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Vol. XXXIV, Number 32 N May 10, 2013

Growing revenues spell healthier city budget Page 3

Tech transforms teaching Stanford’s approach to online learning is ‘flipping’ the classroom page 35

Transitions 13

Spectrum 16

Eating Out 19

Movies 20

Summer Class Guide 29

Puzzles 66

NArts Recalling Watergate: faces of scandal

Page 17

NSports New swim stars surfacing at CCS

Page 22

NHome Inspired by PV’s Decorator Show House

Page 41

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Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

Palo Alto budget review kicks off on happy note 'ROWINGREVENUESSPELLHEALTHIERBUDGETFORTHECITYIN by Gennady Sheyner FTER YEARS OF BUDGET DEFICITS INGSINTHENEXTMONTH ISARADICAL STAFF CUTS AND SERVICE REDUC DEPARTUREFROMITSGLOOMYPREDECES TIONS 0ALO !LTO OFFICIALS SORS2EVENUESAREUPBYPERCENT FOUND THEMSELVES IN A DELIGHTFUL EMPLOYEESARECONTRIBUTINGMORETO AND UNFAMILIAR POSITION 4UESDAY WARDTHEIRPENSIONSANDHEALTHPRE NIGHT -AY WHENTHEYTOOKTHEIR MIUMSANDTHEFROZENPOSITIONSIN FIRST LOOK AT #ITY -ANAGER *AMES THE0OLICE$EPARTMENTAREABOUTTO +EENESPROPOSEDBUDGETFOR BEREACTIVATED%VENWITHEXPENSES 4HEDOCUMENT WHICHWILLUNDER RISING BUDGETOFFICIALSEXPECTTOEND GO SCRUTINY OVER A SERIES OF MEET FISCAL YEAR  WHICH BEGINS ON

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*ULY WITHA SURPLUS h4HISYEAR FORTHEFIRSTTIMESINCE) WASHERE WEREINABETTERPOSITIONAS FARASWHAT)MABLETORECOMMENDTO THECOUNCIL v+EENE WHOWASHIREDIN  TOLDTHE#ITY#OUNCILS&INANCE #OMMITTEEh7ERENOTDEALINGWITH THEKINDSOFSPECIFICCUTBACKSWEVE HADTODOEVERYYEAR7EREPARTLYIN THAT POSITION BECAUSE WE DID THOSE THINGSINTHEPRIORYEARSv +EENESBUDGETPROPOSESAPER CENTINCREASEINEXPENDITURES WITH

MUCH OF THE ADDED FUNDING USED TOKEEPUPWITHTHERISINGCOSTSOF EMPLOYEEPENSIONSANDBENEFITS/F THEMILLIONINONGOING EXPENSE CHANGES MILLIONWOULDBEUSED FORTHESEBENEFITADJUSTMENTS 4HE CITY ALSO PLANS TO UNFREEZE SEVEN POSITIONS IN THE 0OLICE $E PARTMENT  MILLION  RAMP UP SPENDINGFORPLANNINGANDDEVELOP MENT SERVICES  MILLION  AND ALLOCATEMOREFUNDSFORPOLICEOVER TIME  

4HEBUDGETISINSOMEWAYSMORE NOTABLEFORWHATSNOTINITTHETYPES OF PROPOSED CUTS THAT IN THE PAST HAVEDRIVENDISCUSSIONSANDSTIRRED TEMPERS 4HIS YEARS BUDGET IS NOT PROPOSING TO OUTSOURCE MUNICIPAL OPERATIONS CLOSETHEANIMALSHELTER OR CUT RECREATION PROGRAMS IN THE #OMMUNITY3ERVICES$EPARTMENT )NSTEAD THE &INANCE #OMMITTEE HEARD A GENERALLY ROSY OUTLOOK )T (continued on page 7)

