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Vol. XXXIV, Number 36 N June 7, 2013

Guide to the Citywide Yard Sale Page 17 w w w.PaloA ltoOnline.com

The streets are alive with music PAGE 23

Spectrum 14

Eating Out 26

Shop Talk 27

Movies 29

Living Well 42

Title Pages 50

Real Estate 52

Home 57

NNews Council members: two terms too short?

Page 3

NSports Baseball merger puts Menlo, SHP in PAL

Page 31

NCover City hackathon fĂŞtes all things innovative

Page 37


Learn the Guitar this Summer

Join us for 5th Annual Free Music Festival

Carol McComb’s “Starting to Play� workshop includes the FREE use of a Loaner Guitar for the duration of the classes.* Regular cost is just $160 for nine weeks of group lessons, and all music is included. *“Starting to Play� meets for one hour each Monday night for nine weeks beginning June 17. Students are encouraged to bring their own guitar, but both nylon-string and steel-string loaner guitars are available. Other classes at more advanced levels are also offered. A full brochure is available at Gryphon.

Ă•ĂƒiՓÊ+Ă•>Â?ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ,iÂŤ>ÂˆĂ€Ăƒ UĂŠ*ÂœĂ€ViÂ?>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠUĂŠ*ÂœĂŒĂŒiÀÞÊUĂŠ>Ă€LÂ?iĂŠ UĂŠ>`iĂŠUĂŠĂ›ÂœĂ€ĂžĂŠUĂŠÂ?>ĂƒĂƒĂŠ UĂŠ7œœ`ĂŠUĂŠ-ĂŒÂœÂ˜i

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Stringed Instruments Since 1969

650 U493 U2131

,AMBERT!VENUEs0ALO!LTO

www.restorationstudio.com

www.gryphonstrings.com

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! HERBIE HANCOCK, SOLO Saturday, June 22

SOLD“Herbie was the step after Bud OUT Powell and Thelonious Monk, and I photo by Douglas Kirkland

haven’t heard anybody yet who has come after him.� – Miles Davis

Palo Alto World Music Day Sunday June 16 3:00 - 7:30 pm University Avenue 50 Musical Groups! Jazz, Blues, Classical, Pop, Rock, Greek, Klezmer, World Music, Choral, Dance www.pamusicday.org IZeh:emh

tickets on sale for these great shows BLUES NIGHT w/ HENRY BUTLER

SAVION GLOVER & HIS TRIO

Wednesday, July 24

Saturday, August 3

TIA FULLER QUARTET

CHRIS POTTER

Saturday, July 27

Wednesday, August 7

ďŹ nd out more & purchase tickets

K^\k^Zmbhg ?hng]Zmbhg

TRIO DA PAZ w/ MAĂšCHA ADNET

STANLEY CLARKE TRIO

CHUCHO VALDÉS QUINTET

Thursday, July 13

Saturday, July 20

Saturday, August 10

STANFORDJAZZ.ORG or 650-725-ARTS (2787)

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Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

Palo Alto may toss out City Council term limits #ITYTOCONSIDEREXTENDINGTERMLIMITSFROMTWOTOTHREE ˆORELIMINATINGTHEMENTIRELY by Gennady Sheyner AYS AFTER THREE MEMBERS OF THE 0ALO !LTO #ITY #OUNCIL PROPOSEDEXTENDINGTHECOUN CILSTERMLIMITSFROMTWOTOTHREE THENINE MEMBERBODYON-ONDAY *UNE  THREW ANOTHER IDEA ON THE TABLE ELIMINATING TERM LIMITS EN TIRELY

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)N THE FINAL ACTION OF ITS LONGEST MEETINGSOFARTHISYEAR THECOUN CILVOTED ˆWITH0AT"URTAND 'REG3CHMIDDISSENTINGˆTOHAVE THE /FFICE OF THE #ITY !TTORNEY DRAFT LANGUAGE FOR TWO POTENTIAL #ITY #HARTER AMENDMENTS PERTAIN ING TO COUNCIL TERMS /NE CHANGE

WHICHWASFIRSTPROPOSEDLASTWEEK BY6ICE-AYOR.ANCY3HEPHERDAND #OUNCILWOMEN,IZ+NISSAND'AIL 0RICE WOULDEXTENDTHENUMBEROF FOUR YEAR COUNCIL TERMS FROM TWO TOTHREE!NOTHERONE PROPOSEDBY -AYOR'REG3CHARFFSHORTLYBEFORE THE MEETING CONCLUDED AT  PM WOULD ELIMINATE TERM LIMITS ENTIRELY #OUNCIL MEMBERS DIDNT MAKE ANY DECISIONS ABOUT CHANGING THE RULESFORTERMSDECISIONSTHATINANY

EVENTWOULDBESUBJECTTOVOTERAP PROVAL BUT SEVERAL VOICED SUPPORT FOR ELIMINATING TERM LIMITS #HIEF AMONGTHEMWAS#OUNCILMAN,ARRY +LEIN WHOSERVEDONTHECOUNCILFOR MUCHOFTHESBEFORERETURNING TO THE COUNCIL IN  (E IS CUR RENTLYINHISSECONDTERM +LEINCALLEDTERMLIMITShBASICAL LYUNDEMOCRATICvANDhINSULTINGFOR ELECTORATES v WHO ALWAYS HAVE THE OPTION OF VOTING OUT AN INCUMBENT IF THEY DONT LIKE HOW HE OR SHE IS

PERFORMING h9OUAREDEPRIVINGVOTERSOFTHEIR RIGHT TO CHOOSE OR NOT CHOOSE THAT PERSON v+LEINSAID )N FACT SINCE  THREE 0ALO !LTO INCUMBENTS HAVE BEEN VOTED OUT OF OFFICE ˆ 2OY #LAY 3ANDY %AKINSAND.ANCY,YTLE 3HEPHERD +NISSAND0RICEARGUED THAT EXTENDING TERM LIMITS WOULD BENEFITTHECITYBECAUSEITWOULDAL (continued on page 8)

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Showdown looms over senior housing (OUSINGADVOCATES NEIGHBORHOODRESIDENTSCLASHOVER PROPOSALFORFORMERORCHARDSITE by Gennady Sheyner FTER TWO EMOTIONAL PUBLIC MEETINGS 0ALO!LTOOFFICIALS AREPREPARINGTOMAKEAMA JOR RULING -ONDAY ON A DEVELOP MENTTHATHASSTIRREDANXIETIESAND STOKED ANGER AROUND SOUTH 0ALO !LTO ˆ A PROJECT THAT INCLUDES  SENIOR HOUSINGUNITSANDSINGLE FAMILYHOMESNEARTHEINTERSECTION OF-AYBELLAND#LEMOAVENUES 4HE #ITY #OUNCIL WILL CONSIDER APPROVINGAZONECHANGETHATWOULD ALLOWTHENONPROFIT0ALO!LTO(OUS ING#ORPORATIONTOBUILDTHEPROJECT ATAFORMERORCHARDSITEAT-AY FIELD !VE )F THE COUNCIL APPROVES THE CHANGE TO A hPLANNED COMMU NITYvZONE THE(OUSING#ORPORATION WOULDBEABLETODEVELOPTHESITEAT AMUCHHIGHERDENSITYTHANTHEUN DERLYING ZONING WOULD OTHERWISE ALLOW )NEXCHANGEFORTHEZONECHANGE DEVELOPERS TYPICALLY PROVIDE hPUB LICBENEFITSvTHATTHEYNEGOTIATEWITH THE COUNCIL )N THIS CASE THE MAIN BENEFIT IS THE PROJECT ITSELF WHICH ADDRESSES ONE OF 0ALO !LTOS MOST GLARING HOUSING NEEDS BY PROVID INGUNITSFORLOW INCOMESENIORS 4O UNDERSCORE THAT URGENT DEMAND FORAFFORDABLEHOUSING THECITYHAS ALREADYLOANEDTHE(OUSING#ORPO RATIONMILLIONTOPURCHASETHE -AYBELLSITE h!BOUTPERCENTOFSENIORSARE LIVING AROUND THE POVERTY LEVEL OR SLIGHTLY ABOVE IT 4HIS WOULD BE A SIGNIFICANTCONTRIBUTIONTOWARDTHAT POPULATION vCITYPLANNER4IM7ONG TOLD THE 0LANNING AND 4RANSPORTA TIONON-AY "UTEVENWITHTHEBENEFITOFMORE SENIOR HOUSING THE PROPOSAL HAS STOKEDANGERAMONGLOCALRESIDENTS WITHHUNDREDSATTENDINGRECENTPUB LICHEARINGSONTHEPROJECTANDBOM BARDINGTHECOUNCILWITHLETTERSAND EMAILS ! NEW STAFF REPORT ON THE

A

Katie Brigham

9OUNGSHOPPERSCHECKOUTTHECANDYAISLEATTHEGRANDOPENINGOF4HE&RESH-ARKET ANEWGROCERY STOREIN0ALO!LTOS%DGEWOOD0LAZA

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Long-awaited Fresh Market opens in Edgewood Plaza !FTERADECADEOFCONTROVERSY CUSTOMERSEAGERLYWELCOMETHEGOURMETGROCERYSTORE by Karishma Mehrotra N THE OPENING DAY OF THE GOURMET GROCERY STORE &RESH -ARKET IN THE RENO VATED%DGEWOOD0LAZA THEREWAS ONEWORDONPEOPLESMINDSh&I NALLYv !FTER A YEAR OF WATCHING CON STRUCTION AND SEVEN YEARS AFTER THEOLD!LBERTSONSCLOSED +AREN 3NOWSAIDSHENEARLYCRIEDWALK INGINTOTHESTOREON7EDNESDAY MORNING h7EVE BEEN WAITING FOREVER FORTHISBECAUSEITSBEENAMESS DOWNHERE vSAID3NOW WHOLIVES NEARBYh)TSBEAUTIFULv 4HE RELIEF MAKES SENSE AS THE

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PLAZAIN0ALO!LTOS$UVENECK3T &RANCISNEIGHBORHOODHASBEENA HOTBEDOFCONTENTIONTHROUGHOUT THE PAST DECADE &RESH -ARKETS OPENING MARKS THE FIRST PHASE OF REVITALIZATION OF THE DESERTED PLAZA AFTER2EDWOOD#ITY BASED 3AND (ILL 0ROPERTY #OMPANY SPENTYEARSNEGOTIATINGANAGREE MENTWITHNEIGHBORHOODRESIDENTS ON ITS HISTORICAL VALUE THE PLAZA WAS *OSEPH %ICHLERS ONLY COM MERCIALDEVELOPMENT  %VENAFTERAPLANWASSETTLEDˆ TO BUILD  HOMES A SMALL PARK ANDANEWGROCERYSTOREˆITWAS DELAYEDWHENACONTRACTORDEMOL

ISHEDAHISTORICALBUILDINGTHATHAD BEENSLATEDFORPRESERVATION 0UTTING ALL THE FUSS BEHIND THEM CUSTOMERS REVELED AT THE MUCH ANTICIPATEDGROCERYSTOREON 7EDNESDAYMORNING4HEYSIPPED FROMSAMPLECUPSOFHOUSE BLEND EDCOFFEEWHILEOGLINGALARGEPRO DUCESECTIONWITHLABELSFORLOCAL  MILES AWAY AND REGIONAL MILESAWAY FOOD4HEBAK ERY FEATURED  DIFFERENT BREADS AND  DIFFERENT PIES THE CHEESE SECTION MORE THAN  DOMESTIC ANDIMPORTEDVARIETIESALLCUTAND (continued on page 9)

PROJECTINCLUDESASANATTACHMENTA STACK OF LETTERS MORE THAN AN INCH THICK WITHASIZABLEMAJORITYOPPOS INGTHEZONECHANGE -OSTCRITICSCITETRAFFICCONCERNS AND ARGUE THAT THE CORRIDOR IN THE SCHOOL HEAVY SECTION OF TOWN CAN NOTACCOMMODATEANYMORECARSON THEROAD,YDIA+OU A"ARRON0ARK RESIDENT SPEAKING ON BEHALF OF HER NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION TOLD THE PLANNING COMMISSION LAST MONTH THATTHELOCATIONISNOTSUITABLEFORA HIGH DENSITY DEVELOPMENT AND REC OMMENDEDTHECITYREJECTTHEZONE CHANGE 'EORGIA !VENUE RESIDENT 2OBERT(ESSENALLUDEDTOTHEhFLO TILLA OF KIDS ON BICYCLESv WH O USE -AYBELL TO GET TO 'UNN (IGH AND OTHERAREASCHOOLSANDARGUEDTHAT ADDINGMORETRAFFICTOTHEAREAISA RECIPEFORDISASTER h5NLESSTHATAREAISCAREFULLYPO LICED THERESGOINGTOBEAFATALITY AND WERE GOING TO HAVE HUNDREDS AND HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE WEARING BLACKARMBANDS v(ESSENSAID /THERS HAVE ARGUED THAT THE NEIGHBORHOOD DOESNT HAVE ENOUGH AMENITIESTOACCOMMODATESENIORS 4HEN THERES THE ISSUE OF THE CITYS LOAN WHICHMANYRESIDENTSVIEWAS ASURESIGNTHATTHEPROCESSISRIGGED ANDTHATTHEPROJECTSAPPROVALISES SENTIALLYADONEDEAL "UT FROM THE STANDPOINT OF CITY STAFF THESECONCERNSAREOVERSTATED AND INSOMECASES MISGUIDED)NA NEWREPORT STAFFNOTESTHATTHEAREA ALREADYINCLUDESSEVERALMAJORSE NIOR HOUSINGCOMPLEXES INCLUDING ONEMANAGEDBYTHE(OUSING#OR PORATIONTHATWOULDBENEXTTOTHE PROPOSED -AYBELL DEVELOPMENT 4HE TRAFFIC IMPACTS STAFF STATES WOULDBEMINIMAL!TRAFFICANAL YSIS WHICH MANY RESIDENTS HAVE (continued on page 8)

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ՘iÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 3


Upfront

The Ritz-Carlton, Half Moon Bay introduces your quintessential weekend for foodies and wine lovers. All of your senses will be brought to life when experiencing ďŹ ne cooking, exceptional dining, and learning the art of the trade. Each weekend offers an exclusive culinary adventure. Club Level Coastal Accommodations Taste of the Weekend Reception

JULY 12-14 Featuring Farm to Table Cooking Class

JULY 26-28 Featuring Wine Blending Class

AUGUST 23-25 Featuring Cheese Making at Harley Farms Private in the Kitchen Chef’s Dinner Sunday Brunch in Navio FO R RESERVATIONS Please call 800-241-3333 and ask for package code EATA www.RitzCarlton.com/HMB

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505) EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Elena Kadvany (223-6519) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns John Brunett, Rye Druzin, Karishma Mehrotra, Audra Sorman ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Christine Afsahi (223-8582), Adam Carter (2236573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 223-6569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Paul Llewellyn, Scott Peterson Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Š2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

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Let us be your guide on an Epicurean Weekend at The Ritz-Carlton, Half Moon Bay

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

We’ve been waiting forever for this. —Karen Snow, a customer at the new Fresh Market grocery store in Edgewood Plaza, on her anticipation of the Palo Alto retailer’s opening Wednesday. See story on page 3.

Around Town

CALIFORNIA DREAMING ... Palo Alto’s planned transformation of California Avenue has been a turbulent three-year ride — a journey filled with anger, lawsuits, confusion, revision, excitement and expanding ambitions. Now, the city is at last preparing for construction, which is scheduled to begin this fall. On Thursday morning, the Architectural Review Board voted unanimously to endorse the latest changes (adding a long list of conditions, as per board custom) to the streetscape plan. In addition to reduction of lanes from four to two, by far the most controversial aspect of the plan, the project includes wider sidewalks, new plazas and a host of new street furniture along California Avenue, between the Caltrain station and El Camino Real. The plan also calls for removal of five existing street trees, a thorny subject in a neighborhood that remembers all too well the “chainsaw massacre� of September 2009, when the city surprised area residents by chopping down all 50 mature street trees at once. College Terrace resident Fred Balin alluded to that infamous episode Thursday morning when he urged city officials to tread carefully on tree removal. The city, he said, “has a casual approach to protecting trees on California Avenue.� He also noted that there hasn’t been any outreach to the community about the new proposal to remove five trees — two valley oaks, one southern live oak and two Shumard oaks. The project is slated to be reviewed by the city’s Planning and Transportation Commission and the City Council this summer before construction commences this fall. STRETCHED THIN ... When a group of stakeholders from all corners of Palo Alto got together a year ago to consider what the city should do about the sprawling and dilapidated Cubberley Community Center, one of the ideas it came up with was a “community needs assessment� for the site. The 35-acre center is coowned by the Palo Alto Unified School District (which owns 27 acres) and the city (which owns 8 acres). While the Cubberley Community Advisory Committee argued in favor of the assessment, city staff isn’t wild about the idea. The reason? Staff has too many other things on its plate. “At this time, there is not sufficient staff capacity to support such a potential wide-ranging effort, especially as there is enough near term critical

work that must take place relating to the lease and covenant negotiations,� a new report from the office of City Manager James Keene states. “There is more than enough effort required over the next six months relating to the lease negotiations.� The report also argues that the “needs assessment� recommendation has a scope far beyond the Cubberley site. Staff recommends discussing this project as part of the next year’s budget process, a recommendation that the council’s Policy and Services Committee is scheduled to take up next Tuesday. PARK HERE ... The solution to downtown Palo Alto’s famous parking woes may still be far beyond the horizon, but next week city officials will consider one idea that they hope will make things at least marginally better. The council will ponder on Monday night whether the city should partner with developer Charles “Chop� Keenan on building a new garage on High Street, between University and Hamilton avenues. The site, which is currently a city-owned parking lot, is known as Lot P. At prior discussions, some council members (most notably Karen Holman) and downtown residents and merchants expressed concern about going this route and using city-owned land for a parking structure that would benefit a private developer. Under the proposal, the 145-space, five-story garage would accommodate workers from Keenan’s proposed new development at 135 Hamilton Ave. Public parking would be limited to the bottom two floors during the day, though all spaces would become public during evenings and weekends. Keenan had offered to pay about $7 million for the new structures, with the city spending another $1.5 million in construction costs and permit fees. While the project is still far from a done deal, planning staff has already endorsed the proposal and is recommending in a new report that the council move forward with a memorandum of understanding with Keenan. “Staff believes that, given the options available, the proposed joint publicprivate garage makes financial and land use sense at this time,� the report states. “The spaces gained will relieve downtown parking regardless of whether they are committed to a private development, and the impact on the city’s parking funds is minimal.� N


Upfront ).&2!3425#452%

A razor-thin margin "ALLOTMEASUREWOULDNEEDMAJORITY

Infrastructure bond a tough sell, survey says

Strng. Sup.

Smwt. Opp

39%

Streets, Sidewalks Trail Measure

7HILEMOST0ALO!LTORESIDENTSWOULDSUPPORTABOND REACHINGTWO THIRDSMAJORITYPOSESACHALLENGE

Smwt. Sup.

Vital Facilities Measure

33%

Children & Families Measure

32%

Strng. Opp.

DK/NA

Total Support

Total Oppose

8%

74%

24%

13%

11%

72%

24%

17%

10%

71%

27%

12%

68%

30%

15%

65%

32%

34%

16%

39%

by Gennady Sheyner

T

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PaloAltoOnline.com An article about the Infrastructure Committee’s discussion of the survey Thursday can be read at www.PaloAltoOnline. com.

 SPECIFIC PROJECTS INCLUDING THE POLICE BUILDING A DOWNTOWN PARK INGGARAGEANDSTREETPAVING 4HE RESULTS OFFERED A MIXED PIC TURE/NONEHAND VOTERSEXPRESSED AWILLINGNESSTOPAYMOREFORPROJ ECTS DEALING WITH STREET MAINTE NANCE hVITAL FACILITIESv SUCH AS LIBRARIES AND COMMUNITY CENTERS ANDPUBLICSAFETY&ORSTREETMAINTE NANCE WHICHDREWTHEMOSTSUPPORT PERCENTSAIDTHEYWOULDSUPPORTA BALLOTMEASURETHATWOULDINCREASE TAXESWITHPERCENTOFTHEMSAY ING THEY WOULD hSTRONGLY SUPPORTv SUCHAMEASURE ANDPERCENTSAY INGTHEYWOULDOPPOSE &OR A GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND A TAX MECHANISM THAT THE CITY USED MOST RECENTLY TO PAY FOR LIBRARY RENOVATIONS A TWO THIRDS VOTER AP PROVALISREQUIRED /THER IDEAS THAT ATTRACTED SUP PORTFROMMORETHANPERCENTOF RESPONDENTSINCLUDEDAhVITALFACILI TIESMEASUREvPERCENT SUPPORT ING STREETS PUBLIC SAFETY LIBRARIES ANDCOMMUNITYCENTERSAhCHILDREN ANDFAMILIESMEASUREvPERCENT

29%

24%

Parks Open Space Measure 0

17%

41% 20

40

17% 60

80

100

!RECENTSURVEYOF0ALO!LTORESIDENTSSHOWEDTHATAPPROVALOFAFUNDRAISINGBALLOTMEASURE WHICHWOULD REQUIRESUPPORTOFATWO THIRDSMAJORITYOFVOTERS ISNOTGUARANTEED SUPPORTING PRESCHOOLS SAFE ROUTES TOSCHOOLS PARKSANDNEIGHBORHOOD TRAFFICCALMINGANDAhPUBLICSAFETY MEASUREvPERCENT FORPOLICEAND FIRESTATIONSANDIMPROVEDCOMMU NICATIONSYSTEMS "UTATTHESAMETIME THESURVEY OFRANDOMLYSELECTED0ALO!LTO VOTERS SUGGESTS THAT A INFRASTRUC TURE MEASURE WOULD BE FAR FROM A SLAMDUNK7ITHAMARGINOFERROR ATPERCENT THERESULTSPOINTTOAN ELECTION WITH A RAZOR THIN MARGIN 7HILEPERCENTSUPPORTEDABALLOT MEASUREFORINFRASTRUCTURE MOSTEX

PRESSEDONLYTENTATIVESUPPORT!ND THISSUPPORTSTARTSTODECLINEBELOW THE TWO THIRDS THRESHOLD ONCE THE COSTS TO AN AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SUR PASS !CCORDING TO A STAFF REPORT AN ANNUAL TAX OF  FOR A GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND THAT WOULD BE RE PAIDOVERYEARSWOULDYIELD MILLIONFORINFRASTRUCTUREIMPROVE MENTS )N GENERAL BONDS WERE THE MOST POPULAROFTHEFOURFUNDINGMECHA NISMSTHATRESPONDENTSWEREASKED ABOUT7HILEABONDRECEIVEDHIGH

APPROVAL RATINGS FROM  PERCENT OF THE RESPONDENTS INCREASES IN THE CITYS HOTEL TAX AND REAL ESTATE TRANSFERTAXRECEIVEDPERCENTAND  PERCENT RESPECTIVELY !NOTHER  VOICED SUPPORT FOR A BUSINESS LICENSE TAX WHICH THE CITY TRIED TO INSTITUTEINBUTWASULTIMATELY SHOTDOWNINTHEVOTINGBOOTH 7HILE HIGHLIGHTING THE CHAL LENGESOFPASSINGANINFRASTRUCTURE BOND THE SURVEY ALSO INDICATED THATRESIDENTSAREGENERALLYCONFI (continued on page 13)

College and career readiness in Silicon Valley

%$5#!4)/.

% proficient in algebra by eighth grade

% graduated in four years and eligible for UC/CSU

Latino

22

20

African American

24

22

.EWNONPROFITRANKSLOCALSCHOOLSONRESULTSWITHDISADVANTAGEDSTUDENTS

Pacific Islander

26

19

by Chris Kenrick

Filipino

52

42

White

57

53

Asian

76

BRABYEIGHTHGRADE v(AMMERSAID /NECHARTERSCHOOL 3AN*OSES+)00 (EARTWOOD WAS THE BEST WITH  PERCENTOFITS,ATINOEIGHTH GRADERS ACHIEVINGALGEBRAPROFICIENCY 4HE TOP THREE PUBLIC SCHOOL DIS TRICTS IN ,ATINO EIGHTH GRADE ALGE BRAACHIEVEMENTWERE,AS,OMITAS %LEMENTARYPERCENT ,OS!LTOS %LEMENTARYPERCENT AND'ILROY 5NIFIEDPERCENT  /N A DIFFERENT METRIC ˆ PREPAR ING,ATINOSTUDENTSFORELIGIBILITYFOR #ALIFORNIASFOUR YEARPUBLICUNIVER SITIESˆ0ALO!LTOWASNEARTHETOP RANKINGSECONDOUTOFLOCALDIS TRICTS WITH HIGH SCHOOLS ACCORDING TOTHE)NNOVATEREPORTTITLEDh"ROKEN 0ROMISES4HE#HILDREN,EFT"EHIND IN3ILICON6ALLEY3CHOOLSv ,OS 'ATOS 3ARATOGA *OINT 5NION (IGH 3CHOOL $ISTRICT RANKED FIRST AMONG PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS ENSURING  PERCENT OF ITS ,ATINO SENIORS GRADUATED WITH THE PREREQ UISITES FOR FOUR YEAR COLLEGES COM PAREDTO0ALO!LTOSPERCENT !N%AST0ALO!LTOCHARTERSCHOOL !SPIRE0HOENIX!CADEMY DIDEVEN BETTERPERCENTOFITS,ATINOSTU DENTS TOOK THE CLASSES REQUIRED FOR ENTRANCETOAFOUR YEAR COLLEGE #HARTER SCHOOLS FIGURED PROMI NENTLY AMONG THE TOP PERFORMING SCHOOLSHIGHLIGHTEDINTHE)NNOVATE

REPORT WITH FOUR CHARTERS AMONG THE TOP  ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS IN ,ATINO !CADEMIC 0ERFORMANCE )N DEXSCORES 2OCKETSHIP %DUCATION A CHARTER ORGANIZATION CO FOUNDED BY 0ALO !LTORESIDENT*OHN$ANNER OPERATES MANYOFTHETOP PERFORMINGSCHOOLS CITEDINTHEREPORT 3CHOOLS THAT DO WELL WITH DISAD VANTAGED STUDENTS TEND TO SET CON SISTENTLY HIGH EXPECTATIONS (AM MERSAID h&ROM KINDERGARTEN UP THESE SCHOOLS BELIEVE ALL THEIR STUDENTS CAN SUCCEED IN COLLEGE AND PUSH THEIRSTUDENTSHARD!SPIRE0HOENIX REQUIRESSTUDENTSTOTAKECOMMUNITY COLLEGE COURSES 3UMMIT 0REP IN 2EDWOOD #ITY REQUIRES AT LAST SIX !DVANCED0LACEMENTCOURSES h%FFECTIVE SCHOOLS ORGANIZE TO REACHTHEIRGOALS!LLFOCUSINTENSE LYONTRACKINGSTUDENTSPROGRESSTO MAKESURETHEYGETHELPWHENTHEY NEEDITˆBEFORETHEYLOSEHOPEv 3AN*OSES!LUM2OCK3CHOOL$IS TRICT HAD THREE OF THE FIVE TOP PER FORMING MIDDLE SCHOOLS FOR ,ATINO ALGEBRA PROFICIENCY AS WELL AS ONE OF THE TOP PERFORMING ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS4HATDISTRICTHASLAUNCHED THREE NEW SCHOOLS IN RECENT YEARS AND ALSO HAS WORKED COOPERATIVELY WITHCHARTERSCHOOLS (AMMERSAID

Lili Cao

Palo Alto schools not top-performing for Latino, low-income students HE 0ALO !LTO 5NIFIED 3CHOOL $ISTRICT RANKS BEHIND NINE OTHER 3ILICON 6ALLEY DISTRICTS INHELPING,ATINOSTUDENTSGAINPRO FICIENCYINALGEBRABYEIGHTHGRADE ACCORDINGTOANEWREPORT 4HE NONPROFIT )NNOVATE 0UBLIC 3CHOOLS WITHOFFICESATTHE3ILICON 6ALLEY#OMMUNITY&OUNDATION AN ALYZED THE PERFORMANCE OF MINOR ITY AND LOW INCOME STUDENTS IN ALL  PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN 3ANTA #LARAAND3AN-ATEOCOUNTIES 4HENEWGROUPSAYSITWILLISSUE ANNUALREPORTSSPOTLIGHTINGTHEBEST ANDWORST PERFORMINGLOCALSCHOOLS WITHRESPECTTOTHEIRRESULTSWITHDIS ADVANTAGEDSTUDENTS )NTHISYEARShREPORTCARDvˆ)N NOVATESFIRSTˆ0ALO!LTOCAMEOFF ASNEITHERBESTNORWORST h)N 0ALO !LTO 5NIFIED ONLY  PERCENTOF,ATINOCHILDRENAREPRO FICIENTINALGEBRABYEIGHTHGRADE v SAID)NNOVATE0UBLIC3CHOOLS%XECU TIVE$IRECTOR-ATT(AMMER h"YTHATMETRIC 0ALO!LTORANKS THOUTOFDISTRICTSCONTAINING MIDDLESCHOOLS IN3ANTA#LARAAND 3AN-ATEOCOUNTIESANDISDOINGJUST  PERCENT BETTER THAN 2AVENSWOOD #ITY 3CHOOL$ISTRICT h4HE TOP PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN THE 6ALLEYAREGETTINGTWICEASMANY ,ATINO KIDS TO PROFICIENCY IN ALGE

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38%

39%

Public Safety Measure

Lili Cao

HE GOOD NEWS FOR 0ALO !LTO OFFICIALS IS THAT CITIZENS FEEL CONFIDENT IN THE #ITY #OUN CILS ABILITY TO TAKE CARE OF THE CITYSINFRASTRUCTURE ANEWSURVEY INDICATES 4HE BAD NEWS IS THAT ABOUT A THIRD OF THE CITY IS UNLIKELY TO SUPPORT A BOND MEASURE TO FUND INFRASTRUCTUREREPAIRSANDNEWFA CILITIES WHICHMEANSTHECITYSTILL HAS PLENTY OF WORK TO DO TO PAY FOR A NEW PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING UPGRADED FIRE STATIONS AND OTHER BADLYNEEDEDPROJECTS 4HEBASELINESURVEYCONDUCTEDBY THE FIRM &AIRBANK -AULING -ETZ AND!SSOCIATES&- ATTEMPTEDTO GAUGE RESIDENTS FEELINGS ABOUT THE #ITY #OUNCILS MANAGEMENT OF FI NANCES THECITYSINFRASTRUCTUREAND

