often stayed at the homes of families whose children they had hosted. Don’s photographs of their travels are legendary, demonstrating both his eye for beauty and the spirit of friendship that he and Mary fostered on their adventures together. The life of Donald N. Granholm will be celebrated at a memorial service at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, January 4, 2014, at the First Baptist Church, 305 N. California Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Don’s wishes were that in lieu of owers, donations could be made to the First Baptist Church of Palo Alto or to LinďŹ eld College, McMinnville Oregon. PA I D

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 ", - ,6 A memorial service for Luis Farjado, MD, will be held Saturday, Jan. 4, at 1:30 p.m. at the University Club of Palo Alto, 3277 Miranda Ave., Palo Alto.

OBITUARY

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/obituaries

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Donald Nils Granholm passed away peacefully on December 19, 2013 at a nursing home in Mountain View, California. Don leaves behind his wife of 53 years Mary Jane (Budrow) Granholm; two sons, Steve Granholm and Dean Granholm; as well as four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Don was born on October 15, 1918, the oldest son of Nils Olaf Granholm and Victoria Erica (Lundquist) Granholm, in Yakima, Washington. He was preceded in death by his two brothers, David Granholm and Victor Granholm. Don and Mary met in the First Baptist Church of Palo Alto, California, where they were married on April 9, 1960. Members at the time, they have remained so to the present day, often drawing on the strong church community for support but always returning the favor many times over. Don and Mary have been residents of Mountain View, California since the mid-1950s. Don graduated from Wapato High School in Wapato, Washington and received his Bachelor’s degree in 1939 from LinďŹ eld College in McMinnville, Oregon. He went on to earn a Master’s degree from the University of Washington in 1948 and pursued other postgraduate work at the University of California Berkeley, Denver University, the University of Chicago, and Stanford University. A lifelong educator as well as learner, Don spent sixteen years as a science teacher and principal at several high schools in Washington State before moving to California in 1956. There Don taught chemistry, as a charter member of the faculty of the new Cubberley High School in Palo Alto. He especially

Calif., and Houston Yang of Los Angeles, Calif. The family will have a private remembrance and requests that in lieu of flowers, contributions be made to FORCE (Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered) at www. facingourrisk.org. FORCE is a nonprofit organization specializing in the fight against hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

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Managing Broker DeLeon Realty JD - Rutgers School of Law L.L.M (Taxation) NYU School of Law

horseback riding and developed a lifelong borderline obsession with her first car, the Dodge Dart. After graduating from Amherst College with degrees in computer science and music composition, she moved to Rotterdam, Netherlands. After two years abroad, she moved back to her home state where she pursued both musical ambitions and computer technology. She was an avid singer, improvisational pianist and world traveler well known for her infectious laugh. She is survived by her parents, Georgia and Harold Yang of Santa Rosa and her siblings, Genevieve Yang of Petaluma,

DEADLINE 4 January 3, 201

For more information and to enter, visit PaloAltoOnline.com/photo_contest

The Board of Director. Of Palo Alto Park Mutual Water Company A special call meeting by the Board of Directors of the Palo Alto Park Mutual Water Company will be held on Saturday February 1, 2014 at the hour of 10:00 o’clock am; at; 2190 Addison Ave., E. Palo Alto, CA 94303 for the express purpose to discuss the proposed water rate assessments increase of $10.00 per month. “Community Water Service Since 1924� “Our #1 priority is serving quality on tap�


Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Apples and oranges Editor, During the last City Council meetings, several council members tried to justify their view(s) of not taking seriously the message of the November 2013 election rejecting Measure D. Some had the hubris to say they were elected with more votes than the votes defeating Measure D. Your election had nothing to do with Measure D. This is an insult to Palo Alto voters, comparing apples and oranges. No one disputed the legitimacy of their election nor denied their right to continue holding misguided views. Our system of government does not require citizens to vote. We and our neighbors from throughout the city went door to door leafleting and talking to fellow citizens. They understood this election was not about affordable senior housing, but developments increasing density in residential neighborhoods, declines in quality of life and safety for their children. This decline is reflected in ugly, oversized, under-parked projects with increased traffic and congestion. Council’s attempts to miscategorize and devalue citizen’s views is a reflection of their believing they are invincible and their inability to accept they may be wrong. This turns people off and leads to mistrust of the council. We urge council and all staff to seriously examine the election results and the implications it has for our city’s future. We hope the next project on the Maybell site will be guided by current zoning and consideration of people in the neighborhood along the Maybell corridor. Michael J. and Ruth Lowy Thain Way, Palo Alto

Transfer Maybell loan to Buena Vista Editor, I support reprogramming the $5.8 million City loan on the Maybell property to help the residents of the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park to purchase the property and become homeowners in the City we all love. This would show a good faith effort to preserve and maintain the current level of lowincome housing stock, by saving the largest low-income housing project in the city. Margaret Fruth El Camino Way, Palo Alto

Dangerous darkness Editor, Every year in December it gets dark quite early and I become very concerned while driving. Each year I see bikers (kids and adults) riding with dark clothes,

either no or woefully inadequate lights, no reflectors and riding like it was daylight. It is very difficult to see them with bright car lights, street lights, house lights and Christmas decorations all attracting your eyes’ attention. These riders are may be smart people, but they are doing a very stupid and dangerous thing. I don’t understand why they don’t spend a few dollars for reflective clothes and adequate lights and reflectors to protect themselves from serious injury. I don’t know what the city can do to rectify this situation but anything would be welcomed. Mike Murnane Metro Circle, Palo Alto

Eastside Prep props Editor, Hallelujah for the cover story on Eastside Prep. As one in an army of dedicated volunteers, I can attest to the virtues of the institution. It’s not just a school. It’s truly a community where mutual admiration and respect among students and adults fuel a rigorous, demanding level of college-preparatory learning. There is no praise high enough for its founders, Chris Bischof and Helen Kim, who have maintained a pure and steady focus on one singular goal — providing an environment where every Eastside student will be fully prepared and successful in graduating from college and launching him/herself into the world with a strong belief in his/her own capabilities. Where others may have been tempted to “franchise� their operation and expand to additional sites, Chris and Helen have instead painstakingly worked to remove all of the potential obstacles and cracks in the road that might waylay their students. The end product — Eastside Prep as it stands today — is breathtaking in its integrity. Every time I step foot onto the Eastside campus, I leave awash in a gentle euphoric flush, not unlike a runner’s endorphin-induced “high.� The teachers impress and inspire me, but it’s the students that make me smile. Although we struggle together with asymptotes and algebraic equations, they take full responsibility for their own understanding and mastery of learning, and are earnestly appreciative of the support that volunteers offer. If your readers are looking to give themselves a holiday gift, they should consider joining the ranks of Eastside supporters. Barbara Sih Klausner Salvatierra Street, Stanford

opinion (Dec. 13) are supporting a campaign against permit parking. Why? They own a building on Alma between Lincoln and Addison, bordered on two sides by residential and the other by my antique store. The original house facing Alma is leased to a designer; the concrete addition opening onto the alley was his family’s upholstery shop, later leased to the Pacific Art League who used it a few hours a week as a studio/ classroom. The property is “nonconforming� with only four or five unmarked spaces, about a third of the actual need for this building. But, because of the restrained intensity of the former uses parking was never an issue. When the art use left, city staff handed the brothers a golden egg — they approved an office use and remodeling along the alley but no parking or limits on workers. The owners increased the rent and a start-up with 16 employees moved in. Clearly the brothers enjoy and want to defend the financial subsidy they receive (over $500,000), letting their neighbors, sometimes parking for my store, provide their parking needs. Why not? All of the other downtown developer/ owners are subsidized, why not Cintz? So, they are defending what they feel is their right to destroy the character of the surrounding residential neighborhoods and maintain their subsidy. Why did the city approve the intensification of a clearly nonconforming use? Other cities don’t. Go figure. Ken Alsman Addison Avenue, Palo Alto

No need to upgrade Editor, We have used California Avenue for a significant portion of our weekly shopping and easy access to convenience stores and eating places for the past 55 years. It is quietly the way much of small town California main streets used to be. There is nothing wrong with it. It does not need to be “upgraded� into another El Camino or University Avenue. It is and has been essentially down town for much of Palo Alto and Stanford University student and faculty housing. It has convenient on-street parking and parking facilities. Just because it may look old-fashioned to some is no reason to change a good working community resource. Check it out for yourself. Marvin and Alison Lee Harker Avenue, Palo Alto

Go figure

City for sale

Editor, The Cintz brothers mentioned in Mr. Thorwaldson’s Weekly guest

Editor, Thanks to Karen Holman, Greg Schmid and Gail Price for stand-

ing up against the humongous Grocery Outlet sign. Perhaps council members should take a class in negotiating so they won’t fold to every threat against city regulations. But maybe it’s too late. By this time, every developer — and now every business owner — knows that the city is a pushover and its laws are made to be broken. Resident Tom DuBois had photos showing that nowhere else in the Bay Area does Grocery Outlet have a sign more than 1/4 the size of the one that Palo Alto approved. Even that didn’t sway the council to a sane decision. Palo Alto: A city for sale where the council can’t say no to developers and can’t say yes to residents. Pat Marriott Oakhurst Avenue, Los Altos

No trees on golf course Editor, In response to Ed Lauing’s comments as chair of the Parks and Recreation Commission (Palo Alto Weekly, Dec. 13), in reference to the tree replacement plan at the Municipal Golf Course: Mr. Lauing has incorrectly stated that “Trees ‘R Us� is a fitting guiding principle for full replacement of the trees at the Municipal Golf Course at the Baylands. The golf course sits on land that was historically salt marsh, and unfortunately, this plant community does not include trees. With an eye towards eventual sea level rise as predicted by climate change models, the better course would be to adopt a hybrid plan that includes both tress and salt marsh habitat restoration. In the long run, salt marsh at the Bay’s edge, not trees, will mitigate somewhat the rising tides. This means Palo Alto spends less on disaster recovery from flood damage. The benefits don’t end there — the increased wildlife viewing opportunities will be enjoyed by the large numbers of people who walk and bike and birdwatch in the Baylands every week. Plus

the superior oxygen-producing ability of a salt marsh to a forest is well-documented. Yes, we are a city of trees, but the trees have their place on the uplands and in our neighborhoods, but not at the Bay’s edge on the golf course. Jane Moss Ferne Avenue, Palo Alto

R.I.P. University Art Editor, I grew up in Palo Alto but moved to the east coast 30 years ago for school and then work. I return a couple of times a year to see family. Palo Alto was a wonderful place to grow up in — great schools, interesting people, fantastic weather, entrepreneurship. Much of that is now gone, replaced by a techie/hipster vacuum. I agree with those who say that Mountain View, Menlo Park and Redwood City have more vital downtowns. Palo Alto city planning has been poor. Other similar cities, like Boulder, Colo., have figured out how to preserve vital downtown space with a diversity of shops. University Avenue could be a pedestrian mall with parking offline. Shuttles, trolleys and other public transport would help. Extending BART or light rail down the peninsula to San Jose (and looping up to the East Bay, and further south) would reduce traffic. But Palo Altans/Peninsula residents are partly to blame for this. Complaining about lots of traffic? The NIMBY opposition to public transport/light rail is foolish and short-sighted. Palo Alto has the money, ingenuity and ideological commitment to progressive politics. So who’s going to step up and take the lead? RIP Varsity Theatre, Megabooks, Swensen’s, Rapp’s shoes, Stapleton’s, University Arts, Shady Lane, City Feet, House of Today, Swain’s House of Music and everything else that served real people with real needs. Lisa Jadwin Rochester, New York

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Senior Focus CIVIL RIGHTS FOOT SOLDIER ... Hear the story of civil-rights foot soldier James Armstrong, 85, the proprietor of Armstrong’s Barbershop in Birmingham, Ala., where hair was cut, civil rights marches organized and battle scars iced. Armstrong’s story is told in the Oscar-nominated film “Barber of Birmingham� to be shown Monday, Jan. 6, at 2 p.m. at Avenidas, 450 Bryant St. Free and open to the public.

JANUARY 2014

LivingWell A monthly special section of news

& information for seniors

AFRAID OF FALLING? ... Learn to recognize positive and negative beliefs about falls and how to shift to positive patterns in A Matter of Balance, a weekly class that begins Monday, Jan. 6, at 1 p.m. at Avenidas. Classes include discussion, exercises and guest speakers. Call Judith at 650-289-5436 before registering. Register www.avenidas.org or by calling 650-289-5400.

MEET THE FILMMAKER ... Bert Shapiro worked in educational publishing for more than 30 years before becoming a filmmaker in New York City in 1995 at the age of 64. He launched the Pheasants Eye production company and has produced 15 documentaries so far. Shapiro will screen four documentaries with a total run-time of 70 minutes and then answer questions on Tuesday, Jan. 7, from 1 to 3 p.m. in the Schultz Cultural Arts Hall of the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way. The titles are “Speaking for Myself,� “Let’s Tango,� “Doing the Don’t,� and “The Soapboxers.� Admission is $15 at the door. For more information, contact Michelle Rosengaus at mrosengaus@ paloaltojcc.org or 650-223-8616. LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS ... Instructor Peggy Simon will show people how to self-manage their health in this six-week, evidencebased Stanford program. Learn to communicate with family, friends and physicians; develop and maintain an exercise program; eat healthfully; and manage stress and manage medications appropriately. The class meets Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon, and runs from Jan. 9 to Feb. 13. It includes the book, “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions� and the CD “Relaxation for Mind and Body.� Register online at www.avenidas.org. NARRATIVE HISTORY BASICS ... Narrative historian Maggie MarkdaSilva will help people get started on the basics of oral history interviewing: the do’s and don’ts, a list

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NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS ... Learn how to get off the dieting roller coaster with an uplifting talk by Cynthia Magg, author of “Getting To The Heart Of The Platter.� Magg’s approach does not focus on diet and exercise yet is designed to supplement every diet out there. Magg will speak Tuesday, Jan. 7, at 2 p.m. at Avenidas. The talk is free, but RSVPs are requested at 650-289-5400.

Becky Spitzer and Jim Wong, students in Sheila Dunec’s life stories memoir class, look over Wong’s binder containing family photos, letters, notes and more which he uses when writing about his past.

Everybody has a story In ‘guided autobiography,’ people tell their life stories and ponder wisdom gained by Chris Kenrick

T

he death of her mother was the spark that ultimately led Palo Alto resident Sheila Dunec to make a major turn in her own career. “So much was lost with her passing,� Dunec recalls of her mother’s death at age 84 in 1991. “In addition to my already profound grief, I had this overwhelming regret of why I hadn’t asked her things, listened to the stories. “She was sort of my model and my guide, but when it’s too late it’s really too late.� Dunec, a counselor who at the time was running anger-management workshops and teaching veterans at Foothill College, began advising her friends who still had living parents to “ask them questions, write the tributes, the expressions

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of gratitude.� She got interested in recording life stories and, ultimately, sought permission from Foothill to launch communitybased classes in “life stories and guided autobiography.� Now retired from Foothill, Dunec offers her 10-week “Life Stories� classes at Avenidas, Grace Lutheran Church and in a private home in Portola Valley. She’s a firm believer in the psychological value of reviewing and recording one’s life memories, crediting the late psychiatrist and gerontologist Robert Butler and gerontologist James Birren of the University of Southern California for pioneering work in the “life stories� field. “Really reviewing and taking stock of one’s life correlates with good mental

health in older adulthood,� Dunec said. ‘It’s one of the activities an older adult can engage in that correlates with successful aging and a positive view going forward.� Moreover, it’s a gift that older people can give to children and grandchildren, she said. “If your adult children are way too busy, caught up in the rush of midlife, trying to make a living and raise kids, you can bridge that gap by writing about things you’d like them to know about your life,� she said. “As children we’re sort of meshed in a relationship with our parents, and it’s hard to see them as independent young adults, navigating the same challenges that we do.