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Palo Alto hopeful about buying historic post office #ITY#OUNCILTOCONSIDERMAKINGANOFFERONBUILDING by Gennady Sheyner HEFUTUREOF0ALO!LTOSDOWN TOWN POST OFFICE BUILDING COULDBECOMECLEARER-ONDAY NIGHT WHENTHE#ITY#OUNCILCON SIDERSWHETHERTOPURCHASETHEHIS TORIC AND ICONIC (AMILTON !VENUE BUILDING FROM THE CASH STRAPPED 530OSTAL3ERVICE #ITYOFFICIALSHAVEBEENEYEINGTHE "IRGE#LARK DESIGNEDBUILDINGSINCE EARLY  WHEN THE POSTAL SERVICE ANNOUNCEDITSPLANSTOSEVERELYDOWN SIZEITS0ALO!LTOOPERATIONASPARTOF ANATIONALEFFORTTOCLOSEANDCONSOLI DATE ITS FACILITIES "UILT IN  THE BUILDINGWASTHEFIRSTINTHECOUNTRY TOBEDESIGNEDSPECIFICALLYTOFUNCTION ASAPOSTOFFICE4HEPOSTOFFICEHAS DETERMINED THAT THE   SQUARE FOOTBUILDINGISTWICEASBIGASNEEDED AND DECLARED ITS INTENTION TO FIND A SMALLERBRANCHIN0ALO!LTO 3INCE0OSTAL3ERVICEOFFICIALSMADE THEIR PRESENTATION TO THE COUNCIL IN &EBRUARY STAFFHASBEENEVALU ATING THE BUILDING AND CONSIDERING POSSIBLEFUNCTIONSITCANSERVEFORTHE CITY SHOULDTHECOUNCILDECIDETOBUY IT)TSEARLYFINDINGSAREPROMISING! REPORTRELEASEDTHISWEEKBYTHE$E PARTMENT OF 0LANNING AND #OMMU NITY%NVIRONMENTCONCLUDESTHATTHE BUILDINGhCOULDBESEISMICALLYRETRO FITTEDANDUPGRADEDTOMODERNOFFICE SPACEATAREASONABLECOST WHILEPRE SERVINGTHEHISTORIC DEFININGCHARAC TERISTICSOFTHESTRUCTUREv 4HE CITY HAS ALSO COMMISSIONED ANAPPRAISAL WHICHHASBEENCOM PLETED AND WHICH THE COUNCIL WILL CONSIDERINACLOSEDSESSIONBEFORE ITS MEETING -ONDAY NIGHT THE RE SULTSARECONFIDENTIALBECAUSEOFTHE UPCOMINGNEGOTIATIONS !TTHEEND OFTHEMEETING THECOUNCILISSCHED ULEDTOHOLDANOPENDISCUSSIONAND POSSIBLY VOTE ON WHETHER THE CITY SHOULDMAKEABID4HEOPENINGBID PROCESSISATLEASTTWOMONTHSAWAY ACCORDINGTOSTAFF

T Veronica Weber

Generational bonding 4HIRD GRADERS3AVANNAH9OUNG LEFT AND3OFIE:ALATIMOGETREADYTOPLANTPUMPKINSDURINGA h2OOTSAND3HOOTSvSESSIONATTHE%LIZABETH&'AMBLE'ARDENON-AY3TUDENTSFROM7ALTER(AYS %LEMENTARY3CHOOLPAIRWITH'AMBLE'ARDENVOLUNTEERSONCEAWEEKFORSIXWEEKS4HATDAY THEYALSO HARVESTEDMORETHANPOUNDSOFLETTUCE KALEANDBOKCHOY WHICHWILLBEDONATEDTOAFOODBANK

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District previews plan to ensure ‘safe, welcoming schools’ (IGH LEVELCOMMITTEEPLUSTASKFORCEWOULDADDRESSCONCERNSONBULLYING by Chris Kenrick O CONSIDER COMMUNITY CON CERNS ABOUT BULLYING AND HA RASSMENTINLOCALSCHOOLS 0ALO !LTO 3UPERINTENDENT +EVIN 3KELLY PROPOSEDASCHOOL BOARD LEVELCOM MITTEE AS WELL AS A SUMMER TASK FORCE4UESDAY -AY 4HE PROPOSALS CAME IN A "OARD OF%DUCATIONSTUDYSESSIONINWHICH BOARDMEMBERSSAIDTHEYWELCOMED AHIGH LEVELDISCUSSIONOFBULLYING AND HARASSMENT BUT HAD RESERVA TIONS ABOUT CREATING A BOARD COM MITTEETHATWOULDMEETASOFTENAS MONTHLYONTHETOPIC