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,ATINOSMAKEUPPERCENTOF+ ENROLLMENTIN3ANTA#LARAAND3AN -ATEOCOUNTIESPUBLICSCHOOLS %AST0ALO!LTOS2AVENSWOOD#ITY 3CHOOL $ISTRICT WAS REPRESENTED ON TWOOFTHEhWORST PERFORMINGvLISTS 2AVENSWOODS 2ONALD -C.AIR !CADEMY WAS THE LOWEST SCORING MIDDLE SCHOOL FOR ,ATINO ALGEBRA PROFICIENCYIN3ANTA#LARAAND3AN -ATEOCOUNTIES WITHONLYPERCENT OFITSEIGHTH GRADERSPROFICIENT AC CORDINGTOTHEREPORT 4WO OTHER 2AVENSWOOD SCHOOLS 'REEN /AKS !CADEMY AND "ELLE (AVEN%LEMENTARY3CHOOL WEREON THELISTOFTHELOWEST SCORINGELE MENTARYSCHOOLSINTHETWOCOUNTIES INTHESTATE!CADEMIC0ERFORMANCE )NDEXSCORESFOR,ATINOSTUDENTS 2OCKETSHIP TWO YEARS AGO WAS TURNED AWAY FROM OPENING A +  CHARTER SCHOOL IN THE 2AVENSWOOD DISTRICT AFTER A   VOTE BY 2AVEN SWOOD TRUSTEES 6OTING IN FAVOR OF 2OCKETSHIPWERETRUSTEES!NA-A RIA0ULIDOAND%VELYN"ARAJAS ,UIS 6OTING AGAINST 2OCKETSHIP WERE -ARCELINO ,OPEZ 3AREE -ADING AND 3HARIFA 7ILSON ACCEPTING THE RECOMMENDATION OF 2AVENSWOOD

3UPERINTENDENT -ARIA $E ,A 6EGA THAT 2OCKETSHIP PRESENTED AN hUN SOUND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMv THAT WAS UNLIKELY TO BE IMPLEMENTED SUCCESSFULLY 0ALO!LTOHASCLOSELYANDPUBLICLY TRACKED THE PERFORMANCE OF ITS MI NORITY AND LOW INCOME STUDENTS IN RECENT YEARS MEASURING PROGRESS AGAINSTGOALSSETIN,ASTFALL DISTRICT STATISTICIAN $IANA 7ILMOT REPORTEDSOMEPROGRESSINNARROW INGTHEACHIEVEMENTGAP 0ALO !LTO HAD EARNED A h$v IN SERVICETOMINORITYANDLOW INCOME STUDENTS IN A -ARCH  REPORT PUBLISHED BY THE /AKLAND BASED %DUCATION4RUST7EST WHICHEVALU ATES HOW WELL #ALIFORNIAS LARG EST SCHOOL DISTRICTS SERVE ,ATINO !FRICAN !MERICANANDLOW INCOME STUDENTS 4HE DISTRICT ALSO HAS BEEN SANC TIONED BY THE STATE FOR HAVING AN OVERREPRESENTATIONOFMINORITYSTU DENTSINSPECIALEDUCATION)N (continued on page 13)

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Upfront -%$)#).%

Protracted lawsuit against Stanford Blood Bank ends #ASEPUTSPOTLIGHTONCONDITIONSUNDERWHICHPEOPLEDONATEDBLOOD by Sue Dremann FIVE YEARLEGALBATTLEBETWEEN 3TANFORD "LOOD "ANK AND A MAN WHO CLAIMS HE DEVEL OPED A SEVERE INFECTION AS A RESULT OFDONATINGBLOODHASENDED COURT DOCUMENTSSHOW #HRISTOPHER"UI  A0ALO!LTO RESIDENT CLAIMED THE BLOOD CENTER DIDNOTPROPERLYSTERILIZEHISARMBE FOREDRAWINGHISBLOOD ACCORDINGTO THECOMPLAINTFILEDININ3ANTA #LARA#OUNTY3UPERIOR#OURT/NE DAYAFTERHIS!PRIL  DONA TION HEDEVELOPEDA'ROUP"STREP TOCOCCALINFECTIONTHATINFECTEDHIS COLLAR BONE 4HE SITUATION BECAME LIFE THREATENING AND PART OF "UIS CLAVICLEHADTOBEREMOVED ACCORD INGTOTHELAWSUIT !TTORNEYS FOR BOTH SIDES DID NOT RETURNREQUESTSFORCOMMENTONTHE LAWSUIT "LOOD BANK SPOKESWOMAN $AYNA -YERS DECLINED TO CLARIFY WHETHERTHELEGALBATTLEENDEDWITH AFINANCIALSETTLEMENT h3TANFORD "LOOD #ENTER AND -R "UI REACHED A CONFIDENTIAL RESOLU TIONTHEREFORE WECANNOTCOMMENT FURTHER vSHESAID )N3EPTEMBER THE3TANFORD "OARD OF 4RUSTEES HAD OFFERED TO PAY   TO "UI IN EXCHANGE FOR DISMISSING THE LAWSUIT BUT THE OFFERWASREJECTED BLOODBANKLAW YERS TOLD THE COURT IN SETTLEMENT CONFERENCEPAPERS 3TANFORD (OSPITAL DID WRITE OFF

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  IN MEDICAL BILLS FOR "UI COURTDOCUMENTSSTATED 4HE TYPE OF INFECTION "UI HAD IS HIGHLY UNUSUAL AND THE CASE ALSO HIGHLIGHTS THE MURKINESS OF HOW FREQUENTLY INFECTIONS OCCUR FROM DONATINGBLOOD"LOODBANKSARENOT REQUIREDTOREPORTINFECTIONSTOFED ERALORSTATEAGENCIES EXPERTSSAID &EDERALLAWREQUIRESRECORD KEEP ING OF POST DONATION COMPLAINTS INCLUDINGINFECTIONS FOR53&OOD AND $RUG !DMINISTRATION INSPEC TION BUTBLOODBANKSDONTHAVETO PROACTIVELY REPORT INFECTIONS AND OTHERINCIDENTSUNLESSADONORDIES AN&$!SPOKESWOMANSAID 4HEISSUEISEXACERBATEDBYALACK OFNATIONALSTANDARDSTHATDEFINERE ACTIONS AND DATA COLLECTION PROCE DURES BY BLOOD CENTERS THROUGHOUT THE 5NITED 3TATES ACCORDING TO A !MERICAN2ED#ROSSREPORT 4HE DEARTH IN DATA COLLECTION IS ALSO DUE TO THE RARITY OF INFECTION EXPERTSSAID h4HE INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND THROMBOPHLEBITISAFTERBLOODDONA TION IS NOT KNOWN BECAUSE IT IS SO RARE -ORE THAN  MILLION PEOPLE GIVEBLOODEVERYYEAR vSAID3TEPHA NIE-ILLIAN DIRECTOROFBIOMEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE !MERICAN 2ED #ROSS #ELLULITIS AND THROM BOPHLEBITISˆSKINANDVEININFEC TIONSˆHAVEAONEIN TOONE IN PROBABILITY ACCORDINGTO

A!MERICAN2ED#ROSSSTUDY 4HEFREQUENCYOF"UISTYPEOFIN FECTIONISUNKNOWN BLOOD DONATION EXPERTSSAID ,AWYERS FOR BOTH SIDES IN "UIS CASE FOUGHT FOR YEARS OVER RECORDS THAT MIGHT SHOW HOW MANY DONA TION RELATED INFECTIONS OCCUR AT THE BLOOD BANK AND WHAT CONSTITUTES A SUSPECTEDINFECTION "LOODBANKSTAFFSAIDTHEYKNEW OF NO OTHER CASES OF INFECTIONS PROMPTING A MAN WHO WORKS AT THECENTERTOANONYMOUSLYCONTACT "UIS ATTORNEYS *OSEPH #ARCIONE *RAND*OSHUA(ENDERSON IN-AY  (E POINTED THEM TO RECORDS THE BLOOD BANK KEEPS ON PATIENT COMPLAINTS AND POST DONATION COMPLICATIONS ACCORDING TO A SET TLEMENT CONFERENCESTATEMENT !FTER THE EXISTENCE OF THE 3TAN FORDSRECORDSCAMETOLIGHT 3UPE RIOR #OURT *UDGE 0ETER +IRWAN OR DERED THE BLOOD BANK TO TURN OVER   0OST $ONATION )NFORMATION &OLLOW UP0$)& DOCUMENTSRELAT EDTOKNOWNORSUSPECTEDBACTERIAL INFECTIONS THAT OCCURRED BETWEEN *AN  AND!PRIL  4HE DOCUMENTS RECORD ANY POS SIBLE ILLNESS EXPERIENCED BY A DO NOR THAT COULD HAVE CONTAMINATED DONATED BLOOD 4HEY ALSO CONTAIN INFORMATIONABOUTDONORINFECTIONS ANDCOMPLAINTS INCLUDINGBRUISING BLEEDING PAIN SWELLING AND FEVER

ACCORDINGTOCOURTPAPERS 3TANFORD "LOOD "ANK CONDUCTS THOUSANDS OF BLOOD DRAWS ANNU ALLY BLOODDRAWS INCLUDING  WHOLE BLOODDONATIONS DUR INGFISCALYEAR  ITSWEBSITE STATES &EW RESULT IN AN INFECTION STAFFSAIDINCOURTPAPERS 3TAFF FOUND SIX CASES IN WHICH DONORS WERE GIVEN ANTIBIOTICS FOR POSSIBLEDONATION RELATEDINFECTIONS BETWEEN.OV  AND*ULY  COURTDOCUMENTSSHOWED4HE NATURE OF THE INFECTIONS AND THEIR TREATMENTWERENOTEXPLAINED /N.OV  AT"UISREQUEST +IRWANTHENDECIDEDUPONAREVIEW OFALL RECORDSBYANINDEPEN DENTDOCTORORNURSE PRACTITIONER/N !PRIL THESAMEDAY+IRWANCHOSE A NURSE PRACTITIONER TO CONDUCT THE REVIEW BOTHSIDESRESOLVEDTHECASE -YERSSAIDINANEMAIL #OURTRECORDSSHOWTHAT"UISAT TORNEYSFILEDADISMISSALON-AY )N COURT DOCUMENTS EXPERTS FOR THEBLOODBANKCASTDOUBTON"UIS CLAIM THAT IMPROPER STERILIZATION PROCEDURES CAUSED HIS INFECTION "UT WHILE EVEN LOCALIZED SKIN AND VEININFECTIONSARERARE THATDOESNT MEAN A SYSTEMIC INFECTION SUCH AS "UISHASNTHAPPENED SAID$R#EL SO"IANCO ANINFECTIOUS DISEASEEX PERTANDSPECIALISTINDONORSCREEN ING AND TRANSFUSION TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS

h4HIS IS A VERY VERY RARE EVENT )N TERMS OF A GENERALIZED INFEC TION )NEVERSAWONEINALLMYYEARS INVOLVED IN THE .EW 9ORK "LOOD "ANK "UT IF ) NEVER SAW ONE IT DOESNT MEAN THAT IT DOESNT EXIST v SAID "IANCO FORMER VICE PRESIDENT OFMEDICALAFFAIRSATTHEBLOODBANK ANDTHERETIREDEXECUTIVEVICE PRESI DENTOF!MERICAS"LOOD#ENTERSIN 7ASHINGTON $# -OSTINFECTIONS WHENTHEYOCCUR CAUSEPHLEBITISANINFLAMMATIONOF THEVEINCAUSEDBYBACTERIA ORCEL LULITISINFLAMMATIONOFCONNECTIVE TISSUEWITHSEVEREINFLAMMATIONOF SKIN LAYERS  "IANCO SAID HE RARELY SAWLOCALIZEDINFECTIONS/CCASION ALLYHESAWABSCESSESNEXTTONEEDLE PUNCTURES h7EHAVEAVERYLARGEPOPULATION OFBACTERIAONTHESKIN3OMETIMES WEDONTKILLALLOFTHEM vHESAID &EDERALPROTOCOLREQUIRESADOUBLE hARM SCRUBBINGv WITH DISINFECTANT PRIORTOTHENEEDLEPUNCTURE WITHA  SECOND INTERVAL IN BETWEEN THE SCRUBS7HENINFECTIONSOCCUR THE SUSPECTED CAUSE IS AN IMPROPERLY STERILIZEDSKINSITE "IANCOANDOTH ERSSAID )N COURT PAPERS 3TANFORD DENIED ITHADINADEQUATELYSTERILIZED"UIS ARM SAYINGTHECENTERFOLLOWSFED ERAL PROTOCOL "UT IN A *UNE  (continued on page 10)

Media Center explores immigrants’ tales 4OBUILDUNDERSTANDING NEWWEBSITEFEATURESIMMIGRANTEXPERIENCES by Sue Dremann NGEBORG"AEHR(IRSCHHORNSIM MIGRATIONSTORYDIDNOTSTARTOUT LIKETHESTORIESOFTHEGENERATION BEFOREHER IMMIGRANTSWHOCAMETO !MERICAFROMGRINDINGPOVERTY 3HEWASTHEDAUGHTERINAWELL OFF *EWISHFAMILY LIVINGINACOMFORT ABLE HOME IN "AMBURG 'ERMANY INTHESANDATTENDINGAPRIVATE SCHOOL "UT THE DARK CLOUD OF .A ZISM SOON HAD THE  YEAR OLD GIRL ANDHERFAMILYFLEEINGFORTHEIRLIVES !.AZIhBROWNSHIRTvPARAMILITARY ONCEBEATHERFATHERSOBADLYTHATHIS EARDRUMRUPTURED 4HE FAMILY FLED TO #HICAGO )LL IN(IRSCHHORNSPENTTHENEXT YEARSˆUNTILAGEˆINATINY ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT SLEEPING ONHERPARENTSLIVINGROOMSOFA)T WASAFARCRYFROMTHELUXURYOFTHE FAMILYS MULTISTORY HOME IN 'ER MANY SAIDHERDAUGHTER 0ALO!LTO RESIDENT%LLEN(IRSCHHORN#OHEN (IRSCHHORN IS NOW  AND HAS !LZHEIMERS DISEASE BUT MEMO RIESOFTHATHARROWINGTIMEREMAIN (ERSTORY FROMTRIALTOTRIUMPH IS POSTED ON A NEW STORYTELLING WEB SITE h-ADE )NTO !MERICA )MMI GRANT 3TORIES FROM THE "AY !REA v LAUNCHED BY THE -IDPENINSULA

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#OMMUNITY-EDIA#ENTERON-AY 4HEWEBSITERECOUNTSTHETALESOF "AY!REAIMMIGRANTSHOWTHEYOR THEIRFAMILIESGOTHEREANDHOWTHEY STRUGGLED AND SUCCEEDED IN THEIR NEWHOMELAND 4HEPROJECTISFUNDEDBYAGRANT FROM THE 3ILICON 6ALLEY #OMMU NITY &OUNDATIONS )MMIGRANT )NTE GRATION PROGRAM WHICH PROMOTES UNDERSTANDINGBETWEENIMMIGRANTS AND THEIR RECEIVING COMMUNITIES 4HE INITIATIVE ALSO FUNDS PROGRAMS RELATED TO NEW IMMIGRANTS LEGAL ECONOMICANDEDUCATIONALNEEDS 4HE"AY!REAISAGOLDMINEFOR IMMIGRANT TALES /NE THIRD OF "AY !REA RESIDENTS ARE IMMIGRANTS NEARLYHALFOFTHEWORKFORCEISFOR EIGN BORN AND CLOSE TO TWO THIRDS OF THOSE UNDER THE AGE OF  ARE CHILDREN OF IMMIGRANTS ACCORDING TO THE #OMMUNITY &OUNDATIONS WEBSITE "UTTHERELATIONSHIPBETWEENNEW IMMIGRANTS AND hOLDv IMMIGRANTS ISNT ALWAYS EASY SAID %LLIOT -AR GOLIES THE h-ADE )NTO !MERICAv COORDINATOR h7E HOPE TO ERASE SOME OF THE BORDERSBETWEENTHOSEWHOTHINKOF THEMSELVES AS NON IMMIGRANTS AND

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IMMIGRANTS INSTEAD OF @US VERSUS @THEM7ETHOUGHTTHATBYINVITING FAMILIES THROUGHOUT 3ILICON 6ALLEY TOCELEBRATETHEIROWNPERSONALCON NECTIONS WECOULDDEVELOPABETTER WAY TO VALUE IMMIGRANTS 7HATS GOINGTOMAKETHISPROJECTDIFFERENT ISTHATITEXPANDSTHENOTIONOFWHOS ANIMMIGRANT7EHOPETHATPEOPLE WILLTAPINTOTHATGENEALOGICALSPIRIT 4HERE IS A REALLY COMPELLING STORY ABOUT OUR FAMILIES THAT WE REALLY DONTKNOW vHESAID 4HE WEBSITE MADEINTOAMERICA ORG ALLOWS CONTRIBUTORS TO UPLOAD BRIEF FAMILY STORIES PHOTOGRAPHS ANDVIDEOS3TORIESARESEARCHABLEIN THREECATEGORIESWHEREPEOPLECAME FROM WHERETHEYLANDEDANDTHEERA FROMBEFORETOTHEPRESENT "ART7ESTCOTTOF0ALO!LTOPOSTED A STORY ABOUT HIS ANCESTOR 3TUKELY 7ESTCOTT A FARMER FROM %NGLAND WHOCAMETO!MERICAIN*UNE ANDSETTLEDIN3ALEM -ASS7ESTCOTT WAS BANISHED FROM 3ALEM BECAUSE HEASSOCIATEDWITH2OGER7ILLIAMS AN ADVOCATE FOR SEPARATION OF CIVIL AND RELIGIOUS AUTHORITY (E JOINED 7ILLIAMSTOFOUNDTHE2HODE)SLAND COLONY 6AN!NH4RANOF3TANFORDPOSTED

Courtesy of Ellen Hirschhorn Cohen

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)NGEBORG(IRSCHHORNSPASSPORT ALONGWITHHERSTORYOFIMMIGRATINGTO THE53 ISFEATUREDONTHEWEBSITEh-ADE)NTO!MERICA vWHICHISRUN BYTHE-IDPENINSULA-EDIA#ENTERIN0ALO!LTO THE STORY OF HER FATHER 4HO 4RAN WHICH TRACES HIS ESCAPE FROM A 6IETNAMESE hRE EDUCATIONv CAMP TOHISPASSAGEONABOATTO-ALAY SIA(ELANDEDIN4EXASANDLIVEDIN /HIO EVENTUALLY MOVING TO #ALI FORNIA .EW IMMIGRANTS ALSO TELL THEIR STORIESABOUTLIFEINTHE"AY!REA #HRISTIAN"ACK ASTUDENTWHOIS STUDYING ACCOUNTING AND HOPES TO WORK FOR ONE OF THE "IG &OUR AC COUNTINGFIRMS DISCUSSEDHISEXPE RIENCESASABI RACIALIMMIGRANT)N AVIDEOSEGMENT "ACK WHOISPART 'ERMANANDPART&ILIPINO TELLSHOW HETRIEDTOHIDEBEING!SIANDUETO THEPREJUDICEHEENCOUNTEREDIN'ER MANY(ESTILLBATTLEDPREJUDICEAFTER MOVINGTO3AN*OSEWITHHISFAMILY HESAID(ETRIEDHIDINGHISACCENT AFTERDISCOVERINGBEING'ERMANWAS ADISADVANTAGE "UTINHIGHSCHOOLHEBEGANTOAC

CEPTHIMSELF HESAID h) LEARNED THAT ) WASNT THE ONLY IMMIGRANT)WASNTTHEONLYPERSON WITH AN ACCENT OUT THERE OR THAT ) WASNTTHEONLYMULTICULTURALPERSON OUTTHERE4HATSWHEN)NOTICEDTHAT THIS IS NOT ABOUT THE COLOR OF YOUR SKIN YOUKNOW ORHOWYOUSAYTHE WORDS BUT INSTEAD ITS MORE ABOUT THETYPEOFPERSONTHATYOUARETHAT MATTERS vHESAID -ARGOLIES SAID IMMIGRANTS STO RIESDOCUMENTIMPORTANTERAS h4HERE ARE QUITE A NUMBER OF HISTORICAL MOVEMENTS OR CATASTRO PHESTHATUNDERLIETHESESTORIES vHE ADDED 4HINKING ABOUT HER MOTHERS EX PERIENCE #OHENAGREED h4HOSEKINDSOFSTORIES THEYGET WASHED OUT v SHE SAID ADDING THAT THESITEOFFEREDHERACHANCETOSHED (continued on page 12)


Upfront ,!.$53%

Palo Alto to get community’s input on downtown site #ITYPLANSOUTREACHMEETINGS STAKEHOLDERGROUPTOHELPSETVISIONFOR5NIVERSITY!VE FTER CRASHING INTO A WALL OF COMMUNITY OPPOSITION LAST YEAR 0ALO !LTO OFFICIALS ON -ONDAYFORMALLYHITTHERESTARTBUT TON ON THEIR PLANNED TRANSFORMATION OFAPROMINENTDOWNTOWNSITECOM MONLYKNOWNAS5NIVERSITY!VE .OW ADOPTINGAPROCESSTHATWILL LIKELY LAST MORE THAN A YEAR THE CITYSSTRATEGYISTOCOMEUPWITHA COMMUNITY VISION FOR THE  ACRE SITE BOUNDED BY %L #AMINO 0ARK 5RBAN ,ANE %L #AMINO 2EAL AND !LMA 3TREET 4HE AREAS FUTURE BE CAME A HOT BUTTON ISSUE LAST YEAR WHEN DEVELOPER *OHN !RRILLAGA PROPOSED RELOCATING THE HISTORIC (OSTESS(OUSE CURRENTLYTHEHOME OF-AC!RTHUR0ARKRESTAURANT AND BUILDINGADENSEOFFICECOMPLEXAND APERFORMING ARTSTHEATER 7HILECITYPLANNERSPRAISED!RRIL LAGASPROPOSALASAGREATOPPORTU NITYTOMAKELONG AWAITEDIMPROVE MENTS TO TRAFFIC CIRCULATION AROUND THEPROMINENTBUTLABYRINTHINETRAN SITHUB RESIDENTSBLASTEDITFORBEING FARTOOBIGANDCRITICIZEDTHEPROCESS FORITSLACKOFTRANSPARENCY /N-ONDAYNIGHT THE#ITY#OUNCIL

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SIGNALEDTHATITRECEIVEDTHEMESSAGE WHENITVOTEDAFTERALONGDISCUSSION TO PROCEED WITH hFOCUSED COMMU NITY INPUT v WHICH WILL INCLUDE BE TWEENSIXANDEIGHTPUBLICMEETINGS ANDANEWSTAKEHOLDERGROUPˆAN ABRIDGEDVERSIONOFTHEPROCESSTHAT THECITYUSEDADECADEAGOTODEVELOP ACOMMUNITYVISIONFORTHE3OUTHOF &OREST !VENUE 3/&! NEIGHBOR HOOD!FTERSQUABBLINGOVERTHEDE TAILS COUNCILVOTED  WITH,ARRY +LEINRECUSINGAND0AT"URT +AREN (OLMAN AND 'REG 3CHMID DISSENT ING TOLAUNCHTHEPROCESS 4HOUGH THE VOTE WAS NOT UNANI MOUS ALL COUNCIL MEMBERS AGREED THAT PLANNING FOR  5NIVERSITY NEEDS TO BE SIGNIFICANTLY SLOWED DOWN4HOSEDISSENTINGARGUEDFOR ANEVENMOREINTENSEPROCESSWITH MORE MEETINGS 7ITH ITS VOTE THE COUNCILCOMMITTEDTOHOLDINGMORE MEETINGSTHANTHETWOTOTHREETHAT STAFFHADRECOMMENDEDINAREPORT LASTWEEK!LLONTHECOUNCILAGREED THESTAFFNUMBERWASINSUFFICIENT #ITY -ANAGER *AMES +EENE AC KNOWLEDGED IN HIS INTRODUCTORY COMMENTSTHATTHEPROJECThGOTOFF

ONTHEWRONGFOOTvLASTYEAR WHEN STAFFPROPOSEDBRINGINGTHEOFFICE AND THEATER DEVELOPMENT TO THE PUBLIC FOR A VOTE 4HE INITIAL PRO POSAL CALLED FOR FOUR OFFICE BUILD INGS RANGING FROM  TO  FEET IN HEIGHT ! REVISED PROPOSAL THEN CALLEDFORBUILDINGSBETWEENFEET ANDFEETTALL STILLFARBEYONDTHE CITYS LEGAL HEIGHT LIMIT OF  FEET 5NDER !RRILLAGAS PROPOSAL THE OF FICEBUILDINGSWOULDBEDONATEDTO 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY WHILE THE NEW THEATERWOULDBECOMETHEHOMEOF 4HEATRE7ORKS ANONPROFITCOMPANY THATCURRENTLYSPLITSITSTIMEBETWEEN ,UCIE3TERN#OMMUNITY#ENTERAND THE -OUNTAIN 6IEW #ENTER FOR THE 0ERFORMING!RTS )N$ECEMBER AFTERHEARINGCRITI CISMFROMDOZENSOFMEMBERSOFTHE PUBLIC THECOUNCILDIRECTEDSTAFFTO TAKEASTEPBACKANDCONSIDEROTHER ALTERNATIVES FOR THE SMALL BUT CEN TRALLYLOCATEDSITE2ATHERTHANRETURN WITHDESIGNOPTIONS STAFFPROPOSED A COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROCESS THATWOULDARRIVEATAhMASTERPLANv FORTHESITE SAID!ARON!KNIN AS SISTANTPLANNINGDIRECTOR

City of Palo Alto

by Gennady Sheyner

4HECOMMUNITYWILLWEIGHINONTHEFUTUREOF5NIVERSITY!VE AKEY AREAOFLOCATEDNEARTHEDOWNTOWN#ALTRAINSTATION0ICTUREDHEREARE OFFICEBUILDINGSBYDEVELOPER*OHN!RRILLAGA h7ETHOUGHTTHISWASANIMPORTANT ENOUGHSITETOREALLYTHINKTHROUGH THE DIFFERENT OPTIONS TO REALLY GIVE THECOUNCILOPTIONSFORCOMMUNITY INPUTANDMASTERPLANNING v!KNIN SAIDh7ENEEDTOMAKESURETHATVI SIONDIRECTSDEVELOPMENT7EREALLY NEEDTOBETTERCONNECTTHE3TANFORD AREATOTHEDOWNTOWNAREA%VENIF NOTHINGWASTOBEBUILTONTHISLAND WENEEDTOIMPROVETHETRANSITSTA TION SO THAT IT FACILITATES INCREASED RIDERSHIPINTHEFUTUREv 4HE PROPOSAL HAS GENERATED A SWELL OF COMMUNITY INTEREST AS EVIDENCEDBYMORETHANPEOPLE

,!.$53%

WHO ATTENDED THE -ONDAY HEARING ONTHENEWPROCESS3OMEURGEDTHE COUNCILTOPROCEEDINATRANSPARENT FASHION /THERS PRAISED !RRILLAGAS PROPOSAL AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE FOR 4HEATRE7ORKS A NATIONALLY RECOG NIZED COMPANY !MONG THE LATTER WAS 2OBERT +ELLEY THE COMPANYS ARTISTICDIRECTOR!PERFORMING ARTS THEATER BETWEEN DOWNTOWN 0ALO !LTOAND3TANFORD5NIVERSITYWOULD CREATE A hCULTURAL BRIDGE BETWEEN 3TANFORDANDTHECITY h7EBELIEVETHEARTSOFFERATREMEN (continued on page 13)

Redevelopment Area

East Palo Alto wins award for ‘grassroots’ redevelopment vision 4HECITYSSPECIFICPLANPROMISESNEWHOMES RETAIL OFFICESPACEANDJOBS

Romic

(now closed)

Site for proposed Ravenswood Health Center

Cooley Landing

R Bay

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Catalytica (now closed)

Weeks St

4 Corners project

DKB Homes Rail spur trail

Pulgas Ave

WASNEXT WHATWASTHENEXTSTAGEIN THISDEVELOPMENT WHATSTHENEXTVI SIONOFTHISAREAGOINGTOLOOKLIKE v #HARPENTIERSAID /VER THE COURSE OF NEARLY TWO DOZENPUBLICMEETINGS THECOMMU NITYCREATEDTHREEALTERNATIVESFORTHE AREA HE SAID h7E ANALYZED THEM ANDSAID @7ELL THISONEISGOODFOR JOBS THIS ONE IS GOOD FOR REVENUE THISONESGOODFORRETAIL!NDTHEN THEYMERGEDTHEMALLINTOONEv 4HEENDPRODUCTWASTHESPECIFIC PLAN OFFICIALLY APPROVED LAST 3EP TEMBER !LREADY THECITYANDCOMMUNITY HAVEDONEMUCHOFTHEHEAVY LIFTING THATDEVELOPERSNORMALLYWOULDBE RESPONSIBLE FOR SUCH AS CONSULTING THECOMMUNITYABOUTAPOTENTIALDE VELOPMENT AND PUTTING TOGETHER AN ENVIRONMENTALIMPACTREPORT%)2 ACCORDING TO #OUNCILMAN 2UBEN !BRICA WHO CONVENED THE COM MITTEE THAT GUIDED THE COMMUNITY PROCESS h3OWEHAVEACOMPLETED%)2 THE SPECIFICPLANANDANECONOMICDEVEL OPMENTPLAN)TSBETTER WEHOPE TO BEABLETOATTRACTSOMEDEVELOPERSv -ULTIPLEPRIVATEANDPUBLICPROJ ECTSTHATAREPARTOFTHESPECIFICPLAN ARE ALREADY UNDERWAY INCLUDING A REVAMPING OF "AY 2OAD A MAJOR CITYTHOROUGHFARE