Living Well

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From left, Bill Lee, Sheila Dunec, Becky Spitzer and Jim Wong share stories while meeting briefly at Avenidas, where Dunec leads her life stories memoirs class on Dec. 31, 2013. “Everyone in my class has a desire to be seen as people independent of the role of mother or father.� The “Life Stories� curriculum is not to be confused with a memoir-writing class, Dunec says. She advises students to write about their life struggles, admit

their mistakes and steer clear of romanticizing the past. “If somebody’s looking to publish a witty little collection, this isn’t for them,� she said. “This is not a rosy memoir class — we get into really tough stuff.� Toward the end of a 10-week session Dunec typically asks

Living Well Well Living

students to ponder death: their early experiences with it, their thoughts on immortality and what they would do if they knew they had just one more year to live. “Like money, this is another taboo that we don’t talk about much, but it’s a very important subject,�

JANUARY 2014 SEPTEMBER 2713 Calendar of Events

Friday Jan. August Wed. 12 AARP Tax Assistance Avenidas 9-10-30 am closed Free by appointment for NY Day only @Avenidas

Avenidas presents its 3rd Annual Financial Conference

Building Security for Longevity Topics will include:

Financial Shock Absorbers sponsorship ad Smart Retirement Planning 2 3/8� x 6� Care Insurance & Long-Term

â—† â—† â—† â—† â—† â—† â—†

Estate & Tax Strategies Maximizing Social Security Navigating Medicare Leaving a Legacy

Saturday, January 25, 2014 8:30 am - 2 pm 450 Bryant Street, Palo Alto To register or for more information, visit Avenidas.org or call (650) 289-5435

Thursday, Jan.5 2 Monday August Senior Adults Legal Assistance Health Insurance 10am-12pm Counseling Free @Avenidas (450 Bryant St.) @Avenidas 9am-12noon. Free, but call Spouse and Partner Caregivers (650) 289-5400 Support Group for appointment. 1:30-3 pm Free Friday, Jan. 3 @Avenidas Transitions group @ Tuesday August 6 Avenidas Everything You Wanted to 10:15-11:45am. $20/quarter Know About Hoarding 12-30-2 pm Free Monday, Jan. 6 @Avenidas UNAFF for Seniors Movie Wednesday August 7 “The Barber of Birmingham� Chess @Avenidas @2pm. Free. 1-4 pm Free @Avenidas Tuesday, Jan. 7 Meet theAugust Author: Thursday 8 Advance Health Cynthia MaggCare Directives 9-11 am “$5.00 The by Heart of the Platter� appointment only @Avenidas @Avenidas @2 pm. Free. Spinal & Muscle Stretching

Intro Workshop

Wed. Jan. 8 11am-12pm $20 members/$30 non members Parkinson’s Group @Avenidas @Avenidas Friday pm. September 6 2-3:30

Social Ballroom Dancing

Resources and programs for positive aging

3-4:30 pm Free @Avenidas

Saturday August Thursday, Jan. 10 9 Successful Aging Celebration Movie: “Now 9:30 am-1:30 PM You See Me� Free @Avenidas @1:30pm PAMF Mountain View Campus Free for members/ $2 non Monday August 12

Massage and Friday, Jan.Reexology 10 1:30-4 pm Wine Appreciation Club $35 members/$45 non @Avenidas @Avenidas 3-4:30pm. $12. 13 Tuesday August Register calling Support StanfordbyCaregiver Group289-5400. (650) 12-1 pm Space is limited! Free

Friday, Jan. 17 Friday August 16 Garden Club, 1-2pm Aveneedles Knitting Group 2:30-4:30 pm @Avenidas. Free Call (650) 289-5400 for info. @Avenidas Monday August Monday, Jan. 19 20 Senior Adults Legal Assistance Avenidas closed 10 am-2 pm Free for Santa Clara County residents only Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday @Avenidas

Tuesday, Jan. 20 21 Tuesday August Camp Avenidas Summer Fitness Tuina @Avenidas Academy 10-11am. Free. 10 am-3:30 pm 8/20 thru 8/22

@Avenidas

Monday, Jan. 13 Movie “Age of Champions� “2 When Healthcare Throws pm $2You members/$5 non members a Curveball.� @Avenidas @Avenidas 2-3pm Free.

$75 members/$105 Wed. Jan. 22non member at Channing House Reiki energy treatments An Evening with Host of Bay @Avenidas by appointment. Area Backroads Call (650) 289-5400. $30/$35. 6:30pm-8:30pm

Wednesday August 14

$10 800 Middle Avenue, Menlo Thursday, Jan 23Park, CA 94025 Reservation:Caregiving (650) 326-2025 Ext 222 or Family Email knwachob@peninsulavolunteers.org 101 Workshop

Tuesday, 14 Skin Cancer Jan. Screening 1-2 pm Fitness for Health Free by appointment only @Avenidas @Avenidas 3:30-4:40 pm. Free Adult Child Caregivers Support Group 6-7:30 pmJan 15 Wed. $10 donation Dementia & @Avenidas Unacknowledged Grief Thursday August 15 @Avenidas 6-7:30pm. Free. Health Insurance Counseling 9-11 am

Thursday, Jan. 16 Free for Santa Clara County residents only @Avenidas Monthly Book Group @Avenidas AARP Driver Safety 2-6:30 pm “$12 Orphan Train� non from 3-4:30pm. members/$14 members by Free. appointment only @Avenidas

“Wednesday How to MoveAugust Mama 21 Reiki Without Hurting Yourself� 9am-12noon In members/$35 Mountain View $30 non members by @Avenidas appointment onlyRose Kleiner Center RSVP to (650) 289-5498 @Avenidas

Friday, 2422 ThursdayJan. August Spinal and Muscle Stretching Free discussion on 11am – 12 noon “$20 Advocating for your members/$30 non members Government BeneďŹ tsâ€? @Avenidas @Avenidas from 12:30-2:30pm Caregiver Workshop “Taking Care of Youâ€? 7 pm Free

270 Escuela Ave,25 Mountain View Sat. Jan. Avenidas 3rd 23 Annual Friday August Podiatry Conference Financial 9am-4:30 pm @Avenidas fromnon8:30am-2pm $40 members/$45 members @Avenidas RSVP to (650) 289-5445 Monday August 26

Monday, Jan. 27 Acupuncture 9:15 am-11:30 am Free Spouse $25Partner Caregivers & @Avenidas Support Group Tuesday August 27 @Avenidas from 11am-12:30

Stanford Caregiver Support Group

Tuesday, Jan. 28 12-1 pm Free talk: “Are you Free @Avenidas IPAD Curious?� Wednesday @Avenidas @August 2pm. 28 Drop-in Blood Pressure Screening

Wed. Jan. 29 9-10:30 am Free Blood Pressure Free Cubberley Community Center, PA Screening Adult Child from Caregivers @Cubberley 9:30-10:30am. Support Group 6-7:30 pm

Thurs. Jan. 30 $10 donation @Avenidas“Mud� Movie w/Matthew McConaughey Thursday August 29 Pole Walking for Mobility @Avenidas @1:30pm 2:30-4:45 pm Free for members/ $2 non $15 members/$20 non members @Avenidas

Friday, Jan. 31st Friday August 30 Social Ballroom Dance Foot Hand Nail Care & Pedicure @Avenidas 9 am-1:30 pmfrom 3-4:30pm Free $40 members/$45 non =-members (for manicure) $50 members/$55 non-members (for both manicure & pedicure) @Avenidas

For complete schedule or information about Avenidas events, call 650-289-5400

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Living Well she said. “We talk about making plans for the future — basically the bucket list — of what’s important to you to learn, experience, express or finish in the time you have left. All the research con-

cludes that people who’ve done the things that are important to them have a much better chance of greeting the end of life with peace of mind, a sense of equanimity, a sense of having completed life.�

In the first week of Life Stories, Dunec asks students to share what’s brought them to the class, what they’d like to accomplish and whether they’re writing for anybody other than themselves.

In later sessions, students are asked to reflect on their lives chronologically — birth, family, growing up, adulthood. Later, the themes shift to retrospection, as students consider how the world has changed, what’s

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been gained and what’s been lost. Other sections ask students to integrate the insights gained to “create a more authentic life in the present.� Sometimes Dunec adds a section on “The Times of Our Lives,� in which students revisit their best memories and consider lessons learned on how to enjoy life. Another section, “Being My Age,� asks them to try to assess honestly what it feels like to be their age. Dunec says she finds continual inspiration in her students. “People come to me and say, ‘My life has never been anything out of the ordinary’ — and then they start talking,� she said. One student in his 90s, Menlo Park resident Carl Clark, received military honors after his wartime heroism came to light in Dunec’s class. Dunec brought the story to the attention of U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo, who worked for two years to secure military recognition for Clark, an African-American. On the night of May 3, 1945, a kamikaze attack on the USS Aaron Ward instantly killed Clark’s colleagues on a firefighting team, and, despite a broken collarbone, Clark, sprang into action to extinguish fires sparked by a subsequent kamikaze plane. In a 2012 ceremony at Moffett Field, U.S. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus bestowed the Navy and Marine Corps Medal with the Combat Distinguishing Device, with Dunec, Eshoo and Clark’s surviving child and his siblings — who are in their 90s — looking on. “We were loyal Americans and tried to do our part,� Clark said, acknowledging other black servicemen never properly honored. Clark’s story is among 42 oral history narratives of World War II collected by Dunec and others in a decade-long project that filled Foothill College’s Smithwick Theater in its 2009 premier. “We gathered people from everywhere, and it felt like we got so many of them in the nick of time,� she said. “It was important to get many different viewpoints. It was a world war, not just an American

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Living Well war, but we’re so apt to just tell the American point of view. The heartfelt desire of everyone who participated was, ‘Let’s learn from this and never let it happen again.’� Dunec estimates that several thousand students have taken her class over the years but has no real count. A few have continued with the class for as long as 15 years. She’s seen students publish books with their life stories, write moving tributes to people — known and unknown — who have inspired them, travel across the world to track down long lost relatives and fall in love in their 90s. “I’ve had several love stories that have just bloomed, and it’s given me the knowledge — not just the suspicion — that love can truly flower at any age. Who would’ve thought? “I’ve learned far more than I’ve ever taught,� she said. “I’ve learned about how to grow old well and what a difference attitude makes. “I have the most remarkable students who are teaching me how to grow old and age successfully, both by negative and positive examples, but mostly positive.� Information about Life Stories classes is available by contacting Dunec at 650-565-8087. N Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@ paweekly.com.

Senior Focus ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠvĂ€ÂœÂ“ĂŠÂŤ>}iÊÓäŽ of questions to begin an oral history interview, suggestions for recording devices and other materials and ideas for end products. MarkdaSilva, a Stanford graduate who has lived and traveled worldwide, founded Narrative Histories in 2011 and has been conducting oral histories with people in the Bay Area and across the country. The class will be held Tuesday, Jan. 14, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in Room E-104 of the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way. Admission is $15 at the door. For more information, contact Michelle Rosengaus at mrosengaus@paloaltojcc.org or 650-223-8616. JEWISH POETS OF BROADWAY ... The life and work of lyricist Sheldon Harnick known for hit musicals such as “Fiddler on the Roof,â€? will be explored in the kickoff lecture of the series Jewish Poets of Broadway offered on the last Tuesday of the month through June (except for April) from 1:30 to 3 p.m. in the Schultz Cultural Arts Hall of the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way. In the series, theater educator Bonnie Weiss will discuss the careers of Alan Jay Lerner, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, Fred Ebb and Oscar Hammerstein. Admission is $15 at the door. For more information, contact Michelle Rosengaus at mrosengaus@ paloaltojcc.org or 650 223-8616.

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Chiwetel Ejiofor, center, in “12 Years A Slave,� the unflinching historic drama that made it on both Weekly critics’ top-10 lists.

Weekly critics single out the top cinematic tales — and show no mercy to the worst ones

W

hen the Weekly film critics assemble their lists of the top 10 movies of the year, it’s anyone’s guess whether anyone will agree. Some years a blockbuster title crowns more than one list; some years the reviewers don’t see eye to eye on anything. For 2013, an unusual trio of films impressed our panel. There’s the odd romantic comedy (“Her�), which transcended “quirky� to reach “daring�; and the insightful look into an evolving, grown-up relationship (“Before Midnight�). Most serious was the unflinching historic tale (“12 Years A Slave�) with devastating performances. Critic Susan Tavernetti described one scene in the drama as “an indelible image of human bondage and its legacy.� Two Weekly critics, Tavernetti and Peter Canavese, took part in the list-compiling. (Tyler Hanley was unable to take part this year.)

Canavese also gave us a taste of the bottom of the barrel, choosing his five worst films of the past 12 months. Read on for the best and the worst of 2013 in film.

Susan Tavernetti’s top films: 10

The Clock The film-going event of the year did not come to a theater near you. Instead artist Christian Marclay’s “The Clock,� a 24-hour montage of found footage with cinematic time references, marked the minutes before the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art closed for renovations in June. The 2010 masterpiece depicting movie and television references for every minute of every hour of the day was synchronized to local time. So as noon approached, a film clip showed the face of the town clock about to strike the hour be-

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fore cutting to Gary Cooper’s lawman striding down the deserted main street to the iconic shootout in “High Noon.� Surprisingly, no single minute was more climactic or riveting than another. Marclay modulated the pace, offered thematic and visual riffs and delivered a mesmerizing reel experience. Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center had also treated us to the artist’s acclaimed 14-minute “Video Quartet� (2001) installation in 2012.

9

Gravity (in IMAX 3D) Known for his long takes, Alfonso Cuarón stretched this film’s opening shot to a stunning 17 minutes. Visually breathtaking in scope and spectacle, the space thriller immerses the viewer within the weightless, silent expanse above Earth’s atmosphere. The thin narrative is as tenuous as the astronauts’ tethers when an unexpected storm of space debris

wreaks havoc on their mission. But lost in space, Sandra Bullock and George Clooney make us care about their characters and the ensuing journey through darkness. Without the existential payload that grapples with meaning and faith, “Gravity� would lack the gravitas that elevates the cinematic experience to infinity and beyond its CGI artistry.

8

Before Midnight Richard Linklater’s “Before� trilogy has followed Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) from their first meeting on a Vienna-bound train to an unplanned reunion in a Paris bookstore nine years later and now to married with children. The light romantic comedy of “Before Sunrise� (1995) and “Before Sunset� (2004) has grown heavier, like the protagonists, with the onset of middle age. Their vacation on a Greek isle bristles with tension: Celine is re-

sentful of being saddled in compromises while raising their twin daughters, while self-centered Jesse has become a successful author and wants to move the family to New York — despite Celine’s attractive job offer in Paris. They have grown up, and their adult dynamics resemble real ones. Some of the improvisatory exchanges between the two actors catch lightning in a bottle, trapping the elusive essence of the moment in a magical way that could never be scripted or directed.

7

Blue is the Warmest Color (La Vie d’Adèle) Tunisian-born filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche’s controversial love story nabbed the prestigious Palme d’Or at this year’s Festival de Cannes. Clocking in at almost three hours, the riveting drama fully develops the coming-of-age story of Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos) and her relationship with


Arts & Entertainment

The daring romantic comedy “Her,â€? starring Joaquin Phoenix, pictured, impressed the Weekly critics. Emma (LĂŠa Seydoux), an artist sporting blue-streaked hair. The performances pulse with emotion, and the women emerge as fully realized three-dimensional characters. Although the male gaze of the camera tends to commodify the female body in the simulated lesbian sex scenes, the protracted exchanges of passion intensify the couple’s strong bond. The film also resonates on a political level, whether supporting freedom of expression or France’s recent legalization of same-sex marriage.

6

Inside Llewyn Davis Ethan and Joel Coen embark on another Homeric odyssey with music producer T-Bone Burnett (“O Brother, Where Art Thou?�), giving Oscar Isaac a breakout role as the titular singer-guitarist. The Sixties folk musician sings so soulfully at the Gaslight Cafe in Greenwich Village, yet his personal life is in shambles. More character study than folk revival, the dark comedy delves into the question of why some talents shoot to stardom and others can’t catch a break and remain complete unknowns, like rolling stones, in the hardscrabble world of music.

5

Nebraska Alexander Payne and screenwriter Bob Nelson have turned their home state into a memorable character. Defined by Phadon Papamichael’s elegiac black-and-white imagery of vacant main streets, desolate highways and abandoned farmhouses, Nebraska represents a vanishing way of life. The same can be said of Woody (Bruce Dern), a Midwesterner of few words and fewer dreams. Similar to his counterpart in “About Schmidt,� Woody needs a reason to live when hope arrives in the form of a mail-order sweepstakes letter. His son (SNL alumnus Will Forte) agrees to drive the stubborn old man to claim the prize money in a comic, carefully observed road trip to Lincoln, Neb. Payne tempers the sharp satire of stoicism and greed with values befitting America’s Heartland.

Woody’s face may be chiseled in granite, like those memorialized on Mount Rushmore, but his son’s actions could crack any heart of stone.

4

Blue Jasmine Woody Allen did not fashion a love letter to San Francisco (as previously to New York City, Barcelona, Paris and Rome), but “Blue Jasmineâ€? is his best film since “Match Pointâ€? in 2005. Cate Blanchett is brilliant as the title character, infusing the former socialite with the fragility and snobbery of a modern-day Blanche duBois. She, too, arrives penniless at her sister’s modest home — albeit wearing a Chanel jacket, clutching a Hermès Birkin and toting monogrammed Louis Vuitton luggage. Leveled as much by her own character flaws as by the losses incurred by her philandering, Ponzi-scamming husband (Alec Baldwin), the desperate woman is close to being crazy and homeless on the streets of San Francisco. Allen’s devastating portrait of privilege, denial and lack of self-awareness finds its perfect expression in Blanchett’s Oscar-worthy performance.

3

Her The high-concept premise — a lonely man falls in love with an operating system — sounds off-putting and creepy. But writer-director Spike Jonze has crafted a fresh, smart and sweet romantic comedy set in the not-so-distant future. Joaquin Phoenix delivers a sensitive performance as the Cyrano of Cyberculture, writing touching personal letters for people who cannot communicate with their loved ones themselves. His character is completely surprised that his newly purchased OS1 (voiced by Scarlett Johansson) fills the void after his wife (Rooney Mara) leaves him. Subverting generic expectations, “Her� ultimately affirms the need for humans to embrace their humanity — and each other. Brava to Silicon Valley native Megan Ellison and Annapurna Pictures for producing

Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke returned this year for a third installment in Richard Linklater’s “Before� trilogy; the resulting “Before Midnight� was a hit with the Weekly.

the most daringly original work of the year.

2

The Past (Le PassĂŠ) Iranian writer-director Asghar Farhadi extends his masterful storytelling beyond “A Separation,â€? his 2012 Oscar-winner for Best Foreign Language Film. Set in Paris instead of Tehran and dealing with the finalization of a divorce after years of living apart, the nuanced drama offers yet another film of emotional and moral complexity. The past impinges upon and informs the relationship of the estranged couple, Marie (BĂŠrĂŠnice Bejo) and Ahmad (Ali Mosaffa), as well as the situation with the Frenchwoman’s boyfriend (Tahar Rahim) and her troubled teenager (Pauline Burlet). Secrets and scenarios unveil, shifting the narrative into fascinating new directions that tug on the heartstrings and encourage you to switch loyalties. Create your own ending to this tale without closure.