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4HENEWCOMMITTEEANDTASKFORCE WEREPROPOSEDBYDISTRICTSTAFFASPART OF A h3AFE AND 7ELCOMING 3CHOOLS !CTION0LAN vONWHICHTHEBOARDWILL BEASKEDTOVOTE-AY 4HE INITIATIVE WOULD INCLUDE POLI CIESONSAFEANDWELCOMINGSCHOOLS MAKING SURE ALL UNDERSTAND BEHAV IORAL EXPECTATIONS INCLUDING CYBER CITIZENSHIP ANDhREINFORCINGTHEDIS TRICTS COMMITMENT TO TRANSPARENCY ANDINCLUSION vSAIDSTUDENT SERVICES COORDINATOR"RENDA#ARRILLO )TWOULDINCORPORATEEXISTINGAND PROSPECTIVE PROGRAMS AND PARTNER

SHIPS THE DISTRICT HAS WITH MANY ORGANIZATIONSWORKINGINTHISAREA SHESAID 4HECOMMITTEE WHICHWOULDALSO INCLUDECOMMUNITYMEMBERS WOULD SERVE AS A HIGH LEVEL VENUE FOR THE COMMUNITYTOhEXPRESSOBSERVATIONS CONCERNS AND RECOMMENDATIONS AROUNDTHESEISSUES v#ARRILLOSAID 4HESEPARATETASKFORCE MADEUP OF TEACHERS AND SCHOOL STAFF MEM BERS WOULD MEET OVER THE COMING SUMMER TO WORK OUT THE DETAILS OF (continued on page 9)

)NTHENEWREPORT STAFFOUTLINESSEV ERALREASONSFORWHYTHECITYSHOULD CONSIDER PURCHASING THE POST OFFICE INCLUDING ITS STATUS AS A hHISTORI CALTREASUREvANDITSLOCATION WHICH WOULDMAKEITIDEALFORHOUSINGCITY FUNCTIONS 7HILE MOST OF THE CITYS OPERATIONS ARE CURRENTLY LOCATED AT #ITY(ALL THECITYALSOLEASESMULTIPLE PROPERTIESTHROUGHOUTTHECITY INCLUD INGTHEOFFICEACROSSFROM#ITY(ALL THATHOUSESITS$EVELOPMENT#ENTER WHICH HANDLES BUILDING PLANS AND PERMITS 4HE PERMITTING OPERATION ISTHELEADINGCANDIDATEAMONGPOS SIBLEUSESFORTHEPOSTOFFICE SHOULD THECITYOPTTOBUYIT 4HE DEVELOPMENT OPERATION COULD SHARE POST OFFICE SPACE WITH THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT WHICH IS CURRENTLY HOUSED ON THE FIFTH FLOOR OF#ITY(ALL7ITHBOTHOPERATIONS MOVED TO THE POST OFFICE THE FIFTH FLOOR WOULD BE USED TO ACCOMMO DATE A DIFFERENT CITY OPERATION THAT CURRENTLY LEASES SPACE ELSEWHERE THEREPORTSTATES h4HESALEOFTHE530OST/FFICE BUILDING PROVIDES A SINGULAR OP PORTUNITYFORTHE#ITYTORETAINAND ENHANCEANICONICDOWNTOWNCOM MUNITY RESOURCE WHILE STRUCTURING AFINANCINGPLANTHATSHOULDSAVETHE #ITYLEASECOSTSADEQUATETOPAYFOR THE BUILDING v THE NEW STAFF REPORT STATESh"ECAUSEOFITSLOCATIONWITHIN ABLOCKOF#ITY(ALLANDITSDESIGNFOR PUBLIC ACCESS AND SERVICE THE 0OST /FFICE BUILDING IS A VERY DESIRABLE LOCATION FOR THE #ITYS $EVELOPMENT #ENTER 2ELOCATING THIS #ITY FUNC TIONFROMLEASEDSPACETOCITYOWNED SPACEWOULDESTABLISHASTABLERENTFOR THE$EVELOPMENT#ENTERANDHELPTO STABILIZETHECOSTOFTHISSERVICETOTHE #ITYOVERTIMEv 5NDER THIS PLAN THE CITY WOULD ALSO HAVE ENOUGH SPACE TO LEASE (continued on page 6)