Lili Cao

I

NORTHBYARAILLINE THEEASTBYTHE "AYLANDS AND THE SOUTH BY 7EEKS 3TREET ! CONFLUENCE OF FACTORS ˆ A RE TURNINGHOUSINGMARKET THEEXITOF HEAVYINDUSTRYCOMPANIESANDTHEIR CONTAMINATION ANDCOMMUNITYEN GAGEMENTˆAREMAKINGTHISREGION RIPEFORREDEVELOPMENT 4HOUGHTHEAREAWASLONGATOXIC hDUMPINGGROUNDvFORHEAVY INDUS TRY COMPANIES THEIR EXIT WAS THE CATALYST FOR A MAJOR CHANGE IN THE CITY #HARPENTIERSAID 4WO OF THE COMPANIES 2OMIC AND#ATALYTICA WERELOCATEDON"AY 2OAD AND THEIR PRESENCE PROVED A DISINCENTIVE FOR INVESTMENTS HE SAID "UT SINCE BOTH COMPANIES LEFT #ATALYTICA IN  AND 2OMIC IN  THECITYHASCLEANEDTHEPROP ERTIES TO A DEGREE THAT NOW ALLOWS COMMERCIALDEVELOPMENT #HARPENTIERESTIMATEDTHE ACRE LOTTHATUSEDTOBEOCCUPIEDBY2OMIC COULDBEDEVELOPEDINAFEWYEARS 7ITH LAND BECOMING AVAILABLE CITYOFFICIALSREALIZEDASPECIFICPLAN WASSORELYNEEDED h/NE OF THE THINGS THAT THE CITY WAS GRAPPLING WITH WAS THAT THEY COULD TELL THAT A CHANGE WAS COM ING BUTTHECITYANDTHECOMMUNITY DIDNTHAVEAUNIFIEDVISIONFORWHAT

Demeter St

N THE LAST UNDEVELOPED AREA OF %AST 0ALO !LTO MOST SEE EMPTY FIELDS VACANT LOTS AND LONG UN DERUTILIZED DECREPITINDUSTRIALBUILD INGSˆONEOFWHICHUSEDTOHOUSEA PESTICIDEMANUFACTURERANDANOTHER ACHEMICAL RECYCLINGFACILITY 3EAN #HARPENTIER ECONOMIC DE VELOPMENTCOORDINATORFORTHECITYOF %AST0ALO!LTO SEESSOMETHINGELSE ENTIRELYBRANDNEWTOWNHOMESAND STORESCONNECTEDBYMILESOFTRAILS LINEDWITHTREESANDLIGHTSSTATE OF THE ARTOFFICEBUILDINGSWITHVIEWSOF THE3AN&RANCISCO"AY ANDAPARKAT #OOLEY,ANDINGWITHANINTERACTIVE EDUCATIONALCENTERFORCHILDREN 4HIS VISION IS PART OF A  YEAR LONG REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR THIS AREA OF %AST 0ALO !LTO KNOWN AS THE2AVENSWOOD"USINESS$ISTRICT #ORNERS4RANSIT/RIENTED$EVELOP MENT 3PECIFIC 0LAN 4HE COMMU NITY DRIVEN PROCESS THAT LED TO ITS CREATION ˆ  MEETINGS HELD OVER AYEARANDAHALFINWHICHCITYAND COMMUNITYMEMBERSDISCUSSEDTHEIR VISIONS FOR %AST 0ALO !LTOS FUTURE ˆ WAS RECOGNIZED LAST MONTH BY THE.ORTHERN#ALIFORNIA#HAPTEROF THE!MERICAN0LANNING!SSOCIATION WHICHAWARDEDTHECITYA'RASSROOTS )NITIATIVE!WARDOF-ERIT 4HEENTIREPLANAREAISBOUNDEDAT THEWESTBY5NIVERSITY!VENUE THE

University Ave

by Elena Kadvany

!N%AST0ALO!LTOPLANTOREDEVELOPASECTIONOFITSCITYISAIMEDAT BRINGINGINHOUSING RETAILANDNEWJOBS 4HE CITY PLANS TO IMPROVE "AY FROM )LLINOIS 3TREET TO 4ARA 2OAD SO THAT IT CAN BECOME A WALKABLE DOWNTOWN STREET ˆ A PRIORITY FOR COMMUNITY MEMBERS )T WILL HAVE TREES STREETFURNITURE PLANTEDBULB OUTS LIGHTS ABIKELANEONEACHSIDE ANDWIDERSIDEWALKSWHEREPOSSIBLE !STRETCHOFTHEROAD FROM5NIVER SITY !VENUE TO #LARKE !VENUE HAS ALREADYBEENREDONEWITHTHESEELE MENTS"UILDINGSWITHSHOPSATTHE GROUND LEVEL AND HOMES OR OFFICES

ABOVEAREENVISIONED 4HEOTHERPUBLICPROJECTISAQUARTER MILE LONGRAILSPURTHATRUNSBETWEEN #LARKEAND0ULGASAVENUES4HERAIL LINEWASABANDONED ACQUIREDBYTHE CITYANDWILLBETURNEDINTOATRAIL THE FIRSTTHATRUNSINSIDE%AST0ALO!LTO RATHERTHANALONGCITYBORDERS 4HE TWO PRIVATE PROJECTS INCLUDE THE#ORNERS0ROJECT WHICHWILLRE PLACETHE%AST0ALO!LTOPOSTOFFICE (continued on page 10)

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Upfront #)49#(!24%2

City term limits vary in Bay Area HERECENTPROPOSALTOINCREASE THE TERM LIMIT FOR 0ALO !LTO #ITY #OUNCIL MEMBERS FROM TWO TO THREE CONSECUTIVE TERMS ˆ ORDOAWAYWITHTHERULEENTIRELYˆ WOULDCHANGEAVOTERDECISIONTHAT DATESBACKTO )TS NOT THE ONLY CITY TO CONSIDER SUCHCHANGES THOUGH )N &REMONT WHICHHADHELD ATWO CONSECUTIVE TERMLIMITFORITS COUNCILMEMBERS SINCE  SHOT DOWN A PROPOSAL FROM ONE OF ITS COUNCILMENTOPUTTOAVOTEINCREAS ING THE LIMIT TO THREE TERMS 4HE IDEA WAS PROPOSED BY 6ICE -AYOR "OB 7IECKOWSKI WHO NOW REPRE SENTS THE TH DISTRICT IN THE 3TATE !SSEMBLY 0ROPONENTS OF THE CHANGE IN &REMONT MADE SOME OF THE SAME ARGUMENTS 0ALO !LTO PROPONENTS AREMAKING SAYINGITWOULDALLOW COUNCILMEMBERSTOGAINMOREEX PERIENCE AND INCREASE THEIR INFLU ENCEONREGIONALBOARDS5LTIMATE LY THE&REMONTCOUNCILDECIDEDNOT

T

TO PUT THE PROPOSAL ON THE BALLOT SAYINGTHATATURNOVERINITSRANKS WASHEALTHY ACCORDINGTOAR TICLEBYTHE#ONTRA#OSTA4IMES 4HEREASONINGWASTHESAMETHAT 5NION #ITY FOLLOWED WHEN IT INSTI TUTEDATHREE TERMLIMITONITSCOUN CILMEMBERS IN  TO ENCOURAGE QUALIFIEDCANDIDATESTOSEEKPUBLIC OFFICE 0ALO!LTOISNOTALONEINITSCUR RENT RULES .EARBY CITIES INCLUDING -OUNTAIN 6IEW 3ANTA #LARA AND 3UNNYVALE ALSOLIMITCOUNCILMEM BERSTOTWOCONSECUTIVETERMS 3OME CITIES LIKE -ENLO 0ARK (AYWARD AND .EWARK DO NOT HAVE TERMLIMITS ANDPROPONENTSOFDIS CONTINUING THEM IN 0ALO !LTO SAY THOSECITIESAREATGREATERADVANTAGE TOBUILDCLOUTONREGIONALBOARDS 4HE !SSOCIATION OF "AY !REA 'OVERNMENTS!"!' ISONESUCH ENTITY !"!' IS REGIONAL PLANNING AGENCYCOMPOSEDLARGELYOFREPRE SENTATIVES FROM LOCAL GOVERNMENTS IN THE "AY !REA )T DELIBERATES ON

THE EXAMPLE OF -OUNTAIN 6IEW #ITY#OUNCILMAN-ICHAEL+ASPER (continued from page 3) ZAK WHO TERMED OUT IN  AND LOSTHISPOSITIONASPRESIDENTOFTHE LOW COUNCIL MEMBERS TO BUILD UP ,EAGUE OF #ALIFORNIA #ITIES (E SENIORITYANDOBTAINLEADERSHIPPO LATERRANAGAINFOROFFICEAND AFTER SITIONSONVARIOUSREGIONALBOARDS BEING RE ELECTED TO THE -OUNTAIN INCLUDING ONES PERTAINING TO AIR 6IEWCOUNCIL RECLAIMEDHISPOSI QUALITY WATER UTILITIES TRANSPORTA TIONINTHE,EAGUE TIONANDHOUSINGMANDATES+NISS h#ITIESLIKEOURSTHATHAVETERM SAID-ONDAYTHATITTAKESTIMEFOR LIMITSJUSTNEVERRISETOTHETOPIN LOCAL OFFICIALS TO MAKE AN IMPACT ORDER TO HELP WORK THROUGH SOME ON COUNTY STATE OR FEDERAL LEVELS OFTHEMAJORPOLICYISSUESTHATARE AND TO OBTAIN HIGH POSITIONS ON FACINGCITIESOFOURSIZE v3HEPHERD BOARDS SUCH AS THE -ETROPOLITAN SAID 4RANSPORTATION#OMMISSION WHICH 4HEIRCOLLEAGUESHADSOMECON DOLESOUTGRANTSFORTRANSPORTATION CERNS #OUNCILMAN 'REG 3CHMID PROJECTSTHROUGHOUTTHE"AY!REA WASTHEONLYMEMBERWHOSAIDHE h4HEREAREPOSITIONSATTHELOCAL WOULDOPPOSEEXTENDINGORELIMI STATE AND NATIONAL LEVEL  WHERE NATINGTERMLIMITS)NCUMBENCYIS UNLESSYOURETHEREFORACERTAINPE VALUABLE HEACKNOWLEDGED BUTSO RIODOFTIME YOURENOTGOINGTORISE ISDIVERSITY"RINGINGNEWPEOPLETO TOALEADERSHIPROLETHATYOUMIGHT SERVEINTHEGOVERNMENTISASVALU ASPIRETOORTHATWEHOPEYOUDBE ABLEASTHEKNOWLEDGETHATCOMES ABLETOSERVE v+NISSSAID WITHINCUMBENCY 3HEPHERD CONCURRED AND GAVE h-AYBEITSADVANTAGEOUSWHEN

Term

AND!RTHUR+ELLERAND'REG4ANAKA ABSENT TOSUPPORTTHEZONECHANGE (continued from page 3) 3EVERAL COMMISSIONERS INCLUDING -ICHAEL !LCHECK NOTED THAT THE DISMISSEDASINADEQUATEBUTWHICH PROPERTY WILL BE REDEVELOPED ANY STAFF INSISTS IS ACCURATE INDICATES WAYANDTHATUNDERLYINGZONINGCAN THE PROJECT WOULD GENERATE JUST ALREADY ACCOMMODATE  SINGLE  NEW CAR TRIPS DURING THE PEAK FAMILYHOMES4HETRAFFICFROMSUCH MORNINGHOURANDDURINGTHEAF A DEVELOPMENT COULD BE FAR WORSE TERNOONCOMMUTE*ESSICADE7IT THAN THAT OF A SENIOR FAMILY COM PROJECTMANAGERWITHTHE(OUSING PLEX HESAID #ORPORATION SAID7EDNESDAYTHAT 3OMERESIDENTSHAVEALSOSPOKEN MOST SENIORS AT THESE COMPLEXES OUT IN SUPPORT OF THE PROJECT .INA DONT WORK AND DRIVE ONLY IN OFF (ALETKY RESIDENTOFTHENEARBY!RAS PEAKTIMES TRADERO0ARK!PARTMENTS WROTEINA 4HEPLANNINGCOMMISSION WHICH LETTERTOTHECITYTHATSHEEXPECTSTHE CONSIDERED BOTH SIDES OF THE ARGU -AYBELLPROJECTWOULDBENEFITBOTH MENT AND HEARD FROM DOZENS OF SENIORSANDTHELARGERCOMMUNITY SPEAKERS DURING ITS REVIEW VOTED h)NANAREALIKE0ALO!LTO WHERE   WITH !LEX 0ANELLI DISSENTING WEALTHISABUNDANT THEREISADAN

Maybell

Page 8ÊUÊ՘iÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Veronica Weber

!"!'PRESIDENT VICEPRESIDENTCOME FROMGOVERNMENTSWITHNOTERMLIMITS

+AITLYN.AKAMURA ASWIMMERONTHE0ALO!LTO3TANFORD!QUATICS0!3! SWIMTEAM DOESTHE BREASTSTROKEDURINGTRAININGAT0ALO!LTO(IGH3CHOOLFORTHEUPCOMING3UMMER3ANDERS)NVITATIONAL 3WIM-EETIN2OSEVILLEON*UNE ISSUESSUCHASHOUSINGANDENVIRON MENTALSTANDARDS )TSCURRENTPRESIDENT -ARK,UCE HASBEENONTHE.APA#OUNTY"OARD OF3UPERVISORSSINCEANDHAS SERVEDCONTINUOUSLYSINCE2ECORDS SHOWHESBEENAREPRESENTATIVEIN

@#ITIESLIKEOURSTHAT HAVETERMLIMITSJUST NEVERRISETOTHETOP INORDERTOHELPWORK THROUGHSOMEOFTHE MAJORPOLICYISSUES THATAREFACINGCITIES OFOURSIZE ˆ.ANCY3HEPHERD VICEMAYOR 0ALO!LTO YOUGOTOREGIONALBODIES BUTOUR PRIMEROLEISNTTOREGIONALBODIES BUTTOTHEPEOPLEINTHECITYANDTO REFLECTTHEPEOPLEINTHECITYv #OUNCILMAN -ARC "ERMAN SAID THAT WHILE HE SUPPORTS HAVING THE LANGUAGEDRAFTEDFORFURTHERCONSID ERATION HISMINDISFARFROMMADE UP/PPORTUNITIESFORINCUMBENTSTO STAYINOFFICELONGER "ERMANSAID

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com Do you support the senior-housing project? Share your opinion on Town Square, the online community forum at www.PaloAltoOnline.com.

GEROFEXCLUSIVITYANDTHERISINGCOST OF HOUSING AND GENTRIFICATION HAVE MADE IT DIFFICULT FOR MANY DIFFER ENT TYPES OF PEOPLE TO LIVE HERE v (ALETKYWROTE 4HENEWREPORTBYPLANNINGSTAFF MAKESASIMILARPOINTANDNOTESTHAT hALARGEPERCENTAGEOFSENIORSLIVEAT ORBELOWTHEPOVERTYLINEv h$URINGTHERECENTECONOMICDE CLINE ANUMBEROFSENIORSHAVELOST THEIR RETIREMENT SAVINGS CREATING

!"!' SINCE  AND PRESIDENT SINCETHEBEGINNINGOF !"!'S VICE PRESIDENT *AN 0IERCE IS THE MAYOR OF THE   PERSON#ONTRA#OSTA#OUN TY TOWN OF #LAYTON AND HAS BEEN ON THE TOWN COUNCIL THERE SINCE

 3HE WAS ELECTED AS A DELE GATEINTHEAGENCYONLYFOURYEARS AGO IN"UTPRIORTOTHAT SHE HADBEENANALTERNATEAT!"!'FOR 7ALNUT#REEK-AYOR'WEN2EGA LIAN ˆ%RIC6AN3USTEREN

hINHERENTLYINHIBITNEWPEOPLEFROM GETTINGELECTEDTOTHECOUNCILv h3OMETHING)SUPPORTISDIVERSITY OFALLSORTSˆAGE GENDER ETHNICI TYˆONTHECOUNCIL v"ERMANSAID h3OMETHING LIKE THIS EXTENDING TERMSLIMITS DOESNTHELPv 4HE CONVERSATION ABOUT DEMOC RACY AND REPRESENTATION HAD A TINGE OF IRONY OCCURRING AS IT DID SHORTLY AFTER  PM IN THE SIXTH HOUROFTHECOUNCILSMEETINGAND INFRONTOFANEARLYEMPTY#OUNCIL #HAMBERS"URTAND(OLMANBOTH SAID THAT WHILE THEY ARE OPEN TO DELIBERATING ON THE TOPIC FURTHER THEDISCUSSIONSHOULDBEHELDATA FUTUREDATE h)TWOULDBEAPPROPRIATETOHAVE THISDISCUSSIONWITHTHEPUBLICHAV INGAMPLEOPPORTUNITYTOWEIGHIN ANDPARTICIPATEINIT v"URTSAIDh) THINKTHISISACOMMUNITYDECISION NOTJUSTACOUNCILDECISIONv (OLMANCONCURRED h) DONT THINK ITS THE TIME TO

BRINGITUP v(OLMANSAIDh4HERES NOONEHEREv 4HEIR PROPOSAL TO CONTINUE THE DISCUSSIONINTHEEARLYFALLDIEDBY A VOTE WITHONLY3CHMIDJOIN INGTHEM #ITY!TTORNEY-OLLY3TUMPSAID THAT THE EARLIEST DATE THAT A CHAR TERCHANGECOULDBEBROUGHTTOTHE VOTERSUNDERSTATELAWWOULDBEIN *UNE 0ALO !LTO VOTERS INITIALLY AP PROVED LIMITING COUNCIL MEMBERS TOTWOFOUR YEARTERMSIN 4HE COUNCIL -ONDAY WAS ALSO SCHEDULED TO CONSIDER PROPOSALS TO REDUCE THE SIZE OF THE COUNCIL FROM NINE TO SEVEN MEMBERS AND TOHAVEANEARLIERSWEARING INDATE FORNEWLYELECTEDMEMBERSEARLIER "UTRECOGNIZINGTHELATENESSOFTHE HOUR THECOUNCILDECIDEDTODISCUSS THESECHANGESATALATERDATEN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

EVEN A GREATER NUMBER OF SENIORS ON A LIMITED INCOME v THE REPORT STATES 7HILESTAFFISRECOMMENDINGAP PROVALOFTHENEWDEVELOPMENT ITIS ALSOACKNOWLEDGINGINITSREPORTTHAT THEAREAAROUND-AYBELLAND#LEMO NEEDSTOBEMADESAFERFORPEDESTRI ANSANDBICYCLISTS4HEREPORTSTATES THAT TRAFFIC ISSUES ON -AYBELL CUR RENTLYEXISTANDTHATSTAFFHADBEEN EXPLORINGSAFETYIMPROVEMENTSEVEN BEFORE THE (OUSING #ORPORATION FILEDITSAPPLICATION 0OSSIBLE CHANGES INCLUDE GIVING -AYBELL!VENUEAhBIKEBOULEVARDv FEEL WITH GREEN PAVEMENT MARK INGS TO INDICATE WHERE A BIKE LANE BECOMES A hSHARED BIKEWAYv RE STRICTINGPARKINGONONESIDEOFTHE

STREETANDTRAFFIC CALMINGFEATURES SUCH AS ENHANCED CROSSWALKS AND BULBOUTS AT VARIOUS INTERSECTIONS 4HE4RANSPORTATION$IVISIONHASAL READY HIRED A CONSULTANT TO REVIEW AND WORK WITH THE COMMUNITY ON THESE POTENTIAL IMPROVEMENTS AC CORDINGTOTHEREPORT h!SIDEFROMTHE-AYBELL!VENUE IMPROVEMENTS REQUIRED BY THE DE VELOPERASCONDITIONOFAPPROVAL THE CITYHASACKNOWLEDGED WELLINAD VANCEOFTHISPROJECT ISSUESOFTRAF FICANDSCHOOLSAFETYINTHEIMME DIATE AREA AND IS INITIATING ITS OWN IMPROVEMENTS ON -AYBELL !VENUE ANDNEARBY vTHEREPORTSTATESN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM


Upfront

Fresh Market

185

(continued from page 3)

New Chef... New Menu... Katie Brigham

PACKAGEDINTHESTORE4HEREWASAN OLD FASHIONEDCANDYAISLE A FOOT LONG FREEZER OF FRESHLY GROUND AND CUT MEATS A BULK DEPARTMENT OF NUTS SEEDS DRIEDFRUITSANDGRIND YOUR OWNNUTTERBUTTER AWINEAND BARSECTIONANDMORE -ANY ALSO CAME IN TIME FOR THE MARKETS TRADITIONAL CHEESE CRACK ING CEREMONY IN WHICH THE STORES CHEESE VENDOR CRACKED A  POUND WHEEL OF 2EGGIANO 0ARMIGIANO CHEESETOCELEBRATEOPENINGINSTEAD OFARIBBON CUTTING 4HEND&RESH-ARKETHASHIRED NEWEMPLOYEES MANYOFTHEMSTA TIONEDATTHESAMPLEBOOTHSSCATTERED THROUGHOUT THE   SQUARE FOOT STOREON7EDNESDAY GIVINGCUSTOM ERSCOMPLETEINFORMATIONABOUTSAM PLESOFSTEAK CHUTNEYANDMORE $REWRY 3ACKETT MANAGER OF 02 ANDCOMMUNITYRELATIONSFOR&RESH -ARKET SAIDTHISISTHETYPEOFSTORE WHERE IF A CUSTOMER IS HESITANT ABOUTBUYINGACERTAINBAGOFCHIPS THESTAFFWILLPOPOPENASAMPLEBAG JUSTFORTHEM h)TS A LITTLE BIT DIFFERENT THAN A TRADITIONAL SUPERMARKET v SHE SAID h)TSALITTLEBITMOREOFANINTIMATE SETTING  AN OLD WORLD %UROPEAN FEEL7ETRYTOREALLYSERVEASATRUE NEIGHBORHOODMARKETv 3ACKETTSAIDTHESTOREHOSTSMULTI PLESPECIALS SUCHAShFOODIE&RIDAYv ANDhBUY ONE GET ONE4UESDAY vTHAT CUSTOMERSCANDISCOVERTHROUGHTHE STORESEMAILNEWSLETTERS !LISSA0ICKER WHOGREWUPDOWN THE STREET HAS ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT HERNEIGHBORHOODLACKEDAGROCERY STORE h7EVE WAITED A LONG TIME FOR THIS v 0ICKER SAID h)T EXCEEDS MY EXPECTATIONS)TSVISUALLYLOVELYAND ITHASAVARIETYTHATWILLSUITEVERY ONEANDAFRIENDLYSTAFFANDPLENTY OFPARKINGv 3HECAMETOTHEOPENINGWITHHER

!EMPLOYEEAT4HE&RESH-ARKETARRANGESCHEESESAMPLESDURINGTHE STORESGRANDOPENINGIN0ALO!LTO*UNE TWO LONGTIME BEST FRIENDS ONE OF WHOMHASBEENRANTINGANDRAVING ABOUTTHE&RESH-ARKETSHEUSEDTO SHOPATINTHE3OUTH h) HAVE KNOWN ABOUT THIS STORE COMING FOR A LONG TIME AND ) WAS SUPER SUPER EXCITED TO INTRODUCE MYFRIENDSTO&RESH-ARKET v!MY (SIEHSAID&ORHER THEBESTPARTIS THE CUSTOMER SERVICE EMPLOYEES GREETPEOPLEBYNAME h4HEYWANTTOCOMEINTOANEIGH BORHOODANDTHEYWANTTOBEAPART OFTHECOMMUNITY v(SIEHSAID *EFF'ORDON REGIONALDIRECTOROF OPERATIONS FOR &RESH -ARKET HAS OPENED  STORES IN  YEARS AND SAIDTHATHESFOUNDTHATTHISTYPEOF ENTHUSIASMISCOMMON#USTOMERS AREDRAWNTO&RESH-ARKETBECAUSE OF THE ATMOSPHERE AND ATTENTION TO DETAILANDSERVICE HESAID h7E WANT CUSTOMERS TO HAVE A SHOPPINGEXPERIENCEHEREASIFTHEY WERE A GUEST IN A HOME v HE SAID h7EREREALLYINTHEPEOPLEBUSINESS 7EJUSTHAPPENTOSELLGOODFOODv #USTOMER #ECILY #OETSEE SAID SHE LIKES THE STORES SELECTION AT MOSPHERE AND MORE BUT HAS ONE QUALM h)DONTAPPRECIATETHEPRICES4HE

PRICESAREALLMUCHTOOEXPENSIVE v SHESAID 'IVEN THAT COMPLAINT #OETSEE STILLADMITTEDTHATHERSHOPPINGBAG WOULDENDUPFILLEDWITHFOOD /THERCUSTOMERS INCLUDING3NOW 0ICKER AND (SIEH SAID &RESH -AR KETSPRICESARECOMPARABLETOOTHER GROCERYSTORES !S PART OF THE CELEBRATION 7EDNESDAYMORNING CUSTOM ERS RECEIVED A SAMPLE SIZED BAG OF THEMARKETSHOUSEBLENDCOFFEEAND  RECEIVEDAFREE REUSABLESHOP PINGBAG3ACKETTALSOSAIDTHATCUS TOMERSWHOSIGNUPFORTHEMARKETS NEWSLETTERWILLBEINTHERUNNINGFOR AGIFTCARD 4HE .ORTH #AROLINA BASED CHAIN HASONEOTHER#ALIFORNIALOCATIONIN 2OSEVILLEANDWILLBEOPENINGTWO MORE STORES IN 3ACRAMENTO AS WELL AS ONES IN 3ANTA "ARBARA ,AGUNA (ILLS 9ORBA,INDAAND%LK'ROVE &RESH -ARKET IS LOCATED AT  7EST "AYSHORE 2OAD 0ALO !LTO (OURS ARE -ONDAY THROUGH 3ATUR DAY AMTOPM AND3UNDAYS AMTOPMN %DITORIAL)NTERN+ARISHMA-EH ROTRA CAN BE EMAILED AT KMEH ROTRA PAWEEKLYCOM

“Rich and soulful...the explosion of flavors just went on and on and on...” Michael Bauer, SF Chronicle, about Chef Holt’s famous Braised Chicken Arrabbiata dish

Now open for weekend BRUNCH! Saturday & Sunday 10:30am - 2:30pm Open for Lunch and Dinner, Wednesday - Sunday

185 University Ave, Palo Alto Reservations: (650) 614-1177 www.campo185.com

dcBV^cHigZZi

BVg\Vg^iV7Vg ^cAdh6aidh ™EgZb^jb&%%6\VkZIZfj^aVh ™;gZh]HfjZZoZY?j^XZh ™Dg\Vc^X6\VkZCZXiVg ™;gZh]EjgZZY;gj^ih &+(BV^cHigZZi!Adh6aidh IZa/+*%"**."I68D-''+ lll#ajajhbZm^XVc[ddY#Xdb ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ՘iÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 9


Upfront

Plan

(continued from page 7)

Katie Brigham

ONTHECORNEROF5NIVERSITYAND"AY WITHCONDOMINIUMSOVER  SQUARE FEET OF RETAIL AND THE $+" 0ROJECT WHICHPLANSTOWNHOMES AND SQUAREFEETOFFLEXOF FICE OR LIGHT INDUSTRIAL AND INDUS TRIALSPACEAT0ULGASAND"AY h)NTERMSOFTHEPRIVATEPROJECTS THE  #ORNERS AREA OFFERS QUITE A FEW ADVANTAGES v #HARPENTIER SAID SPEAKING HOPEFULLY ABOUT DRAWING DEVELOPERSANDCAPITALh/NEOFTHEM ISTHATITHASABOUTACRESOFVACANT LANDWITHINTHREEMILESOF3TANFORD WITHIN ONE MILE OF &ACEBOOK ONE MILEOFTHE&OUR3EASONSAND5NIVER SITY#IRCLEOFFICECOMPLEX ANDTHERE JUSTISNTTHATKINDOFLANDAVAILABLE ALONGTHE"AYCLOSETO3TANFORD)TSA REALADVANTAGEFORTHISAREAv )NFRASTRUCTURALCHALLENGES SUCHAS EXCEEDINGTHECITYSANNUALWATERAL LOCATION HAVEDELAYEDTHE#ORNERS PROJECT BUT #HARPENTIER SAID THAT HOPEFULLYITWILLMOVEFORWARDANDBE FINISHEDINTHENEXTCOUPLEOFYEARS 4HE OTHER POTENTIAL ISSUES WHEN IT COMES TO INFRASTRUCTUREARESTORM DRAINS SANITARYSEWERSANDROADWAYS #HARPENTIERSAID!CCORDINGTOACITY BRIEFING PACKET INFRASTRUCTURAL IM PROVEMENTSINTHEAREANOTINCLUDING THECOSTOFADDITIONALWATER WILLRE QUIREAMILLIONINVESTMENT3OME UPGRADES WILL BE MADE THROUGH THE "AY 2OAD PROJECT AND STORM DRAIN PROJECTS ARE CURRENTLY BEING IMPLE MENTED(ESAIDTHECITYISPURSUING

4HESITEOF#ATALYTICA ANABANDONEDCHEMICALPLANTON"AY2OADIN %AST0ALO!LTO ISSLATEDFORREDEVELOPMENT APROGRAMTHATWILLCHARGEDEVELOPERS FORASHAREOFINFRASTRUCTURECOSTSSO DEVELOPERSWILLKNOWUPFRONTWHATIS EXPECTEDOFTHEM -ARK ,AZZARINI MANAGING PRIN CIPALOF$!,0ROPERTIES,,#IN3AN *OSE IS HEADING THE $+" PROJECT ANDSAIDTHATCONSTRUCTIONWILLBEGIN SOMETIMENEXTYEAR !NOTHERMAJORPROJECTISTHE2AVEN SWOOD(EALTH#ENTER WHICHISMOVING FROMPORTABLESON"AY2OADTOATWO STORY   SQUARE FOOT BUILDING ACROSSTHESTREETSOTHATITCANDOUBLE THENUMBEROFPATIENTSITSERVES HOST MEDICALRESIDENTSFROM3TANFORD5NI VERSITYANDOTHERSCHOOLS OFFERMORE SERVICESANDHIREMORESTAFF ,UISA "UADA THE #%/ OF THE

HEALTH CENTER SAID FUNDRAISING IS RUNNING ABOUT  MILLION SHORT OFTHEGOAL BUTTHEGROUPPLANSFOR THEBUILDINGTOBEUPANDRUNNINGIN !PRIL /NEOFTHENEWHEALTHCENTERSPO TENTIALNEIGHBORSCOULDBETHE2AVEN SWOOD #ITY 3CHOOL $ISTRICT WHICH HAS BEEN IN TALKS WITH #UPERTINO BASED4HE3OBRATO/RGANIZATIONTO SELL PROPERTIES ON %UCLID !VENUE $ONOHOE3TREETAND"AY2OAD 4IM 3TEELE SENIOR DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENTFOR4HE3OBRATO/RGA NIZATION SAIDALETTEROFINTENTTHAT hOUTLINESSOMEPRINCIPLESOFEXPLOR INGADEALSTRUCTUREvWITHTHESCHOOL DISTRICTHASBEENWRITTEN h"UT WE DONT HAVE A CONSUM

Led by acclaimed Buddhist master Segyu Rinpoche, this meditation intensive

Matched CareGivers

instruction on how to meditate and

This will be a great opportunity to develop or deepen your meditation practice, and connect with the community. Both

For more information and to register please visit www.juniperpath.org or call 650-299-9333.