1

12 Years a Slave Perhaps only an outsider can look at the deep scars on America’s back without flinching or glancing away. British filmmaker Steve McQueen does just that. Working from John Ridley’s adaptation of Solomon Northrup’s 1853 memoir, the director of African descent treads the ground of history that stretches from Spielberg’s “Amistad� and “Lincoln� to Tarantino’s “Django Unchained.� He deals directly and matter-offactly with the treatment of slaves in the Cotton States — separated from family, auctioned like livestock, horrifically mistreated and sub-humanly perceived as threefifths of a person. With great emotional range, Chiwetel Ejiofor plays the educated New York freeman who is kidnapped and sold into slavery in Louisiana. Northrup maintains his dignity, wits and courage while reeling from disbelief, fear and despair. An excruciatingly long take of him hanging from the branch of a tree, supported by only the tips of his toes,

seems endless — and sears an indelible image of human bondage and its legacy.

Peter Canavese’s top films: 10

All is Lost In critics’ minds, J.C. Chandor’s tale of survival spent the year waltzing with “Gravity.� Both films are technically proficient (though “Gravity�’s brilliant effects, in 3D, dazzle like nothing else this year), but “All is Lost� proves a more pure and moving experience, shot through with sincere melancholy about facing death alone. Robert Redford does fine work as the only human in sight, holding the screen with the strength and frailty of mind and body under fatalistic duress.

9

In the House François Ozon’s devious adaptation of Juan Mayorga’s play “The Boy in the Last Rowâ€? was the headiest comedy of the year. The meta-literary tale of genius envy and thieved intimacy boasts deftly drawn characters, sharp performances and incisive satire: of teacher-student psychology, our increasingly voyeuristic global culture (thank you, internet), our escapism into stories fictional and “reality,â€? capricious criticism and hypocrisy, and all colors of denial.

8

The Wolf of Wall Street There’s a Dorian Gray effect at work in Martin Scorsese’s 23rd narrative feature. Leonardo DiCaprio has finally grown up — his performance as hotshot stockbroker Jordan Belfort is the real deal — and Scorsese’s simultaneously aging in reverse. In terms of energy, this doesn’t feel like the film of a 71-year-old, even as abetted by Terence Winter’s whip-crack adapted screenplay and Thelma Schoonmaker’s brilliant editing. Sterling supporting work by Matthew McConaughey, Kyle Chandler, Margot Robbie and others bolster this get-angry epic

of quintessentially American conspicuous consumption, one that rests comfortably beside “Goodfellas� and “Casino.�

7

A Hijacking Business as usual takes on new meaning in this potent, well-researched verite thriller. In work that approaches documentary realism, Søren Malling gives arguably the best performance of the year as the shipping-company CEO forced to negotiate for the lives of one of his crews. What are those lives worth, and what risks are acceptable? Writer-director Tobias Lindholm manages to make his hostage drama twice as interesting as Paul Greengrass’ superficially similar “Captain Phillips.â€? Taken literally, “A Hijackingâ€? is gripping drama; seen through a wider lens, it’s an allegory for today’s global economy, the ugly choices it offers to high and low, and what happens when push comes to shove.

6

The Act of Killing With the most audacious film of 2013, Joshua Oppenheimer gambled and won by allowing Indonesian death-squad thugs, “victors� of a sort, to “write� recent history as movie scenes starring themselves. Laying bare attitudes and acts that come as close as anything to “evil,� Oppenheimer gives the torturer-executioners enough rope to betray themselves and for one, unexpectedly, to find his guilt bubbling to the surface. Weird, shocking and riveting, “The Act of Killing� means to be offensive — you should be appalled — but also fascinates in how the processes of acting, reenacting, and revisiting can offer access to unexpected emotion and inconvenient truth.

5

Frances Ha Cycles of disappointment make up most of this funny-sad movie cowritten by star Greta Gerwig and director Noah Baumbach. A ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂ˜iĂ?ĂŒĂŠÂŤ>}iÂŽ

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Arts & Entertainment 4

Best of 2013 ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠvĂ€ÂœÂ“ĂŠÂŤĂ€iĂ›ÂˆÂœĂ•ĂƒĂŠÂŤ>}iÂŽ

quirky, funny take on work life, art life, romance and friendship, “Frances Ha� locates a fresh style of humor, creating magical moments of conversational nothing. Remarkably, this black-andwhite, Manhattan-set film survives the inevitable comparison to Woody Allen’s “Manhattan,� another film that usefully explores the tension between romanticization and reality in New York City.

At Berkeley Woody Allen said that 80 percent of success is showing up, and one might say those are words the legendary documentarian Frederick Wiseman lives by. This time, Wiseman shows up at U.C. Berkeley, which just by being there becomes a potent symbol. Concretely, it is that sui generis institution fired into shape by the student protests of the ‘60s, but it also stands in here for the tenuous space occupied by public (higher) education and how any school functions as a microcosm of its community. Wiseman wisely observes, then

GOLDEN GLOBE AWARD ÂŽ

NOMINEE

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS

ŠHFPA

NOMINEE

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

“ONE OF THE BEST PICTURES OF THE YEAR!â€? BÉRÉNICE BEJO

Before Midnight The third in a trilogy shared by co-writers Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke and director Richard Linklater continues to foster dramatic intimacy and tension by radically prioritizing conversation. If the honeymoon is long since over for Delpy’s Celine and Hawke’s Delpy, they offer a good facsimile of one on a Greek family vacation — until, that is, modern-family issues crack open festering resentments, unleashing bitter recrimination and scary midlife evaluation. Plus, as is his wont, Linklater makes room for enter-

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square Fri - Sat 1/3 - 1/4 Inside Llewyn Davis – 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 9:50 Her – 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00

ALI MOSAFFA

THE PAST A FILM BY ASGHAR FARHADI

NOW PLAYING

3

taining digressions and interesting supporting characters.

2

12 Years a Slave The year’s top tale of physical and emotional survival wasn’t “All is Lost� or “Gravity� but this wrenching film adapted from free Northerner Solomon Northup’s autobiographical account of being pressed into slavery. Without succumbing to either undue caution or melodrama, director Steve McQueen thoughtfully unfolds a serious drama of the undeniable pain and the considerably more interesting existential threat of slavery. Chiwetel Ejiofor impeccably traces the odyssey of Northup: beginning with contentedness devastated; proceeding through torture, despairing denial and self-awareness; and arriving at someplace unsettlingly like and unlike his starting point.

1

Owen Gleiberman, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY Stephen Holden, THE NEW YORK TIMES Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

TAHAR RAHIM

assembles his footage into a fourhour fascination that teases provocative notions while allowing you to draw your own conclusions about what the evidence on display proves about the film’s many subjects.

CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORY OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.THEPASTMOVIE.COM

Sun - Thurs 1/5 - 1/9 Inside Llewyn Davis – 1:45, 4:30, 7:15 Her – 1:00, 4:00, 7:00

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

Her The “zeitgeist�-y American movie of the year is a slightly futuristic tale that reflects blindingly on our present. Written and directed by Spike Jonze with elegant, melancholy calm, “Her� functions as a sincere and most unusual romance — between a human and a figureless artificial intelligence — a consideration of the meaning of consciousness, and a dissection of our continental drift away from each other. Yes, (mod-

ern) man is an island: a plugged-in depressive noncommittally straddling life and virtual reality. Brilliantly performed by Joaquin Phoenix and an offscreen but vital Scarlett Johansson.

Peter Canavese’s pans: Romeo and Juliet On Shakespeare’s grave, these words: “ ... curst be he that moves my bones.� How does screenwriter/ desecrator Julian Fellowes sleep at night? Charlie Countr yman What’s the difference between watching this Shia LaBeoufromps-through-Bucharest crimedrama-romance and burying your face in a loaded diaper? That’s not a riddle ... I’m really asking. The Host Do not consume before operating heavy machinery. Side effects may include spontaneous coma or fits of giggling. Grown Ups 2 Adam Sandler really ought to take himself out of competition next year. It’s just not fair to all the other bad movies. Getaway This peerlessly stupid fast-car thriller somehow goes from 0 to 0 in 90 minutes ... while still putting precious miles on your odometer. N

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINE’S

Cucina Venti ons ervati s e r g in accept

able l i a v a ng cateri Now

LIVE MUSIC 1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.cucinaventi.com

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

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On the Patio Wednesdays & Thursdays 5-8pm


Eating Out , -/1, /ĂŠ, 6 7

Friendly, tasty Japanese fare Homey Dohatsuten has something for everyone by Sheila Himmel | Photos by Veronica Weber

J

apanese restaurants can be so intimidating. All the rituals, the untranslated lists of menu items, the feeling that everyone but you knows what to do. Welcome to Dohatsuten, where they may not know your name, but you’ll get a greeting, a thank you and any explanation you need. Another thing not to worry about: Dohatsuten’s menu is not carved into arcane specialties. It’s all about finding something you like. If you don’t like cold seared white tuna you might like fried chicken or a soul-warming noodle soup. Your favorite dish could very well be yakimeshi: rice cooked in an iron pot so that it acquires a fabulous crust, sort of an inner bowl that you break up and stir into the rest of the sticky rice and whatever toppings you’ve selected, from pickled mustard leaf to grilled eel. At Dohatsuten they give you two metal spoons with which to scrape the sides — which you will want to do. You also will want to share, or bring home the leftovers. Portions are large. Dohatsuten is a good place for families, groups and people dining alone. Look for the little pitched roof and chimney among bland flattop buildings on San Antonio Road. At lunch and in the summer, about 20 people can sit outdoors at picnic tables, far enough away from traffic that they’re not eating exhaust. Rush hour occurs precisely be-

Dohatsuten’s signature ramen features spicy garlic pork, shredded chili, kurobata chasu pork, stewed taro pork, cabbage, carrots, green onions, chives, bean sprouts, nori and egg. tween noon and 1 p.m. on weekdays. Even then, the staff is nice about it. “Sorry for your wait,� a server said recently to those of us who had waited maybe 10 minutes. The signature Dohatsuten ramen ($9.95) reflects the owner’s roots in Nagoya, a city known for its unusual style of comfort foods. Choose your broth (among them are both soy and vegetarian soy) and your fillings include types of

pork (grilled, belly and spicy garlic pork ground into balls), half an egg, shredded chili, carrots and green onions. Bean sprouts sprinkled on top stay crisp. Korean-style spicy Napa cabbage (kimchee) gives it a kick, but not too much kick. The kimchee works perfectly in slightly sweet miso ponzu broth. You can also make a meal of tapas, small hot and cold plates such as fried chicken karage

Kat Nguyen, a server at Dohatsuten Japanese restaurant in Palo Alto, stands with a plate of Tan Shio in the restaurant’s dining room. ($6.95), boiled spinach ($3.95), fried tofu in dashi broth ($4.95) and white tuna tataki ($8.45) seared with ponzu. We especially liked the ten-

der licks of grilled beef tongue ($8.45) and onigiri ($4.95), which the menu calls rice balls, ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂ˜iĂ?ĂŒĂŠÂŤ>}iÂŽ

NEW Improvements to the Household Hazardous Waste Station We’ve added Reuse Cabinets! We’ve expanded our hours! (NEW hours too!) Residents can pick up usable The HHW Station is now open: Every Saturday 9am – 11am First Friday of the month 3pm – 5pm

household products such as paints, cleaners and unused motor oil.

Limitations  15 gallons or 125 pounds of waste per visit  Must be a Palo Alto Resident (driver’s license or vehicle registration)

Location Regional Water Quality Control Plant 2501 Embarcadero Way Palo Alto, CA 94303

For more information, visit www.cityofpaloalto.org/hazwaste zerowaste@cityofpaloalto.org | (650) 496-5910

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Eating Out

ShopTalk by Daryl Savage

NEW BLOOMIES UNDERWAY AT MALL ... A new Bloomingdale’s is scheduled to open at Stanford Shopping Center later this year. It will be located in the former parking lot in front of the current Bloomingdale’s, which will remain open until the new three-story building is completed, according to a source familiar with the construction. Plans then call for the older building to be demolished to make way for a cluster of small stores. “We’re shooting for an October opening. The store will have about the same square footage as it does now, but the new Bloomingdale’s will be taller and narrower,� the source said.

Diners enjoying Japanese fare at Dohatsuten, where the portions are large and staff is friendly. ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠvĂ€ÂœÂ“ĂŠÂŤĂ€iĂ›ÂˆÂœĂ•ĂƒĂŠÂŤ>}iÂŽ

but actually are triangular blocks of sushi rice, your choice of fillings such as grilled eel and garlic beefy miso, held together with thin, slightly crisp nori seaweed. Sesame seeds are sprinkled on top. Add julienned strips of pickled ginger or a tiny spoonful of crushed garlic from the condiments on the table. Dohatsuten replaced a previous Japanese tapas restaurant, Hattoriya, about four years ago. Dohatsuten means ... nothing, really. Manager Seiko Alba explained the name as a combination of Chinese characters adding up to something like “Angry Here Sky.� N

Dohatsuten, 799 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto; 650-493-2878 Hours: 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5:30-9 p.m. daily

 

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TWO NEWCOMERS, FOUR GONERS DOWNTOWN ... Lots of movement lately in downtown Palo Alto. Brand-new to University Avenue is Marine Layer, a San Francisco-based clothing store that opened last month at 435 University. It initially came to Palo Alto as a holiday pop-up store but now looks like it may be a keeper. “We’ll be at this location for at least a couple more months,� Marine Layer marketing

director Meg Williams said, adding: “We’ll see how our sales do, but we’re very excited we finally found a spot in Palo Alto.� This is Marine Layer’s third store in the Bay Area. The company, which also has locations in Venice, Calif., and Portland, Ore., says all of its clothing uses 100 percent California-made fabric. Another fairly new business downtown is Infinite Beauty, a skin-care shop at 267 University. The menu for facials has prices ranging from $50 for a 20-minute eye treatment to more than $500 for a “Platinum Facial.� Among businesses that will no longer grace the street, at least for now, is Rudy’s Pub, whose last day in business was Jan. 1. The pub was a 50-plusyear fixture in Palo Alto that was a throwback to the 1960s, according to one patron who described himself as a regular named Joe. “I don’t go for fancy. Rudy’s has everything I need. They know me. I know them. Just grab me a beer,� he said. Pub owner Megan Kawkab said some her “regulars� have been coming to Rudy’s for 45 years. “I’m going to miss this place. I know every square inch of every nook and cranny,� Kawkab said. But she also expressed optimism. “We hope to reopen just down the street in six months, maybe less. I can’t tell you exactly where yet, but it will be on University Avenue,� she said.

And although Rudy’s is gone, its sister restaurant, The Patio, which opened in 2011, will remain in business at 412 Emerson St. Also gone is Mango Caribbean, a Jamaican-style restaurant at 435 Hamilton Ave. Best known for its jerk chicken, it closed in November after eight years in business. Empire Vintage Clothing, which sold clothing and costumes from the 1940s through the ‘80s, closed its doors last week at 443 Waverley St. and will be opening later this month in Mountain View, at 831 Villa St. “My rent went up by 35 percent. There’s just not enough foot traffic anymore to justify that increase. There are too many restaurants downtown and people don’t come here to shop like they used to,� Empire Vintage owner Tiffany Gush said. She said the move to Mountain View is a prudent one because “The rent is cheaper, and the space is bigger.� And the 65-year-old art supply and gift store University Art announced that it plans to close its 267 Hamilton Ave. location this spring and move to Redwood City. N

Heard a rumor about your favorite store or business moving out, or in, down the block or across town? Daryl Savage will check it out. Email shoptalk@paweekly.com

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"6 Ê-/ View up–to–date movie listings at PaloAltoOnline.com/movies.

Discover the best places to eat this week!

Fox Theatre Presents performed by

“The Golden Dragons present a well-placed sampler of a highly stylized art form. There is a precision and beauty about everything these performers do.� – Washington Post

January 19 2pm & 6pm

AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

New Tung Kee Noodle House

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

The Old Pro

INDIAN

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

Janta Indian Restaurant

ITALIAN

Cucina Venti 254-1120 1390 Pear Ave, Mountain View www.cucinaventi.com CHINESE

&OX4HEATREs2EDWOOD#ITY

Ming’s

650-369-7770

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

WWW&OX2WCCOM

0HOTOCREDIT,OLI+ANTOR

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462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

powered by

Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView


Home&Real Estate

OPEN HOME GUIDE 31 Also online at PaloAltoOnline.com

Home Front DECORATE A CAKE? ... Christine Hopkins will teach a class on “Cake Decorating - Level 1� from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Mondays, Jan. 6 to Feb. 3, at the Arrillaga Family Recreation Center, 700 Alma St., Menlo Park. The class covers the basics, including leveling a cake, making icing, and creating roses, stars, shells, leaves and more. Supply list will be available at first class. Cost is $85 for nonresidents, $64 for residents. Information: 650-330-2200 or www.menlopark.org or email: csd@menlopark.org

TREE COLLECTION ... The City of Palo Alto’s GreenWaste will be picking up Christmas trees on regular collection days for four weeks following Christmas Day. Trees must be cut into 4-foot lengths, taken off tree stands, with all decorations removed — including tinsel and nails. The trees should be placed next to the yard-trimmings cart. Sorry, no flocked trees. Residents living in apartment and condominium complexes may place their trees next to the garbage, recyclables and compostables containers. N Send notices of news and events related to real estate, interior design, home improvement and gardening to Home Front, Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302, or email cblitzer@paweekly.com. Deadline is one week before publication.

A fountain was installed in the backyard of a Palo Alto home, with help from Palo Altobased website Houzz.com.