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ>ÞÊ£ä]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 3

Upfront QUOTE OF THE WEEK

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Elena Kadvany (223-6519) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns Rebecca Duran, Audra Sorman ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Christine Afsahi (223-8582), Adam Carter (2236573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 223-6569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung

Mother’s Day Brunch 10:30am-2:30pm

EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza

NEW

CHE

F

Experience the menu of our new

award-winning chef, Robert Holt at Mother’s Day Brunch! Mom can sip a complimentary glass of prosecco while indulging in our Panettone French Toast with maple syrup, mascarpone whipped cream, roasted rhubarb and fresh strawberries.

20% off for Mom’s who are also Teachers!

LUNCH & DINNER: Wednesday-Sunday BRUNCH: Saturday & Sunday 185 University Ave, Palo Alto Reservations: (650) 614-1177 www.campo185.com Page 4ÊUÊ>ÞÊ£ä]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. ©2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

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PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505)

I don’t want to move to another city. —Alvaro Hernandez, a Terman Middle School seventh-grader, on the planned closure of the Palo Alto mobile-home park where he lives. See story on page 5.

Around Town LET THEM EAT KALE! ... The City Council is a particularly busy bunch this year, with agendas getting bulkier, development plans getting beefier, and new committees sprouting at City Hall like daffodils in the spring. This flurry of activity and the growing number of meetings has had at least one unintended consequence: not enough food in the budget to feed the council and staff. On Tuesday night, the council’s Finance Committee was surprised to hear a proposal by City Manager James Keene to add $25,000 to the City Council budget, which includes $15,000 for “council meals.” This proposal surprised Chair Pat Burt. “That just seems like a big jump, and I’m not eating more,” Burt said. City Clerk Donna Grider attributed the rising food expenses to the growing number of council and committee meetings and to the fact that many of these now start earlier in the day and are thus more likely to include meals. At the same time, some council members have requested better food, Grider said. “We’re finding that we don’t have enough money in the budget,” Grider told the committee. Keene noted that the food doesn’t just feed the council members but also the staff that attends these meetings (an average meal, according to Grider, accommodates about 15 people). “I like to try to steer staff to eat here, rather than go out and submit a per diem that actually costs more,” Keene said. Rather than simply swallow the added costs, the committee requested a fuller breakdown of the council’s food budget. Burt said he doesn’t want to just “rubberstamp” the $15,000 increase and asked Grider to come back with a more detailed breakdown of the council’s food expenses. He also suggested that the city may be able to save money by eliminating food waste. Councilman Marc Berman also expressed an interest in learning more about the food budget. “Given the heightened sensitivity to everything we do, it’s prudent for us to try to dig into the details of this, just to kind of make sure the public understands that we’re being as cost-sensitive as we can,” Berman said. Vice Mayor Nancy Shepherd said she was “very grateful” for the meals.