Juniper | buddhist training for modern life

“There’s no place like home.�

When you, or someone you care about, needs assistance... you can count on us to be there. We provide Peninsula families with top, professional caregivers. Call now

(650) 839-2273 www.matchedcaregivers.com

Page 10ĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â˜iÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session to discuss negotiations with the Palo Alto Police Managers Association. Council members also plan to consider a new public-private parking garage on High Street; consider a “planned community� zone to enable 60 apartments for low-income seniors and 15 homes at 567 Maybell Ave. and conclude its adoption of the fiscal year 2014 budget. The closed session will begin at 4 p.m. on Monday, June 10, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will hold a public hearing on, and a discussion of, a proposed 2013-14 budget for the Palo Alto Unified School District. The board also will discuss an update on high-school guidance counseling, a contract for school nutrition services for 2013-14 and an extension of the lease of Garland School. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, June 11, in the boardroom of school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). It follows a 4:30 p.m. closed session at which the board will discuss labor and real-property negotiations as well as anticipated litigation.

respond to questions about your practice.

Cost $125 (including lunch).

COURTDEPOSITION THEBANKSDIRECTOR OFQUALITYASSURANCE 0ATRICIA,EN DIO SAID 3TANFORD HAD NOT AUDITED ITSPHLEBOTOMISTSSINCE"LOOD BANKS CONDUCT PERIODIC AUDITS OF PERSONNELTOENSUREPROCEDURESARE DONECORRECTLY 4HE #ODE OF &EDERAL 2EGULATIONS REQUIRESPERIODICAUDITSBUTNOTSPE CIFICALLYFORSTERILIZINGARMS SHESAID 7ITHIN TWO MONTHS OF "UIS RE PORTEDPROBLEMS THEBLOODBANKIN STITUTEDMORESTRINGENTAUDITSOFITS ARM SCRUBSTERILIZATIONPROCEDURES 4HEAUDITSARENOWDONEONAYEARLY BASIS SHESAID !SSISTANT-EDICAL$IRECTOR#HRIS TOPHER'ONZALEZSAIDINADEPOSITION THAT HE VERBALLY PROMISED "UI THE BLOOD BANK WOULD PAY FOR MEDICAL COSTS ARISING FROM DONATION COM PLICATIONS IF "UI WOULD CONTINUE TO DONATEBLOOD"UISBLOODISUNCOM MONBECAUSEITDOESNOTCONTAINAVI RUSFOUNDINMORETHANPERCENTOF DONORS3TANFORDHASACTIVELYSOUGHT SUCHBLOOD WHICHISVALUEDFORPA TIENTS WITH COMPROMISED IMMUNE SYSTEMS ACCORDINGTOCOURTPAPERS "UI DOES NOT HAVE HEALTH INSUR ANCE "EFORE THE  INCIDENT HE HAD TWO PRIOR COMPLICATIONS OF AN UNSPECIFIED NATURE AT THE BLOOD BANKINAND ACCORDING TOCOURTDOCUMENTSN 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

CITY COUNCIL POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to consider whether to proceed with a needs-assessment study for Cubberley Community Center. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 11, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

in short sessions. Rinpoche will provide

are welcome.

(continued from page 6)

A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week

will focus on concentration meditation

beginners and experienced meditators

Blood bank

Public Agenda

One Day Meditation Intensive June 29, 2013, 9:00AM to 4:00PM Quadrus Conference Center, Menlo Park, CA

MATEDDEAL NO vHESAID 4HE ONLY 3OBRATO DEVELOPMENT PROJECTCURRENTLYMOVINGFORWARDIN %AST0ALO!LTOIS5NIVERSITY0LAZA TWO BUILDINGS WITH A PLAZA IN BE TWEEN 4HE LARGER   SQUARE FOOT FOUR STORYBUILDINGWILLBEBUILT ATTHECORNEROF5NIVERSITY!VENUE AND $ONOHOE 3TREET AND A SMALLER  SQUARE FOOT THREE STORYONE AT #OOLEY !VENUE AND $ONOHOE "OTHAREDESIGNATEDFOROFFICESPACE AND WILL HAVE TWO LEVELS OF UNDER GROUNDPARKING3TEELESAIDHISOR GANIZATIONISCURRENTLYLOOKINGFORA TENANTTOOCCUPYTHEBUILDINGS *UST DOWN THE STREET FROM THE PLANNED HEALTH CENTER AND POSSIBLE SCHOOL DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS IS AN EMPTYLOT FULLOFDRYWEEDS ABAN DONEDTRAINCARSANDNOTMUCHELSE "UTBECAUSEOFITSSTRIKINGVIEWSOF THE "AY ˆ ONE OF THE AREAS MAIN SELLINGPOINTSFORDEVELOPERSˆTHE CITY HOPES IT WILL BECOME A hCOREv EMPLOYMENT ZONE WITH ENOUGH OF FICEBUILDINGSTOHELPMEETTHESPE CIFICPLANSGOALOFAPERCENTIN CREASEINJOBS4HECITYALSOPLANSTO BUILDTRAILSTHATCONNECTTOTHE"AY 4RAIL ALLOWINGPEOPLETOBIKETOAND FROMWORKFROM-ENLO0ARK -OUN TAIN6IEWORANYWHEREINBETWEEN h2IGHTNOWITSJUSTWEEDS BUTv SAID #ARLOS -ARTINEZ THE CITYS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIVISION MANAGER SURVEYINGTHELOTONARE CENTAFTERNOONh)THASGREATPOTEN TIALvN %DITORIAL !SSISTANT %LENA +AD VANYCANBEEMAILEDATEKADVANY PAWEEKLYCOM

PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to hold a study session with the officials from Office of the City Attorney and discuss the 2005 Mayfield Development Agreement. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, June 12, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). CITY COUNCIL RETREAT ... The council will consider adopting core values and discuss action items for 2013 council priorities. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Thursday, June 13, at Lucie Stern Community Center (1305 Middlefield Road). HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION ... The commission will hear a presentation from the Palo Alto Housing Corporation as part of its affordable-housing learning series; and respond to direction from the council Policy and Services Committee about use of funds from the Stanford University Medical Center development agreement. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 13, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).


Upfront

News Digest Woman assaulted while jogging in Baylands

Veronica Weber

Palo Alto Police Department

!WOMANINHERSWASASSAULTEDASSHE JOGGEDALONGTHE"AY4RAIL3UNDAY *UNE WHENAMANJUMPEDONHERBACKANDGROPED HER SEXUALLY OVER HER CLOTHING BEFORE SHE WASABLETOPUSHHIMAWAY POLICESAID 0OLICEWERECALLEDTOTHESECTIONOFTHE "AY4RAILBETWEENTHEBRIDGEINTO%AST0ALO !LTOANDTHE"AYLANDS!THLETIC#ENTERON 'ENG2OADATAM 4WOBICYCLISTSAPPROACHEDTHEWOMANAS SHESTRUGGLEDWITHHERATTACKER CAUSINGTHE MANTOFLEEOVERTHEBRIDGEINTO%AST0ALO !LTO THE WOMAN SAID 4HE BICYCLISTS LEFT THESCENEAFTERCHECKINGONTHEWOMAN AC CORDINGTOASTATEMENTFROMTHE0ALO!LTO0OLICE$EPARTMENT 0OLICEWEREUNABLETOLOCATETHEMANANDSAIDTHEYAREHOPINGTOSPEAK TOTHEBICYCLISTSWHOWITNESSEDTHEATTACK 4HEWOMANESTIMATEDTHEATTACKERTOBEABOUTFEETINCHESTALLAND POUNDS3HESAIDHEWAS(ISPANICORBLACKBIRACIALAROUNDYEARS OLD HADBLACK CLOSELYCROPPEDHAIRANDWASCLEAN SHAVEN(EWASWEAR INGLONGBLUESHORTS APLAINWHITE4 SHIRT WHITETENNISSHOESANDHAD CLEAR COLOREDSTUDDEDEARRINGSINBOTHEARS POLICESAID 0OLICESAIDTHEYAREINCREASINGPATROLSINTHEAREA WORKINGWITHPARKRANG ERSFROMTHE#ITYOF0ALO!LTOS/PEN3PACE 0ARKS AND'OLF$IVISIONN ˆ!UDRA3ORMAN

&ROMLEFT !DITYAFOREGROUND *USTIN (ARRYAND4ONYREACTAS"ARBARA3HAPIROOFTHENONPROFIT %NVIRONMENTAL6OLUNTEERSUNVEILSAFISHHEADTOTEACHTHEMABOUTBIOLOGYDURINGTHE*UNIOR.ATURALIST 0ROGRAMATTHE%CO#ENTERIN0ALO!LTO

Council challenges salary bumps in 2014 budget )NCONSIDERING0ALO!LTO#ITY-ANAGER*AMES+EENESPROPOSEDBUDGET FORFISCALYEAR WHICHBEGINS*ULY THE#ITY#OUNCILVOTED  WITH MEMBERS'AIL0RICEAND'REG3CHMIDDISSENTING TOWITHOLDANALLOTMENT FORSTAFFRAISES 4HE BUDGET RECOMMENDS ALLOCATING ENOUGH FUNDS FOR A POTENTIAL  PERCENTRAISEFORTHECITYSNON PUBLIC SAFETYEMPLOYEES EVENTHOUGHTHIS COMPENSATIONINCREASEHASYETTOBENEGOTIATEDWITHTHELABORUNIONS4HIS DIDNTSITWELLWITH#OUNCILMAN,ARRY+LEINAND-AYOR'REG3CHARFF WHOCHARACTERIZEDTHEBUDGETINCREASEASPOORNEGOTIATING +LEINSAIDHEWASCONCERNEDABOUTTHEhPSYCHOLOGICALvIMPACTOFIN CLUDINGTHEFUNDSINTHEBUDGET4HERAISESWOULDAPPLYTOTHECITYSLARG ESTLABORGROUP THEMORETHANWORKERSREPRESENTEDBYTHE3ERVICE %MPLOYEES)NTERNATIONAL5NION ,OCAL ANDTOTHEROUGHLYNON UNIONIZEDWORKERSINTHEhMANAGERSANDPROFESSIONALSvGROUP4HECITYIS PREPARINGTOENTERINTONEGOTIATIONSWITHTHE3%)5ONANEWCONTRACT +EENESAIDTHEINCLUSIONOFTHECOMPENSATIONADJUSTMENTISAWAYOF INDICATINGTHATTHECITYSFINANCIALOUTLOOKHASIMPROVED h)TWOULDBEDISINGENUOUSFORUSTOACTLIKETHERESNOTHINGAVAILABLE v +EENESAID 3CHARFFCALLEDTHEINCLUSIONOFTHERAISEAhHORRIBLENEGOTIATIONSTRAT EGYvANDSAIDITMAKEShABSOLUTELYNOSENSEvTOINCLUDEITINTHEPROPOSED BUDGET WHICHTHECOUNCILISSETTOFORMALLYADOPTON*UNE h7EHAVETOGONEGOTIATEWITH3%)5 v3CHARFFSAIDh4OSAY@7EWANT TOSTARTWITHPERCENT)TMIGHTBEZERO ITMIGHTBE ITMIGHTBE)TS ALLABOUTWHATTHEPACKAGEIS h)MSURETHEREISAGROUPOFTHINGSTHEY3%)5MEMBERS WANT AND THEYLLTELLUS ANDWELLBARGAINv #OUNCILMAN0AT"URT WHOCHAIRSTHECOUNCILS&INANCE#OMMITTEE CHALLENGED3CHARFFSCHARACTERIZATIONOF+EENESRECOMMENDATION4HE DEBATE HESAID ISALEGITIMATEONEWITHGOODPOINTSONBOTHSIDES5LTI MATELY HEAGREEDTHATITWOULDMAKESENSETOTAKETHEFUNDSFROMSALARY INCREASESANDPUTTHEMINTOARESERVEFORTHETIMEBEINGN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

McDonald house expansion clears final hurdle 4HE2ONALD-C$ONALD(OUSE WHICHOFFERSSHELTERTOFAMILIESOFCHIL DRENWITHLIFE THREATENINGILLNESSES WILLROUGHLYDOUBLEINSIZEANDADD ROOMSUNDERANEXPANSIONPLANTHE0ALO!LTO#ITY#OUNCILENTHUSIASTI CALLYAPPROVED-ONDAYNIGHT )NAUNANIMOUSVOTE THECOUNCILGREEN LIGHTEDAPROPOSALBY2ONALD -C$ONALD(OUSETOBUILDATHREE STORYADDITIONDIRECTLYNEXTTOITSEXIST INGFACILITYNEAR3AND(ILL2OADAND%L#AMINO2EAL4HECURRENTCOMPLEX HASROOMSANDHASSEENASURGEINDEMANDINRECENTYEARSˆDEMAND THATISEXPECTEDTOCLIMBEVENFURTHERBECAUSEOFTHEPENDINGEXPANSION OFTHE,UCILE0ACKARD#HILDRENS(OSPITAL7ITHSPACELIMITED THE(OUSE HASBEENFORCEDTOTURNAWAYBETWEENANDFAMILIESADAY 4HE COUNCIL HAD NOTHING BUT PRAISE FOR THE ORGANIZATION AND FOR ITS PROPOSEDEXPANSION WITH#OUNCILMAN-ARC"ERMANCALLINGTHEFACILITY AhGEMINTHECROWNOFTHECITYvAND#OUNCILMAN,ARRY+LEINCALLINGITS EXPANSIONAhGREATPROJECTv h/NLYTHE'RINCHWOULDVOTEAGAINSTTHISTONIGHT v#OUNCILWOMAN,IZ +NISSSAID 7ORKONTHE  SQUARE FOOTADDITIONISEXPECTEDTOBEGINNEXTYEARN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ՘iÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 11


Upfront

Media Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs Cranio Sacral Therapy Cupping, Ear Seeds, Tuina

SPECIALIZING IN:

Yaping Chen, L.Ac.

Sports Injuries Chronic Pain Stress and Mood Swings Insomia and Fatigue Depression and Anxiety Weight Management Menopause Symptoms

Call Today for Appointment 650.853.8889

INFO ACUPUNCTUREOFPALOALTOCOMsACUPUNCTUREOFPALOALTOCOM

Insurance Accepted

Support Palo Alto Weekly’s coverage of our community. Memberships begin at only 17¢ per day Join today: SupportLocalJournalism.org

Classes to help you and your baby

(continued from page 6)

LIGHTONTHECONSEQUENCESOFHUMAN BEHAVIOR THAT GREATLY CHANGED HER MOTHERSLIFE 2EADINGANDHEARINGIMMIGRANT STORIESCANCREATEASTRONGERSENSE OFUNDERSTANDING SHESAID h4HESEAREREALPEOPLE-AYBEIF WE LOOK AT THE COLLECTIVE OF IMMI GRANTS ON A PERSONAL LEVEL WE CAN HAVEMOREEMPATHY)TSACHALLENG INGTHING)TSGOODTOTRYTOREMEM BER vSHESAID

h7HEN YOU KNOW MORE ABOUT A PERSON IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THEY BECOMEMORETHANTHENEIGHBORYOU SEETAKEOUTTHETRASHBIN4HEYBE COMEMORETHANTHENEIGHBORWHO POSTS ON THE EMAIL LIST )F WIDELY USED THEWEBSITE COULDDEFINITELY DRIVE A FEELING OF GREATER COMMU NITY vSHESAID 4HE-EDIA#ENTERPLANSTODEVELOP ANINTERGENERATIONALINTERVIEWPROJ ECTINTHESCHOOLS -ARGOLIESSAID)N 3EPTEMBER THE CENTER WILL HOLD AN IMMIGRATIONSTORYTELLINGEVENTN 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Peninsula College Fund names 2013 honorees &IFTEENLOCALHIGH SCHOOLGRADUATESWILLBEHONORED*UNEBYTHE 0ENINSULA #OLLEGE &UND A NONPROFIT AIMED AT HELPING LOW INCOME FIRST GENERATIONCOLLEGESTUDENTSACHIEVEEDUCATIONALANDCAREERGOALS (Posted June 6, 9:49 a.m.)

Obama visits Palo Alto for fundraising 0RESIDENT"ARACK/BAMAISSCHEDULEDTOVISITTWO0ALO!LTOHOMES ON 4HURSDAY *UNE  TO RAISE FUNDS FOR THE $EMOCRATIC 3ENATORIAL #AMPAIGN#OMMITTEE(Posted June 6, 9:01 a.m.)

Prenatal Pilates

     

Our prenatal exercise class is appropriate for women at any stage of pregnancy. The fifty minute class will focus on exercises to improve postural support, strengthen the arms to prepare for carrying an infant and discuss proper body mechanics and other topics related to remaining active during pregnancy. Some classes will include resistive bands and large birthing balls as well. Comfort Techniques for Labor

       

For couples who have already completed Childbirth Prep, this class provides additional tools and practice for relaxation, breathing and comfort measures for labor. Bringing Baby Home

      

A two-part workshop for expectant couples and new parents in their first postpartum trimester. This program, designed by Drs. John and Julie Schwartz Gottman, enhances the postpartum couple relationship and develops the new relationship between parents and baby. Grandparents Seminar

   

Designed for new and expectant grandparents, this class presents the latest trends in obstetrics and pediatrics, including new ideas for infant care, as well as the important role for grandparents in the life of a grandchild. Call (650) 724-4601 or visit calendar.lpch.org to register or obtain more information on the times, locations and fees for these and other courses.

Palo Alto police tech guru tapped for state board 0ALO!LTO0OLICE$EPARTMENTSLEADINGTECHNOLOGYEXPERTHASBEEN TAPPEDBY'OV*ERRY"ROWNTOSERVEONANADVISORYBOARDCHARGED WITHIMPROVING#ALIFORNIASEMERGENCYCOMMUNICATIONS#HARLES#UL LEN WHOHASBEENSERVINGASTHE0OLICE$EPARTMENTSTECHNICALSER VICESDIRECTORSINCE WILLJOINNINEOTHERPUBLIC SAFETYEXPERTSON THE#ALIFORNIA3TATE  !DVISORY"OARD(Posted June 5, 2:53 p.m.)

Two birds with West Nile found in San Mateo 4WODEADBIRDSFOUNDIN3AN-ATEOHAVETESTEDPOSITIVEFOR7EST .ILEVIRUS THE3AN-ATEO#OUNTY-OSQUITOAND6ECTOR#ONTROL$IS TRICTANNOUNCEDTODAY(Posted June 5, 9:22 a.m.)

Palo Alto man in wheelchair struck in hit and run !MANINAWHEELCHAIRWASSTRUCKBYACARINAHITANDRUNON5NIVER SITY!VENUE3ATURDAYMORNING4HESUSPECTISSTILLATLARGE ACCORDING TOPOLICE(Posted June 5, 9:12 a.m.)

County hepatitis case linked to berries from Costco ! YEAR OLD3ANTA#LARA#OUNTYWOMANISTHEFIRSTCONFIRMEDCASE OF(EPATITIS!LINKEDTOAMULTIPLE STATEOUTBREAKLINKEDTOFROZENBER RIESSOLDAT#OSTCOSTORES OFFICIALSFROMTHE3ANTA#LARA#OUNTY0UBLIC (EALTH$EPARTMENTANNOUNCEDTODAY(Posted June 4, 2:47 p.m.)

Program introduces kids to the Baylands 4HESECONDINSTALLMENTOFTHE%CO#ENTERS*UNIOR.ATURALISTPROGRAM TOOKOFFTHISMONTH ALLOWINGKIDSINTHIRDTHROUGHFIFTHGRADETOWATCH BIRDSANDLEARNABOUTFISHANDTHEHISTORYOFTHE"AYLANDS(Posted June 3, 4:17 p.m.)

Man charged in string of 8 Los Altos robberies ! YEAR OLDMANHASBEENCHARGEDINASTRINGOFEIGHTROBBERIES IN,OS!LTOSSINCE&EBRUARY INCLUDINGFOURBANKS ALIQUORSTORE GAS STATIONANDPIZZERIA ,OS!LTOSPOLICESAID(Posted June 3, 9:20 a.m.)

Palo Alto to host Citywide Yard Sale June 8 4HENUMBEROF0ALO!LTORETAILERSISEXPECTEDTOSPIKEON3ATURDAY *UNE  AS MORE THAN  RESIDENTS HOST GARAGE SALES AS PART OF THE #ITYWIDE9ARD3ALE(June 2, 8:34 a.m.)

Palo Alto Weekly named best in Bay Area 4HE 0ALO !LTO 7EEKLY TOOK TOP HONORS AT THE 'REATER "AY !REA *OURNALISM!WARDSDINNER3ATURDAY *UNE RECEIVINGFIRST PLACE'EN ERAL%XCELLENCEINTHECATEGORYOFNON DAILYNEWSPAPERS (Posted June 1, 10:53 p.m.)

Want to get news briefs emailed to you every weekday? Sign up for Express, our new daily e-edition. Go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com to sign up.

Page 12ĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â˜iÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“


Upfront

Infrastructure (continued from page 5)

DENTINTHECITYSONGOINGEFFORTTO MAKETHENEEDEDREPAIRS!CCORD INGTOTHESURVEY PERCENTOFTHE RESPONDENTSAPPROVEDOFTHECITYS WORK IN MAINTAINING INFRASTRUC TURE AND  PERCENT APPROVED ITS USEOFTAXDOLLARS 4HE #ITY #OUNCIL HAD COMMIS SIONED THE SURVEY AS PART OF ITS

Latino

(continued from page 5)

0ALO!LTOWASAMONGOF#ALIFOR NIAS   SCHOOL DISTRICTS LABELED BYTHESTATE$EPARTMENTOF%DUCA TION AS HAVING hSIGNIFICANT DISPRO PORTIONALITYvINSPECIALED 4HE "OARD OF %DUCATION VOTED LASTYEARTOSTIFFEN0ALO!LTOSHIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

University Ave (continued from page 7)

DOUS PUBLIC BENEFIT TO THE PROPOSAL ANDATHEATERISONEARTFORMTHATCOM BINESALLTHEOTHERS v+ELLEYSAID /THERSWEREMORESKEPTICAL%LAINE -EYER PRESIDENT OF THE 5NIVERSITY 3OUTH .EIGHBORHOOD !SSOCIATION URGEDTHECOUNCILTOMAKENEWDE VELOPMENT AT THE SITE COMPLY WITH THE CITYS  FOOT HEIGHT LIMIT AND TOENSURETHATTHEPROJECTWOULDNOT CREATETRAFFICORPARKINGPROBLEMS h0ROPOSALS SHOULD FOLLOW RATHER THANIGNOREPUBLICOPINION v-EYER SAIDh4HEPUBLICISSICKOFMONSTER GIVEAWAYSANDISNOTGOINGTOSUP PORTTHEMv #ONSERVATIONIST%MILY2ENZEL A FORMER COUNCILWOMAN CALLED THE PROPOSEDOUTREACHPROCESShANOTH ERPLOYTOWEARTHEPUBLICOUTAND AVOID PROPER COMPREHENSIVE PLAN NINGFORTHECITY h!LLOFTHISBACKROOMDEALINGHAS CREATED AN ATMOSPHERE WHERE THE PUBLICHASTOWONDERIFANYTHINGWE SAYWILLMAKEADIFFERENCE v2ENZEL SAID h(OW MUCH @MEETING OF THE MINDSHASALREADYTAKENPLACEWITH

EXPLORATION OF A .OVEMBER  BALLOT MEASURE )N  A CITIZEN PANEL KNOWN AS THE )NFRASTRUCTURE "LUE 2IBBON #OMMISSION RELEASED AREPORTESTIMATINGAMILLION BACKLOGINVITALINFRASTRUCTUREPROJ ECTS WITHANEWPOLICEBUILDINGAT THETOPOFTHELIST4HECOMMISSION ALSO FOUND THAT THE CITY HAS ABOUT  MILLION IN DEFERRED MAINTE NANCE )NRECENTMONTHS THECITYHASBEEN CONSIDERINGAPROPOSALFROMTHE*AY

0AUL#OMPANYTOBUILDANEWOFFICE COMPLEX AT  0AGE -ILL 2OAD A DENSEDEVELOPMENTTHATWOULDOFFER AS A hPUBLIC BENEFITv A NEW POLICE HEADQUARTERSATANEARBYSITE  0ARK"LVD4HECITYS0LANNINGAND 4RANSPORTATION #OMMISSION INITI ATED A ZONE CHANGE LAST WEEK THAT WOULDMAKETHEPROJECTPOSSIBLE 7HILE THE *AY 0AUL PROJECT HAS RAISED CONCERNS FROM THE COMMIS SIONANDTHEPUBLICABOUTPOTENTIAL TRAFFICANDPARKINGPROBLEMS ITHAS

ALSOGIVENTHECITYWHATMAYBEITS BEST SHOT AT FINALLY GETTING A NEW POLICEBUILDINGTOREPLACETHESMALL ANDSEISMICALLYDEFICIENTONEAT#ITY (ALL!NEWREPORT WHICHTHE#ITY #OUNCIL )NFRASTRUCTURE #OMMITTEE WAS SCHEDULED TO CONSIDER 4HURS DAY AFTERTHE7EEKLYSPRESSDEAD LINE NOTESTHATBASEDONTHESURVEY A BALLOT MEASURE TO hFULLY FUND A PUBLICSAFETYBUILDINGISUNLIKELYTO RECEIVETWO THIRDSSUPPORTHOWEVER THEPUBLICSHAREOFAPUBLIC PRIVATE

PARTNERSHIPCOULDLIKELYWINAPPROV ALASPARTOFABROADERPACKAGEv &-S REPORT SUGGESTS THAT THE CITYFOCUSPOTENTIALBALLOTMEASURES AROUND PUBLIC SAFETY AND TRANSPOR TATION AND PLACE PROJECTS TOGETHER INPACKAGESTHAThPAIRPROJECTSTHAT DRAW ENTHUSIASTIC PUBLIC REACTION WITH OTHERS THAT ARE MORE LUKE WARMvN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

ALIGNING THEM WITH THE FOUR YEAR COLLEGE PREP CURRICULUM EFFEC TIVE WITH THE GRADUATING #LASS OF 4HEMOVE SUPPORTEDBYMI NORITY STUDENT AND PARENT GROUPS WAS AIMED AT RAISING EXPECTATIONS FOR THE ROUGHLY  PERCENT OF 0ALO !LTOSTUDENTSWHOGRADUATEWITHOUT THOSE PREREQUISITES WITH MINORITY ANDLOW INCOMESTUDENTSOVERREPRE SENTEDINTHATGROUP ,ATINOSMAKEUPPERCENTOFEN

ROLLMENTIN3ANTA#LARAAND3AN-A TEOCOUNTYPUBLICSCHOOLS WITH!FRI CAN !MERICANSAND0ACIFIC)SLANDERS ADDING ANOTHER  PERCENT ,ATINOS MAKE UP  PERCENT OF ENROLLMENT IN0ALO!LTO WITH!FRICAN !MERICANS ADDINGANOTHERPERCENT0ACIFIC)S LANDERSARENOTBROKENOUTINTHEDIS TRICTSPUBLISHEDETHNICITYDATA )NNOVATE 0UBLIC 3CHOOLS WAS LAUNCHED LAST /CTOBER WITH   FROM THE 3ILICON 6AL

LEY #OMMUNITY &OUNDATION AND   FROM THE 7ALTON &AMILY &OUNDATION MANAGEDBYTHEFAMILY THATSTARTED7AL -ART (AMMER AND FORMER 3AN *OSE 5NIFIED3CHOOL$ISTRICT3UPERINTEN DENT,INDA-URRAY NOWASSOCIATED WITH )NNOVATE SAID THE NEW GROUP WANTS TO SPARK A SENSE OF URGENCY FORSCHOOLREFORM 7IDESPREAD SYSTEMIC CHANGE IS PARTICULARLY DIFFICULT BECAUSE THERE

ARE  SEPARATE SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN THETWOCOUNTIES THEYSAID 3ILICON6ALLEY#OMMUNITY&OUN DATION %XECUTIVE $IRECTOR %MMETT #ARSON HAS ARGUED THAT THE HIGH NUMBEROFSEPARATESCHOOLDISTRICTS CONSTITUTESAhFUNDAMENTALLYFLAWED SYSTEM v HAMPERING ACCOUNTABILITY ANDCHANGEN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

RESPECTTO0ALO!LTOSREALESTATEAND PARKLANDv #OUNCIL MEMBERS INDICATED ON -ONDAYTHATTHEYWOULDBEALLTOO WILLINGTOTAKEAFEWSTEPSBACKAND START WORKING ON A NEW VISION FOR THEBUSYAREA ASUBJECTTHATEXPERTS HAVE BEEN EXPLORING FOR DECADES ! hDREAM TEAMv OF ARCHITECTS AND URBAN DESIGNERS FROM THE CITY AND 3TANFORDWORKEDINTHESONA REDESIGNOFTHEHEAVILYUSEDTRANSIT AREA THOUGHTHEIRDREAMENDEDUP LANGUISHINGBECAUSEOFLACKOFFUND ING 4HE IDEA OF IMPROVING TRANS PORTATION OPTIONS ALSO RE EMERGED IN0ALO!LTOSNEGOTIATIONSWITHTHE 3TANFORD5NIVERSITY-EDICAL#ENTER OVER3TANFORDSEXPANSIONOFITSHOS PITALFACILITIES4HECITYSAGREEMENT WITH 3TANFORD PROVIDES FUNDS FOR DESIGNINGANDIMPROVINGCIRCULATION AROUNDTHEINTERMODALCENTER "UT IT WAS !RRILLAGAS DRAMATIC PROPOSAL THAT KICKED THE CONVERSA TIONINTOHIGHGEARANDTURNEDITINTO ACOMMUNITYDEBATEOVEREVERYTHING FROMBUILDINGHEIGHTS PUBLICBENEFITS AND THE RISING PROMINENCE OF DENSE OFFICE PROPOSALS IN DOWNTOWN 0ALO !LTO 6ICE -AYOR .ANCY 3HEPHERD WHOSUPPORTEDTHESTAFFRECOMMEN