*OEB )PV[[ Social networking technology meets home design

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HEALTHY GARDEN SOIL ... Theresa Lyngso, president of Lyngso Garden Materials in Redwood City, will teach a class called “Soil FoodWeb� from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 11, at Common Ground, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto. She will deal with the beneficial organisms in the garden and how to encourage them to build healthy soil. Cost is $31. Information: 650-493-6072 or www.commongroundinpaloalto.org

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JAPANESE FLORAL DESIGN ... Thanh Kosen Nguyen, with more than 22 years’ experience and certification in Wafu and Sogetsu styles, will teach a class on “Floral Design With Ikebana� from 1 to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays, Jan. 7 to March 11, at Greendell P2, 4120 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Nguyen will teach traditional and contemporary design, with students completing one or two designs in class each week. Students should bring sturdy garden scissors, a Pyrex bowl and a large pin frog to the first class. Cost is $75 plus a $100 materials fee payable to the instructor (or students can bring their own flowers). Information: 650-329-3752 or www.paadultschool.org

by Kimberlee D’Ardenne

The front yard of a Palo Alto home was re-landscaped with tips from Houzz.com, a Palo Alto-based website for home remodeling and design.

hat happens when you

W

combine the words house

and buzz? The answer is the online community “Houzz,� where design is democratic, said Liza Hausman, vice president of community at Houzz. “Houzz is a website and mobile app for home remodeling and design,� Hausman said. “It helps homeowners all the way through their home build, remodel or decorating project.� Co-founders and Palo Alto residents Adi Tatarko and Alon Cohen created the online community while remodeling their own home in 2009. Houzz officially became a company the following year. Houzz inspires, educates and connects, Hausman said. Users include homeowners and design professionals such as architects, interior designers, landscapers and contractors. Because the company earns revenue from ad-

vertising, Hausman added, using Houzz is free for homeowners and professionals alike. More than two million high-resolution images of renovated homes are accessible through Houzz, Hausman said, and users can save images they like to online folders called “ideabooks.� “Homeowners can use (ideabooks) collaboratively with an architect, designer or contractor who they hire. Visuals are an effective way for homeowners who do not have the language of design to communicate,� she said. Houzz also includes a budgeting tool called the “Real Cost Finder,� which shows cost ranges for projects, materials, labor and products based on ZIP code. To date, more than 16 million homeowners use the free website each month. The Houzz mobile app, also free and available for both iOS and Android platforms, has been downloaded more then 12 million times, Hausman said. “Many professionals around the country and in Palo Alto are getting new clients (by using Houzz),� Hausman said. “They are able to showcase their work to a much broader audience than before, when things were more strictly word of mouth.�

Rebecca Thompson, who moved to Palo Alto from Seattle with her family more than four years ago, used Houzz for a landscaping project at her home in the Palo Verde neighborhood. While the initial impetus for Thompson’s landscaping project was the removal of an old backyard swimming pool, she said she and her husband decided to replace all their landscaping to complement their Eichler home. Thompson said her time perusing Houzz initially started off as a guilty pleasure, but it ended up paying off — both financially and aesthetically. Because Houzz facilitates communication between homeowners and design professionals, Thompson said she thoroughly researched the details of the project herself. She estimated that Houzz saved them thousands of dollars in consulting fees. “Houzz was a critical resource for decisionmaking,â€? Thompson said. By sharing her Houzz ideabooks with her landscape designer and also her contractor, Thompson said she was able to have directed conversations about the project that otherwise ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂŤ>}iÊә)

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Home & Real Estate

The owners of this Palo Verde neighborhood home consulted with Houzz.com when remodeling their backyard patio, left, including the landscaping, right.

In da Houzz ­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠvĂ€ÂœÂ“ĂŠÂŤ>}iÊÓǎ

might have required paid consultants. “We were able to do a much higher-end project for less money,� she said. Using Houzz is like having access to thousands of housing and design magazines, Thompson added, but with streamlined search options. “If you see a picture you like, you can find out what the materials are,� Thompson said. “Through Houzz, we were able to contact professionals and ask questions like, ‘What size cinder blocks?’ or ‘What color concrete?’� And asking professionals lots of questions is exactly what Thompson did. When Thompson searched for “Eichler landscaping� on Houzz, she said she viewed an image of a combination cinder

block wall and fountain that she loved. Through Houzz, Thompson said she contacted the company that posted the photo, Huettl Landscape Architecture of Walnut Creek. By talking with them, Thompson

‘We were able to do a much higher-end project for less money.’ —Rebecca Thompson, homeowner, Palo Alto said she learned specifics about the project that allowed her to customize her own cinder-block wall and fountain. “We were able to take an idea that we loved and modify it for our own needs and scale,� Thompson said.

Thompson said she also learned that the cinder blocks in the Houzz image came from a commercial supplier, Calstone. So she went to Calstone to ask questions about cinder blocks and said she ended up getting a custom product for her property. “I ended up working directly with a (Calstone) guy who is a plant manager,� Thompson said. “Cinder blocks come in all different faces and colors; there are standard and custom colors. If a commercial project does a custom color, they might have an overrun. (My) blocks are just cinder blocks, but they have a slice taken off them, to expose the aggregate underneath them. They are also only 6 inches high, which is not standard.� Even though Calstone usually only works

with commercial clients, Thompson said her contact there asked to see pictures of everything related to her finished project. Linking design professionals and homeowners is what sets Houzz apart in the crowded online social-networking market, Thompson said. “Houzz let us imagine things we would not have been able to dream up on our own,� Thompson said. “It makes design so much more accessible.� N

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PaloAltoOnline.com For more Home and Real Estate news, visit www.paloaltoonline.com/real_estate.

L o s A lt o s L a n d

AUCTION

Knowledge and Experience. Applied. 650.766.6325 tpaulin.com

Michael Repka Before you select a real estate agent, meet with Michael Repka to discuss how his real estate law and tax background beneďŹ ts Ken DeLeon’s clients.

One of the last tracts of open land in Los Altos Nominal Opening Bid: $500,000 9.36+/- ac Conveniently Located on I-280 w/Leased Buildings

2100 Woods Lane, Los Altos, CA

Live Auction Jan 15th at 4pm Managing Broker DeLeon Realty JD - Rutgers School of Law L.L.M (Taxation) NYU School of Law

(650) 488.7325 DRE# 01854880 | CA BAR# 255996

michaelr@deleonrealty.com www.deleonrealty.com

Open to the Public: Fri Jan 3 10am-3pm; Sun Jan 12 1-5pm; Wed Jan 15 2-4pm

800.801.8003 t williamsauction.com/LosAltos DAN NELSON RE LIC 01866273; MONTE W LOWDERMAN AUC LIC CA 770034; WILLIAMS & WILLIAMS AUC LIC AUC BOND NO. 6830812. 5% BUYER’S PREMIUM.

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SOLD

Home & Real Estate

SOLD

Garden Tips Belmont

Burlingame

SOLD

SOLD

by Jack McKinnon

I’ve been busy in Menlo Park SOLD

2013

S

Palo Alto SOLD

Portola Valley

Redwood City

SOLD

SOLD

Redwood City

Redwood City

SOLD

But never too busy for you!

Winter: Time to get back to work in the garden

SOLD

o, why does Mother Nat u re a l low young plants to die for good gardeners? What is the reason for us being here anyway? How did we manage to get this far already without being wiped out by a meteor, a volcanic shift or a cosmic convergence? And why do weeds grow better than flowers? It is time for some pruning, and if you are sitting around as I am asking all these simple-minded, easily answered questions, then you are a lazy bones and need to get back to work. But first, to get the questions out of the way. If nature wasn’t random in its service to gardeners, it would not be nature. We struggle to make good gardens. The struggle is as important as the results. Luck is how we got this far so far, nothing more, nothing less. And weeds grow better than cultivated plants because the ones that survive are ideal for where they are. We try to choose or create an ideal environment for the plants we select. Weeds thrive or die by ideal environment or natural selection. Our choice

HOME SALES Redwood City

San Jose

SOLD

SOLD

Home sales are provided by California REsource, a real estate information company that obtains the information from the County Recorder’s Office. Information is recorded from deeds after the close of escrow and published within four to eight weeks.

Atherton

San Mateo SOLD

Top 1% Nationwide

San Mateo SOLD

San Mateo

Sausalito

SOLD

SOLD

650.465.5602 www.wendiselig.com wselig@cbnorcal.com BRE #01001476

East Palo Alto 2133 Capitol Ave. Weaver Trust to A. Wellman for $418,000 on 11/21/13 2272 Poplar Ave. D. Wilson to L. Huang for $423,000 on 11/12/13; previous sale 1/07, $257,500 1045 Garden St. Wilson Trust to T. & H. Lee for $470,000 on 11/20/13 2368 University Ave. Elone Trust to University Avenue Senior Housing for $600,000 on 11/7/13; previous sale 1/93, $140,000

Los Altos

Direct Line

Sunnyvale

48 Linden Ave. WCSZ Partnership to Verdiell Trust for $8,650,000 on 11/7/13; previous sale 1/11, $3,010,000 76 Melanie Lane Ekrom Trust to Y. Fu for $2,900,000 on 11/7/13; previous sale 7/91, $1,200,000

Woodside

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456 Gabilan St. #3 N. Manning to J. Wilson for $653,500 on 12/13/13; previous sale 4/12, $540,000 150 West Edith Ave. #18 L. Kirkley to J. Wang for $825,000 on 12/10/13 4388 El Camino Real #348 J. Leung to J. Hu for $879,000 on 12/12/13; previous sale 1/10, $660,000 1811 Granger Ave. Kwan

is by control or desire; theirs is survival. Actually, we have a much higher success rate. Their advantage is in numbers. A little cultivation shifts that advantage to us in our gardens. Here are this month’s tips: 1. Time for winter pruning. Remove everything dead, dying and diseased. Leave no stubs. 2. Plant trees, shrubs and vines. 3. Control vines by tying to trellises. 4. Cut back ground covers, especially ivy. 5. Clean up debris, leaf matter and dead plants. 6. Compost or recycle all waste. 7. Shop for seeds, plants and bareroot roses and fruit trees when they become available. 8. Dress beds with compost and cultivate. 9. Divide clumping grasses and plants. 10. Redesign a vista either by large scale including hardscape, water features and sculptural elements or with color accenting and/or highlighting. Remember that subtle can be quite profound. Good gardening. N Garden coach Jack McKinnon can be reached at 650-455-0687 (cell) or by email at jack@jackthegardencoach. com. Visit his website at www.jackthegardencoach.com.

Trust to R. & S. Knueppel for $1,600,000 on 12/5/13; previous sale 3/76, $88,900 1567 Siesta Drive T. Depew to C. & S. Kim for $1,750,000 on 12/6/13 1212 St. Matthew Way Quinn Trust to A. & I. Moha for $1,750,000 on 12/3/13; previous sale 11/74, $91,400 808 Yardis Court Scott Trust to C. Marchisano for $1,650,000 on 12/4/13; previous sale 5/02, $1,105,000 110 North El Monte Ave. Baldwin Trust to X. Lou for $1,680,000 on 12/10/13 678 Rosita Ave. G. Tice to Enriques Ventures for $2,200,000 on 12/3/13 664 Meadow Lane M. & L. Uhler to W. Qi for $2,460,000 on 12/6/13 1677 Whitham Ave. Walsh Trust to Urban West Limited for $2,675,000 on 12/10/13

Los Altos Hills 27310 Julietta Lane S. & F. Wang to M. Wang for $649,000 on 12/10/13 27641 Purissima Road Mad Manor II to Askarinam Trust for $2,000,000 on 12/6/13; previous sale 6/97, $2,137,500 12179 Hilltop Drive F. Ayari to Urban West Limited for $2,250,000 on 12/11/13; previous sale 6/05, $2,150,000 13531 Burke Road Mcmahon Trust to KDCI Development for $2,700,000 on 12/11/13 26355 Esperanza Drive Heimsoth Trust to Owen Signature Homes for $3,100,000 on 12/13/13 14210 Wild Plum Lane S. & R. Fang to Five Trust for $4,450,000

on 12/5/13; previous sale 3/88, $1,450,000

Menlo Park 425 8th Ave. P. Fouse to BGDK Foundation for $620,000 on 11/14/13 715 College Ave. Sterling Limited to College Limited for $825,000 on 11/15/13 1015 Atkinson Lane F. Naimi to Atkinson Limited for $2,000,000 on 11/15/13 3816 Fair Oaks Ave. MOAB Investment Group to E. & M. Petersen for $805,000 on 11/15/13 321 Laurel Ave. D. Stevens to J. Chen for $1,370,000 on 11/15/13 90 Oak Hollow Way Suarez Trust to B. & C. Arkin for $3,088,000 on 11/13/13; previous sale 10/03, $1,900,000 1007 Peggy Lane KDCI Development to D. Li for $1,595,000 on 11/7/13 745 Stanford Ave. Bhalla-Khush Trust to A. & S. Bowers for $1,925,000 on 11/15/13; previous sale 2/08, $1,567,500 646 Creek Drive Kelso-Marlow Trust to Johnston Trust for $1,355,000 on 11/18/13; previous sale 8/11, $1,175,000 4123 Fair Oaks Ave. Sequoia Realty Services to J. Dais for $1,423,000 on 11/22/13; previous sale 12/04, $869,500 304 Sherwood Way E. Kulakoff to Kulakoff Trust for $1,500,000 on 11/19/13 929 Valparaiso Ave. Foster Trust to J. Bache for $1,664,000 on 11/25/13

Mountain View 731 Calderon Ave. J. & R. Sad-

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Home & Real Estate SALES AT A GLANCE Atherton

Menlo Park

Total sales reported: 2 Lowest sales price: $2,900,000 Highest sales price: $8,650,000

Total sales reported: 12 Lowest sales price: $620,000 Highest sales price: $3,088,000

East Palo Alto

Mountain View

Total sales reported: 4 Lowest sales price: $418,000 Highest sales price: $600,000

Total sales reported: 18 Lowest sales price: $349,000 Highest sales price: $1,675,000

Los Altos

Palo Alto

Total sales reported: 11 Lowest sales price: $653,500 Highest sales price: $2,675,000

Total sales reported: 8 Lowest sales price: $526,000 Highest sales price: $2,960,000

Los Altos Hills

Portola Valley

Total sales reported: 6 Lowest sales price: $649,000 Highest sales price: $4,450,000

Total sales reported: 1 Lowest sales price: $2,300,000 Highest sales price: $2,300,000 -ÂœĂ•Ă€Vi\ĂŠ >Â?ˆvÂœĂ€Â˜Âˆ>ĂŠ, ĂƒÂœĂ•Ă€Vi

­VÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜Ă•i`ĂŠvĂ€ÂœÂ“ĂŠÂŤĂ€iĂ›ÂˆÂœĂ•ĂƒĂŠÂŤ>}iÂŽ dler to A. Rincon for $1,525,000 on 12/4/13 326 Church St. W. Bruner to T. Straszheim for $1,675,000 on 12/6/13; previous sale 3/96, $300,000 119 Flynn Ave. #B M. Spear to C. Zhou for $523,000 on 12/4/13 78 Gladys Ave. Capper Trust to L. Chen for $950,000 on 12/3/13; previous sale 11/02, $634,000 111 Laurel Way Haggag Trust to J. Zhang for $1,125,000 on 12/4/13; previous sale 3/95, $269,000 2080 Marich Way #22 Vampola Trust to R. Belikov for $978,000 on 12/6/13; previous sale 2/11, $735,000 1633 Miramonte Ave. J. Porcella to B. & M. Kim for $1,200,000 on 12/3/13; previous sale 5/08, $965,000 802 Moraga Drive C. Hall to Lass Trust for $1,250,000 on 12/3/13 480 Quincy Drive W. & K. Guthrie to V. Dinh for $1,220,000 on 12/3/13; previous sale 10/10, $735,000 49 Showers Drive #H446 R. Brocks to B. Kumar for $780,000 on 12/4/13 532 Tyrella Ave. #3 M. Tin-Wa to P. Fu for $550,000 on 12/3/13 36 Tyrella Court Nappo Trust to A. Millan for $927,000 on 12/5/13 108 Bryant St. #19 Bryant Place Limited to B. & D. Germain for $865,000 on 12/10/13 183 Del Medio Ave. #102 L. Xie to Y. Zhou for $389,000 on 12/12/13; previous sale 9/09, $290,000 65 Paul Ave. J. & R. Pigg to M. Jansen for $1,040,000 on 12/12/13; previous sale 9/99, $105,000 255 South Rengstorff Ave. #157 Maikoo Trust to W. & L. Baker for $349,000 on 12/10/13; previous sale 2/08, $330,000

344 Walker Drive F. & T. Africa to M. Ho for $950,000 on 12/12/13; previous sale 6/05, $300,000 1046 Wright Ave. #B D. Cook to Q. Li for $612,000 on 12/10/13; previous sale 11/11, $387,000

Palo Alto 435 Fernando Ave. Valleyone Investment to M. Gu for $2,430,000 on 12/4/13; previous sale 6/12, $1,545,000 182 Hemlock Court Wakabayashi Trust to J. Miao for $2,000,000 on 12/4/13 4258 Mckellar Lane Nuys Trust to C. Jung for $1,650,000 on 12/4/13 757 Moreno Ave. M. & G. Aberg to Place-Craft Limited for $1,900,000 on 12/3/13; previous sale 10/98, $483,000 1900 Birch St. R. Vicenti to G. Lai for $2,960,000 on 12/13/13; previous sale 10/90, $700,000 564 Georgia Ave. Cashion Trust to J. Wang for $1,498,000 on 12/10/13; previous sale 9/86, $212,500 670 San Antonio Road #25 D. Pavlovic to S. & S. Freedman for $965,000 on 12/10/13; previous sale 1/03, $510,000 2468 West Bayshore Road #2 Zhang Trust to S. Mohan for $526,000 on 12/10/13; previous sale 1/02, $275,000