“It takes one edge off the logistics of trying to be almost everywhere sometimes as a council member,” Shepherd said. SNUFFED OUT ... Critics of the infamously thorough “Palo Alto process” will likely be shocked by the dizzying speed with which the city is proceeding to ban smoking at local parks. The idea to make small downtown parks smokefree was floated by Mayor Greg Scharff during his February “State of the City” speech. It then swiftly spread to the council’s Policy and Services Committee, which within minutes expanded the ban from the five proposed parks to every local park smaller than 5 acres. And this new idea can become law of the land as early as Monday night, when the full City Council considers the proposed ban. If approved, the new law would affect 24 parks and plazas, including prominent hubs such as City Hall’s King Plaza, Heritage Park and Lytton Plaza, where smoking is particularly common. A new report from the Community Services Department lists several reasons for the new ban. Chief among these is public health. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 443,000 deaths in the United States are attributable to tobacco annually, with 49,000 of these attributed to second-hand smoke. City officials have also been fielding complaints from downtown residents and businesses about smoking, particularly in urban spaces such as Lytton Plaza and Cogswell Plaza. These complaints, according to the new report, pertain to litter, fire safety, environmental quality or, in some cases, all of the above. Furthermore, the report states, numerous studies show that “an overwhelming majority of people want more restrictions on smoking in public places, parks and places or employment. ... For these reasons, more and more cities and counties in the United States and in California particularly, are adopting bans on smoking in outdoor public areas in an effort to reduce exposure to the known hazardous and unwanted effects of secondhand smoke.” N

Upfront #/--5.)49

East Palo Alto girls create app to clean up graffiti, trash %0!#HICA3QUADPLACESHIGHINAGLOBALMOBILE APPCOMPETITION ANESSA4OSTADO ASOPHOMORE AT %ASTSIDE #OLLEGE 0REP IN %AST 0ALO !LTO REMEMBERS WATCHING A VIDEO IN COMPUTER SCI ENCECLASSTHISYEARTHATSTUCKWITH HER h7E ACTUALLY SAW A VIDEO ABOUT HOWTHEREARENTMANYGIRLSINENGI NEERING3OITSLIKE @5GH WESHOULD DOIT)TSREALLYIMPORTANTv 4HE hITv SHE REFERRED TO IS 4ECH NOVATION AGLOBALCOMPETITIONTHAT USESANONLINECURRICULUMTOGUIDE TEAMS OF MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS THROUGH THE PROCESS OF DEVEL OPINGMOBILE PHONEAPPLICATIONS 3ELF DUBBED THE h%0! #HICA 3QUAD vTHREE%ASTSIDE0REPSOPHO MORES ˆ 6ANESSA !SHLEY $AVIS AND-ARGARITA4ENISIˆANDONE3E QUOIA(IGH3CHOOLFRESHMAN 2OSIE 6ALENCIA COMPETEDIN4ECHNOVATION THISYEAR 4HEY CREATED AN !NDROID APP CALLEDh4AG)TvTHATALLOWSUSERSTO TAKEAPICTUREOFGRAFFITI VANDALISM ORTRASHINTHEIRNEIGHBORHOOD TAG ITS LOCATION AND CREATE AN EVENT TO GETITCLEANEDUP 4HEGIRLSCOMPETEDINTHETHIRD AND LARGEST 4ECHNOVATION COMPE

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TITIONAGAINSTAPPLICANTSFROM -OUNTAIN 6IEW (IGH 3CHOOL AND #ASTILLEJA 3CHOOL IN 0ALO !LTO AS WELL AS #HINA 9EMEN *ORDAN "RAZIL )NDONESIA )NDIA .IGERIA 5KRAINEANDTHE5NITED+INGDOM 4HEY PLACED IN THE TOP  WORLD WIDEANDINTHETOPFIVEOUTOF ENTRIES IN THE 3AN &RANCISCO RE GION 4HEFOURGIRLSCREATEDTHEIRAPP INWEEKS WORKINGONTWOBOR ROWED LAPTOPS FOR JUST FOUR HOURS EACH WEEK AT "AYSHORE #HRISTIAN -INISTRIESIN%AST0ALO!LTO4HEY WERE GUIDED BY TWO TECH PROFES SIONALS 3ELINA -ARTINEZ A "AY SHOREVOLUNTEERWHOUSEDTOWORK AT A &ACEBOOK APPS STARTUP AND 3ARAH#LATTERBUCK A,INKED)NWEB DEVELOPER !T A RECEPTION ON -ONDAY 6AN ESSA RECALLED THE DAY THEY BEGAN BRAINSTORMING SITTING UPSTAIRS IN A ROOM AT "AYSHORE WRITING DOWN IDEAS THAT CORRESPONDED TO THREE QUESTIONS 7HAT DO YOU WANT TO DO7HATISTHEPURPOSE7HATARE SOMEIDEAS h7E STARTED WITH ISSUES IN THE COMMUNITY AND THEN WENT TO APPS