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CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (June 3)

27 University Ave.: The council approved a “focused community input” process to create a vision for the downtown area around 27 University Ave. Yes: Berman, Holman, Kniss, Scharff, Shepherd No: Burt, Holman, Schmid Recused: Klein Terms: The council directed the Office of the City Attorney to draft two charter amendments, one that would extend the term limits of council members from two to three terms and another that would abolish terms limits entirely. Yes: Berman, Holman, Klein, Kniss, Scharff, Shepherd No: Burt, Schmid

Historic Resources Board (June 5)

Varsity Theatre: The board recommended approval of proposed changes to Varsity Theatre, 456 University Ave., and directed the applicant to provide a detailed maintenance, protection and restoration plan that would be prepared by a historicpreservation consultant. Yes: Unanimous

Architectural Review Board (June 6)

Varsity Theatre: The board approved proposed changes to the Varsity Theatre building at 456 University Ave. It added a series of conditions, including a requirement for no-color glass and a mock-up of canopy material installed at the site for board review. Yes: Unanimous

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Editorial

Missteps on ‘reforms’ Proposals to reduce size of council and loosen term limits get inauspicious start

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onsidering recent controversies suggesting a lack of sensitivity of current City Council members to the need for transparency and public outreach, the council showed more of the same tone deafness this week in dealing with two very old ideas that suddenly re-emerged as urgent items. Were it not for a new state law about which the council was informed just prior to its meeting Monday night, two dormant but significant changes to the way Palo Alto is governed could have been on their way to a special election ballot this November at a cost of $350,000 or more. We have no objection to re-opening a community discussion on reducing the size of the council from nine to seven members or of increasing the term limits from eight years to 12, but doing so by seeking to rush these changes through in two weeks, as three council members (Nancy Shepherd, Liz Kniss and Gail Price) proposed, is both mystifying and a disservice to the community. As Councilman Pat Burt appropriately asked, what was so important or urgent about these proposals that they required action after 11 p.m., directing the city attorney to draft ballot language without any agreement on what it should say and without any effort to seek public input? Amazingly, Burt’s motion to continue the item to a future meeting failed when it only received support from council members Karen Holman and Greg Schmid. So what’s going on here? And why, having rushed to direct preparation of a ballot measure to make an undetermined change to the current eightyear term limit, did the council then decide to postpone discussion on reducing the size of the council? While Vice Mayor Shepherd told the Weekly she was relieved that there is no longer any time pressure because the changes in state law mean the earliest any measure to change the city charter could appear on the ballot is next June, and possibly next November, she couldn’t explain why she and her colleagues felt urgency in the first place. The most logical explanation of why the issue has suddenly re-emerged is that it would allow Larry Klein, the only member of the council who will be termed out next year, to seek a third, four-year term in the November 2014 council election. If that is the hidden agenda of the sponsors of this change, Klein didn’t help it any by attacking all term limits as “undemocraticâ€? because they denied the rights of incumbent office holders from running for office for as long as they wanted and as long as they were re-elected. Since voters in Palo Alto already rejected that argument when they passed term limits in 1991 (by 58 percent,) Klein came off as both arrogant and disrespectful of the voters. For someone who is on his way to having served 17 years on the council, including three terms as mayor, it is difficult to feel that extraordinary and urgent steps are needed to give voters the opportunity to elect him again. And it is particularly galling that the council would give any thought to holding a special election instead of placing it on a regular, general-election ballot. Although we don’t find the reasons to extend term limits particularly compelling, the best case for it is that our council representatives to regional bodies are never able to advance to leadership roles in those bodies. If that’s the best argument, there better be some clear and convincing examples of where our interests were trampled because of this lack of leadership service. So far, we’ve seen none. While we believe term limits have been shown to cause problems at the state level, at the local level they ensure a regular flow of fresh talent and healthy turnover. In the 10 years since being implemented in Palo Alto, we can’t see how the city has suffered because council members had to step down after eight years. No one individual is irreplaceable, and we prove that repeatedly with the election of capable, new council members. Perhaps most telling at Monday’s meeting were the comments of the council’s newest member, Marc Berman, who made clear he had many questions and concerns, including whether increasing term limits and reducing the size of the council would inhibit diversity on the council and make it less likely that new people like him could be elected. As Berman and council member Schmid pointed out, both measures enhance the power of incumbency. To underscore that point, in the last 30 years, only two incumbents seeking reelection have been defeated, Sandy Eakins (2001) and Nancy Lytle (2003.) Both lost due to intense controversies they helped create and after political organizing efforts in the community. The nature of politics in Palo Alto is that good people do not step forward to run for City Council unless there is at least one “openâ€? seat (where an incumbent is either termed out and can’t run or who has decided not to seek a second term). Reducing the council size and extending term limits is a double-strike against turnover, and therefore must be approached very cautiously, with lots of public discussion. The City Council showed great disregard for this Monday night when they prematurely set in motion the drafting of a ballot measure and cavalierly threw out the idea of repealing term limits altogether. Regardless of intent, it sure smacks of pure self-interest. 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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Keep city council small Editor, Good idea for the City Council to have seven rather than nine members. It is, however, rather audacious for City Council members to suggest a possible council term of 12 years and an increase in pay of $600 to do a job that they chose and the people of the city of Palo Alto elected them to do. Does Palo Alto need professional politicians? Give other Palo Altans have a chance to “represent� the people of this city. There are good reasons for term limits. We should not have entrenched politicians in any office. It sounds like the City Council wants to go into “dictatorship� mode. We have already had revolving doors for two City Council members. This is only a city of 66,000 people. If they are not sufficiently familiar with the issues while running for office then Palo Altans are in for trouble. Who gets 12 years to learn a job “to become more experienced with complex issues�? This is a small city, not the state or federal government! A citizen’s recommendation: 1. Term limits of two terms of two years each per elected official, and that is it! You do not get a chance to run again. 2. No increase in salaries paid to city council members! 3. Get out of the pockets of developers and start making decisions that benefit the people of Palo Alto and not Arrillaga and the like. Joan Reid Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto

The sleeping-in-cars ban Editor, Let the police department furnish them (people living in their cars) with cell phones and a large placard (similar to the ones on pizzadelivery cars) printed in big bold letters — “Neighborhood Watch Vehicle� — then allow them to park on local streets with high rates of burglaries, acting as a deterrent to potential burglaries and as additional eyes and ears to the police department in crime prevention. Richard Hays South Court, Palo Alto

On losing one’s home Editor, I am a Palo Alto resident. In my late teens I was thrown out of my house for the great sin of going to college. I was terrified. I hadn’t the least idea of where to go or how to support myself. I wandered the streets worrying that I might be killed or that I would starve. Had I imagined that I was also a felon, I would have been even more traumatized. Fortunately, that time, a relative took me in. Today, it must be just as traumatic to lose one’s home either through losing a job, medical

bills or emotional problems. To criminalize this terrifying event instead of providing needed services out-Scrooges Scrooge. Our community can come together to solve this problem. Lois W. Salo Ross Road, Palo Alto

In support of Maybell housing Editor, I am a resident of Barron Park writing to strongly support the Palo Alto Housing Corporation (PAHC) proposal to build affordable senior housing on Maybell. I have lived on the same block as the proposed development for more than 25 years. I believe the PAHC project will serve an underserved group of people in Palo Alto. The self-elected Barron Park Association board opposes the project through a close 6-4 vote, taken without surveying Barron Park residents to determine the sense of the neighborhood. This vote represents only six people, not our neighborhood. Through a course of public hearings, PAHC and the city responded

to criticisms by changing the design, eliminating driveways onto Maybell, scaling down the size of the Maybell residences, providing two additional means of automobile egress from the property, widening the sidewalks and increasing the setbacks. Knowledgeable advocates for Palo Alto’s “Safe Routes to School� tell me they have studied the Maybell situation and do not believe this project will make an appreciable impact on traffic or bike/ pedestrian commute safety. The proposed development is surrounded on two sides by large apartment complexes, one 8-stories tall, and on one side by Juana Briones Park. The proposed two-story houses on Maybell are across the street from a vacant lot and a small rented house, and nearby are several large two-story houses. The proposed development is compatible with the immediate neighborhood and provides much-needed affordable senior housing. Along with many of my Barron Park neighbors, I support this project. Don Anderson Alta Mesa Avenue, Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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Do you think increasing or eliminating the two-term limit for City Council members is a good idea?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.


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Streetwise

What do you think Palo Alto and the surrounding areas should do to encourage innovation? Photos and interviews by Rye Druzin. Asked in front of the Cambridge Avenue Post Office in Palo Alto.

James Bailon

Business and operations manager College Terrace, Palo Alto “Do more entrepreneurial and community initiatives not involving Stanford to involve local kids.”

Henry Luce

Retired Ruthelma Avenue, Palo Alto “I think that Palo Alto already does a good job of being innovative.”

Thomas Brosnan

Engineer Blackberry Farm, Cupertino “Improve the communication with the residents in the surrounding cities in order to share ideas.”

David Millsom

Network engineer College Terrace, Palo Alto “We should put all of our trains and Alma into tunnels, and make a continuous park running through the Peninsula to San Francisco. Also, our Internet offerings are pathetic.”

Mark Georgia

Retired Tippawingo Street, Palo Alto “Schools need to offer real courses on innovation to students.”

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This information was supplied by Seller and/or other sources. Broker believes this information to be correct but has not verified this information and assumes no legal responsibility for its accuracy. Buyers should investigate these issues to their own satisfaction. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

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F = FURNITURE

J = JEWELRY Street Name

T = TOYS

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

Section

Street Number

Cross Street

Sale Items

A

353

Addison Ave

Waverley St

B, C, E, T, Plants, Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s designer clothes, Toddler clothes, Shoes, Small rugs

A

1158

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Parkinson Ave

A, B, C, E, F, T, Icemaker, Playmobil sets

A

1128

Emerson St

Lincoln Ave

B, C, E, J, Vases, Bedding, Towels

A

1402

Emerson St

Kellogg Ave

B, C, F, J

A

1564

Emerson St

Churchill Ave

Misc household items

A

325

Channing Ave

Bryant St

Household and travel items

A

627

Channing Ave

Webster St

A, AP, B, C, E, F, T

A, AP, B, C, E, F, J, T, Knickknacks

A

Emerson St

Seale Ave

Channing Ave

Newell Rd

Artwork, CDs, DVDs, VCR, Tools

A

1857

1450

C, T, Household/craft/bicycle items, Baby gear, Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; clothing

N California Ave

B, E, T

A

1624

Channing Ave

Newell Rd

E, T, Athletic equipment

A

2290

Emerson St

N California Ave

Bellview Dr

N California Ave

A, AP, B, C, E, F, T, Skating shoes

B, C, E, F, Cameras, Framed art, Kitchenware

A

444

Churchill Ave

Waverley St

AP, B, C, E, F, Bicycles

Erstwild Ct

Walter Hays Dr

B, F, T, Garden clay pots

Blair Ct

Greer Rd

AP, B, C, E, F, Kitchen equipment, Home decor

A

A

38

959

133

Coleridge Ave

Alma St

AP, C, F, Craft materials, Office supplies

A

192

Everett Ave

Emerson St

C, Art, Doodads, Knickknacks, Misc

A

820

Boyce Ave

Guinda Ave

B, C, E, Garage tools

204

Cowper St

Hawthorne Ave

Misc household items

A

Everett Ave

Emerson St

A

A

202

169

Bryant St

Poe St

B, C, T, 3 households will participate

A

342

Cowper St

Lytton Ave

AP, E, F, J, Decorative items

A

315

Bryant St

Lytton Ave

B, F, Good free items

A

B, C, E, F, J, T, Apple track jackets, Small Apple electronics, Board and card games, Office supplies, Bookcases, Console tables

915

Cowper St

Channing Ave

E, F, Sports equipment

A

315

Everett Ave

Bryant St

A

2392

Cowper St

Oregon Ave

B, C, F, T, Infant girl clothing - 4T

AP, B, C, E, F, T, Kid stuff, Videos, Sports equipment

A

80

Crescent Dr

University Ave

AP, B, C, E, F, T, Sports items

A

317

Everett Ave

Bryant St

B, C, General household items

A

1256

Dana Ave

Lincoln Ave

B, C, F, Lawn and Garden items

A

420

Everett Ave

Waverley St

AP, B, F, Cooking utensils

A

688

Everett Ave

Middlefield Rd

B, C, F, T, Craft supplies

A

1087

Fife Ave

Lincoln Ave

A, B, E, F, T, Camera, Collectibles, Small violins

A

1655

A

2002

Barbara Dr

N California Ave

A

2091

Barbara Dr

A

2156

A

Alma St

Lowell Ave

B, C, E, F, T, Baby items *Multi-family Complex Sale*

A

960

Bryant St

Addison Ave

A, B, C, F, J, Serving trays, Home accessories

A

1100

Bryant St

Lincoln Ave

C, Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accessories, Small household items, Misc items

A

1325

Bryant St

Embarcadero Rd

A, B, C, E, T, Misc gardening stuff

A

1499

Edgewood Dr

Newell Rd

A, B, C, E, T

A

1404

Bryant St

Kellogg Ave

B, E, F, T, Small aquarium, Hamster habitat

A

1953

Edgewood Dr

Channing Ave

A, B, C, E, F, J, Kitchen/household items

A

2025

Bryant St

Santa Rita Ave

E, F

A

1954

Edgewood Dr

Greer Rd

B, C, E, F

A

649

Fulton St

Hamilton Ave

AP, B, C, E, F, T, Home decor

A

333

Byron St

Lytton Ave

AP, B, C, E, F, J, T

A

2129

Edgewood Dr

Channing Ave

B, T, Air hockey table, Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bike

A

743

Garland Dr

Middlefield Rd

AP, E, F, T, Building materials, Tile, Light fixtures and more

A

1160

Byron St

Kingsley Ave

AP, C, J, T, Small dog crates, Gates, Fabric, Craft supplies

A

914

Elsinore Dr

Louis Rd

A, AP, B, C, E, T, Skis, Bikes

A

801

Garland Dr

Ross Rd

A, B, C, E, F, J, T

A

2050

Byron St

Santa Rita Ave

B, C, E, F, J, T, Guitars, DVDs, Computers, iPhones, Garden pottery, Couches

A

116

Emerson St

Hawthorne Ave

B, C, F, T, Almost antiques

A

817

Garland Dr

Ross Rd

B, E, F, T

A

206

Emerson St

Hawthorne Ave

General household items

A

826

Garland Dr

Louis Rd

B, C, F, Household/kitchen items, Knickknacks

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 17


A = ANTIQUES

AP = APPLIANCES

KEY TO SALE ITEM ABBREVIATIONS B = BOOKS C = CLOTHING E = ELECTRONICS

F = FURNITURE

J = JEWELRY

T = TOYS

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

A

859

Garland Dr

Louis Rd

B, C, F, T, Shop tools

A

857

Southampton Dr

Newell Rd

B, C, F, Misc items

B

965

Colorado Ave

Louis Rd

B, E, Photos, Household items

B

1001

Colorado Ave

Greer Rd

A, B, C, E, F, J

A

2370

Greer Rd

Oregon Expy

B, C, E, Sports equipment, Art

A

882

Newell Rd

B, C, E, F, J, T, Shoes

A

Southampton Dr

576

Hale St

University Ave

AP, B, F, Kitchenware, Dishes, Misc items

1020

Colorado Ave

Greer Rd

B, C, Potted plants

A

B

415

Tasso St

Lytton Ave

C, F, J

1056

Colorado Pl

Colorado Ave

B, C, T, Guitar, CDs, games

A

Hamilton Ave

Seneca St

C

A

B

909

2025

Tasso St

Seale Ave

B

1060

Colorado Pl

Colorado Ave

A, F, Fine china, Art glass

A

B, C, E, F, J, House/Office/ Kitchenware, Art

1280

Hamilton Ave

Lincoln Ave

B, C, F, J, T, Craft supplies

Tennyson Ave

Alma St

B, E, F, Misc items

B

2771

Cowper St

El Dorado Ave

1836

Hamilton Ave

Rhodes Dr

B, C, T, Craft/sewing, Glassware, Holiday, Crystal, Quilt, Dolls, Folding screen, Paintings

A

156

A

A

210

Tennyson Ave

Emerson St

B, E, F

C, F, All things neat and clean, Glass-top coffee table, Ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shoes sz 6.5, Some free stuff

Emerson St

B

Cowper St

Loma Verde Ave

AP, B, C, E, F, Baby goods

Channing Ave

A, AP, B, F, T, 1930â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wedgwood stove

C, Collectibles, Glassware, Textiles, Lamps, Household items

2976

A

Tennyson Ave

High St

A

219

900

A

Duncan Pl

Ely Pl

B, C, T

Tennyson Ave

Emerson St

AP, B, C, Garden supplies, Housewares

B

3926

225

B

708

E Charleston Rd

Middlefield Rd

B, C, E, F, J, T, Misc items

B, C, E, F, J, T, Guitar

A

401

Tennyson Ave

Waverley St

A, AP, B, C, E, F, J

B

738

E Charleston Rd

Middlefield Rd

AP, E, Dishware

AP, B, C, E, F

A

520

Tennyson Ave

Cowper St

A, B, C, F, J, T

B

762

E Charleston Rd

Louis Rd

B, C, E, F, T

C, F, T, Housewares

A

669

Tennyson Ave

Middlefield Rd

F, Rugs, Misc items

B

3735

Egret Ln

E Meadow Dr

A

1310

University Ave

Maple St

A, B, C, F, T

B, C, T, Paper goods, Baby equipment

A

El Capitan Pl

Nelson Dr

B, C, T Misc items

W Greenwich Pl

Newell Rd

AP, B, F, Sporting goods

B

495

750

A

El Capitan Pl

Nelson Dr

B, C, T, Suitcases, Dishes

W Greenwich Pl

Newell Rd

B, C, E, F, T

B

504

763

A

El Carmelo Ave

Waverley St

C, F, Plants

Walnut Dr

Newell Rd

B, E, F, Household items

B

317

1543

A

Elbridge Way

Louis Rd

E, F, T

113

B

859

B

867

Elbridge Way

Louis Rd

C, E, F, T, Plants, Kitchen appliance, CDs, Free candy, Table, and more

B

705

Ellsworth Pl

Middlefield Rd

F, Household items

B

730

Ellsworth Pl

Middlefield Rd

Collectibles/vintage items

B

931

Elsinore Dr

Louis Rd

A, B, J, Pictures and frames

B

2096

Emerson St

El Dorado Ave

B, C, E, F, T

B

2905

Emerson St

El Dorado Ave

A, E, F

B

3028

Emerson St

El Carmelo Ave

B, C, E, F, Misc items

B

3598

Evergreen Dr

Aspen Way

AP, C, F, T, Kitchen items, Sports equipment

B

288

Fairfield Ct

Mackay Dr

C, F, Small furniture, Housewares, Pictures, Plants

B

303

Ferne Ave

Scripps Ave

B, C, F, J, T, Art

A A A A

715 960 298 1499

Homer Ave Hutchinson Ave Iris Way Kings Ln

Middlefield Rd Channing Ave Heather Ln Newell Rd

B, C, F, T, Baby gear

A

365

Kingsley Ave

Waverley St

SERRV items, Fair Market items

A

817

Kipling St

Homer Ave

B, C, F, J, Files, Cat carrier, Dishware

A

930

Lincoln Ave

Channing Ave

B, C, E, F, Paintings, Small appliances, Dishes, Glassware, Garden tools, Sporting goods

Walter Hays Dr

Walnut Dr

A, Garden brick, Flower pots, Oak table tops, 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; chest of drawers, Art books, Rug, Window shutters

A

113

Lois Ln

Walnut Dr

B, F, T, Cookware, Sports equipment

A

144

Lois Ln

Stanley Way

F, Artwork, Personal effects, Local artist exhibit

A

144

Walter Hays Dr

Walnut Dr

C, E, F, T

A

315

Lowell Ave

Waverley St

B, E, F, T, Home decor

A

205

Walter Hays Dr

Stanley Way

B, C, T

286

Walter Hays Dr

Walnut Dr

B, C, E, F, Sporting goods

Waverley St

Hawthorne Ave

Garden items: plants, pots, accessories

A

658

Lowell Ave

Middlefield Rd

AP, C, E, T

A

A

667

Melville Ave

Middlefield Rd

AP, B, C, E, F

A

210

A

2332

Middlefield Rd

Garland Dr

AP, B, C, E, T

A

280

Waverley St

Everett Ave

A

87

Morton St

Embarcadero Rd

Yard art, Misc items

A, AP, B, C, F, T, Music (sheet and books), CDs

A

Waverley St

Lytton Ave

N California Ave

High St

A, B, C, E, F, J, T

A

333

170

AP, B, C, F, Misc household items, Sheet music, Mad magazines

A

945

N California Ave

Louis Rd

A, AP, B, C, E, F, T, CDs, Garden tools, Misc items

A

745

Waverley St

Homer Ave

AP, B, C, E, F, T, Kitchen equipment, Group sale

A

180

Nevada Ave

Emerson St

A, B, F, T, Misc household items

A

2245

Webster St

N California Ave

C, Household items

A

665

Newell Rd

Hamilton Ave

B, C, F, T

Section

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

A

Street Number

Ferne Ave

San Antonio Rd

B, C, J, Pet cage

Newell Rd

Seale Ave

A, B, C, F, Tools

2609

Alma St

Colorado Ave

A

B

B

431

1801

Ferne Ave

San Antonio Rd

AP, B, C, E, F, J, T, Tools

Newell Rd

Seale Ave

B, C, F, J, Household items

B

495

1861

A, AP, B, C, E, F, J, Dog accessories, Bikes, Home decor

A

B, C, F, T

Alma St

Loma Verde Ave

AP, B, C, E, T, Suitcases, CDs, DVDs

B

Louis Rd

Webster St

3193

Gailen Ave

Oregon Ave

B

804

609

A

723

Oregon Ave

Ross Rd

A, B, C, F, T

B

F, Stereo, Skis, Doors, Misc household items

4265

Alma St

San Antonio Rd

B

131

Greenmeadow Way

Alma St

A

737

Oregon Ave

Ross Rd

C, E, F, T, Sports/exercise equipment

A, B, C, F, J, Selling Fri-Sun, Plants, Pots and garden art, Lamps and rugs, Collectibles, Housewares, Sporting goods

Multiple households selling misc items at Meadowcreek Townhomes

A

Louis Rd

B, C, F, T

B

B, C, F, T

C, T

Amarillo Ave

Moffet Cir

Alma St

928

Greer Rd

Palo Alto Ave

B

2857

160

A

Louis Rd

AP, C, E, T

B

B, C, T

A, B, C, J, Collectibles, Vintage clothing, Old cigarette lighters

Ames Ave

Colorado Ave

Cedar St

894

Greer Rd

Parkinson Ave

B

2975

1231

3593

Arbutus Ave

E Meadow Dr

C, E, F, T

B

3131

Greer Rd

Loma Verde Ave

B, E, F, T

A

B

15

Phillips Rd

Madison Way

B, C, F, T, Kitchen items, CDs, Misc items

B

570

Ashton Ave

Ashton Ct

A, B, C, E

B

3341

Greer Rd

Loma Verde Ave

B, C, F, Knickknacks

A

1280

Pine St

Hopkins Ave

B, C, E, J, T, Holiday decorations

B

3434

Ashton Ct

Ashton Ave

B, E, F, T

B

3510

Greer Rd

Louis Rd

A, F, Oriental rug

A

347

Ramona St

Lytton Ave

B, C, E, F, Wood trim

B

2477

Aztec Way

Indian Dr

B, C, E, J, Dishes, Knickknacks

B

193

Hemlock Ct

Briarwood Way

B, T

A

845

Ramona St #625

Homer Ave

B, C, E, F, T, Small electronics

B

2590

Bryant St

Colorado Ave

B, C, F, T

B

723

Holly Oak Dr

Ames Ave

B, C, T

3071

Bryant St

Loma Verde Ave

N California Ave

B, C, E, T

B

Ames Ave

Ramona St

C, Home decor items both new/used

Holly Oak Dr

2380

B

783

A

B, Housewares, Rocks, Russian treasures, Games, Misc items

A

158

Rinconada Ave

Emerson St

B, E, F, T

B

3492

Bryant St

E Meadow Dr

AP, C, E, F, T, Shoes

B

3440

Janice Way

Greer Rd

A

261

Rinconada Ave

Bryant St

AP, B, C, E, T

B

931

Celia Dr

Agnes Way

AP, B, C, E, J, Tools

A, B, C, E, F, T, Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bikes, Windsurfing equipment, Roller skates

Celia Dr

Louis Rd

C, F

B

3488

Janice Way

Greer Rd

B, C, E, Chainsaw, Hardware

B

639

Keats Ct

Middlefield Rd

AP, B, C, F, J

A

451

Ruthven Ave

Waverley St

AP, C, E

B

954

A

244

Seale Ave

Bryant St

AP, B, C, E, F, J, T, DVDs, CDs, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s items

B

800

Charleston Rd

Fabian St

AP, B, C, E, F, T, Baby items, Game consoles and accessories

Kenneth Dr

Greer Rd

B, C, E, T, Tools, Exercise Bike

651

Seale Ave

Middlefield Rd

B, C, F, T, Household items, Sports equipment

B

B

3381

A

801

Clara Dr

Ross Rd

AP, B, C, E, F, T

B

967

Loma Verde Ave

Greer Rd

A, B, C, E, F, J, T, Household items

807

Clara Dr

Ross Rd

AP, B, C, E, F, T

AP, C, F, J

B

B

2550

Louis Rd

Marshall Dr

T, Housewares

895

Clara Dr

Louis Rd

B, F, T, Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stuff

A, B, C, F

B

B

2901

Louis Rd

Colorado Ave

A, AP, B, C, E, F, J, T

947

Clara Dr

Louis Rd

B, C, T

B, C, T, Collectibles

B

Louis Rd

Loma Verde Ave

B, C, E, F, T

B

B

3262

716

Coastland Dr

Marion Ave

B, C, F, T

3524

Louis Rd

Greer Rd

AP, B, C, E, J, T

B

B

778

Colorado Ave

Ross Rd

B, C, J, Household items

B

3650

Louis Rd

E Meadow Dr

B, Linens, Misc household items

B

825

Colorado Ave

Ross Rd

B, C, E, J, T

B

3843

Louis Rd

Ross Rd

F, T, Baby gear, Bikes

A

663

A

526

A

754

A A

Seale Ave Seneca St

Middlefield Rd University Ave

Southampton Dr

Newell Rd

833

Southampton Dr

Newell Rd

B, C, F, T, Teak table, Patio chairs

851

Southampton Dr

Newell Rd

B, C, F, T

Page 18Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;


A B

C D For the online interactive map scan this QR code or visit www.PaloAltoOnline.com/yardsale

Map data Š 2013 Google Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 19


A = ANTIQUES

AP = APPLIANCES

KEY TO SALE ITEM ABBREVIATIONS B = BOOKS C = CLOTHING E = ELECTRONICS

F = FURNITURE

J = JEWELRY

T = TOYS

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

B

3880

Louis Rd

Ross Rd

B, C, E, T, Misc household items

B

2580

Waverley St

Colorado Ave

D

743

Barron Ave

La Donna Ave

B, C, E, F, T, Baby stuff

B

3909

Louis Rd

Gailen Ave

C, E, F, Tools

D

788

Cereza Dr

Amaranta Ave

B

B, C, F, 78 LP Records, Plants, Old tools

941

Maddux Dr

Greer Rd

B, C, F, Skylight, Misc household items

A, B, C, E, F, New and used trunks, Large TravelPro suitcase, Chalk board, Large tapestry, Brass coat tree, Adult Kelty red backpack, Misc items

D

796

Cereza Dr

Amaranta Ave

B, C, E, F, T, Rugs, Misc items

D

698

Chimalus Dr

Tippawingo Dr

A, B, C, E, F, J, T, Shoes, Artwork, Purses

B

708

B

725

Maplewood Ave

Sutherland Dr

C, E, F, J

B

2593

Marshall Dr

Moreno Ave

AP, E, F

B

2663

Marshall Dr

Bruce Dr

F, Large file cabinet, Soft car rooftop luggage

Maplewood Ave

Sutherland Dr

B, E, Computer stuff

B

2837

Waverley St

El Dorado Ave

B, C, E, T, Household items

B

3415

Waverley St

East Meadow Dr

AP, B, C, E, F, J, T

B

2504

Webster St

Marion Ave

A, AP, C, F, Luggage, Lamps

D

4134

Donald Dr

Arastradero Rd

AP, B, C, E, T, Exercise equipment

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

D

4148

Donald Dr

Arastradero Rd

A, Art supplies and prints

El Camino Real

2321

Amherst St

California Ave

B, C, F, T, Dishes and baking dishes

D

4250

C

W Charleston Rd

C, Misc household items, Unit D336

C

2145

Birch St

Oxford Ave

B, T, Little boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; toys

D

3708

El Centro St

Barron Ave

AP, C, Misc household items

B

1012

B

2901

Middlefield Rd

Sutter Ave

B, C, F, Neighborhood sale, Misc household items

C

2140

Bowdoin St

College Ave

C, E, F, T

D

3970

El Cerrito Rd

Los Robles Ave

C, Patio chairs 8x6 lattice, New sheets, Skill saw, Misc items

B

3130

Middlefield Rd

Loma Verde Ave

C, F, T

C

2301

Bowdoin St

California Ave

B, C, F, J, T, Luggage, Videos, DVDs

D

630

Georgia Ave

Donald Dr

AP, F, Household items

B

3969

Middlefield Rd

Charleston Rd

A, C, E, T, Tools, DVDs, VHS

C

1661

Castilleja Ave

Churchill Ave

B, C, T, Garden supplies

D

666

Georgia Ave

Hubbartt Dr

B

4000

Middlefield Rd

E Charleston Rd

B, CDs, DVDs, Framed art, Puzzles, Games, LPs

C

261

College Ave

El Camino Real

B, F, J, Electric saws, Drill press, Collectables

F, T, Housewares, Rugs, Holiday decorations

D

828

La Jennifer Way

El Centro St

B

749

Moreno Ave

Middlefield Rd

A, B, C, E, F, J, 10-speed Bike, Glassware

C

431

College Ave

El Camino Real

B, C, E, F, J, T

B, C, E, T, Arts and Crafts, Old Movies, Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Items