Portola Valley 6 Hawkview St. Schoebel Trust to Brown Trust for $2,300,000 on 11/6/13; previous sale 6/79, $180,000

BUILDING PERMITS Palo Alto 375 N. California Ave. change out all windows and two sliding patio doors, create new sliding patio door under existing header, $10,767; remove wall to combine

two bedrooms into master bedroom, raise ceiling height, $n/a 2450 Cowper St. re-roof, $15,000 449 Forest Ave. repair gas leak at furnace, $n/a 1205 Forest Ave. revise plans, re-roof with similar slate material, $n/a 4050 Ben Lomond Drive foundation, framing and bolt detail changes, $n/a 598 Loma Verde Ave. install gas fireplace, $n/a 959 Blair Court remodel bathroom, $10,000 1650 Waverley St. replace sewer line, $n/a 855 El Camino Real, Suite 67 interior sign in enclosed office for Chase Bank, $n/a 245 Ramona St. upgrade electrical service, $n/a 522 Jackson Drive revision for side entry door/window, $n/a 785 Allen Court re-roof, $11,000 457 Kingsley Ave. add two new furnaces in attic, $n/a 655 Hale St. change beam size in dining room and raised beam in stair location, $n/a 1275 Dana Ave. red tag gas repair, $n/a 455 Portage Ave., Unit A Samsung: tenant improvement, including new rooftop HVAC unit, upgrade accessible toilets, $309,000 629 Bryson Ave. replace furnace in attic, $n/a 3825 Middlefield Road replace water heater, $n/a 2674 Bryant St. install 20 rooftop, flush-mounted solar PV panels, $n/a 741 Barron Ave. remodel kitchen, $28,000 3350 W. Bayshore Road, Suite 150 Avolante: expand into adjacent suite on first floor, $275,000 2672 Bryant St. install 8 rooftop, flush-mounted solar PV panels, $n/a

PALO ALTO WEEKLY OPEN HOMES EXPLORE OUR MAPS, HOMES FOR SALE, OPEN HOMES, VIRTUAL TOURS, PHOTOS, PRIOR SALE INFO, NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDES ON www.PaloAltoOnline.com/real_estate UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ALL TIMES ARE 1:30-4:30 PM

EAST PALO ALTO

MOUNTAIN VIEW

4 Bedrooms 172 Jasmine Wy Sun 2-4:30 Coldwell Banker

1 Bedroom - Condominium $649,000 325-6161

725 Mariposa Av #305 Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$448,800 324-4456

Support Local Business ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊÎ]ÊÓä£{ĂŠU Page 31


HAPPY NEW YEAR

WWW.SERENOGROUP.COM WWW.SERENOGROUP.COM/ONEPERCENT PALO ALTO | LOS ALTOS | SARATOGA | LOS GATOS | WILLOW GLEN | SANTA CRUZ | APTOS Page 32ÊUÊ>˜Õ>ÀÞÊÎ]ÊÓä£{ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“


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OVER 20+ YEARS HELPING HOME BUYERS & SELLERS

SOLD

UNIVERSITY AVENUE LOS ALTOS REPRESENTED THE BUYER

SERVING YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MENLO PARK ATHERTON PALO ALTO STANFORD WOODSIDE PORTOLA VALLEY LOS ALTOS LOS ALTOS HILLS

SOLD

COLORADO AVENUE PALO ALTO REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

SOLD

SELBY LANE ATHERTON

MAYFIELD AVENUE STANFORD

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

SOLD

HOBART STREET MENLO PARK REPRESENTED THE SELLER

monica corman

HAWTHORNE AVENUE PALO ALTO REPRESENTED THE SELLER

BROKER

SOLD

GREENOAKS DRIVE ATHERTON

SOLD

MENLO OAKS MENLO PARK

BRE #01111473

mcorman@apr.com

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

650.543.1164 monicacorman.com SOLD

SOLD

CREEK ROAD MENLO PARK

UNIVERSITY DRIVE MENLO PARK

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

REPRESENTED THE SELLER

SOLD

STONEPINE LANE MENLO PARK

SOLD

SAN CLEMENTE AVENUE MENLO PARK

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

BISHOP OAK COURT MENLO PARK

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

SOLD

ALPINE ROAD MENLO PARK

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

REPRESENTED THE BUYER

SOLD

BERRYESSA STREET PALO ALTO REPRESENTED THE SELLER

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WISHING YOU AND YOUR FAMILY A HAPPY AND HEALTHY 2014 Expressing my gratitude for my 2013 transactions 736 College Avenue

510 Lowell Avenue

418 Albion Avenue

1701 Bryant Street

1325 San Mateo Drive

196 Patricia Drive

1050 Creek Drive

1103 Forrest Avenue

2898 Louis Road

620 Fremont Street

2206 Coronet Blvd

2555 Eaton Avenue

73 Maple Avenue

73 Maple Avenue

1324 Oakhurst Avenue

1236 Hoover Avenue

548 Ruby Street

351 W. Oakwood Blvd

2711 Clifford Avenue

327 Bay Road

1013 Whitehall Lane

132 Jeter Street

2198 Clayton Drive

95 Irving Avenue

300 De Anza Avenue

2450 Cowper Street

16355 Cypress Road

1100 Sharon Park Drive

4250 El Camino Real

1761 Newcastle Drive

1224 Arbor Court

2802 San Juan Blvd

219 Cerrito Avenue

835 La Honda Road

29 Dexter Street

925 Middle Avenue

211 Lexington Avenue

10 Perry Avenue

536 Iris Street

155 Clifford Terrace

30 Middlegate Street

1902 Limetree Lane

6 Friars Lane

888 Harvard Avenue

482 Gilbert Avenue

3668 Country Club Drive

2544 W Middlefield Road

1052 Oakland Avenue

Judy Citron Opens Doors. Experience the difference.

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Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com

E-MAIL ads@fogster.com

P HONE

650/326-8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

INDEX N BULLETIN

BOARD 100-155 N FOR SALE 200-270 N KIDS STUFF 330-390 N MIND & BODY 400-499 NJ OBS 500-560 NB USINESS SERVICES 600-699 NH OME SERVICES 700-799 NFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 801-899 NP UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997 The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

fogster.com

TM

THE PENINSULAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice. Donate Your Car Fast Free Towing 24 hr. Response - Tax Deduction. UNITED BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION. Providing Free Mammograms and Breast Cancer Info. 888-792-1675 (Cal-SCAN)

Bulletin Board

235 Wanted to Buy

115 Announcements Dance Expressions (ages 3 +) IMSB Hosts Dr. Rick Hanson Insight Meditation South Bay is pleased to announce a talk by Neuropsychologist Dr. Rick Hanson, who will speak from his research and new book, Hardwiring Happiness, at 7:00PM on Tuesday January 14th at St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church, 2094 Grant Road, Mountain View, CA. By Donation; no registration needed. For information visit: imsb.org or www.rickhanson.net/ hardwiringhappiness

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330 Child Care Offered

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EXPERIENCED NANNY

240 Furnishings/ Household items Antique Loveseat, Rocker, Chair $100.00

Struggling with Your Mortgage? Worried about foreclosure? Reduce Your Mortgage and Save Money. Legal Loan Modification Services. Free Consultation. Call Preferred Law. 1-800-587-1350 (Cal-SCAN)

Dining Table -Iron Work & Glass - $450

425 Health Services

Kindergarten Dance Class

Medical Guardian Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only. $29.95 per month. 800-761-2855 (Cal-SCAN)

new Holiday music original ringtones Square Dance Lessons Stanford music tutoring Stanford Research Healthy Women

640 Legal Services Injured in an Auto Accident? Call InjuryFone for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don`t wait, call now. 1-800-958-5341 (Cal-SCAN)

substitute pianist available

130 Classes & Instruction HVAC Installation and Repair YOU CAN BECOME an expert. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www. HVAC-Online-Education.com (Cal-SCAN)

GE French Door Refrigerator Refrigerator is less than 6 months old. Measures 68â&#x20AC;?H x 32.5â&#x20AC;?W x 32.5â&#x20AC;?D. Ladies MBT Walking Shoes - 50 Wool Area Rug 5x8 Red - $130

245 Miscellaneous AT&T U-verse for just $29/mo! BUNDLE & SAVE with AT&T Internet+Phone+TV and get a FREE pre-paid Visa Card! (select plans). HURRY, CALL NOW! 800-319-3280 (Cal-SCAN)

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133 Music Lessons Christina Conti Private Piano Instruction (650) 493-6950 Hope Street Music Studios In downtown Mtn.View. Most Instruments voice. All ages & levels 650-961-2192 www. HopeStreetMusicStudios.com

Reduce Your Cable Bill Get an All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $24.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, SO CALL NOW! (877)366-4509 (Cal-SCAN)

Piano Lessons in Palo Alto Call Alita at 650.838.9772

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135 Group Activities Square Dance Lessons

150 Volunteers Fosterers Needed for Moffet Cats

Safe Step Walk-in Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. AntiSlip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN)

For Sale 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts

260 Sports & Exercise Equipment

toyota 2001 highlander - $11,000

202 Vehicles Wanted Cash for Cars Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

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Media Makeup Artists Earn $500/Day. Airbrush and Media Makeup Artists for: Ads - TV - Film Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

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English Cortina Saddle - 100 English Riding Boots - 10

710 Carpentry

560 Employment Information Drivers: CDL-A Train and Work for Us! Professional, focused CDL training available. Choose Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. (877) 369-7126. www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: Owner Operators Dedicted home weekly! Solos up to $175,000/year, $2500 Sign-on Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year, $5000 Sign-on Bonus! Forward Air 888-652-5611 (Cal-SCAN)

Home Mailer Program Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.easywork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN) Mail Brochures from Home $1,000 Weekly!! Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) Work and Travel $$$$$ Energy jobs available in Northern California... $500.00/ $1200.00 per week... must be 18+. BBB accredited Company... apply online www.energyplus1.com, 1(208)590-2870. EOE. (Cal-SCAN)

715 Cleaning Services LARAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GREEN CLEANING Mariaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housecleaning Service 19 years exp., excellent refs. Good rates, own car. Maria, 650/207-4709

Drivers: Top 1% Pay and CSA Friendly Equipment. Full benefits + Quality Hometime. No slip seating - take truck home. CDL-A Required. Call 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: Truck Drivers Obtain Class A CDL in 2 1â &#x201E;2 weeks. Company Sponsored Training. Also Hiring Recent Truck School. Graduates, Experienced 01D.rivers. Must be 21 or Older. Call: (866) 275-2349 (Cal-SCAN)

Cabinetry-Individual Designs Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling: Mantels * Bookcases * Workplaces *Wall Units * Window Seats. Ned Hollis, 650/856-9475

Navarro Housecleaning Services Apartments and homes. Carpets and windows. 20 years exp., good refs. Call for free est. 650/853-3058; 650/796-0935 Olga's Housecleaning Res./Com. Wkly/mo. Low Rates. Local Refs. 25 years Exp. & Friendly. I Love My Job! Ins. (650) 380-1406

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730 Electrical

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737 Fences & Gates Lopez Fences *Redwood fences *Chainlink fences *Repairs *Decks, retaining walls 12 years exp. Free est. 650/771-0908 or 771-2989

748 Gardening/ Landscaping Citiscapes I have landscaped here for over 30 years. Free consultation. Ken MacDonald 650-465-5627 Lic# 749570

J. Garcia Garden Maintenance Service Free est. 20 years exp. (650)3664301 or (650)346-6781 LANDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maintenance *New Lawns *Clean Ups *Tree Trimming *Rototilling *Power Wash *Irrigation timer programming. 17 years exp. Ramon 650-576-6242 landaramon@yahoo.com Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477. R.G. Landscape Yard Clean-ups, maintenance, installations. Call Reno for free est. 650/468-8859 Tired of Mow, Blow and Go? Owner operated, 40 years exp. All phases of gardening/landscaping. Ref. Call Eric, 408/356-1350

751 General Contracting A NOTICE TO READERS: It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

757 Handyman/ Repairs Reliable Handyman Services One call, does it all! Fast and Reliable Handyman Services. Call ServiceLive and get referred to a pro today: Call 800-958-8267 (Cal-SCAN) !CompleteHome Repair ! modelin !Professional inting !Carpentr  FRED 30 Years Experience !Plumbing !Electrical 650.529.1662 !CustomCabinets 650.483.4227 !Decknces

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759 Hauling J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc. junk, office, garage, furniture, mattresses, green waste yard debri and more... Lic. &Ins. FREE estimates. 650-743-8852 (see my Yelp reviews) Johnston Hauling 100% Recycle Junk Removal Best Rates * Local Since 1985 650/327-HAUL; 415/999-0594 Insured - PL/PD

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771 Painting/ Wallpaper Glen Hodges Painting Call me first! Senior discount. 45 yrs. #351738. 650/322-8325

REDWOOD PAINTING Serving the peninsula over 15 years Residential / Commercial Apartments, drywall retexturing and repair, window cleaning, pressure washing, and more... Bonded & Insured

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STYLE PAINTING Full service painting. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

775 Asphalt/ Concrete Answers on page 43

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Across 1 NASDAQ purchase 4 Thanksgiving turkey carver, maybe 7 ___-M-Aid (candy renamed Fun Dip) 10 Before 13 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tic ___ Doughâ&#x20AC;? (game show) 14 Last-minute shopperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day 15 Let loose 17 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The greatestâ&#x20AC;? boxer 18 Cinematographerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concern 20 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Twelve Days of Christmasâ&#x20AC;? musician 22 Enjoy Mt. Hood, say 23 Animal on Wyomingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flag 24 Get a move on 26 Roll with the punches 28 Aries, astrologically 30 Unreliable people 34 Garfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foil 36 College town north of San Francisco 38 Computer key 39 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Filthyâ&#x20AC;? dough 41 Jailbird 42 Hockey great Cam 44 Subject of Indiana Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quest 45 Big guy in Molokai 48 First Nations tribe 49 Seven Sisters college 51 Major stress factor, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s said 53 Send a short message 55 Opticiansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; products 58 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I, Robotâ&#x20AC;? author Asimov 61 Confound 63 Wild West â&#x20AC;&#x153;justiceâ&#x20AC;? 64 Person who believes Haile Selassie was the Messiah 67 Org. where Edward Snowden once did contracting 68 Stranded, in a way 69 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bill ___, the Science Guyâ&#x20AC;? 70 Chick 71 Jamaican music 72 Spider-Man creator Stan 73 Home of Kraftwerk and bratwurst: abbr. 74 Part of PBS

Down 1 Bacterial infection, for short 2 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockyâ&#x20AC;? actress Shire 3 Game thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sort of an ancestor of Jenga 4 Court order 5 Sinatra ex Gardner 6 GOPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opposition 7 Like tabloid headlines 8 Needle ___ haystack 9 What to try if things arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t working 10 Halloween vandalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s projectiles 11 Change of address, to a realtor 12 Forbidden fruit locale 16 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet Loveâ&#x20AC;? singer Baker 19 Place to buy a few compacts 21 Old knockout fumes 25 Carrierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s org. 27 To the back of a boat 29 Foot curve 31 Beyonceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Irreplaceableâ&#x20AC;? and Hall & Oatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gone,â&#x20AC;? for two 32 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Allureâ&#x20AC;? shelfmate 33 Eye problem 34 Royal Norwegian name 35 ___ mater (brain covering) 37 Rice from Louisiana 40 Reality check 43 ___ Lodge 46 â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ you for real?â&#x20AC;? 47 Hole-poking tool 50 Singles, RBI and triple-doubles 52 Bruce who keeps up with the Kardashians 54 Keep away from 56 Piece of Bacon? 57 Navy commandos 58 States of anger 59 Did well at Battleship 60 Massive landmass 62 â&#x20AC;&#x153;PED ___â&#x20AC;? (street sign) 65 Charge card charge 66 â&#x20AC;&#x153;All in favorâ&#x20AC;? word

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SUDOKU

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Roe General Engineering Asphalt, concrete, pavers, tiles, sealing, new construct, repairs. 36 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703. 650/814-5572

779 Organizing Services End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)941-5073

Real Estate 801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Mountain View, 2 BR/2 BA - $2,600

805 Homes for Rent Menlo Park, 3 BR/2 BA - $5,000.00 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2.5 BA - $4350

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms Menlo Park, 1 BR/1 BA - $1800/mont

825 Homes/Condos for Sale Menlo Park, 3 BR/2 BA - $1099000 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $899000 Sunnyvale, 3 BR/2 BA - $599999

855 Real Estate Services Roommates.com All areas. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates. com. (AAN CAN)

Public Notices 995 Fictitious Name Statement SILICON VALLEY HEARING, INC. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 585641 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Silicon Valley Hearing, Inc., located at 340 Dardanelli Lane, Suite 22, Los Gatos, CA 95032, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): SILICON VALLEY HEARING CLINIC, INC. 661 Towle Way Palo Alto, CA 94306 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 4, 2013. (PAW Dec. 13, 20, 27, 2013, Jan. 3, 2014)

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IT LAW GROUP FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 584951 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: IT Law Group, located at 501 Forest Avenue, #510, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): FRANCOISE GILBERT 501 Forest Avenue, #510 Palo Alto, CA 94301 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 06/01/2003. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on November 14, 2013. (PAW Dec. 13, 20, 27, 2013, Jan. 3, 2014) EARTH SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 585063 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Earth Systems Engineering, located at 851 Altaire Walk, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A General Partnership. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): ANDREA ARJONA AMADOR 851 Altaire Walk Palo Alto, CA 94303 ANA MARIA QUINTERO 1811 Cliffe Hill Way Rockville MD 20854 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 01/01/2013. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on November 18, 2013. (PAW Dec. 13, 20, 27, 2013, Jan. 3, 2014) TALENTS UNLIMITED FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 585779 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Talents Unlimited, located at 580 Constanzo Street, Stanford, CA 94305, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): OLGA RODSTEIN 580 Constanzo Street Stanford, CA 94305 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 6, 2013. (PAW Dec. 20, 27, 2013, Jan. 3, 10, 2014) PRIME CAB FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 585936 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Prime Cab, located at 3831 Ramirez Ct., San Jose, CA 95121, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A General Partnership. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): INDERJIT KAUR 903 Laurie Ave. Santa Clara, CA 95054 GURPREET SINGH 3831 Ramirez Ct. San Jose, CA 95121 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 12, 2013. (PAW Dec. 20, 27, 2013, Jan. 3, 10, 2014) PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION SERVICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 586272 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Professional Communication Services, located at 260 Sheridan Ave. #216, Palo Alto, CA 94306, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: Married Couple. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): KAY F. MILLS 38 Birkdale Circle Rancho Mirage, CA 92270 HERBERT MILLS

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38 Birkdale Circle Rancho Mirage, CA 92270 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 04/01/1991. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 24, 2013. (PAW Jan. 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014) ENDODONTIC HEALTH OF PALO ALTO FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 586287 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Endodontic Health of Palo Alto, located at 3525 Alma Street, Palo Alto, CA 94306, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): TRI N. HUYNH DDS, PHD DENTAL CORPORATION 3525 Alma Street Palo Alto, CA 94306 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 24, 2013. (PAW Jan. 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RICHARD T. BURRESS Case No.: 113PR173148 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of RICHARD T. BURRESS, RICHARD BURRESS. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LEE BURRESS DUBOC in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: LEE BURRESS DUBOC be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on January 22, 2014 at 9:30 a.m. in Dept.: 12 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ John C. Donegan 111 Main Street- Suite H Los Altos, California 94022 (650)948-9990 (PAW Dec. 20, 27, 2013, Jan. 3, 2014) NOTICE OF TRUSTEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE T.S. No. 12-32026-JP-CA Title No. 120141739CA-LMI ATTENTION RECORDER: THE

FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE 2923.3 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 09/11/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, (cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s check(s) must be made payable to National Default Servicing Corporation), drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state; will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in an â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: RAMON BERNAL, AN UNMARRIED MAN Duly Appointed Trustee: NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION Recorded 09/20/2006 as Instrument No. 19110229 (or Book, Page) of the Official Records of SANTA CLARA County, California. Date of Sale: 01/10/2014 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: At the North Market Street entrance to the County Courthouse, 191 North Market Street, San Jose, CA 95113 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $758,036.60 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 803 WAKE FOREST ROAD, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94043 A.P.N.: 160-05-043 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The undersigned mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent for the mortgagee or beneficiary pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.5(b) declares that the mortgagee, beneficiary or the mortgageeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or beneficiaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s authorized agent has either contacted the borrower or tried with due diligence to contact the borrower as required by California Civil Code 2923.5. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be


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Answers to this week’s puzzles, which can be found on page 42.

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PREP HOOPS . . . The 2013 high school basketball season came to an end this past week without any teams bringing home titles. Two squads won consolation championships in local tournaments while the Eastside Prep girls wound up fourth in the 16-team Coaches vs. Cancer Classic that finished up Tuesday night in East Palo Alto. The host Panthers (8-4) dropped a tough 4237 decision to state-ranked Mitty in the third-place game, despite playing with only five players. Chacitty Cunningham had a season-high 14 points for Eastside Prep with 6-foot-3 Destiny Graham adding 10. The Panthers led after one quarter, 12-9, trailed at the half (24-22) and got within three points before missing on a three-point attempt with under 20 seconds to play. The Menlo-Atherton and Menlo School girls, meanwhile, continued their preparations for the upcoming league basketball seasons by capturing consolation titles in tournaments that concluded on Monday. MenloAtherton rallied to defeat Evergreen Valley, 58-55, in the consolation finals of the Newark Memorial tournament in Fremont and Menlo posted a 53-45 win over Luther Burbank of Sacramento in the consolation finals of the Steve Geramoni Invitational at Notre Dame-Belmont. Evergreen opened a 12-point lead on M-A in the first half before M-Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense tightened and Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; senior guard Emma Heath began hitting outside shots while freshman post Ofa Sili scored 10 of her team-high 19 points in the paint resulting in a 20-3 quarter. In the fourth, M-Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead fell to one point with eight seconds remaining before Heath hit both of a 1-and-1 free-throw opportunity to seal the victory as she finished with 16 points and the Bears improved to 6-2. M-A junior forward Naomi Baer finished with 11 points. In Belmont, all-tournament selection Donya Dehnad tossed in 16 points as Menlo School rolled to a 15-point halftime lead on the way its victory. Hannah Paye and Mackenzie Duffner each added 13 points for the Knights (6-4) while Anna Miller grabbed seven rebounds. In Salinas, Castilleja dropped a 58-53 overtime decision to Salinas in the seventh-place game of the Monterey Bay Sweet 16 Tournament at Notre Dame-Salinas. The Gators (5-7) were led by Paige Vermeer, who finished with 23 points (with five 3-pointers), nine rebounds, seven assists and four steals.

Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Michael Rector (3) made a leaping catch, but had the ball taken away from him by Michigan Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Trae Waynes (15), ruining a possible scoring opportunity in the Rose Bowl on Wednesday in Pasadena.

Rose Bowl win just eludes Stanford Cardinal running game stopped by Michigan State in crucial moments of 24-20 loss by Rick Eymer he 100th Rose Bowl Game, from a Stanford point of view, will be remembered for one thing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; when the Cardinal needed to run the ball, it couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. No one knew that better than Stanford senior Tyler Gaffney. After gaining 67 yards (47 coming on one run) and scoring on

T

a 16-yard touchdown run in the first quarter, he was held to just 24 yards on 18 carries the final three quarters. Not too surprisingly, as Gaffney was stopped, so too was No. 5 Stanford as it let a 17-7 lead disappear in a frustrating 24-20 loss to the No. 4-ranked Spartans before an announced crowd of 95,173 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena on

(13-1). Yet, when Stanford needed just one yard with 1:46 left in the fourth quarter and the ball on its 34, the Cardinal failed to keep the drive going. End of game. Ryan Hewitt got the call on that final carry and plowed into a line that featured some 3,000 pounds of Stanford players and equal of ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iÂŽ

100TH ROSE BOWL

Paly grad Anderson put Cardinal in position to win by Rick Eymer alo Alto High grad Kevin Anderson got a second chance to make a good impression and the way things were going for the fifth-ranked Stanford football team, it came at a good time. Anderson had a chance to intercept a pass early in the second quarter but he could not hold on, and it resulted in a Michigan State reception. Stanford, which lost 24-20 to the Spartans in the 100th Rose Bowl on Wednesday, went into hibernation for much of the second quarter, gaining 22 offensive yards and giving up 157 yards, including two long scoring drives.

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ON THE AIR Friday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Oregon at Stanford, 6 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks; KZSU (90.1 FM) Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2030;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Sunday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Oregon St. at Stanford, 2 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks; KZSU (90.1 FM)

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Wednesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everywhere I looked there was a green defender,â&#x20AC;? Gaffney said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They get into the backfield right away and that immediately disrupts the run. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no space to figure something out.â&#x20AC;? Stanford finished its 11-3 season with a single-season rushing record of 2,904 yards, 162 of that coming against the Spartans

Palo Alto High grad Kevin Anderson (48) had a 40-yard interception return in the Rose Bowl on Wednesday.

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Anderson, who also recorded a tackle for a loss in the quarter, made sure he hung on the next time the ball came his way. His heads-up play turned into a 40yard interception return for a score kept the Cardinal in front at 17-7. It was his first career interception and marked Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 37th forced turnover in its past 38 games. After the Spartans closed to within 10-7, helped in large part by a pass interference call on Wayne Lyons in the end zone on a third-and-goal play, Stanford made it as far as midfield before punting the ball away. Half of the ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;iĂ?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iÂŽ


Rose Bowl ­VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>}iÂŽ

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Despite the loss, Stanford finished a four-year run that saw the Cardinal play in four straight BCS games and go 46-8 overall (only Alabama at 47-6 is better during that time). Only two of those losses were by more than a touchdown. Shaw is now 34-7 in his three seasons. Shaw praised his senior class, which he said â&#x20AC;&#x153;is the most accomplished group of football players to ever go through Stanford University. Regardless of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outcome, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the truth . . . Four straight BCS games . . . itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rare company.â&#x20AC;? Still, there was no Hollywood ending for Stanford this season as it played a virtual mirror image of itself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two teams that play great defense, that run the ball and try to make big plays in the passing game,â&#x20AC;? Shaw explained of the matchup. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One has got to win, one has got to lose, and we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make enough plays for us to be on the right side . . . They played better. They made more plays. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the bottom line.â&#x20AC;? N

Stanford quarterback Kevin Hogan rushed eight times for 41 yards against Michigan State. in and saved the day, at least for the time being. He was right in the middle of what was supposed to be a screen pass. Usua Amanam pressured MSU quarterback Connor Cook into rushing his throw and Anderson gladly accepted the ball and raced 40 yards for the score. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I heard the crowd yelling and saws Kevin with the ball,â&#x20AC;? said Amanam, the Defensive MVP of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rose Bowl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was glad to see Kevin make the play, after all the hard work he has put in.â&#x20AC;? The Spartans only needed 1:39 to respond with another touchdown, to close within 17-14 by halftime. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They took advantage of their opportunities,â&#x20AC;? Stanford free safety Ed Reynolds said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything we prepared for is exactly what they did.â&#x20AC;? Despite losing much of its de-

After gaining 67 yards in the first quarter and scoring a TD, Stanford senior Tyler Gaffney was held to just 24 yards on 18 carries the rest of the game.

fense, quarterback Kevin Hogan, who lost to a ranked opponent for the first time in 11 starts, thinks Stanford will continue to be in future Pac-12 title hunts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got back to the Rose Bowl this year and we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hang our heads,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be back. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough to go out with a loss but these guys have been doing such a great job for four years.â&#x20AC;? NOTES: Stanford set a singleseason rushing record with 2,904 yards . . . The Cardinal defense has recorded at least one sack in 33 of its past 34 games . . . Stanford allowed fewer than 30 points for the 23rd consecutive game . . . Shayne Skov recorded nine tackles and finished with 109, the most since Bo McNally had 114 in 2007 . . . Ty Montgomery, who left the game with an injury, finished with 1,091 return yards, the second Stanford player to

reach the 1,000-yard milestone. His 2,208 all-purpose yards this season rank him No. 3 in school history . . . Stanford is 11-13-1 in bowl games, 6-7-1 in the Rose Bowl . . . Stanford became the only team ever to play in the first Rose Bowl (1902) and the 100th, unfortunately losing both . . . The Cardinal fell to 15-43-3 all-time against top-five opponents . . . Gaffney finished his final season with 330 rushing attempts for 1,709 yards and 22 touchdowns. Those totals rank him No. 2, 2 and 3 in school history, respectively . . . Junior wide receiver Devon Cajuste finished the season by averaging 22.9 yards per catch, setting a single-season school record . . . With Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loss, the Pac-12 finished 6-3 in bowl games this season. It was the first time the conference has won that many bowls after going 5-0 in 2008 and 5-1 in 1997. N

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six plays either lost yardage or did not gain yardage. The Cardinal woes continued after holding Michigan State on its next possession. It started on the Spartans punt when Patrick Skov was nailed with a personal foul and Stanford was forced start on its own eight. A false start cost Stanford another four yards and Tyler Gaffney lost two yards on an ill-advised Wildcat play, in which he took the direct snap. Gaffney made up three yards on the next play but an incomplete pass forced Ben Rhyne to punt. Rhyne entered the game averaging 3.6 punts a contest. He punted five times against Michigan State for an average of 49.8. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when Anderson stepped

Shayne Skov said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got some and we missed some. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You fight all season to get to these moments, to have these opportunities . . . so to lose is incredibly difficult. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy with the way we played but it definitely hurts. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not easy to lose.â&#x20AC;? Michigan State freshman Mike Geiger kicked a 31-yard field goal to tie the game at 17 early in the second quarter after the Cardinal gave up a 61-yard pass play. Stanford made it look too easy on its opening drive. A 43-yard pass from Hogan to Rector opened the field for Gaffney, who went the final 16 yards of the 7-play, 77-yard drive. The Cardinal scored again on a 34-yard field goal by Williamson late in the first quarter. Gaffneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 47-yard jaunt helped give Stanford good field position. The highlights for Stanford, however, were few and far between. Palo Alto High grad Kevin Anderson picked off Cook and returned it 40 yards in the second quarter for the final Cardinal touchdown of the game.

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Anderson

into the game, wide receiver Ty Montgomery, was held to three catches for 21 yards before injuring his left knee on a kickoff return early in the fourth quarter and did not return. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have an MRI to determine the extent of the damage. On the other side, Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense stuffed the run â&#x20AC;&#x201D; allowing just 65 yards on 35 carries â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but the Spartans went to the air and gained 325 of its 397 yards after the first quarter. Connor Cook threw for a careerhigh 332 yards, just 56 in the first quarter, and a pair of touchdowns as he rallied the Spartans. Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25-yard touchdown toss to Tony Lippett was the go-ahead score early in the fourth quarter. Jordan Williamson kicked his second field goal of the game with 4:15 remaining to make it 24-20. Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense did itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job and got the ball back with enough time for a possible winning drive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just realize that if we kept going, kept getting after it, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to get opportunities to make plays,â&#x20AC;? Stanford senior linebacker

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that for Michigan State. There was simply no place to run. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to give it to Michigan State for stuffing that because everybody in the building knew exactly what was coming, a run up the middle,â&#x20AC;? said Gaffney. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a test of wills, and they got the better of us.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;They came off the ball and we got about a foot and a half,â&#x20AC;? Stanford quarterback Kevin Hogan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were six inches short.â&#x20AC;? Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consensus All-America offensive lineman David Yankey said there was a little more to it than that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To be honest they gave us a look we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect at all,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It came down to that one play and they stopped us . . . Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re one of the best defenses in the nation, and they proved it on every play.â&#x20AC;? Stanford head coach David Shaw defended his call because being successful on those plays during the season got the Cardinal to its second straight Rose Bowl Game for only the second time in school history. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that (run on short yardage), everybody goes crazy that we should have done this or should have that, so I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about any of that stuff,â&#x20AC;? Shaw said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to put the ball in the hands of our guys and put it on the offensive line. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to go for it on fourth down in that situation . . . We got beat by a really good football team.â&#x20AC;? The Spartansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense, featuring a nine-man line that dared Stanford to throw, locked down on the Cardinal after allowing two scoring drives in the first quarter. Stanford continued to put itself into hazardous situations after taking a 10-0 advantage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the first quarter they become more movement-oriented,â&#x20AC;? said Yankey, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll likely give up his final year of eligibility and turn pro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They did a lot of stuff and were able to play their style.â&#x20AC;? Gaffney, who lost 26 yards on carries through the first 13 games, was thrown for a loss a total of 15 yards against the Spartans.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have nine in the box,â&#x20AC;? Gaffney explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They made adjustments after the first couple runs first couple of drives of the series â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t respond like we needed to.â&#x20AC;? Another defining fourth-down play came with the game tied at 17 in the third quarter and Stanford on Michigan Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 36. Gaffney was called upon, as expected, and the Spartans knew it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; tossing him for a three-yard loss. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re good at what they do,â&#x20AC;? Shaw said of MSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a nine-man front. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a whole bunch of guys in there.â&#x20AC;? Stanford seemed unstoppable early, gaining 146 yards in the first quarter. The Cardinal moved the ball 159 yards over the final three quarters combined. Hogan, who completed 10 of 18 passes, with one interception, for 143 yards and no touchdowns, completed a 43-yarder to Michael Rector to open the game and a 51-yarder to Devon Cajuste. Take away those two completions and Hogan was 8-for-16 for just 49 yards. His best weapon coming

Paly grad Kevin Anderson (48) celebrates his TD with Jordan Richards.

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Sports

CROSS COUNTRY ALL-PENINSULA ATHLETIC LEAGUE (Based on placing at league finals) Madeleine Baier (Menlo-Atherton) So.; Katie Beebe (Menlo-Atherton) So.; Carmen Contreras (Half Moon Bay) Sr.; Taylor Fortnam (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Oma Skyrus (Aragon) Jr.; Annika Roise (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Annalisa Crowe (Menlo-Atherton) So.; Sarah Gayer (Mills) Fr.; Clara Fassinger (Half Moon Bay) So.; Kayley James (Woodside) So.; Kyleen Freeburg (Half Moon Bay) Sr.; Carmen Zafra (Half Moon Bay) So.; Natalie Strohm (Half Moon Bay) Sr.; Emily Rexter (Carlmont) So.; Raneem Mokatrin (Carlmont) Jr.