La Para Ave

La Donna Ave

B

Wellesley St

Misc household items

D

858

College Ave

B, C, E, T, Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bikes, Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; powered riding toys

Murdoch Dr

Ashton Ave

B, C, E, F, J, T

C

826

3420

1506

College Ave

Columbia St

B, E, F, T

Arastradero Rd

Murray Way

Loma Verde Ave

AP, C, E, F, T

D

Los Palos Ave

3250

C

4217

B

B, C, F, Housewares, Small appliances

B

College Ave

Columbia St

B, F, T

Murray Way

Richardson Ct

A, B, C, F, J, T

C

1528

3292

893

Los Robles Ave

Orme St

B

College Ave

Columbia St

885

Oregon Ave

Ross Rd

A, B, C, F, J, T, Chinese decoration

C

D

1540

A, B, C, E, F, J, T, Dishes, Rugs, Baskets, Frames, More

C, F, Household goods, Pots and pans, Patio heater, Sewing machine

B

230

Parkside Dr

Greenmeadow Way

B, C

C

2195

Columbia St

College Ave

A, B, C, Costumes, Small household goods

D

3852

Magnolia Dr

Military Way

B, C, E, F, T

4243

Manuela Ave

Arastradero Rd

B

Piers Ct

Louis Rd

B, C, F, T

C

354

Leland Ave

Ash St

B, F, J, T, Musical instruments

D

920

B, C, F, J, T, Japanese dishes and art

B

2645

Ramona St

Colorado Ave

A, AP, E, F, Fitness equipment, Home decor, Kitchen equipment

C

1568

Mariposa Ave

Churchill Ave

A, B, C, E, F, T

D

283

Margarita Ave

El Camino Real

B, C, E, F, T

Maybell Ave

Frandon Ct

B, C, E, F, Sporting goods

B

3194

Ramona St

Campesino Ave

AP, B, C, F, Misc items

B

3266

Ramona St

El Verano Ave

B, C, F

B

3731

Redwood Cir

South Ct

B, E, F

B

854

Rorke Way

Ames Ave

T

B

2890

Ross Rd

Sutter Ave

B

2925

Metro Cir

Ross Rd

Greer Rd

Sutter Ave

B, C, J, Huge sale, Unique items, Misc household items

C

268

Mosher Way

Sand Hill Rd

B, C, E, F, Tools, Housewares

D

644

C

332

Oxford Ave

Birch St

C, E, F, T

D

3793

Park Blvd

Curtner Ave

B, C, F, Electric lawn mower

C

1980

Park Blvd

Stanford Ave

A, J, Linens, Posters

D

3925

Park Blvd

Ventura Ave

C, Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rack, Small household items

C

2060

Princeton St

College Ave

AP, B, C, E, T

D

751

Paul Ave

La Donna Ave

2102

Princeton St

College Ave

B, C, F, T

C

B, C, E, F, Gorgeous bedroom set, Misc household items

B, C, T, Housewares, Window air conditioning unit, Door, Windows

D

4248

Rickeys Way

Deodar St

A, B, C, E, F, T

AP, B, C, E, F, T

C

890

S California Ave

Cornell St

Misc items

D

883

Robb Rd

Manuela Ave

AP, E, F

C

440

Sequoia Ave

Portola Ave

AP, B, C, E, J, T, Strollers, Baby carriers

D

4326

Silva Ave

Del Medio Ave

C

315

Stanford Ave

Birch St

C, E, F, T, Bike, Strollers, Car seat, Pictures, Vase, Portable air conditioner, Misc items

Restaurant dishes/tables/chairs, Patio furniture, Household and kitchen items

D

4375

Silva Ave

San Antonio Rd

B, C, E, F, T, Jogger, Booster seat, Misc items

C

340

Stanford Ave

El Camino Real

AP, C, E, F, J, Rugs

D

4261

Suzanne Dr

Arastradero Rd

A, B, C, E, J, T, Old school desks

Section

Street Number

Street Name

Cross Street

Sale Items

D

4278

Suzanne Dr

Arastradero Rd

B, C, Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s/Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s/Child/Baby clothing, CDs, Misc items

D

4134

Abel Ave

Maybell Ave

AP, B, F, Houseware, Baking equipment

D

4102

Thain Way

Maybell Ave

AP, B, C, E, F, T, Decors, Accessories, Kitchenware

D

4138

Abel Ave

Maybell Ave

C, J, Christmas decorations, Kitchen items, Knickknacks

D

275

Ventura Ave

Park Blvd

AP, B, C, E, T

D

4128

Amaranta Ct

Maybell Ave

F, Patio items, Tools, Kitchenware, Games, Wine glasses, Rugs

D

443

Ventura Ave

El Camino Real

Multi-family complex yard sale

4023

Villa Vista

Vista Ave

B, C, F, T

D

D

566

Arastradero Rd

El Camino Real

B, C, F, T, Kitchen items

D

3643

Whitsell Ave

Kendall Ave

B, C, T

D

574

Arastradero Rd

El Camino Real

B, C, F, J, T, Multi-family sale

D

4080

Wilkie Way

Meadow Dr

B, C, E, F, J, T

D

649

Arastradero Rd

Cherry Oaks Pl

C, J, T, Picture frames, Bags, Shoes

D

4174

Wilkie Way

Charleston Rd

B, C, T, Bikes, Sports equipment

D

680

Arastradero Rd

Willmar Dr

AP, B, C, F, J, T

D

4211

Wilkie Way

D

721

Barron Ave

La Donna Ave

C, Wall hanging, Painting, Small B-B-Q, Vintage radial arm saw, Misc household items

W Charleston Rd

B, Ceramics, Artwork, Crafts, Kitchen items

D

4274

Wilkie Way

Whitclem Dr

F, Lamps, Hiking boots (W Sz 10), Plates, Rugs, Sewing machines

B

3180

Ross Rd

Loma Verde Ave

AP, B, C, E, J, T

B

3240

Ross Rd

Loma Verde Ave

AP, B, C, E, F, T

B

3387

Ross Rd

Ames Ave

B, C, E, Sports collectables

B

765

San Antonio Rd #27

Middlefield Rd

C, Misc items

B

279

Scripps Ct

Scripps Ave

B, C, E, F, T

B

2915

South Ct

El Dorado Ave

A, B, E, F, Kitchen items

B

3391

South Ct

Meadow Dr

C, E, T, Baby items

B

3428

South Ct

E Meadow Dr

AP, B, C, E, J, DVDs, CDs, Video games, Board games

B

556

St Claire Dr

Cowper St

B, C, F, Lots of great misc household items

B

655

B

3361

B

1143

B

787

Stone Ln

Ross Rd

B, 7-piece drum set, Large tent

B

795

Stone Ln

Ross Rd

AP, B, C, F, J, T, Decorative household items

B

4028

Sutherland Dr

Charleston Rd

C, Misc items

B

4072

Sutherland Dr

Maplewood Dr

A, AP, B, C, E, F, T, Toy trains

B

783

Sutter Ave

Ross Rd

C, F, T

B

846

Sutter Ave

Ross Rd

AP, B, C, E

B

817

Sycamore Dr

Louis Rd

A, F, T, Household goods, High chairs

B

830

Sycamore Dr

Louis Rd

B, C, J, T

B

879

Talisman Dr

Evergreen Dr

F, Misc items

B

718

Torreya Ct

Loma Verde Ave

T, Luggage, Household items

B

734

Torreya Ct

Loma Verde Ave

A, B, C, F, Misc items

St Claire Dr St Michael Ct Stanislaus Ln

Middlefield Rd St Claire Dr E Meadow Dr

B, F, T, Frames, Lamps, Carpet B, C, J, T F, Cherry wood bedroom set, Misc household items

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7o learn Pore about =ero :aste and wa\s to reduce reuse and rec\cle visit www.zerowastepaloalto.org and like us on facebook www.facebook.com/zerowastepaloalto


Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto May 30-June 5 10Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Elder abuse/neglect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Elder abuse/financial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Sexual assault. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suicide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Credit card fraud. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Theft undefined. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .7 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Parking/driving violation . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Vehicle accident/mnr. injury . . . . . . . . . .9 Vehicle accident/prop. Damage . . . . .27 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Drinking in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Minor in possession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Possesion of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Miscellaneous Animal call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .5 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .4 Tree blocking roadway . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Verbal threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of a concealed weapon . . . .1

Menlo Park May 30-June 5 Violence related Assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

William Edward Roth Sept. 19, 1919-June 1, 2013 The Greatest Generation lost one of its outstanding members when Bill Roth died in his sleep on June 1st at the age of 93. Like many of his generation, he served in World War II â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with the Army in New Guinea and the invasion of the Philippines â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and then returned to the Bay Area to raise a family and help build post-war America. Among the many projects his construction company completed was the Carlmont Shopping Center, and he went on to found and run First American Records Storage, which is now a nation-wide enterprise. A fourth generation Californian, Bill had Stanford in his blood from an early age, as he grew up on the campus where his parents, Mildred and Almon Roth, and his sisters, Betty Roth Kendrick and Miriam Roth MacKenzie, both of whom predeceased him, lived while Almon, for whom Roth Way is named, was Comptroller of the University. Bill attended Stanford, where he met his ďŹ rst wife, Diana Fyfe Hunter, played football, ran track, and graduated in 1941. He lived all his life within ďŹ ve miles of campus, and attended 74 straight Big Games. Bill and Diana had four children, all of whom survive them, and all with a Stanford connection. Barbara (Sandy) Scott received an MBA from Stanford and supervised the construction of the Schwab Center building on campus; Richard (Dick) swam for Stanford and won a gold medal in the Tokyo Olympics; Douglas followed in his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s footsteps as a successful construction executive and helped rebuild Stanford after the Loma Prieta earthquake; Nancy received three degrees from Stanford and served on the Graduate School of Business Advisory Council. After Dianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death, Bill enjoyed playing golf with Debby Niethammer, who had also lost her spouse, and the friendship blossomed into romance that led to their wedding in 1999. They enjoyed 13 years together, and Bill credited Debby with keeping him young enough to shoot his age at golf three times after he turned 80. In his youth, Bill enjoyed hunting and a good prank â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including putting a cow in a third ďŹ&#x201A;oor ofďŹ ce of one of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deans â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and he kept his ďŹ&#x201A;ower garden in stunning exuberance in his ďŹ nal years. Besides his four children, he is survived by Debby and her four children, Bill, Steve, Jim and Mike Niethammer, twentythree adoring grandchildren, and eleven great grandchildren, all of whom will carry on the memory of his long, productive and loving life. The family requests donations to Stanford Athletics, the Palo Alto Medical Foundations, or the charity of your choice. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Theft undefined. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .9 False registration tabs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Lost/stolen plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/mnr. injury . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/prop. damage . . . . . . .6 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Minor in possession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Under the influence of drugs . . . . . . . . .2 Miscellaneous Coroner case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fire call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Probation violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious threat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Threatening emails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of concealed firearm . . . . . .1

Atherton May 30-June 5 Theft related Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Residential burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Parking/driving violation . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/mnr. injury . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/prop. damage . . . . . . .2 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Alcohol or drug related Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Fire call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Noise ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .4 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto E.Meadow Drive, 5/29, 2:15 p.m.; Suicide. W. Meadow Drive, 5/30, 2:03 p.m.; Elder neglect. El Camino Real, 5/31, 3:54 p.m.; battery on a peace officer. Embarcadero Road, 6/2, 11:59 a.m.; Sexual assault on female runner.

Menlo Park Middle Avenue/San Mateo Drive, 6/3, 12:14 p.m.; bottle thrown at victim from vehicle. 1300 block Willow Road, 6/3 10:31 p.m.; battery. 600 block Cotton Street, 6/4, 9:09 p.m.; assault.

Lillian Dubinsky Aug. 26, 1923 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 1, 2013 Lillian Darling Dubinsky was born on August 26, 1923, in Hartford,Connecticut, and passed away on June 1, 2013, in Palo Alto, California, at the age of 89. One of ten children, Lillian graduated from Weaver High School, where she was a cheerleader and an excellent student. She married Alfred Dubinsky on June 18, 1950, in Hartford,Connecticut. The couple lived for a short while in Newark, Ohio, and Washington D.C.before settling ďŹ rst in Cleveland, Ohio, then Benton Harbor, Michigan, then Palm Desert, California, then moving to the Vi in Palo Alto seven years ago. Lillian was an accomplished bridge player, with Silver Life Master status, earning over 2000 points. She taught bridge and ran her own games at various

times in her life. She is survived by her husband of 63 years, Alfred, her children Michael (Rona), Donna (Lenny) and Ann (Jere), and her grandchildren Bradley, Jennifer and Marina. Her family and her many friends will miss her very much. Contributions in lieu of ďŹ&#x201A;owers may be sent to Theatreworks, P.O. Box 50458, Palo Alto, CA, 94303-0458 in recognition of Lillianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for theatre. PA I D

OBITUARY

Dr. John VanWinkle Young Dr. John VanWinkle Young (Dr. John) passed away at Channing House in Palo Alto on May 21, 2013 at the age of 89. He is predeceased by his twin sister, Jane, and his older sister, Betty. He is survived by Sally C. Young, his wife of 52 years, and his children, John Q. Young and Susan Y. MacLeod and their spouses (Jenny and Rod), and his adoring grandchildren (Alex, Abigail, Matthew, Naomi, and Hannah) and nieces (Mary, Sarah, and Katie). Dr. John was born in Evanston, Illinois on April 4, 1924 and grew up in Oxford, Ohio. He attended McGuffey High School where he played multiple sports, including football for the then high school coach Weeb Ewbanks. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Miami University in Oxford in 1947 with honors in physics. His college career was interrupted by World War II during which he served in the US Navy on a supply ship in the PaciďŹ c from 1944 to 1946. After ďŹ nishing his bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree, he continued his studies at Northwestern University School of Medicine, followed by a 4 year residency in Internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. One of the high points of his career was a fellowship at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston (Harvard Medical School) where he worked with Dr. John Merrill on the development of kidney dialysis and transplant and participated in the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst successful kidney transplantation. He joined the Palo Alto Medical Foundation in 1957. In 1961, he directed the medical team overseeing the ďŹ rst kidney transplantation on the West Coast. He was a Clinical Professor of Medicine at

Stanford and loved teaching medical students how to take a history â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an endeavor he continued after he retired from clinical practice in 1990. After retiring, he also volunteered at Samaritan House in Redwood City. His retirement years were ďŹ lled with travel, golf, teaching, studying Spanish, volunteering, and other adventures. Dr. John met his wife, Sally, in the San Francisco Bach Choir and that was the beginning of a long and happy marriage. John and Sally lived in Menlo Park in the Allied Arts Neighborhood where they raised their two children, John and Susan. For over 30 years he was a faithful member at Menlo Park Presbyterian Church, which included serving as a deacon and volunteering on several mission trips. He continued his love of music through the years by singing in Schola Cantorum and the Aurora Singers, playing cello and attending a wide variety of musical events. He is best remembered by his family for his love of his children, sense of humor, the laughter he generated, enjoyment of the mountains, passion for medicine and healing others, curiosity and quest to learn about the world and God, calm and steady-hand during difďŹ cult times, and his wisdom that he imparted to those around him. The memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church (330 Ravenwoods Avenue, Menlo Park; (650) 326-2083) at 4pm on June 10. A reception will take place at the church after the memorial service. In lieu of ďŹ&#x201A;owers, memorial donations may be made to the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. PA I D

OBITUARY

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 21


David Anthony Curtis November 24, 1962 - May 17, 2013 David Anthony Curtis, loving husband, son, and brother died on the morning of May 17, 2013 at age 50 from complications following a stroke. David is survived by his wife, Margaret and his family Kita, Richard and Steven Curtis, Shelly Pargh and Mary, Les and David Kaye. David earned a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in business administration from San Jose State University. He then operated his own business as a general contractor. Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clients appreciated his engaging personality, his skills, and his commitment to quality craftsmanship. He will be greatly missed. A celebration of Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life will be held at 4 p.m. on Sunday, June 9 at Kannon Do Zen Meditation Center, 1972 Rock St., Mountain View. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District Notice is hereby Given that proposals will be received by the Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District for bid package: Contract No. RFQ #1-7 DESCRIPTION OF THE WORK: The District will be accepting separate bids packages for each of the trades below. The work includes, but is not limited to; Job Work Order projects for the following scopes of work: s s s s s s s

&LOORING !SPHALTAND3TRIPING &ENCING 4REE#ARE3ERVICES &IRE!LARM)NSPECTION 2OOlNG "OILER2EPAIRAND-AINTENANCE

"IDDERMUSTBELICENSEDINTHEPROPERCATEGORYFOREACHBIDPACKAGE"IDDINGDOCUMENTSCONTAINTHEFULLDESCRIPTIONOFTHEWORK -ANDATORYPRE BIDCONFERENCESWILLBEHELDON7EDNESDAY  THROUGH4HURSDAY ATTHEDistrict Facilities OfďŹ ce located at 25 Churchill Ave. Palo Alto, California 94306. The following schedule below displays the conference times for each trade: s s s s s s s

&LOORING AMnAM !SPHALTAND3TRIPING AMnAM &ENCING AMnAM 2OOlNG AMnAM 4REECARESERVICES AMnAM &IRE!LARM)NSPECTION AMnAM "OILER2EPAIRAND-AINTENANCE PMnPM

Transitions Births, marriages and deaths

Lew Allen Raney Lew Raney died on Friday, May 17. The longtime resident of Palo Alto was 79 years old. He was born on April 17, 1934 in Whittier, Calif. to Harry and Agnes Raney. He graduated from UC Berkeley in electrical engineering in 1956. At Berkeley, he met his wife, Shirley Anne Stone. They married in 1956. They traveled to Japan, Carmel, Hawaii and Hong Kong while Lew served in the U.S. Navy. They settled in Palo Alto in 1960, where they raised their two children, Diana and Stephen. He was a Palo Alto resident for 53 years. His work with Singer Link in the defense industry pioneered a number of early simulation technologies, including simulators for fighter jet flight training, secret surveillance planes and nuclear reactors. Later

in his career, he worked on a number of large early laser and hard disc storage devices. A lifelong sports fan, he led his UC Berkeley intramural football team to two championships and continued to play football in the annual holiday Mud Bowl with his son Steve and his friends from Palo Alto High School. He is survived by his son Steve of Palo Alto, and three grandchildren, Kristina and Brian Smith and Emma Raney. He was preceded in death by his wife, Shirley, and his daughter, Diana Smith of El Dorado, Calif.

Marian Carpenter Lockwood Marian Carpenter Lockwood, a longtime resident of Palo Alto, died on May 28.

Osvaldo Edeza-Acosta Ng February 27, 1978 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; May 29, 2013 Osvaldo Edeza-Acosta Ng, 35, died on May 29, 2013 at his home in Palo Alto. Osvaldo was born on February 27, 1978 in CuliacĂĄn, in northern Mexican state of Sinaloa, to his birth mother, Juana Acosta de Edeza. After his motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passing, Osvaldo came to the United States at age 16 for medical treatment, and was adopted by Harven and Nancy Ng. He graduated from Gunn High School in 1998, and became a talented painter whose work includes depictions of legends from his native Mexico, scenes of everyday life, and portraits, especially of his beloved family members. He is survived by a brother and two sisters from his birth family, his mother, Nancy Ng, and his twelve siblings and sixteen nieces and nephews. A rosary will be held at Roller, Hapgood & Tinney on Friday, June 7 at 7pm, and a funeral on Saturday, June 8 at 2:30pm at St. Albert the Great Church in Palo Alto. PA I D

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She was born on June 11, 1920 in Brooklyn, N.Y. She attended Smith College, where she earned a degree in economics. After graduating she worked in Washington, D.C., as a statistician. She married, and later moved to Palo Alto in 1958 with her husband and three children. She was an active member of the First Congregational Church and served in the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fellowship and the Ecumenical Hunger Project. Her son, Rick, predeceased her. She is survived by her two daughters, Barbara and Carol, son-in-law, Tim, and two grandsons, David and Scott.

Births

Renny Hwang and Ann Lin, Palo Alto, May 24, a girl.

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Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

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Outdoor-concert season is nearly upon us, from University Avenue to local parks and malls by Rebecca Wallace

Left: Grupo Falso Baiano will perform Brazilian choro (an early style of popular music) at Stanford Shopping Center on Aug. 15. Above: The Bay Area group Moâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Fone plays funky jazz at the Stanford mall on Aug. 29.

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ame a musical genre, and chances are you can hear it on the Midpeninsula this summer, outside and free. Indian percussion, Brazilian, beat box, Beatles, ragtime rock, kid rock, pop rock? All of the above, yes. Summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming, the hills have gone brown and the time for free al fresco concerts is nearly upon us. The biggie, World Music Day, brings 50some musical acts downtown on June 16, with other Palo Alto series starting up soon after. Opening nights are: June 15 for concerts at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, June 20 for SFJAZZâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Summerfest at Stanford Shopping Center, June 29 for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twilight Concert Series and July 3 for concerts at Town & Country Village. Tuesday noontime shows are already underway at the Lucile Packard Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aptly named Doobie Brothers Courtyard. Events in nearby cities include Wednesday evenings in Menlo Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fremont Park, starting June 19; Moun-

tain Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Summer Concert Series, beginning July 11; and Redwood Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slew of shows, already in full swing at Courthouse Square. Pack a picnic, dancing shoes, earplugs and sunblock â&#x20AC;&#x201D; whatever you need to kick off the season.

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alo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local incarnation of World Music Day still feels fresh, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already in its fifth year. The popular event is organized by the Palo Alto Recreation Foundation and chaired by Claude Ezran, who founded it with fellow Human Relations Commissioner Olana Hirsch Khan after he was inspired by the World Music Day festivals in his native France. Palo Alto celebrates the event (known as Fete de la Musique in France) every year on Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. Amateur and pro musicians will perform from 3 to 7:30 p.m. on corners, sidewalks and plazas downtown, along University Avenue and on King Plaza at City Hall. Street closures are planned

from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.: on University between Webster and High streets and on Hamilton Avenue between Bryant and Ramona streets. The scene on King Plaza is all about dance music. The California Blues Machine, billed as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bluesâ&#x20AC;? band, plays from 3 to 4:30 p.m., followed by Acoustic Son (acoustic folk, rock and originals) at 4:30. The T Clemente Band brings â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s rock to the plaza at 6. Meanwhile, musicians of many stripes will play casual streetside gigs along University and on neighboring Lytton Plaza at Emerson Street. Genres include folk, choral, harp, rock, classical, jazz, blues, pop and klezmer. World Music Day has also started incorporating a few dance performances. The first session, from 3 to 4:30 p.m., features two big vocal ensembles singing in front of 375 University Ave.: the Peninsulaires doing barbershop from 3 to 3:45, and the Peninsula Harmony

Chorus from 3:45 to 4:30. Other acts playing from 3 to 4:30 p.m. include event regular Singing Wood Marimba (music from Zimbabwe) at 525 University, Sara Furrer with American folk and country at 435 University, BuffaloChips with acoustic roots and steel drums at 353 University, and Park Avenue Jazz at 156 University. The second session, from 4:30 to 6 p.m., includes Punjabi folk dances with Nachda Punjab at 435 University and Indian percussion with Anutthaman Hari Krishnaswamy at 540 Bryant St. Some of the classical offerings are the Redwood Symphony Chamber Ensemble at 525 University and opera singer Catherine Vincenti at 479 University. Perpetual performer Cello Joe brings his beat-boxing cello act to 281 University. The third session is from 6 to 7:30 (continued on next page)

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Above: The Peninsulaires sing barbershop harmony at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Music Day festival in downtown Palo Alto. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be back at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event on June 16. Right: Country-folk-honky-tonk artist Jenny Kerr will play outdoors at the Lucile Packard Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital on July 16.

Roger Lybard

Cathy Rong

Arts & Entertainment

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quirky San Francisco chamber-pop band Foxtails Brigade (think violin, cello, dark lyrics). Up next: The Groove Kings with rock and R&B on July 20 in the 300 block of South California Avenue. The series then heads to Mitchell Park at 600 E. Meadow Drive for the last three concerts: the Dave Rocha Jazz Group on July 27, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musician Dr. Noize on Aug. 3, and Teens on the Green (several local teen bands) on Aug. 10. For more information, call 650-463-4930.

p.m. Performers include Johnny Law with rock/pop originals at 567 University, the Plaka Band playing Greek music on Lytton Plaza, and Ken Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gypsy jazz combo at 156 University. For a complete schedule and more information, go to pamusicday.org.

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Frank Duran

hree free al fresco concerts are planned this summer at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center at 3921 Fabian Way in Palo Alto, on the JCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Town Square. Audience members are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and picnic dinners. The jazz band Herd of Cats kicks things off at 7:30 p.m. on June 15, featuring three musicians who met while attending the Stanford Jazz Workshop: Lowell Moulton (guitar), Phil Hirshberg (sax) and Gary Wohl (piano). Next up is the Capriccio Chamber Orchestra at 7:30 on July 27. Dancers join the music at 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 24 for a tango evening. The San Francisco tango ensemble Redwood Tango Trio will perform, with a tango class open to the audience. For more information about the series, go to paloaltojcc.org or call 650-223-8699. Meanwhile, the City of Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twilight Concert Series is all set to start on June 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with one caveat. The first act is the United States Air Force Band of the Golden West, but city officials said this week that the booking is still tentative thanks to the sequester. Should the Air Force musicians indeed come to town, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll play June 29 at Rinconada Park, 777 Embarcadero Road. Twilight concerts are in various locations around Palo Alto; all are at 7 p.m. on Saturday nights. The second in the series is set for July 13 at Rinconada Park, featuring the

Top: Nachda Punjab perform Punjabi folk dances on University Avenue at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Music Day; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll return this year. Above: Laura Weinbach of the San Francisco chamberpop band Foxtails Brigade, booked for Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twilight Concert Series on July 13.

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ummerfest means free jazz gigs at Stanford Shopping Center, presented by SFJAZZ. All shows are Thursdays (except July 4) from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the courtyard between Nordstrom and Crate & Barrel. The Stanford Jazz Workshop Faculty All-Stars starts things off with straight-ahead jazz on June 20, with the Musical Art Quintet taking a more global approach on June 27. The sassy Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers are back at the series on July 11. On July 18, LaTiDo brings on a Cuban dance party, followed by the gypsy jazz musicians Gaucho on July 25. The Wayne Wallace Latin Jazz Quintet is set for Aug. 1, with cabaret singer Mara Hruby on Aug. 8. Grupo Falso Baiano plays Brazilian jazz on Aug. 15. Rock and jazz meet and mingle on Aug. 22 when Michael Zilber & The Heretics perform, and Moâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Fone offers up funk, sax and drums on Aug. 29. For more information, go to sfjazz.org. Up El Camino Real, Town & Country Village also hosts music for Palo Alto shoppers with its sixth annual July concert-fest. Shows are Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m. under the oak trees near the Embarcadero Road entrance to the mall. The Motown tribute band Top Shelf starts the series on July 3


Arts & Entertainment with R&B, soul, funk and a dollop of doo-wop. Next comes Jonathan Poretz with his Vegas tribute â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sinatra, Bennett, Davis Jr. tunes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on July 10. The next tribute is old-time rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll with the band Double Take on July 17. Avanta performs Brazilian music, complete with salsa dancers, on July 24. Double Funk Crunch offers the sounds of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s on July 31. For more about the concerts, call 650-325-3266. For those who prefer to swing and sway in the afternoon, the Lucile Packard Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital at 725 Welch Road in Palo Alto hosts noon concerts on Tuesdays into the fall. Mimi Dye & Friends play classical music on June 18, with instrumental Beatles music by Fools on the Hills on July 2. Jenny Kerr sings and plays (guitar, clawhammer banjo and harmonica, to name just a few instruments) country, folk and honky-tonk on July 16. Edgardo Cambon & LaTiDo Quartet perform Latin music on July 30. Later acts are: rocker Marc Levine with TLC on Aug. 13, the Dave Rocha Jazz Band on Aug. 27, Brazilian jazz musician Masha Campagne and her ensemble on Sept. 10, classical music with the Albany Consort on Sept. 24, and R&B with The Circuit Breakers on Oct. 8.

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utside Palo Alto, neighboring municipalities have plenty of music as well. The City of Menlo Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is the first, with Wednesday concerts (except July 3) at Fremont Park at University Drive and Santa Cruz Avenue from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Livewire starts the series with rock and pop on June 19, followed by funk and R&B with The Megatones on June 26. Tsunami Band plays classic rock on July 10. Acts after that are: pop and disco with the Cocktail Monkeys on July 17, rock with The Hot Rods on July 24, Jessica Johnson doing soul and jazz on July 31, Cajun/zydeco/blues with Tom Rigney and Flambeau on Aug. 7, and Beatles tribute band The Sun Kings on Aug. 14. For more, go to menlopark.org or call 650-3322220. In Mountain View, shows are also 6:30 to 8 p.m. On Castro Street, The Peelers play Top 40 mashups on July 11, with classic-rock band Daze On the Green on July 25 and Livewire on Aug. 8. In Cuesta Park at 615 Cuesta Drive, Cold Feat performs R&B on July 18. And Rengstorff Park at 201 S. Rengstorff Ave. hosts the 19-piece Pacific Mambo Orchestra on Aug. 1. For more, go to www. ci.mtnview.ca.us. Downtown Redwood Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Courthouse Square is also a major destination for concertgoers. Bands are now playing there every Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. through the end of September. Upcoming acts include: the Bon Jovi tribute band Steelhorse on June 7, Kenny Metcalfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elton John Tribute on June 14, the soft-rock group Mustache Harbor on June 21, and the pop-soul band Pride & Joy on June 28. For a full schedule, go to redwoodcity.org/ events. N

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ShopTalk by Daryl Savage

PIZZERIA DELFINA TO REPLACE EMPIRE TAP ROOM ... The unexpected closing last month of the Empire Tap Room, a Palo Alto fixture for 21 years, has made way for a new restaurant. Pizzeria Delfina will move into 651 Emerson St. after remodeling. The pizzeria has a long history in San Francisco. The original Delfina restaurant opened in 1998 in San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mission District; seven years later, Pizzeria Delfina opened next door. It became known for its Neapolitan-style, thin-crust pizza. In 2008, the second Pizzeria Delfina opened in Pacific Heights. Palo Alto is the third location, and downtown Burlingame will be the fourth. Both Palo Alto and Burlingame are looking at late September/early October openings, according to Craig Stoll, who owns the restaurants with his wife, Anne. The couple also owns Locanda Osteria, a two-year-old Italian restaurant/bar on Valencia Street in San Francisco. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been coming to Palo Alto for years and looking for locations for a restaurant, and then lo and behold, we got the call that Empire Tap Room was closing,â&#x20AC;? Stoll said. He plans to renovate the aging building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know to what extent yet. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see what we can afford,â&#x20AC;? he said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;SECRETâ&#x20AC;? APPLE STORE TAKING SHAPE ... Appleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest and possibly grandest store, while still hidden from ground-level view by tall black sheeting, is taking shape on the west end of Stanford Shopping Center. Although officials at both the mall and Appleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cupertino headquarters continue to be tight-lipped about the huge structure, construction is in full swing seven days a week, usually beginning at 7 a.m., according to a security guard at the site. A large crane towers above the single-story, 23-foot-tall store to carefully lift glass panels into place. When asked about the status of the store last week, company spokesperson Michaela Wilkinson would say only: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have made no announcement about a store at that location.â&#x20AC;? The identical statement was given to the Weekly one year ago, when the story first was printed about the 12,000-square-foot store beginning construction. At that time, a source familiar with the project said that initial estimates were for a grand opening in November 2012. The apparent delays may be due to the sensitive glass design of the building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Apple is a great innovator of glass. The glass technique used in this building is very advanced.