Dvorak (Carlmont) Jr.; Cindy Liu (Hillsdale) Sr.; Natalie Spievack (Hillsdale) Sr.; Mariko Iinuma (Hillsdale) Jr. Second Team Biying Sun (Aragon) Sr.; Lisa Patel (Burlingame) Sr.; Haley Shaffer (Burlingame) Jr.; Mar Burgueno (Carlmont) So.; Pareesa Darafshi (Carlmont) Jr.; Morgan Watson (Carlmont) So.; Nina Bachicha (Half Moon Bay) So.; Irene Palisoc (Hillsdale) Sr.; Kathy Li (Hillsdale) Fr.; Lindy LaPlante (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Sally Carlson (Menlo-Atherton) So.; Amanda Scandallos (Menlo-Atherton) So.; Sadie Rhen (Sequoia) So.

ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE Most Valuable Runner: Niki Iyer (Harker) First Team Zoe Enright (Menlo School); Nicole Colonna (Pinewood); Lizzie Lacy (Menlo School); Meagan Moyer (Mercy-Burlingame); Hana Marsheck (Priory); Lianna Blodgett (Crystal Springs); Eliza Crowder (Menlo School)

GOLF ALL-PENINSULA ATHLETIC LEAGUE Golfer of the Year: Aman Sangha (San Mateo) So. First Team Valerie Chen (Aragon) Jr.; Kelly Fang (Aragon) Jr.; Allie Economou (Burlingame) Jr.; Naomi Lee (Menlo-Atherton Fr.; Lisa Sasaki (San Mateo) Jr.; Tessa Ulrich (Aragon) Fr.; Abbey Pederson (Menlo-Atherton) Fr.; Brooke Williams (Half Moon Bay); Ashley Utz (MenloAtherton) Jr. ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE Most Valuable Player: Chloe Sales (Castilleja) Jr. First Team Maddy Ellison (Sacred Heart Prep); Jessica Koenig (Sacred Heart Prep); Kristine Lin (Harker); Danielle Mitchell (Castilleja); Nicole Mitchell (Castilleja); Jessie Rong (Menlo School); Lauren Von Thaden (Sacred Heart Prep) Second Team Sinead Haley (Sacred Heart Prep); Daphne Liang (Harker); Divya Nekkanti (Notre Dame-SJ); Paris Wilkerson (Castilleja); Lauren Yang (Menlo School); Ellie Zales (Castilleja) Honorable Mention Kiana Cacchione (Sacred Heart Prep); Nicole Henderson (Menlo School); Connie Li (Harker); Cami Steppe (Sacred Heart Prep); Ashley Zhong (Harker)

TENNIS ALL-PAL BAY DIVISION First Team Kaede Ishikawa (Aragon) Sr.; Sami Andrew (Menlo-Atherton) Jr.; Alex Harrigan (Burlingame) Sr.; Lizzie Siegel (San Mateo) Sr.; Cori Sidell (Carlmont) Sr.; Cassidy Sobey (Carlmont) So.; Veronika

VOLLEYBALL ALL-SCVAL DE ANZA DIVISION Co-Most Valuable Players: Casey Carroll (Homestead), Carmen Annevelink (Los Altos) Outstanding Senior: Morgan Robinson (Homestead) Outstanding Junior: Maria Balus (Homestead) Outstanding Freshman: Jessica Lee (Palo Alto) Coach of the Year: Peter Kim (Los Altos) (Note: No Outstanding sophomore was selected) First Team Morgan Robinson (Homestead) Sr. OH; Maria Balus (Homestead) Jr. setter; Hannah Koehler (Los Altos) Sr. setter; Katie Tristchler (Los Altos) Sr. DS; Becca Raffel (Palo Alto) Sr. OH; Keri Gee (Palo Alto) Sr. DS; Kristi Brown (Los Gatos) Sr. setter; Jensen Ditzler (Los Gatos) Jr. DS; Erica Johnston (Gunn) Sr. OH; Megan Robinson (Mountain View) Sr. setter;

Second Team Claudia Tischler (Harker); Michelle Bromley (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Danielle Tatsuno (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Emily Cox (Notre Dame-SJ); Alina Brown (Castilleja); Julia Monaco (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Maria Naclerio (Priory) Honorable Mention Katie Chu (Crystal Springs); Simran Arora (Menlo School); Britney Biddle (Crystal Springs); Katherine Huang (Crystal Springs); Helena Merk (Pinewood); Lydia Ho (Mercy-Burlingame); Natalie Novitsky (Sacred Heart Prep); Emelia Hamilton (Notre Dame-SJ); Hannah Arledge (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Fernanda Salguero (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Brooke Hammarskjold (Menlo School); Jenny Shearer (Crystal Springs); Katie Harrison (Sacred Heart Prep); Quynh Tran (Mercy-SF); Madeline Cooney (MercySF); Maya Mizuki (Notre Dame-SJ); Mary Najibi (Harker); Meilan Stemple (Harker); Mackenzie Carman (Mercy-Burlingame); Grace Hammarskjold (Menlo School); Lexi Van Ligten (Menlo School)

line Fukomoto (Mercy-San Francisco); Jenna McCormick (Mercy-Burlingame); Yena Kim (Mercy-Burlingame); Alyssa Farella (Mercy-Burling

Elizabeth Yao ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE FOOTHILL DIVISION Most Valuable Athlete: Elizabeth Yao (Menlo School) Jr. First Team Christine Eliazo (Menlo School); Helena Ong (Menlo School); Sadie Bronk (Menlo School); Alice Yao (Menlo School); Paulette Wolak (Castilleja); April Chien (Castilleja); Celeste Woloshyn (Castilleja); Tara Ritchey (Sacred Heart Prep); Vi-Van Nguyen (Notre Dame-SJ); Dora Tzeng (Harker) Second Team Paulina Golikova (Menlo School); Sarah Schinasi (Menlo School); Melissa Tran (Menlo Scho ol); Mia McConnell (Menlo School); Georgia Anderson (Menlo School); Ruth Sarwal (Sacred Heart Prep); Lucy Ackley (Sacred Heart Prep); Maddy Jones (Sacred Heart Prep); Allison Harman (Sacred Heart Prep); Courtney Schulz (Crystal Springs); Sahithya Parkash (Harker); Izzy Gross (Harker) Honorable Mention Arden Hu (Harker); Sondra Yue (Harker); Anna Verwillow (Castilleja); Jackie Maloney (Castilleja); Julia McKay (Castilleja); Megan Colford (Castilleja)

SKYLINE DIVISION Most Valuable Athlete: Tia Lee (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy) First Team Maggie Mei (Priory); Esther Bartlett (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Emilhy Hilton (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Anna Moreno (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Florence Lau (Mercy-San Francisco); Holly Lam (Mercy-San Francisco); Kristell Ng (Mercy-San Francisco); Leah Hess (Pinewood); Hannah Manheim (Pinewood); Francesca Faoro (Mercy Burlingame) Second Team Karina Uppal (Pinewood); Desirae Bustos (Mercy-San Francisco); Zerena Shaw (Mercy-San Francisco); Marcela Alvarez (Mercy-San Francisco); Kristi Seymour (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Emily Friesen (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Kari Bergsdedt (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Nicole Trahan (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Alana Wilson (Mercy-Burlingame); Alexa Oropeza (Mercy-Burlingame) Honorable Mention Charlotte Beriker (Priory); Mary Lin (Priory); Amanda Lee (Priory); Jacque-

Page 46Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£{Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Second Team Katie Barker (Homestead) Jr. OP; Connor Bunka (Homestead) Jr. OP; Michelle Albright (Los Altos) Sr. OP; Megan McDermott (Los Altos) Sr. OH; Lauren Kerr (Palo Alto) Sr. MB; Jessica Lee (Palo Alto) Fr. Setter; Tori Taormina (Los Gatos) Jr. OH; Shea Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Gorman (Los Gatos) Jr. OP; Meghan Mahoney (Gunn) Jr. OH; Beverly Yu (Monta Vista) Sr. OH Honorable Mention Bre Rachel (Homested) So. MB; Allison Inanoria (Homestead) Sr. DS; Jenna Hoover (Los Altos) Jr. MB; Joyce Christiansen-Salameh (Los Altos) Jr. setter; Jade Schoenberger (Palo Alto) Jr. OH; Jessica Dinneen (Gunn) Jr. OP; Nicole Brigham (Gunn) Jr. setter; Elle Rogers (Los Gatos) Jr. MB; Elyse Fitzsimons (Mountain View) Jr. MB; Alice Liu (Monta Vista) Sr. MB ALL-PAL BAY DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Christine Alftin (Woodside) Sr. First Team Madison Lee (Aragon) So.; Morgan Ho (San Mateo) Sr.; Isabell Walker (Burlingame) Sr.; Morgan McKeever (Burlingame) Sr.; Jami Maffei (Hillsdale) Sr.; Sifatogo Faaiu (South San Francisco) Sr.; Danielle Walsh (Woodside) Sr.; Haili Hoeft (Woodside) Sr.; Paulina King (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Virginia Lane (MenloAtherton) Sr.; Amelia Tupou (Carlmont) Sr.; Ella McDonough (Carlmont) Sr.

First Team Elisa Merten (Menlo School); Marine Hall-Poirier (Priory); Shreya Dixit (Harker); Katya Scocimara (Castilleja); Victoria Garrick (Sacred Heart Prep); Divya Kalidindi (Harker); Melissa Cairo (Menlo); Morgan Dressel (Menlo) Second Team Natalie Marshall (Sacred Heart Prep); Lida Vandermeer (Menlo School); Madeline Johnson (Castilleja); Kijana Best (Mercy-San Francisco); Jessica Norum (Castilleja); Doreen Kang (Harker) Honorable Mention Olivia Pellarin (Menlo School); Jacquelyn Yee (Mercy-San Francisco); Samantha Lui (Mercy San Francisco); Shannon Richardson (Harker); Sarah Rose (Castilleja); Maddy Frappier (Menlo School); Maddie Stewart (Menlo School); Taylor McNeil (Mercy-San Francisco); Merceded Chien (Harker); Jennifer DiSanto (Castilleja) SKYLINE DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Mehra Den Braven (Pinewood) First Team Diana Vandenberg (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Peyton Nora (Crystal Springs); Caroline Diemer (Notre Dame-SJ); Amelia Smith (Notre Dame-SJ); Nicole Connolly (Mercy-Burlingame); Louise Hardiman (Mercy-Burlingame) Second Team Rose Gold (Crystal Springs); Krista Saito (Notre Dame-SJ); Victoria Langi (Mercy-Burlingame); Geli Du (Crystal Springs); Angie Lao (Notre Dame-SJ); Ciara Young (Mercy-Burlingame) Honorable Mention Abigail Sylvester (Eastside Prep); Perla Ramos (Eastside Prep); Makiya Frands (Eastside Prep); Esi Thompson (Eastside Prep); Caroline Callaghan (Crystal Springs); Maddie Clay (Crystal Springs); Caroline Chiemwalski-Anders (Notre Dame-SJ); Sabrina Santos (Mercy-Burlingame); Kathleen Glasser (Mercy-Burlingame); Milan Loiacono (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Laura Miller (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Alyssa Pablo (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Tehmi den Braven (Pinewood); Karalena Davis (Pinewood); Sarah Cilker (Pinewood); Valene Trigueros (ICA); Allyson Balocating (ICA); Lynell Magat (ICA); Michelle Dearden (ICA); Arianna Chacon (ICA); Anne Scerbak (Notre Dame-SJ)

ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE FOOTHILL DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Maddie Huber (Menlo School) Sr.

ALL-PAL BAY DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Jessica Heilman (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. Most Valuable Goalie: Francesca Gilles (Menlo-Atherton) Jr. First Team Sofia Caryotakis (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Samantha Henze (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Anna Yu (Castilleja) Jr.; Stephanie Flamen (Castilleja) Sr.; Kristen Denney (Carlmont) Jr.; Nicole Reynolds (Burlingame) Sr.; Sasha Levin-Guracar (Sequoia) Jr. Second Team Nicole Zanolli (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Alex Zafran (Castilleja) Jr.; Katelyn McGrath (Carlmont) Jr.; Kristen Dames (Carlmont) Sr.; Claire Morrison (Burlingame) So.; Helena Larsen (Sequoia) Sr.; Tessa Draper (Aragon) Jr. Honorable Mention Sierra Sheeper (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Fernanda Kramer (Castilleja) Jr.; Sarah Fecher (Carlmont) Sr.; Gretta Musayelyan (Burlingame) Sr.; Samantha Peyton (Sequoia) Sr.; Alison Clark (Aragon) Sr. ALL-PAL OCEAN DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Micaela White (Half Moon Bay) Sr. Most Valuable Goalie: Emily Dunlap (Woodside) Sr. First Team Terez Touhey (Woodside) Jr.; Taira Hovden (Woodside) Jr.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kyla Kemp (Half Moon Bay) Sr.; Sarah Stretch (Half Moon Bay) Jr.; Donya Dehnad (Menlo School) Sr.; Madison Gomes (Mercy-Burlingame) So.; Saige Daniel (Mills) Sr. Second Team Mina Sealund (Woodside) Fr.; Fiona Handler (Half Moon Bay) Jr.; Audrey Flower (Menlo School) Jr.; Kate Huneke (Menlo School) Sr.; Talor Cormier (Mills) Sr.; Darya Shtykalo (Hillsdale) Sr.; Nikela Klinghagen (San Mateo) Sr.; Grace Casolo (Mercy-Burlingame) Jr.; Tylor Gomes (Terra Nova) So. Honorable Mention Suzie Ortiz (Woodside) So.; Sarah Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe (Half Moon Bay) Fr.; Jenny Greenstein (Menlo School) Jr.; Josie Madrigal (Mills) Sr.; Lexie Gordon (Hillsdale) Sr.; Briana Cerda (San Mateo) Jr.; Vanessa Kibblewhite (Mercy-Burlingame) Jr.; Eddy Kapp (Terra Nova) So.

Second Team Devin Joos (Menlo-Atherton) Jr.; Leanna Collins (Menlo-Atherton) So.; Isabella Mauricio (San Mateo) Jr.; Melanie Moore (Aragon) Fr.; Bianca Alverez (Burlingame) Sr.; Tatum Novitzky (Burlingame) Jr.; Karen Chang (Hillsdale) Jr.; Natasha Lee (South San Francisco) Sr.; Sierra Nelson (South San Francisco) Sr.; Ana Oropeza (Woodside) Sr.; Francesca Fioresi (Woodside) Sr.; Bailee Roces (Carlmont) Sr.; Charlotte Jackman (Carlmont) Sr. Honorable Mention Miranda Taylor (Aragon) Jr.; Anna Joshi (Aragon) Jr.; Kirby Knapp (MenloAtherton) Fr.; Alyssa Ostrow (MenloAtherton) Jr.; Brittney Carias (Burlingame) Jr.; Rachel Topper (Burlingame) Jr.; Lisa Morabe (Hillsdale) Jr.; Cherene Uale (Hillsdale) So.; Sharon Tukuaoga (South San Francisco) Jr.; Bianca Ng (South San Francisco) Sr.; Jesse Larkin (Woodside) So.; Heilani Hoeft (Woodside) Jr.; April Smith (Carlmont) Sr.; Elena Mateus (Carlmont) So.; Amanda Corsetti (San Mateo) So.; Hayley Goell (San Mateo) Jr.

Second Team Sara McAllister (Homestead) Jr.; Irene Feng (Lynbrook) Jr.; Gabrielle Bethke (Gunn) Sr.; Jenna Gavenman (Los Altos) Sr.; Katie Francis (Palo Alto) So.; Mary Stone (Los Gatos) Jr.; Madison Gress (Saratoga) Jr.; Natasha Batista (Gunn) Sr.

ALL-WEST CATHOLIC ATHLETIC LEAGUE

Caroline Anderson WATER POLO Most Valuable Player: Caroline Anderson (Gunn) Sr. Most Valuable Goalie: Nicole Nelson (Los Gatos) First Team Samantha Acker (Gunn) Jr.; Rachel Wong (Gunn) Sr.; Bianca Batista (Gunn) Jr.; Rebecca Lysaght (Los Gatos) Sr.; Betsy Wall (Los Gatos) Sr.; Nikki De Roos (Saratoga) Sr.; Mackenzie Rosenthal (Saratoga) Jr.; Romy Aboudarham (Los Altos) Jr.; Casey Vanneman (Los Altos) Sr.; Tess van Hulsen (Palo Alto) Jr.; Katie Richards (Homeatead) Jr.; Helen Li (Lynbrook) Sr.; Kimberlyn Tilley (Los Altos) Sr.; Puck De Roos (Saratoga) Jr.