Unlike other materials, there is no forgiveness with glass. It has to be precise and must fit perfectly. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no margin of error. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a complicated process but will be well worth the time and investment to create the indoor/ outdoor environment in the design of the building,â&#x20AC;? said the source, who would speak only under the condition of anonymity. Although the project is obscured from shoppers in the mall, and even Google maps fail to yield clues since the satellite photo of the location has not been updated in more than a year, there is one way to see it, thanks to a creative Weekly reader. A two-story parking garage that faces Neiman Marcus makes for adequate viewing. Climb the 20 steps to the upper level to get a fairly unobstructed panorama of the sheer size and elegant design of the new Apple store. NEW BREAKFAST OPTION IN PALO ALTOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MIDTOWN ... Midtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest restaurant is ready to open. Owner John Hsu has pegged June 11 as the first day of business for The Palo Alto Breakfast House. He took over the Cafe Sophia spot at 2706 Middlefield Road and transformed the Afghani restaurant into a casual, colorful, light and airy space that will serve breakfast all day. N

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Eating Out

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*Four course dinner with Complementary glass of Proseco Champagne $59 per person

Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day

Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Menu â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 16th A ppetiz ers B r uschetta Al Pomodoro Toasted slices of Oven Baked Bread topped with Roma tomato cubes marinated with Olive Oil, Garlic and Fresh Basil

Day s â&#x20AC;&#x2122; r e h fat vation today!! y p p a H eser -1120 your r 50-254

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Salad Summer in Sor rento Watermelon topped with Feta cheese square, Arugula, fresh fi gs, Sicilian olives with Vidalia onion dressing. Strawberr y Fields Crisp Mixed Lettuce, Fresh Strawberries, Toasted Pecans, Gorgonzola Cheese and served with our tangy Vidalia Onion Dressing E nt re e s Filet Mignon Marinated with herbs served with in a mushroom sauce with spinach. Served with broccoli and a risotto cake fi lled with blue cheese. B raised Short Ribs in a light red wine sauce Served with Polenta and seasonal fresh cut Vegetables. L inguine Pescatore Fresh salmon, snapper, clams, mussels and prawns in a spicy tomato sauce.

Come see live music on the patio every Wednesday & Thursday, 5-8pm!

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Hear t shape Ravioli A Portobello & Shitake mushroom fi lling with Roma tomatoes and fresh spinach, in a light Marsala cream sauce. Grilled Salmon Served with sautĂŠed spinach wild rice and vegetables. D essert Tiramisu Italian dessert, consisting of alternating layers of coffee-soaked lady fi ngers and sweet mixture of mascarpone cheese, eggs and sugar. L i nzar Hear ts Cookies & Gelato Old fashioned ground nut dough cut into hearts and sandwiched with raspberry jam served with your choice of vanilla or chocolate gelato.

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 27


Arts & Entertainment

Serving Fine Chinese Cuisine in Palo Alto since 1956 A Great Place for Get-togethers Happy Hour s Catering s Gift CertiďŹ cates Private Dining s Meeting s Banquet Rooms

Worth a Look Art

Stanford Art Spaces [Chopsticks Always Optional]

We have daily dim sum service from 11am-2pm. We also offer tasty vegetarian and vegan dishes. In our Bar we have happy hours from 3pm to 6pm / Mon-Fri. Book now for our private rooms and banquet facilities. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget about our take out and delivery. In addition to all this, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re open 365 Days / 11am-9:30pm and parking is never a problem.

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Mingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinese Cuisine and Bar 1700 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto tel 650.856.7700 / fax 650.855.9479 / www.mings.com

Painter Bryan Ida may be a Palo Alto native, but many of his works are inspired by scenery a little farther south â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the architecture of Southern California, that is. In thick layers of abstract epoxy, he explores the rectangles and angles of towering buildings and how we relate to all those shapes and spaces. Currently, 15 of Idaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings are on display at Stanford University as part of the latest three-artist exhibit at Stanford Art Spaces. In the halls of the Paul G. Allen (C.I.S.) building and neighboring areas, Idaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings are up with figurative and abstract paintings by Warren J. Hedgpeth; and abstract fiber constructions by Aryana B. Londir. For her part, Londir often finds inspiration in the Connecticut woods and Arizona cacti. The current show is up through Aug. 8, with an artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reception planned for July 12 from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Paul G. Allen reception area at 420 Via Palou on campus. Exhibit hours are weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Go to cis.stanford.edu/~marigros or call 650-725-3622.

Pacific Art League. The horses stand in a misty, ethereal landscape near Glacier National Park in Montana. After a run, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pausing for some hay, with the fog and the heat from their sprinting creating a dreamlike mist around them. This image by Larry Calof, who had a career in corporate and securities law before photography became his real driving force, fits right in with the theme of the new show

  



 

  



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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Santa Monica Nightâ&#x20AC;? is one of the architecturally inspired paintings by Bryan Ida now on exhibit at Stanford Art Spaces.

hour-long film, part documentary and part musical made by Ada Bligaard Søby. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the movies that will be shown this week in Palo Alto as part of the 12th annual San Francisco Documentary Film Festival. Films from the festival, which is presented by SF IndieFest, will be screened locally at the Aquarius Theatre at 430 Emerson St., June 9 through June 11. Overall, the festival runs June 6 through June 23 in San Francisco, Oakland and Santa Cruz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Complaints Choirâ&#x20AC;? is set for a 3 p.m. screening on June 10. Other documentaries coming to Palo Alto include â&#x20AC;&#x153;After Happily Ever After,â&#x20AC;? an American film that showcases filmmaker Kate Schermerhornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s search to find the secrets to a contented, long-lasting marriage. It will screen at 7 p.m. June 9. The 2012 Emily Wick film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life With Larry Calofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 photo â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horses in the Mistâ&#x20AC;? is part of a new Alex,â&#x20AC;? showing at 7 p.m. June 10, looks at aniexhibition in Palo Alto. mal researcher Irene Pepperberg and her African Gray parrot Alex. At 9 p.m., â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bill Wâ&#x20AC;? tells at the Pacific Art League: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fur, Feathers, and Fins.â&#x20AC;? If only â&#x20AC;&#x153;fogâ&#x20AC;? were included. The show features works by 29 the story of the Alcoholics Anonymous co-founder by that artists: animal-themed prints, photos, paintings and draw- name. The 2012 film was made by Dan Carrachino and Kevin Hanlon. ings chosen by juror Michael Azgour, himself a painter. Another title is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Terms and Conditions,â&#x20AC;? showing at 7 Also new at the art league this week is an exhibition of paintings by San Jose artist Zhaonan Duan, who does p.m. June 11. This new American film by Cullen Hoback portraits of Chinese opera singers. Students of artist Leah looks at what computer users are really agreeing to in these minutely written paragraphs. Lubin are also displaying their work. Tickets are $11. For a full schedule of the Palo Alto All the shows run through June 28, with a reception scheduled for tonight, June 7, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. The screenings, go to sfindie.com or call 415-552-5580. evening includes Lubinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance event â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Beats: A&E DIGEST Where It All Began,â&#x20AC;? with art, music and poetry readings paying tribute to the Beat poets. While the main art league CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THEATER AWARDED NEA GRANT ... The building is being renovated, events are at 227 Forest Ave. Palo Alto Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theatre is one of 77 nonprofits to be in downtown Palo Alto, neighboring the construction. For awarded a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Readâ&#x20AC;? grant from the National Endowmore information, go to pacificartleague.org or call 650ment for the Arts. As part of the project, which aims to 321-3891. â&#x20AC;&#x153;revitalize the role of literature in American culture,â&#x20AC;? the

Film SF DocFest

A pair of Finnish performance artists roams the globe asking one burning question: â&#x20AC;&#x153;What are you complaining about?â&#x20AC;? Every little grumble becomes fuel for a melody, as the whiners learn to sing in chorus about whateverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bugging them. This is the premise behind â&#x20AC;&#x153;Complaints Choir,â&#x20AC;? a 2009

theater received a grant of $11,300; overall, the awards totaled $1 million. Focusing on the Tobias Wolff novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old School,â&#x20AC;? the theater will send a teaching artist to participating schools to develop creative activities around the book, which could take the form of theatrical readings, musical performances or other projects. Wolff will attend a gala event and address the students. Past events, which included some Palo Alto schools, focused on Ray Bradburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fahrenheit 451â&#x20AC;? and Julia Alvarezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Time of the Butterflies.â&#x20AC;?


Movies

THE INCREDIBLE UNTOLD TRUE STORY OF WIKILE AKS â&#x20AC;&#x153;BRILLIANT & PROFOUND!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;ALTOGETHER ENTHRALLING! I thrilled to WikiLeaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; revelations!â&#x20AC;?

OPENINGS

We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks --!QUARIUS 4HETITLEOF!LEX'IBNEYSAMBITIOUSDOCU MENTARY HAS AN IRONIC EDGE 7IKI,EAKS DOESNT STEAL SECRETS 4HE WEBSITE FUNCTIONS AS AN ELECTRONIC DROP BOXTHATANONYMOUSLYANDUNTRACEABLYCROSS PUBLISHES SENSITIVEDOCUMENTSINSUCHWAYSTHATTHEINFORMATION CANNOTBEREMOVEDFROMTHE)NTERNET !CCORDINGTOTHEENIGMATIC*ULIAN!SSANGE THE!US TRALIAN FOUNDER OF THE MEDIA ORGANIZATION THE GOAL IS REFORMANDTHEMETHODTRANSPARENCY4HEPHRASEABOUT STEALINGSECRETSCOMESFROM-ICHAEL(AYDEN THEFORMER DIRECTOROFTHE.ATIONAL3ECURITY!GENCYAND#ENTRAL)N TELLIGENCE!GENCY ANDAPPLIESNOTONLYTOTHEACTIVITIES OFTHE53GOVERNMENTAND!SSANGESPOSSIBLEBAITING OFWHISTLEBLOWERS BUTALSOTO!RMY0FC"RADLEY-AN NING ACCUSEDOFAIDINGTHEENEMYBYSENDINGTROVESOF

CLASSIFIEDDOCUMENTSTO7IKI,EAKS 4HE/SCAR WINNINGDIRECTOROFh4AXITOTHE$ARK3IDEv SHOWSALLSIDES PLAYINGTRUTHANDCONSEQUENCESWITHTHE ONGOINGSAGACURRENTLYUNFOLDINGINTHEDAILYNEWS 2ELYINGONARCHIVALFOOTAGE INTERVIEWS GRAPHICSAND VOICE OVERS 'IBNEYHASASTRENGTHTHATLIESINHISABIL ITYTOWRESTLEANENORMOUSAMOUNTOFINFORMATIONINTO AN EASY TO FOLLOW TIMELINE ,IKE A FAST PACED THRILLER THEFILMBEGINSWITH7!.+7ORMS!GAINST.UCLEAR +ILLERS -ELBOURNECOMPUTERHACKERSWHOUNLEASHEDA WORMAGAINST.!3!INTOPROTESTITSLAUNCHOFTHE PLUTONIUM POWERED'ALILEOSPACECRAFT3PECULATINGTHAT THETEENAGE*ULIAN!SSANGEWASONEOFTHEACTIVISTS THE DOCUMENTARYTHENWARPSACROSSTWODECADESTOFOCUS ON!SSANGEANDHIS7IKI,EAKSFUELINGTHEPUBLICRAGE AGAINSTTHEMELTDOWNOF)CELANDSTHREEMAJORCOMMER (continued on the next page)

MOVIE TIMES All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A PROPULSIVE ESPIONAGE TECHNO-THRILLER!â&#x20AC;?

GO TO FACEBOOK.COM/ WESTEALSECRETS FOR MORE

STARTS FRIDAY, 6/7 IN SELECT THEATRES                  

     



           

GET IT ON iTUNES STARTING FRIDAY 6/7 AT iTUNES.COM/WESTEALSECRETS

++++

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

A GREAT CONSPIRACY THRILLER.â&#x20AC;? A TWISTY, BREATHLESS GENRE FILM.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

42 (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 1:50 & 7:35 p.m. After Earth (PG-13) ( Century 16: 10 & 11:15 a.m. & 12:30, 1:45, 3:05, 4:20, 5:35, 7, 8:15, 9:30 & 10:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m. & 12:55, 1:55, 3:20, 4:25, 5:50, 7:05, 8:20, 9:35 & 10:45 p.m. Before Midnight (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: 1:15, 4, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Bus Stop (1956) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri 7:30 p.m. Calamity Jane (1953) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat-Sun 5:35 & 9:25 p.m. The East (PG-13) ((( Palo Alto Square: 1:30, 4:15 & 7:15 p.m. Fri-Sat also at 10 p.m.

BRIT MARLING ALEXANDER SKARSGĂ&#x2026;RD ELLEN PAGE AND PATRICIA CLARKSON

Epic (PG) ((( Century 16: 11:20 a.m. & 4:35 & 9:50 p.m. In 3D 1:55 & 7:15 p.m. Century 20: 10:50 a.m. & 1:20, 4, 6:45 & 9:25 p.m. In 3D 11:50 a.m. & 2:30, 5:15, 8 & 10:35 p.m. Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 10 a.m. & 1, 4, 7:10 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m. & 12:10, 1:55, 3:05, 4:50, 6:10, 7:50, 9:15 & 10:50 p.m. Frances Ha (R) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 2:15, 4:30, 7 & 9:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:55 a.m. & 2:25, 4:55, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) (( Century 16: 11:45 a.m. & 6:40 p.m. In 3D 3:10 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 12:30 & 6:50 p.m. In 3D 3:40 & 10 p.m. The Hangover Part III (R) (1/2 Century 16: 11:30 a.m. & 2:05, 4:45, 7:30 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:55 & 10:25 p.m. The Internship (PG-13) (( Century 16: 10:05 & 11:35 a.m. & 1:05, 2:35, 4:05, 5:30, 7:05, 8:40 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 12:25, 3:15, 6:15 & 9:10 p.m. In XD 10:55 a.m. & 1:50, 4:45, 7:40 & 10:35 p.m. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 1:25 & 7:35 p.m. In 3D 10:20 a.m. & 4:25 & 10:30 p.m. p.m. In 3D 10:45 a.m. & 4:40 & 10:40 p.m.

Century 20: 1:40 & 7:40

Mud (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 1:50 & 7:35 p.m. Sat 1:50 & 7:35 p.m. Now You See Me (PG-13) (( Century 16: 10:35 a.m. & 12:05, 1:30, 2:55, 4:15, 5:45, 7:20, 8:45 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 10:50 a.m. & noon & 1:30, 2:50, 4:15, 5:35, 7, 8:30 & 10:15 p.m. The Purge (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m. & 1:15, 3:30, 5:40, 8 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:05 a.m. & 12:05, 1:15, 2:20, 3:25, 4:35, 5:40, 6:55, 8:10, 9:20 & 10:30 p.m.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

THOUGHT-PROVOKING AND ENTERTAINING.â&#x20AC;?

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Sun 2 p.m. Wed 2 & 7 p.m. Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat-Sun 3:40 & 7:30 p.m. Some Came Running (1958) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri 5 & 9:20 p.m. Spirit of the Marathon (2007) (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Wed 7 p.m. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 10:10 a.m. & 12:10, 1:10, 4:10, 6:15, 7:25 & 10:35 p.m. In 3D 11:10 a.m. & 2:15, 3:15, 5:15, 8:30 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 10:45 a.m. & 1:45, 4:45, 7:45 & 10:50 p.m. In 3D 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 & 9:20 p.m. (Sun no 1:45 p.m.) Stories We Tell (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 10:15 a.m. & 12:55, 3:45, 6:50 & 9:35 p.m. This Is The End (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Tue 7 & 9:35 p.m. & 12:05 a.m. Wed 12:10, 2:45, 5:25, 8:05 & 10:45 p.m. We Steal Secrets (R) ((( Aquarius Theatre: 2, 5 & 8 p.m. What Maisie Knew (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 11:30 a.m. & 2, 4:30, 7:10 & 9:40 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 2, 4:30 & 7:25 p.m. Fri-Sat also at 9:50 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding For show times, plot synopses, trailers, theater addresses and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline. com/movies

WeAreTheEast.com

!  EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS !             START FRIDAY, JUNE 7   PALO ALTO

SAN JOSE

Support Palo Alto Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s print and online coverage of our community. Join today: SupportLocalJournalism.org/PaloAlto Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 29


Movies (continued from the previous page)

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Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square Fri and Sat 6/7 – 6/8 The East – 1:30, 4:15, 7:15, 10:00 What Maisie Knew - 2:00, 4:30, 7:25, 9:50 Sun thru Thurs 6/9 – 6/13 The East – 1:30, 4:15, 7:15 What Maisie Knew - 2:00, 4:30, 7:25 Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

FOLLOWED ALSO NOTING THAT SOLDIERS CASUALLYEXCHANGE#$SOFSUCHFOOT AGEASTHOUGHTRADINGCARDS 'IBNEYUSESSUCHhWHISTLEBLOWINGv TOSETTHESTAGEFORADISTRESSED"RAD LEY-ANNINGTORELEASETHOUSANDSOF SENSITIVE DOCUMENTS TO 7IKI,EAKS *UST AS THE PROLIFIC DIRECTOR CARE FULLYCRAFTSTHENARRATIVE SODOESHE CLEVERLY DEPICT THE PRINCIPAL PLAYERS ASTHOUGHINAFICTIONFILM4HESELF ASSURED !SSANGE WITH HIS SHOCK OF WHITE HAIR AND GROWING COCKINESS EMERGESASTHERISINGROCKSTAROFTHE )NTERNET/NTHEOTHERHAND -ANNING ISREPRESENTEDASANALMOSTINVISIBLE MAN BORN WHERE THERE WERE hMORE CHURCHPEWSTHANPEOPLEvIN#ENTRAL /KLAHOMA(ESSMALLINSTATURE AN OUTSIDERGRAPPLINGWITHGENDER IDEN TITYISSUES ANDABROKENSOULDEEPLY DISTURBEDBYTHEREPORTSTOWHICHHE HAD DATABASE ACCESS !SSANGE GETS PLENTY OF CAMERA TIME -ANNINGS WORDSARETYPEDONABLANKSCREEN AS THOUGHBEINGPECKEDOUTINSOLITUDE ONHISCOMPUTER !LTHOUGHh7E3TEAL3ECRETSvRAISES BIGQUESTIONSABOUTNATIONALSECURITY AND FREEDOM OF INFORMATION IN THE DIGITALAGE THEDOCUMENTARYTRIVIAL

IZESTHESERIOUSNATUREOFTHECONTENT IN SEVERAL WAYS 4OO MUCH TIME IS SPENTINSPECULATIONABOUTTHEMOTIVA TIONSOF!SSANGEAND-ANNING4HE APPROACHMAYADDLAYERSTOTHEhCHAR ACTERSvANDBETTERENGAGEVIEWERS BUT THEPRESENTATIONOFTHERAPECHARGES AGAINST !SSANGE AND THE SEXUALITY AND ANGER ISSUES OF -ANNING SEN SATIONALIZE MORE THAN INFORM #LIPS FROM POPULAR CULTURE RANGING FROM h7AR'AMESv TO h3TAR 4REK )) 4HE 7RATH OF +HAN v ADD UNNECESSARY LEVITYANDPADTHERUNNINGTIME 1UOTING 3IDDHARTHA THE DOCU MENTARY NOTES THAT h4HREE THINGS CANNOTBELONGHIDDENTHESUN THE MOONANDTHETRUTHv4HELATTERHAS YETTOBEREVEALED 2ATED2FORSOMEDISTURBINGVIO LENT IMAGES LANGUAGE AND SEXUAL MATERIAL4WOHOURS MINUTES ˆ3USAN4AVERNETTI

The Internship -#ENTURY #ENTURY 'OOGLE GOES (OLLYWOOD IN h4HE )NTERN SHIP vANINTERMITTENTLYAMUSINGBUT

PENINSULA

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

Chef Chu’s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Ming’s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

ITALIAN

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Cucina Venti

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

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www.PaloAltoOnline.com To read Weekly critic Peter Canavese’s review of “The East,” go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. He gave the thriller three stars and called the story “cleverly built.”

“IF I WERE ONLY ALLOWED TO SEE ONE MOVIE THIS YEAR, I’D WANT IT TO BE BEFORE MIDNIGHT. IF I WERE ONLY ALLOWED TWO TRIPS TO A THEATER THIS YEAR, I’D SEE IT TWICE.” -Mary Pols, TIME MAGAZINE

“A WONDERFUL PARADOX: A MOVIE PASSIONATELY COMMITTED TO THE IDEAL OF IMPERFECTION THAT IS ITSELF VERY CLOSE TO PERFECT.” -A.O. Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES

254-1120 1390 Pear Ave, Mountain View www.cucinaventi.com

Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions

-Owen Gleiberman, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

“FASCINATING TO WATCH!” -Mick LaSalle, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant 462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

and more at ShopPaloAlto,

Thaiphoon

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323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

and ShopMountainView

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Sports Shorts

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Keeping his job is the next goal for Cardinal grad

OF LOCAL NOTE . . . Menlo-Atherton High grad Jeff Keller, a junior at Dartmouth, has been named to the first team on the Capital One Academic All-American Baseball Team by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). Keller is the first Big Green baseball player ever to earn Academic All-America honors and the only player from the Ivy League on any of the three teams this year. Keller, an outfielder from Atherton and a former member of the Menlo Park Legends, is an economics major with a 3.97 grade-point average and enjoyed a standout season for the Big Green. Dartmouth won its sixth consecutive Rolfe Division title in the Ivy League and finished the year with a school-record 32 victories. Keller earned a spot on the All-Ivy First Team by finishing among the top three in the conference in 10 offensive statistical categories as he led the loop in runs scored (39), RBI (41), doubles (21), triples (4), total bases (99) and slugging percentage by more than 100 points (.702). Keller hit .369 for the season with six homers and was perfect on the basepaths, stealing eight bases in eight attempts. . . . Rachel Ersted, a 2010 graduate of Palo Alto High and now a rising senior at UC Berkeley, won the 2013 NCAA Division I Varsity 8+ National Championship at Eagle Creek Reservoir in Indianapolis, Indiana on Sunday. As cox of Calâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top boat in the grand final, Ersted helped top Varsity 8+ entries from Princeton, Ohio State, Virginia, Washington and USC.

BANK OF WEST . . . The field for the 2013 Bank of the West Classic has been considerably improved by the addition of Agnieszka Radwanska, the No. 4-ranked tennis womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis player in the world.

ON THE AIR Friday Track and field: NCAA Championships, 4:30 p.m.; ESPNU

Saturday Track and field: NCAA Championships, 2 p.m.; ESPNU

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Gunn junior Sarah Robinson finished third in the 1,600 and fifth in the 3,200 at the CIF State Track and Field Championships last weekend, but will spend her summer months playing club soccer.

(continued on page 34)

TRACK & FIELD

PREP BASEBALL

State medalists have different summer plans

Menlo, SHP join PAL Bay Division WBAL rivals join M-A in a new CCS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; league

by Keith Peters fter following the same path during the season while setting records and earning medals at the 2013 CIF State Track and Field Championships, juniors Sarah Robinson of Gunn and Maddy Price of Menlo School will have quite different summers. Robinson, after finishing third in the 1,600 and fifth in the 3,200 in her first state finals last Saturday at Buchanan High in Clovis, will put her track shoes away and concentrate on soccer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since the state meet ended on a high note, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think I will do any summer meets,â&#x20AC;? Robinson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think I will focus on soccer and still do some training. I will eventually begin prepping for cross country. Right now, (head coach) PattiSue (Plumer) and I are creating a training schedule for the

by Rick Eymer

A

(continued on page 33)

B

Kenneth Wilner

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by David Driver ust a few days after making his dreamy debut in Major League Baseball with the Washington Nationals, former Stanford pitcher Erik Davis was roughly returned to reality. Davis made his second big league outing, and first at home, on Wednesday as he allowed three runs in one inning in a 10-1 loss to the New York Mets. Davis did fan three batters. He made his big league debut with Washington on Saturday in Atlanta, coming out of the bullpen to retire all five batters that he faced, with two strikeouts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a dream come true and I was happy I did well,â&#x20AC;? said Davis, 26, sitting in the Washington dugout prior to batting practice on Tuesday. Davis, a 2004 graduate of Mountain View High School, had a solid career at Stanford before he was drafted in the 13th round in 2008 by the San Diego Padres. His early minor league career included stops in the Single-A California League. But in spring training of 2011, as he prepared to head out to another San Diego farm team, he was traded to the Washington Nationals, a franchise that had lost more than 100 games at the big league level in 2010. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know, it was crazy. It was right at the end of spring training and everyone was planning on where they were going (with the Padres),â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only did I change teams but fly across the country and meet all of the different people I had no idea who they were. It was definitely a shock to the system. It took me a little while to adjust.â&#x20AC;? Davis had made trips to Washington with his father, Tom, who works for NASA, but that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help much in baseball circles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was going to places I was not really quite familiar with,â&#x20AC;? he added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was no sense of comfort ability with anything and the whole situation. I definitely could have handled it better. The first time that happens it is tough for anyone. In the long run it made me stronger.â&#x20AC;? And in the long run, perhaps, it helped him reach the Major Leagues.

J

Kenneth Wilner

A BIG NIGHT . . . Former Stanford standout John Mayberry Jr. hit his first career grand slam with two outs on the bottom of the 11th to carry his Philadelphia Phillies to a 7-3 victory over the visiting Florida Marlins on Tuesday night in Major League Baseball action. Mayberry entered the game in the seventh inning and tied it in the 10th with a solo homer before delivering his game-winning hit. Mayberry is the first player to hit two extra-inning home runs in one game since Baltimoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mike Young in 1987. He is also the first player in baseball history to hit two extra-inning homers in one game, with the second home run being a walk-off grand slam. He is also the first Philadelphia player to hit a walk-off slam since Dale Murphy on Aug. 6, 1991.

Former Stanford pitcher Davis has two outings under his belt with Washington

Menlo junior Maddy Price will continue running this summer after her sixth place in the 400.

aseball just wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be the same in the Peninsula Athletic League next season. In fact, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s likely to get a whole lot better thanks to the pending merger of the West Bay Athletic League and the PAL in baseball only. In anticipation of the new league order, the Central Coast Section baseball committee voted to extend â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; status to the PAL Bay Division for next year. The CCS Board of Managers likely will make it official in January. With the addition of Menlo School and Sacred Heart Prep, the Bay Division could become a sort of super league. The Knights and Gators tied for the WBAL title this season, and both teams advanced to the quarterfinal of the CCS Division III playoffs, with Menlo reaching the title game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scheduling will be a lot easier,â&#x20AC;? Menlo coach Craig Schoof said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More teams will want to play Bay teams now that we are an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; league.â&#x20AC;? Both the PAL Bay Division and WBAL were â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (continued on page 34)

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 31


Sports WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SWIMMING

STANFORD ROUNDUP

Tosky set for busy summer

Women chase NCAA track titles Carter reaches 400 hurdles final, Weissenbach and Fedronic in 800 finale

Palo Alto High grad gets a good tuneup at Santa Clara GP by Rick Eymer

S

P

Kyle Terada

alo Alto High grad Jasmine Tosky learned a lot about training outside the pool during her freshman year at USC. She also learned that swimming is serious business, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always time for fun. Tosky completed her weekend at the Arena Grand Prix at Santa Clara on a good note last Sunday at the George F. Haines International Swim Center. She finished fifth in the 200-meter individual medley in 2:15.85, in a race that featured Olympians Caitlin Leverenz and Missy Franklin. Tosky also finished second, and was the top American, in the 200 fly in 2:10.89. Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Audrey LaCroix won the race in 2:08.64. On Saturday, Tosky also finished eighth in the 50 free, swimming a confounding 33.60. And no, she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cramp up during the race. She choose to swim the breaststroke. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had an open lane next to me, so I thought I would take advantage,â&#x20AC;? Tosky said, smiling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dave (USC coach Dave Salo) liked it. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure what (Palo Alto Stanford Aquatics coach) Tony (Batis) thought.â&#x20AC;? Tosky earned one of her two AllAmerican honors during her first collegiate season the 200-yard fly, finishing fifth at the NCAA championship in Indianapolis with a time

by Rick Eymer tanford junior Kori Carter hopes to repeat her efforts from Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinal in Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship race of the 400-meter hurdles at the 2013 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in Eugene, Ore. Carter, who was named Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s West Region Track Athlete of the Year by the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association on Monday, ran the fastest womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 400 hurdle preliminary race in meet history (54.67) and joined 800-meter runners Justine Fedronic and Amy Weissenbach in Friday finals. Carter won the Pac-12 championship in the 100-meter hurdles, in which she was scheduled to compete Thursday, and 400 hurdles and is ranked among the top 10 in the world in both events. She is also scheduled to compete on Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1,600 relay team. Carterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season best of 54.21 in the 400 hurdles ranks her No. 3 in the world and No. 1 in the United States. She has three of the top five times in that race in the U.S. Her 100 hurdles time of 12.76 ranks her No. 8 in the world and No. 2 in the NCAA. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 400 hurdles race promises drama as Carter looks to complete an undefeated season against 2012 Olympic finalist Georganne Moline of Arizona. The two women already have raced against each other four times. Moline holds the other two-fastest times in the U.S. Carterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 54.67 in the prelims surpassed the previous NCAA preliminary record of 55.35 by Virginia Techâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Queen Harrison in 2010. In their fourth matchup this season, Carter used a late-race surge to maintain her undefeated record â&#x20AC;&#x201D; against her Pac-12 rival and for the season. Moline was second in the heat in 54.89. This is the first time Carter has qualified for an NCAA final, after three previous appearances in NCAA indoor and outdoor championship meets. Her time is nearly 10 seconds faster than she ran in this meet last year (1:04.19) and more than four seconds faster than she ran as a freshman (59.14). Carter has broken 55 seconds four times this season. No other collegian besides Moline has done so even once. Fedronic and Weissenbach became the first Stanford teammates to reach the final of the 800. Fedronic, who attended nearby Carlmont High in Belmont, was second in her heat with a time of 2:04.07. They also become the first from Stanford to reach a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 800 final since

Palo Alto High grad Jasmine Tosky gained a valuable swimming education during her first season at USC and has carried that over into the early summer. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll compete at the U.S. National Championships in a few weeks. of 1:55.11. She also earned an AllAmerican award with the 800 free relay team, which finished sixth. Tosky will be back in Indianapolis for the U.S. National Championships that begin June 25. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be focusing on the 200 fly, 200 free and 200 IM, although she may throw in a 50-meter event just for fun. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really did a lot of experimenting at USC,â&#x20AC;? Tosky said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to try different things and I think that I benefited from that.â&#x20AC;? She swam the Trojansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; best times of the season in the 200 fly (1:53.98) and 200 free (1:45.14) and helped set the school record in the 200 free relay (1:28.42). Tosky swam in eight events during the Santa Clara Grand Prix, including two relays. She swam in three â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; finals and a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; final. The PASA 800 free relay team, which also included Sacred Heart

Prep junior Ally Howe, Gunn sophomore Jennifer Campbell and California sophomore Camille Cheng, finished second on Saturday. PASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 400 medley relay team, with Tosky, Campbell, Howe and Monta Vista junior Sarah Kaunitz, was fifth. Tosky appeared tired on Friday and Saturday, seemingly pushing herself through every event. Sunday, she seemed fresh, relaxed and smooth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I usually do better later in a meet,â&#x20AC;? Tosky said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was tired early but it was more mentally tiring. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been training a lot and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been rough, but worked out better.â&#x20AC;? One of the first things she learned about college swimming was the training done outside the pool. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I lifted a lot more and changed my training,â&#x20AC;? Tosky said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I got back with PASA, the sets were

just as hard as I remember them.â&#x20AC;? She also trained alongside the Trojan Swim Club occasionally and found the experience eye-opening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here are some of the greatest swimmers in the world and the guys would talk about surfing,â&#x20AC;? Tosky said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It made me realize there is a time to focus and a time to have fun. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried surfing but I also donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to the beach a lot.â&#x20AC;? Tosky already has qualified for the World University Games, which get underway in Kazan, Russia on July 6, in both the 100 fly and 200 fly. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hoping to finish among the top two at the national championships, which also serve as the world trials, and change her itinerary to include Barcelona for the World Championships that start July 16. Gunn grad Rachael Acker and Palo Alto grad Liv Jensen are also qualified for the University Games. N

Stanford grad Godsoe is back enjoying swimming Solid efforts at Arena Grand Prix at Santa Clara meet gives former All-American a bright outlook for the summer. by Rick Eymer motivation. I had a bad freshman ugene Godsoe returned to year at Stanford but that became the Stanford to help put the fun avenue toward the NCAA title as a back into swimming. Being senior.â&#x20AC;? able to reconnect with former CarHe swam 54.69 in Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dinal teammates and others in the championship race, just behind the Stanford community shared winning time was a bonus. of 54.47 produced by His life and swimAmerican Olympian ming career on the Matt Grevers and upswing, the 25-yearRussian Olympian old former NCAA Arkady Vyatchanin. champion seems to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a month out have a balanced perfrom the world trials spective about life. and more than times Godsoe added I was more interested a third-place finin seeing where I ish in the 100 back am,â&#x20AC;? Godsoe said. Eugene Godsoe (an event in which â&#x20AC;&#x153;Training has been he won his NCAA title in 2010) consistent and that has been paying on Sunday to his weekend at the off. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m seeing improvement month Arena Grand Prix at Santa Clara, by month.â&#x20AC;? a meet that featured most of the top Godsoe, who spent two years American swimmers. He was fourth training at Swim MAC in Charlotte in the 100-meter fly on Saturday at following graduation, has his sights the George F. Haines International on a possible berth in the World Swim Center. Championships. He has to finish â&#x20AC;&#x153;My whole career has been a among the top two at the U.S. Naseries of ups and downs,â&#x20AC;? Godsoe tional Championships, which begin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve grown to use that as June 25 in Indianapolis.

E

Page 32Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a good 2012 but I knew I had more in me,â&#x20AC;? Godsoe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swimming was 24/7 there and now I do a lot of things that are exciting to me. Now only can I immerse myself in the sport, I can immerse myself in Silicon Valley and reunite with friends with start-up companies.â&#x20AC;? He also became part of a group of Stanford grads who formed their own post-grad swim group through Stanford swimming and Palo Alto Stanford Aquatics. That group also includes Chad La Tourette, Bobby Bollier, BJ Johnson and Jason Dunford, all of whom competed in Santa Clara over the weekend and swam in an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; final. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an elite group who has a strong desire to improve and get to the next level,â&#x20AC;? Godsoe said. La Tourette finished third in the 1,500 free in 15:28.22, Bollier was sixth in the 200 fly with a time of 2:00.00, just behind Stanford freshman and Sacred Heart Prep grad Tom Kremerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time of 1:59.91, and Johnson was seventh in the 100 breast in 1:02.65.

Dunford, who represented Kenya in the last Olympic Games, finished third in the 100 fly on Friday, swimming a 52.69. Godsoe was right behind in 52.85. Johnson, whose best events are in the breaststroke, â&#x20AC;&#x153;has really developedâ&#x20AC;? Godsoe said. La Tourette, an eight-time AllAmerican, won the 2010 NCAA title in the 1,650 free and holds the Stanford record in the event. Bollier is a 14-time All-American and finished as an NCAA runner-up in the 200 fly in 2011. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also an assistant swim coach at Menlo-Atherton High. Bollier and La Tourette each finished third in their respective events at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s United States Olympic Trials, just missing a chance to swim in the Olympics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still fun to improve,â&#x20AC;? Godsoe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun to challenge myself. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still learning about myself and swimming.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s committed to swimming at least through 2014, when he will re-evaluate his expectations for the future. N

(continued on next page)


Sports

State track (continued from page 31)

Spencer Allen/sportsimagewire.com

Stanford sophomore Brianna Bain collected her second top-three javelin finish as she finished third in the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s javelin with a mark of 176-11 at the NCAA Track and Field Championships on Wednesday. (continued from previous page)

Baseball Stanford senior pitcher Mark Appel is one of five finalists for the 2013 Dick Howser Trophy presented by Easton Foundations, the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association announced Thursday. The award, given to the top player in collegiate baseball, is based on two rounds of national voting. Appel, Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-time strikeout leader (372), ranks third in the Pac-12 with a 2.12 ERA and boasts a .203 opposing batting average. The Houston, Texas, native leads the conference and ranks fourth in the nation with 130 punchouts. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis Stanford junior Nicole Gibbs earned her second straight Honda Sports Award for tennis. Her se-

Spencer Allen/sportsimagewire.com

Ashley Freeman in 2006. Weissenbach, who improved her own school freshman record, was third in 2:04.19, and was the first to advance on time. She remains No. 2 on Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-time performance list behind Fedronic, who owns the school record of 2:03.54. Also competing Friday, Stanford junior Jessica Tonn and sophomore Aisling Cuffe will look to earn their first outdoor All-America honors in the 5,000. Tonnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 15:54.90 is the 13th-best time in the field and Cuffe, a two-time American junior record-breaker in the indoor 3,000, is 24th at 16:15.53. Stanford senior Alyssa Wisdom competes in the shot put on Saturday. Stanford junior Erik Olson will compete in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5,000. Stanford sophomore Brianna Bain, meanwhile, collected her second top-three javelin finish on Wednesday. Bain, the 2012 NCAA runner-up, rallied from seventh to third on her fourth throw, but was unable to improve upon her mark of 176-11 or her place. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t accomplish what I set out to do,â&#x20AC;? said Bain, who entered the meet with a collegiate-leading throw of 183-10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But at the same time, I feel like I competed well.â&#x20AC;? Stanford junior Kori Carter clocked 54.67, the fastest 400 hurdles prelim in NCAA history, to qualify for Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finals in Eugene, Ore. lection by the Collegiate Women Sports Awards (CWSA) program recognizes Gibbs as the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top female player in her sport. An All-American in singles during each of her first three seasons, Gibbs collected her fourth career singles title when she became the NCAAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first repeat champion since former Cardinal standout Amber Liu (2003-04) and Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 16th all-time collegiate singles winner (14 NCAA, 2 AIAW) overall. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Stanford 2012 Olympic gold medalist Melissa Seidemann was named

the 2013 Peter J. Cutino Award winner, the Olympic Club of San Francisco announced Saturday night. It is the first such honor of Seidemannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career. She was previously a finalist for the award, given annually to the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top male and female collegiate water polo player, in 2011. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crew Stanford lightweight rowingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s I Eight made it four national championships in a row Sunday, capturing the IRA Championships Grand Final with a four-second victory over the field at Lake Natoma. N

summer months.â&#x20AC;? While she will continue to run during workouts, Robinson will spend much of her â&#x20AC;&#x153;vacationâ&#x20AC;? playing for her Mountain View/Los Altos Lightning club soccer team. The highlight of the summer will be a trip to Aurora, Colo., for the ECNL Regionals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For the remainder of the club soccer season, she is going to be a soccer player,â&#x20AC;? Plumer said of Robinson, who has verbally committed to play soccer at Stanford. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once that is over, she and I will sit down to plan out the cross-country season.â&#x20AC;? Price, who finished sixth in the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 400 meters (54.94) in her first appearance in the state finals, will continue to run track. First up will be a couple of qualifying meets for the National Junior Olympics, June 21-22 at Chabot College in Hayward and July 5-6 at Diablo Valley College in Concord. Price then will travel to SainteTherese, Quebec and will compete at the Canadian Junior Track and Field Championships (July 12-14) in an attempt to make the team for the Junior Pan American Games in Colombia in August. Priceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents are both from Canada (mom Toronto, dad Ottawa). She has an application for dual citizenship currently being processed. Price will run both the 200 and 400 and could have as many as six races. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll then return home for a short stay before heading off to the JO Nationals (July 22-28) in Greensboro, N.C. Again, she could be facing as many as six races. Price ran three times at the state meet, failing to advance in the 200 on Friday but running 55.15 in the 400 prelims â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the No. 2 qualifying time â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to reach for Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finals. There she finished sixth in 54.94, the second-fastest time in her life â&#x20AC;&#x201D; second only to the 54.78 that won her the Central Coast Section title. The top qualifier, Nia Dorner of Cordova, made good on her top seed by pulling away in the final to win in a state-leading 53.00. Price also was passed on the homestretch by Ellisa Bryant of Piedmont Hills, who lost to Price at the CCS finals. Bryant finished third on Saturday in a CCS-leading 54.64. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She is crushed,â&#x20AC;? Menlo coach Jorge Chen said of Price after the race. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(But) We are still really proud of her for coming from not even making the finals last year to dropping almost three seconds from a year ago to a podium finish and going under 55.00 twice this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, all that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter to Maddy since sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fierce competitor. But, when she takes some time to let her season sink in, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll feel better.â&#x20AC;? Price finished her prep season ranked No. 6 in the state, but as the No. 1 junior. She was one of only six runners under 55 seconds this season and now ranks No. 12 on the CCS all-time list. Robinson, meanwhile, finished her season ranked No. 3 in the state in the 1,600 (4.47.58 converted) and No. 6 in the 3,200 (a school record

of 10:26.65). Those times rank her No. 9 and No. 8, respectively, on the CCS all-time list. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought that, overall, my first state meet went really well,â&#x20AC;? Robinson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For the 1,600, I was trying to run as conservative as possible. On the last lap, I really gave it everything I had, almost catching (winner) Anna (Maxwell).â&#x20AC;? Robinson was in fourth place with one lap to go, but made a move with 250 left and took over second. The gap between Robinson and Maxwell was too great, however. Robinson made a valiant attempt to catch Maxwell on the homestretch, but was passed by Nikki Hiltz of Aptos with less than 10 meters left. Maxwell won in 4:47.36 with Hiltz second in 4:48.07 and Robinson third in 4:48.37. The order of finish was perhaps appropriate since the three ranked No. 1, 2 and 3 in the state, respectively, coming into the meet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the 1,600, my legs were fatigued,â&#x20AC;? Robinson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, I decided to run the 3,200. I was happy I did because I PRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d and placed on the podium.â&#x20AC;? Robinson became the first Gunn girl to bring two medals home from the state final. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was very proud of her for so many reasons,â&#x20AC;? said Plumer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She took a chance in the 1,600, going with a lap and trying to catch Anna. It almost worked. She gave it everything she had. I really wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure she would be physically capable of running the 3,200, especially given the (hot) weather. She couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;warm downâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for over 30 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, then, Danielle Katz from Los Gatos made her run with her, and then after a little more rest and ice and cold towels, she wanted to do it. Fingers crossed, I agreed. And then she went out and PRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d!! Our goal for her in that race was to get on the podium (top six). I am very happy and think she did an awesome job.â&#x20AC;? Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time of 10:26.65 was the No. 2 non-winning state meet time in CCS history in addition to being the fastest fifth-place time at the state meet by a CCS girl. While Robinson and Price earned medals on Saturday, four other local athletes did not advance out of Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prelims. Sacred Heart Prep senior Nico Robinson missed out on both his events, the 110 high hurdles and long jump. He ran 14.61 in his heat and finished 14th overall. Robinson also missed out in the long jump as he reached only 21-4 3/4 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; his first attempt. He also jumped 20-6 1/2 and 20-0 1/2 after qualifying for the state meet with a lifetime best of 22-10. Also in the same event, Palo Alto senior Victor Du came up short as he reached only 21-2 1/2 after winning the CCS title last week with a PR of 23-4. Du has been limited to only seven jumps total in his final five meets due to an injured left heel. His other jumps Friday included a foul and a 21-0 3/4 mark. Palo Alto junior Nick Sullivan missed advancing in the 400 when he was disqualified for a lane violation after running on the lane line three times. He needed to run 48.18 (continued on page 35)

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 33


Sports

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 *****************************************

THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SPECIAL MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBERS June 10, 2013 - 4:00 PM

(TENTATIVE) AGENDAâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;SPECIAL COUNCIL RETREAT-LUCIE STERN BALLROOM June 13, 2013 - 6:00 PM 1. 2. 3.

Discussion of Proposed Core Values and Possible Adoption Review Action Items for the 2013 Council Priorities Effectiveness of Meetings Check-in

STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Policy and Services Committee will meet on Tuesday June 11, 2013 at 6:00 P.M. to discuss; 1) Discussion and Consideration of Recommendation by the City Council on Whether to Complete a Needs Assessment Study for Cubberley Page 34Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

(continued from page 31)

Davis, after pitching in the minors for Washington in 2011 and 2012, began this season with Triple-A Syracuse of the International League. Then, he got the call from Washington. â&#x20AC;&#x153;First time out he looked great,â&#x20AC;? Washington manager Davey Johnson told reporters after his debut. Now the challenge will be for Davis to stick with the Nationals, who made a flurry of roster moves on Tuesday in a season that has not lived up to the preseason hype. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stick with your strength. That is what got you here. I stuck with my strength, which is throwing strikes. I hope to build off that outing (in Atlanta),â&#x20AC;? said Davis, who throws a two-seam fastball, circle change and spike curveball. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to mix speeds. I try to make batters uncomfortable.â&#x20AC;? Among the moves involving pitchers this week: veteran relievers Henry Rodriguez and Zach Duke were designated for assignment while lefty reliever Ian Krol was called up from Double-A Harrisburg. Does Davis worry about going back to Syracuse, especially after Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outing? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try not to think about it,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things will take care of itself. As long as I am here I am going to make the most of it. Hopefully I can stay. My goal is to be here and stay here.â&#x20AC;? Jeff Kobernus, an infielder/outfielder who played with Davis at Syracuse this season before getting called up to Washington, said â&#x20AC;&#x153;he has an above average fastball and he can throw that change up.â&#x20AC;? Davis said the key for him is when the Nationals made him a reliever

Merger (continued from page 31)

leagues this spring. Five PAL Bay Division teams qualified for the CCS tournament, with Half Moon Bay and Terra Nova joining the ranks of Division III, while Burlingame played in Division II and both Carlmont and Menlo-Atherton participated in Division I playoffs. The Ocean Division co-champions, Mills and Sequoia, both advanced to the CCS playoffs. Menlo will even have a PAL title to defend next season. The Knights went undefeated (12-0) in froshsoph play in the Ocean Division. Sacred Heart Prepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frosh-soph played an independent schedule. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a lack of frosh-soph teams in the WBAL, so this opportunity makes their scheduling easier and creates a more competitive situation for them as well,â&#x20AC;? Sacred Heart Prep coach Gregg Franceschi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve looked to schedule the best teams in the area to play and that routinely includes teams from both divisions, this year was the top six in the Bay and three of the top four in the Ocean.â&#x20AC;? Menlo-Atherton will suddenly have an interesting set of geographical rivalries. The Bears and Carlmont have a rivalry that dates to the old South Peninsula Athletic

Courtesy Washington Nationals

CLOSED SESSION 1. Labor-PAPMA SPECIAL ORDERS 2. Peninsula Council of Lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club Honors Fire and Law Enforcement OfďŹ cials 3. Appointment of Candidates to the Historic Resources Board 4. Appointment of Candidates to the Human Relations Commission 5. Appointment of Candidates to the Library Advisory Commission 6. Appointment of Candidates to the Public Art Commission CONSENT 7. Adoption of an Ordinance Approving and Adopting a Plan for Improvements to Eleanor Pardee Park 8. Approval of Wastewater Treatment Enterprise Fund Contract with D. W. Nicholson Corporation in the Amount of $452,650 for the Sedimentation Tanks Equipment Replacement Project at the Regional Water Quality Control Plant - Capital Improvement Program Project 9. Approval of a Five-Year Contract Between the City of Palo Alto and Telecommunications Engineering Associates (TEA) in an Amount of $168,972 Per Year For Annual Maintenance Ser vices of Radio Infrastructure and Project Funding Not To Exceed $50,000 Per Year 10. Park Improvement Ordinance for the San Francisquito Creek Bonde Weir Fish Passage Improvement and Channel Stabiliza tion Project 11. Approval of Utilities Compliance Services Contract with Eric Scott, in an Amount Not to Exceed $150,000 for Managing Compliance Activities Covering Electric, Natural Gas, Water, and Wastewater Collection Utility Services 12. Appointment of Incumbents (Michael Alcheck and Eduardo Martinez) for the Planning & Transportation Commission and (James Cook and Garth Hall ) to the Utilities Advisory Commission 13. Approval of: 1) the Palo Alto LandďŹ ll Closure Stipulated Notice and Order No. LEA-2013-01-1; 2) Amendment No. 1 to Contract No. C12143502 in the Amount of $247,889 for a Total Amount of $461,002 with Golder Associates for Closure Design Service; and 3) Contract C13150284 in the Amount of $250,000 with Toubar Equipment Company for LandďŹ ll Closure and Maintenance Services ACTION ITEMS 14. Consideration of Public-Private Parking Garage on High Street (Lot P) 15. Public Hearing: Assessment of California Avenue Area Parking Bonds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Plan G: FY 2013-2014; Adoption of a Resolution Con ďŹ rming Engineerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report and Assessment Roll, California Ave nue Parking Assessment Parking Project No. 92-13 (For Fiscal Year 2013-2014) 16. Public Hearing: 567-595 Maybell Avenue Planned Community(PC), including: (1) Approval of a Mitigated Negative Declaration, (2) Adoption of a Planned Community Ordinance Amending the Zoning Map to Change the Zone Designations from R-2 and RM-15 to Allow a 15-Unit Single Family and 60 Unit Affordable Rental Development for Seniors, including Two Concessions un der State Density Bonus Law (Building Height and Daylight Plane), and (3) Approval of a Resolution Amending the Compre hensive Plan Designation for a Portion of the Site to Single Fam ily Residential (from Multifamily Residential), for the Project Lo cated at 567-595 Maybell Avenue. The Planning and Transpor tation Commission recommends approval of the zone change and project. *Quasi-Judicial 17. Continued Public Hearing: Budget Adoption 18. Public Hearing: Adoption of a Resolution Adopting the 20072014 Housing Element of the Comprehensive Plan and Approv ing a Negative Declaration (continued from May 20, 2013-STAFF REQUESTS THIS ITEM BE CONTINUED TO JUNE 17, 2013) 19. Discussion and Consideration of an Additional Council Meeting on June 24, 2013

Eric Davis

Stanford grad Erik Davis made his MLB debut this week with Washington. after he had been a starting pitcher with the Padres. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Erikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first year with us was a transitional year for him,â&#x20AC;? according to Doug Harris, the director of player development for Washington. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s common for young players to take a bit of time to get comfortable when coming to a new organization. He had been a highly successful pitcher and experienced some challenges that year. At the conclusion of that season, we felt he may ultimately be best suited in a bullpen role. He took off immediately the next spring when we made that switch.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;His fastball velocity grew, his breaking ball improved and both complimented the quality change up he already had,â&#x20AC;? added Harris, a former minor league pitcher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He pitched very aggressively and con-

THE NEW PAL Bay Division Burlingame, Carlmont, Half Moon Bay, Menlo-Atherton, Menlo School, Terra Nova, Sacred Heart Prep. Season has 12 games. Ocean Division Aragon, Capuchino, El Camino, Hillsdale, Mills, Sequoia, Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy, Woodside. Season has 14 games. Lake Division Crystal Springs, Harker, Jefferson, Pinewood, San Mateo, South San Francisco, Westmoor. Season has 12 games.

League days. With Menlo and Sacred Heart Prep just 2 1/2 miles away, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more a likelihood of students at all three schools growing up together and playing for or against each other. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see any real effects on having three teams so close together, although it will cut down on travel time and missed classes for all of us,â&#x20AC;? Schoof said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Competition is always good and the competition in this league will be intense.â&#x20AC;? Franceschi had a similar reaction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a great rivalry with Menlo already,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And most of our kids grow up playing with or against the kids from M-A, so there is a rivalry there that will continue to grow.â&#x20AC;? The new seven-team PAL Division

sistently at both 2A and 3A in that role with much success. He was put on the ML roster after a strong stint in the Dominican and carried it into this season. His hard work has paid off and put himself in position to help us at the ML level.â&#x20AC;? When Davis arrived in Atlanta one of the Washington players he met was fellow reliever Drew Storen, his teammate at Stanford. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is just awesome,â&#x20AC;? Davis said of joining Storen. And Davis has followed Washington reliever Tyler Clippard, who also has a good changeup and wears sports goggles similar to ones worn by Davis. Davis took the 25-man roster spot of outfielder Bryce Harper, who went on the DL with bursitis in his left knee. Davis was 1-2, 3.00 in 21 games with seven saves at Syracuse. In 24 innings of work he had 27 strikeouts with eight walks and allowed 22 hits. He was 15-7, 4.80 in 78 games, with 27 starts, in four seasons with Stanford. He was acquired from San Diego in exchange for infielder Alberto Gonzalez by the Nationals and he pitched that year at the Single-A and Double-A level. Davis, a right-hander, was 7-3, 2.52 in 40 games out of the bullpen for Double-A Harrisburg last year and was 1-0, 4.15 in eight games for Triple-A Syracuse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone has been very (helpful) to me. There are so many good guys on this team,â&#x20AC;? Davis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I certainly feel welcome by everyone on the team. They take their time to ask me how I am doing and if I need anything. It is a good feeling to have.â&#x20AC;? N (Freelance writer David Driver has covered the Washington Nationals and their farm system for several years. He can be reached at www.davidsdriver.com) will include Burlingame, Carlmont, Half Moon Bay, Menlo-Atherton, Menlo School, Terra Nova and Sacred Heart Prep. There will be 12 league games in round-robin order. League play begins March 13, 2014. The new eight-team Ocean Division will have Aragon, Capuchino, El Camino, Hillsdale, Mills, Sequoia, Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Academy and Woodside. The 14-game â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; league season begins March 18, 2014. The new seven-team Lake Division will feature Crystal Springs, Harker, Jefferson, Pinewood, San Mateo, South San Francisco, Westmoor and will play 12 games in a round-robin format that starts March 11, 2014. The Lake will be a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122; league for CCS purposes. There will be two frosh-soph leagues, Bay and Ocean. PAL commissioner Terry Stogner also has created space in the final week of the season for a 12-team PAL Tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The merger will allow for three very competitive divisions,â&#x20AC;? Franceschi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are very excited about the opportunity to play baseball in the PAL.â&#x20AC;? Schoof echoed those sentiments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This obviously makes the PAL Bay one of the top leagues in the CCS,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be a lot of fun going out and competing against top teams every game, especially since this was not always the case in the WBAL.â&#x20AC;? N


Sports

JUNE 2013

BOYSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; GOLF

Menloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Buchanan finishes eighth in state finals by Keith Peters enlo School senior Andrew Buchanan played Quail Lodge & Golf Club for the first time in competition on Wednesday and shot a respectable even-par 71. Sacred Heart Prep junior Bradley Knox also had a good effort as he toured the picturesque flat layout in Carmel Valley with a 1-over 72. Under normal circumstances, both scores would have been good enough to win league or section titles. Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tournament, however, was the CIF/CGA Boys Golf Championships -- also known as the state championships. The scores by Buchanan and Knox were good, but not good enough to bring home individual honors on the short course that played 6,449 yards and featured 10 man-made lakes. Buchanan, in his first state tourney, was one of four golfers at 71 while tying for eighth. Knox, also in his first state finals, was in a group of five at 72, tying for 12th. The top finisher from the Central Coast Section was Seb Crampton of R.L. Stevenson with a 1-under 70. He helped his team win the state title with a 368 total. Sunny Hills was second at 370. Crampton was the only CCS golfer ahead of Buchanan while Knox had only three ahead of him. Buchanan, who has a scholarship to Southern Methodist University

in the fall, capped his prep career with four birdies, 10 pars and four bogeys. Starting on the 10th hole, Buchanan had four straight pars before getting a birdie on the 502-yard par-5 14th. He gave it right back with a bogey on the 15th, a 519-yard par-5. He picked up another birdie on the 146-yard par-3 17th to finish his first nine at 1-under. A birdie on the 540-yard par-5 first hole put Buchanan at 2-under. He stayed that way until a bogey on the fourth hole, a 403-yard par 4. He gave back strokes on the sixth and seventh holes, both par-4s, before getting back to even with a birdie on the 541-yard par-5 ninth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a nice finish to my high school golf career and it felt good to birdie the par-5 ninth hole, which was my last hole today,â&#x20AC;? Buchanan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is definitely bittersweet to be leaving Menlo. I have really enjoyed my teammates and I am looking forward to playing for SMU in the fall.â&#x20AC;? Buchanan next will play in the 102nd California State Amateur on June 15 at Monterey Peninsula Country Club in Pebble Beach. Knox also started on 10, just two groups ahead of Buchanan. He finished with six birdies, six pars, five bogeys and a damaging double-bogey six on the 408-yard par-4 16th that put him at 3-over for his first nine holes. N

State track

reach the finals. Her personal best is 43.39 from CCS. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She ran a really strong race, and knows that she has lots of room for improvement,â&#x20AC;? Plumer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was very exciting for her to be there, quite an accomplishment and a great education.â&#x20AC;? In the boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1,600 relay, Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team of Jayshawn Gates, Eli Givens, Dami Bolarinwa and Sullivan suffered a disqualification for another lane violation. Sullivan led off and again was caught running on the lane line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small fish, big pond,â&#x20AC;? said Fung. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a good day.â&#x20AC;? Except for Sarah Robinson and Maddy Price. N

M

(continued from page 33)

in heat to earn one of two berths and advance. He did run a personal best of 48.40. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He ran great,â&#x20AC;? said Paly coach Jason Fung, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help if you get disqualified. I told Nick you have to run 47s and low 48s to make the finals.â&#x20AC;? Gunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Maya Miklos, the only freshman in the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 300 hurdles field, finished fourth in her heat and 15th overall in 44.40. It was the second-fastest time of her life and the second-fastest time in school history, but she needed a 43.22 to

For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/healtheducation.

SEASONAL ALLERGIES Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real Mountain View 650-934-7373

JUNE 12, 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 P.M. STEVEN RUBINSTEIN, M.D. PAMF ALLERGY, ASTHMA, IMMUNOLOGY This presentation will discuss the prevention and treatment of seasonal allergies.

PREDIABETES Santa Clara Public Library 2635 Homestead Rd. Santa Clara No registration required.

JUNE 17, 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:30 P.M. JUDY FARNSWORTH, R.D., CDE PAMF NUTRITION SERVICES Prediabetes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a wakeup call! Registered dietitian, Judy Farnsworth, will discuss what prediabetes is and how to manage it. Learn small lifestyle changes for making big steps toward diabetes prevention.

HAPPINESS IS: THE MYTHS AND TRUTHS OF THE â&#x20AC;&#x153;PURSUIT OF HAPPINESSâ&#x20AC;? IN AMERICA 2013 HEALTHY SCREENINGS FILM SERIES Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real Mountain View 650-934-7373

JUNE 28, FILM STARTS AT 7 P.M. Join us to view and discuss a thought-provoking ďŹ lm about what happiness truly is.

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PENDING 307 Barton, Menlo Park Represented Buyer Beds 3 | Baths 1 | Home ~ 1,050 sq. ft. | Lot ~ 6,150 sq. ft.

Call Jackie and Richard for a Free Home Consultation Richard

Jackie

650-566-8033

650-855-9700

richard@schoelerman.com

jackie@schoelerman.com

BRE # 01413607

BRE # 01092400

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2013 06 07 paw section1