First Team Samantha Strutner (St. Francis) Sr.; Courtney Batcheller (St. Francis) Sr.; Kaherine Moore (St. Francis) Sr.; McKenna Yates (St. Francis) Sr.; Caitlin Stuewe (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr.; Maddy Johnston (Sacred Heart Prep) Fr.; Morgan McCracken (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr.; Maura Cantoni (Mitty) Jr.; Sabrina Sherrin (Mitty) Sr.; Claudia Macedo (Valley Christian) Sr.; Emma Malysz (Presentation) Jr.; Catherine Summa (St. Ignatius) Sr. Second Team Anna Edgington (St. Francis) Jr.; Natalie Williams (St. Francis) Jr.; Lauren Kerrigan (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr.; Kelly Moran (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr.; Luey Maclean (Mitty) Sr.; Susan Cantoni (Mitty) Jr.; Wynne Stagnaro (Valley Christian) Sr.; Samantha Baker (Valley Christian) Jr.; Jessica Kwok (Presentation) Sr.; Sela Obot (Presentation) Sr.; Paige Waters (St. Ignatius) Jr.; Katie French (St. Ignatius) Jr.; Elenia Giotinis (Notre DameBelmont) Jr.; Megan Cosgrave (Notre Dame-Belmont) Jr. (All-league teams are selected by the coaches)


Sports

CROSS COUNTRY ALL-PENINSULA ATHLETIC LEAGUE (Based on placing in league finals) 1, Logan Marshall (Half Moon Bay) Sr.; 2, Michael Bereket (Carlmont) Sr.; 3, Mark Vingralek (Carlmont) Jr.; 4, Owen Lee (Carlmont) Jr.; 5, Ryan Dimick (Carlmont) Sr.; 6, Zach Plante (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; 7, Gerardo Castro (El Camino) Sr.; 8, James Schulte (Carlmont) Sr.; 9, Graham Faust (Half Moon Bay) So.; 10, Anwar Alghaithy (Westmoor) Jr.; 11, Ryan McAuliffe (Aragon) So.; 12, Michael Ward (Terra Nova), Sr.; 13, Johain Ounadjela (Carlmont) Jr.; 14, Chris Jacobson (Half Moon Bay) Sr.; 15, Charlie Utecht (Sequoia) Jr. ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE Most Valuable Runner: Corey Gonzalez (Harker) First Team Daniel Hill (Sacred Heart Prep); Ross Corey (Priory); Preston Lam (Crystal Springs); Sasha Novitsky (Sacred Heart Prep); Yumeto Shigihara (Crystal Springs); Chris Gregory (Priory); Johnny Trudelle (Priory) Second Team Abin Thomas (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Carter Kremer (Sacred Heart Prep); Isaiah Scott (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Derek Field (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Brandon Chu (Crystal Springs); Javier Rojas (Crystal Springs); Daniel Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy) Honorable Mention Brett Anstrom (Sacred Heart Prep); Dennis Mandudzo (Menlo School); August Howell (Sacred Heart Prep); Zachary Cherian (Crystal Springs); Hugo Pegley (Crystal Springs); Marcus Niksa (Crystal Springs); Tyler Schoenduve (Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy); Robert Screven (Priory); Peter Rosston (Menlo School); Matthew Wan (Menlo School); Rahul Balakrishnan (Harker); Rahul Sridhar (Harker)

Keller Chryst FOOTBALL ALL-SCVAL DE ANZA DIVISION Co-Most Valuable Players: Keller Chryst (Palo Alto Sr. QB and Delshawn Mitchell (Wilcox) Sr. RB MVP Offense: Squally Canada (Milpitas) Sr. RB MVP Defense: Sione Finefeuiaki (Wilcox) Sr. LB MVP Lineman: Jimmy Leatiota (Wilcox) Sr. OL Outstanding Offensive Lineman: Vita Musika (Milpitas) Jr. Outstanding Defensive Lineman: Jason Scrempos (Milpitas) Jr. Outstanding Quarterback: Jonathan Walters (Saratoga) Sr. Outstanding Running Back: Joey Wood (Los Gatos) Jr. Outstanding Wide Receiver: Tre Hartley (Milpitas) Sr. Outstanding Tight End: Tully McCal-

ister (Palo Alto) Sr. Outstanding Inside Linebacker: Andrew Frick (Palo Alto) Sr. Outstanding Outside Linebacker: Benito Serrano (Wilcox) Sr. Outstanding Defensive Back: Cory Olivet (Los Gatos) Sr. Outstanding Utility: Anthony Avery (Mountain View) Outstanding Kicker: Logan Chapman (Los Gatos) Sr. Co-Senior of the Year: Malcolm Davis (Palo Alto) WR/DB and Kenny Dipko (Wilcox) QB Junior of the Year: Solomon Foketi (Milpitas) LB Sophomore of the Year: Eli Givens (Palo Alto) WR First Team Quarterback: Ronnie Reed (Milpitas) Sr.; Nick Bawden (Los Gatos) Sr. Running Back: Savion Black (Milpitas) Jr.; Isiah Jackson (Mountain View); Jacob Marr (Saratoga) Sr.; Keneen Smith (Santa Clara) Sr.; Devaunte Sanches (Fremont) Jr. Wide Receiver: Christian Rita (Milpitas) Jr.; Keensean Johnson (Palo Alto) Sr.; Austin Johnson (Mountain View); Grant Faylor (Saratoga) Sr.; Joey Mederios (Saratoga) Jr.; Dominick Bailey (Wilcox) Sr. Tight End: Frank Kapp (Mountain View); Jake Kenney (Wilcox) So.; Cody Marshal (Los Gatos) Sr. Offensive Line: Mikey Saybe (Milpitas) Sr.; Uate Mataele (Milpitas) Jr.; Christian Haangana (Milpitas) So.; Jack Anderson (Palo Alto) Sr.; Justin Rittman (Palo Alto) Sr.; Afa Prescott (Fremont) Jr.; Clark Rothenberg (Saratoga) Sr.; Jonathan Herrera (Wilcox) Jr.; Jack Jarigan (Los Gatos) Jr.; Andrew Hillard (Los Gatos) Sr.; Brandon Ross (Los Gatos) Sr. Defensive Back: Ken Wu (Saratoga); David Kruskamp (Milpitas) Sr.; Duane Jones (Milpitas) Jr.; Joey Mederios (Saratoga) Jr.; Manu Turituri (Wilcox) So.; Cory Barraclough (Wilcox) Sr.; Cole Wisecarver (Los Gatos) Sr.; Matthew Wilcox (Los Gatos) Jr. Linebacker: Cole Poffenbarger (Milpitas) Jr.; Jake Butters (Mountain View); Sam Kanongata (Fremont) Jr.; Davis Berryhill (Saratoga) Sr.; Jake Tittle (Los Gatos) Sr.; Cameron Ackerman (Los Gatos) Sr. Defensive Line: Sii Mataele (Milpitas) So.; Mike Fitzsimmons (Saratoga) Sr.; Justin Wright (Wilcox) Sr.; Jonathon Pohaha (Wilcox) Jr.; Bailey McNally (Los GAtos) Sr.; CJ Hibbits (Los Gatos) Jr.; Brendan Ross (Los Gatos) Jr.; Nikita Klochko (Santa Clara) Sr. Utility: Jacob Camp (Santa Clara); Adam Garza (Santa Clara) Kicker: Leo Hernandez (Santa Clara) Sr. ALL-SCVAL EL CAMINO DIVISION Co-Most Valuable Players: Derek Rositas (Homestead) Sr. RB/LB and Justin Cena (Monta Vista) Sr. RB/LB MVP Offense: Ryan Allenmandi (Homestead) Jr. RB Co-MVP Defense: Faris Karaborni (Monta Vista) Sr. LB and Tijani Karaborni (Monta Vist) Sr. LB MVP Lineman: Ofisa Pati (Los Altos) Sr. Outstanding Offensive Lineman: Kyle Barry (Monta Vista) Sr. Outstanding Defensive Lineman: Joseph Chang (Lynbrook) Sr. Outstanding Quarterback: Jerome Holloway (Homestead) So. Outstanding Running Back: Sean Lanoza (Los Altos) Jr. Outstanding Wide Receiver: Victor Puiz (Los Altos) Sr. Outstanding Tight End: Max Wilber (Los Altos) Sr. Co-Outstanding Defensive End: Sam Nastari (Monta Vista Jr. and Dakota Kratzer (Los Altos) Sr. Outstanding Outside Linebacker: Dietrich Sweat (Gunn) Jr.

Outstanding Inside Linebacker: David Park (Cupertino) Sr. Outstanding Defensive Back: Jonathan Chang (Lynbrook) Jr. Outstanding Senior: Christopher Lanman (Los Altos) QB Outstanding Junior: Max McCann (Monta Vista) RB/LB Outstanding Sophomore: Anthony Pozzetti (Cupertino) QB/DB Outstanding Freshman: Tonga Keti (Los Altos) OL/DL First Team Quarterback: Ryan Manley (Monta Vista) Running Back: Tim Cheng (Homestead) Sr.; Jason Larsh (Lynbrook) Sr.; Sean Lydster (Gunn) Sr. Wide Receiver: Nathan Duong (Cupertino) Sr.; Bryan Erickson (Homestead) Sr.; Patrick McColl (Los Altos) Jr. Tight End: Joseph faria (Homestead) Jr.; Dylan Schultz (Cupertino) Jr. Offensive Line: Jessie Arreola (Cupertino) Sr.; Noe Barajas (Homestead) Jr.; Nolan Hurtado (Monta Vista) Jr.; Fred Li (Gunn) Jr.; Tristian Salvador (Monta Vista) Sr.; Aaron Siminson (Lynbrook) Sr.; Michael Strahan (Cupertino) Sr.; Josh Williams (Los Altos) Sr. Defensive Back: Kyle Avvakumovits (Cupertino) Jr.; Mateo Manjarrez (Homestead) Sr.; Justin Miller (Homestead) Jr.; Milanko Plavsic (Monta Vista) Sr.; John Rak (Homestead) Jr. Inside Linebacker: David Almas (Homestead) Sr.; Carlo Isola (Lynbrook) Sr.; Forrest Larson (Gunn) Jr.; Duke Myers (Los Altos) Sr. Outside Linebacker: Max Chiew (Gunn) Jr.; Justin Marengo (Homestead) Sr.; Alex Zee (Lynbrook) Sr. Defensive End: Julian Arndt (Lynbrook) Sr.; Won Lee (Monta Vista) Sr. Defensive Line: Jake ACervantes (Homestead) Jr.; Justin Cheng (Cupertino) Sr.; Daniel Grinberg (Lynbrook) Jr.; Thomas Holm (Homestead) Sr.; Anthony Tung (Cupertino) Sr. Utility: Eric Day (Lynbrook) Sr. Kicker: Matt Schonher (Los Altos) Jr.

First Team Offense Anthony Gordon (Terra Nova) Jr. QB; Jack Heneghan (Menlo School) Sr. QB; John Wallace (Terra Nova) Sr. RB; Andrew Segre (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr. RB; Isiah Nash (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. RB; Jaylend Jones (Terra Nova) Sr. WR; Domenic Ortisi (Terra Nova) Sr. WR; Peter Bouret (Menlo School) Sr. WB; Ryan Roberts (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. WR; Oliver Bucka (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. TE; Paul Noa (Terra Nova) Sr. OL; Patrick Finnigan (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr. OL; Alex Castro (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr. OL; Api Mane (Menlo-Atherton) Jr. OL; Adam Yecies (Menlo School Sr. OL; Matt Jenkins (Sequoia) Sr. PK First Team Defense Sam Auelua (Terra Nova) Sr. DL; David Melton (Terra Nova) Sr. DL; Nic Collazo (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr. DL; Enzo Santos (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. DL; Nick Pierotti (Terra Nova) Sr. LB; Ben BurrKirven (Sacred Heart Prep) Jr. LB; Brian Jaggers (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. LB; Noak Kawasaki (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr. DB; Travis Chambers (Menlo School) Sr. DB; Dylan Anderson (Sequoia) Sr. DB; Sam Stroud (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. DB; Ben Sehl (Sequoia) Sr. punter ALL-MISSION TRAIL ATHLETIC LEAGUE Most Valuable Player: Will Latta (Priory) Sr. Sportmanship Award: Gabe Bautista (Alma Heights Christian) Sr. First Team Tom Latta (Priory) Sr.; James McDaniel (Priory) Sr.; Michael Alcaraz (Trinity Christian) Sr.; Dre Perez (Trinity Christian) Sr.; Jack Sweat (Pinewood) Jr.; Aiden Lucero (Pinewood) So.; Gabe Bautista (Alma Heights Christian) Sr.; Ethan Henkens (Stuart Hall) Sr. Second Team Charlie Tidmarsh (Priory) Sr; Garrett Weber (Priory) Jr.; Brandon Zaringhalam (Priory) Sr.; Matt Novak (Trinity Christian) Sr.; Jon Hill (Trinity Christian) Sr.; Kevin Tracy (Pinewood) Sr.; Joshua Cayetano (Alma Heights Christian) Sr.; Marcos Galvan (Anzar) So.; Mena Otovo (North Valley Baptist) Jr.

Second Team Matthew Lund (Lynbrook) Sr.; Gary Chen (Lynbrook) Sr.; JJ Kadifa (Palo Alto) Sr. Quinn Hamilton (Gunn) Fr.; Samuel Lewis (Los Gatos) Jr.; Jackson Zeigler (Monta Vista) Sr.; Alex Paulsen (Mountain View); Ryan Seltzer (Lois Altos) Sr.; Randy Kenyon (Mountain View) Sr. ALL-PAL BAY DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Nick Bisconti (Menlo School) Jr. Most Valuable Goalie: John Wilson (Menlo School) Sr. First Team Johnny Wilson (Menlo School) Sr.; Chris Xi (Menlo School) So.; Evan McClelland (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Jacob Bassin (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Nikola Kapamadzin (Carlmont) Sr.; Weston Avery (Menlo School) Jr.; Hans Brouwer (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. Second Team Andreas Katsis (Menlo School) Jr.; John Knox (Menlo-Atherton) Jr.; Gene Schreck (Carlmont) Sr.; Elias Sebti (Carlmont) Jr.; George Archbold (Sequoia) Sr.; Will Lowdon (Burlingame) So.; Griffin Tietz (Aragon) Sr. Honorable Mention Ryan Hammarskjold (Menlo School) Sr.; Jorge Pont (Menlo-Atherton) So.; Simeon Giverts (Carlmont) Sr.; Eric Bittner (Sequoia) Sr.; Jed Rosen (Burlingame) Jr.; Nathan Rurtenberg (Aragon) Jr. ALL-PAL OCEAN DIVISION Co-Most Valuble Players: Grant Peel (Mills) So. And Kevin Hoffert (Hillsdale) Sr. Most Valuable Goalie: Anthony Pappas (Hillsdale) Sr. First Team Javier Rosas (Hillsdale) Sr.; Eric Rudberg (Hillsdale) Sr.; Clifford Shaw (Mills) Sr.; Jacob Ng (Mills) So.; Garrett Kem (Half Moon Bay) Jr.; Devin Johnson (Terra Nova) Sr.; William Xu (Priory) Sr. Second Team Curtis Cassin (Hillsdale) So.; Zane Girouard (Mills) Fr.; Jackson Crane (Half Moon Bay) Jr.; Malcolm Feix (Half Moon Bay) So.; Aaron Sturtevant (Terra Nova) Sr.; Leo Franco Munoz (Woodside) So.; Scott Harris (Priory) So.; Perry Liu (San Mateo) Sr.; Marcus Rabara (Capuchino) So. Honorable Mention Thomas Durnat (Hillsdale) sr.; Danile Yu (Mills) Jr.; Anthonu Obester (Half Moon Bay) Sr.; Kyle Kehoe (Terra Nova) Sr.; Mitchell Martin (Woodside) Jr.; Brooks Royals (Priory); Danny Pantuso (San Mateo) Jr. All-WEST CATHOLIC ATHLETIC LEAGUE

Coby Wayne WATER POLO ALL-SCVAL DE ANZA DIVISION

Jack Heneghan ALL-PAL BAY DIVISION Co-Offensive Players of the Year: Jack Heneghan (Menlo School) Sr. QB; Anthony Gordon (Terra Nova) Jr. QB Co-Defensive Players of the Year: Nick Pierotti (Terra Nova) Sr.; Ben BurrKirven (Sacred Heart Prep) Jr. Utility Player of the Year: Isiah Nash (Menlo-Atherton) Sr. RB/LB Special Teams Player of the Year: Ben Sehl (Sequoia) Sr. Coaches of the Year: Mark Newton (Menlo School); Bill Gray (Terra Nova)

Most Valuable Player: Coby Wayne (Gunn) Sr. Most Valuable Goalie: Charlie Niehaus (Mountain View) Sr. First Team Ari Wayne (Gunn) Jr.; Christian Znidarsic (Gunn) So.; Anthony Zunino (Gunn) Jr. goalie; Justin Cooper (Gunn) Jr.; Sam Kelley (Palo Alto) Sr.; Lucas Novak (Palo Alto) Jr.; Jake Weinstein (Palo Alto) Sr.; Rey Castillo (Mountain View) Sr.; Matthew Dunn (Mountain View) Jr.; Colin Hong (Monta Vista) Sr.; Rishabh Hegdel (Lynbrook) Sr.; Matthwe Hendrix (Los Gatos) Sr.; Sam Lisbonne (Los Altos) Sr. Jordan Stout (Los Altos) Sr.

First Team Harrison Enright (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr.; Nelson Perla-Ward (Sacred Heart Prep) Jr.; Will Conner (Sacred Heart Prep) Jr.; Michael Swart (Sacred Heart Prep) Jr.; Michael Blach (Bellarmine) Sr.; Rico Burke (Bellarmine) Sr.; Jack Turner (Bellarmine) Sr.; Shawn Welch (St. Francis) Sr.; Adam Antony (St. Francis) Sr.; Reilley May (St. Ignatius) Sr.; Max Schaum (St. Ignatius) Sr.; Joe Kmak (Serra) Jr.; Brian Roush (Valley Christian) Sr. Second Team Chris Hinrichs (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr.; Philippe Marco (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr.; Zack Zamecki (Serra) Sr.; Jeremy Hitchcock (Serra) Sr.; Conor Hehir (Bellarmine) Sr.; Riley Preston (Bellarmine) Sr.; Kyle Phalen (Mitty) Sr.; Trevor Raisch (St. Francis) Jr.; Sean Elmurib (St. Francis) Jr.; Zack Lowenstein (Valley Christian) Sr.; Michael Hoefling (Valley Christian) Sr.; Charlie May (St. Ignatius) So.; Sheldon Boboff (St. Ignatius) So. (All-league teams are selected by the coaches)

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Our Recent Sales in North Palo Alto

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728 Emerson Street, Palo Alto 650.644.3474

2100 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park 650.847.1141

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2014 01 03 paw section1