THAT HELP THOSE ISSUES v SAID 2OSIE ADANCERANDSWIMMERWHOSEINTRO DUCTIONTOTECHTHISYEARHASMADE HERWANTTOSTUDYCOMPUTERSCIENCE INCOLLEGE 4HEY THREW AROUND A FEW IDEAS ˆAFIRE ALARMAPP ATEXT AND CALL POLICE APP ˆ BUT ALL CREDIT 2OSIE WITH COMING UP WITH THE GRAFFITI AND TRASHCLEANUPIDEA 4O FORMULATE A BUSINESS PLAN THE GIRLS CONDUCTED RESEARCH INCLUDING THEIR OWN SURVEY ON WHETHER%AST0ALO!LTANSAREUN HAPPY WITH THE WAY THEIR NEIGH BORHOODSLOOK &ORTY ONE PERCENT OF RESIDENTS SAIDTHEYWEREDISSATISFIED 4HE GIRLS THEN CAME UP WITH A hTOTAL LIKELY MARKETv FOR THEIR APP ˆMILLIONUSERSˆBYMULTIPLY INGTHENUMBEROF53SMARTPHONE OWNERSWITHTHEPERCENTAGEWHOLIVE INANURBANAREA ANDTHENMULTIPLY INGTHATWITHTHEPERCENTOFPEOPLE UNHAPPY WITH HOW THEIR NEIGHBOR HOODSLOOK h)WASJUSTREALLYAMAZEDATTHEIR IDEAS THEIRINPUT THEFACTTHATTHEY WEREABLETOCREATEAFUNCTIONALPRO TOTYPEINWEEKSWITHJUSTAFEW

Courtesy of EPA Chica Squad

by Elena Kadvany

4HE%0!#HICA3QUADMEMBERS FROMLEFT -ARGARITA4ENISI 2OSIE 6ALENCIA !SHLEY$AVISAND6ANESSA4OSTADOCREATEDANAPPCALLED h4AG)TvTHATNOTONLYRECORDSTHELOCATIONOFGRAFFITIBUTHELPSCREATE ANEVENTTOGETITCLEANEDUP4HEIRAPPPLACEDINTHETOPWORLDWIDE INTHE4ECHNOVATIONCOMPETITION HOURS EVERY WEEK v -ARTINEZ SAID h3ARAH AND ) WERE TALKING ABOUT HOWLONGITTAKESˆITTAKESABOUT THAT AMOUNT OF TIME BUT WORKING FULLTIMEv #LATTERBUCK WHO IS PART OF A ,INKED)Nh7OMEN)N4ECHvGROUP THAT WORKS TO INCREASE WOMENS PRESENCEINTHETECHWORLD SAIDTHAT THEMOSTCHALLENGINGPARTOFTHE WEEKS WAS EVERYONE SIMPLY FIND INGTHOSEFOURHOURSEVERYWEEKTO MEET "UTTHEBESTPART h3EEINGTHATWITHRELATIVELYLITTLE TIME YOU CAN BASICALLY CRANK OUT

APRETTYINTERESTINGIDEA vSHESAID h4HESEGUYSAREPRETTYINSPIRINGBE CAUSETHEYRENOTCONSTRAINEDBYALL THEPRECONCEPTIONSABOUTWHATYOU CANBUILDANDWHATYOUCANTBUILD LIKEWEAREINTHEINDUSTRYv .OT TO MENTION THE GIRLS DEVEL OPEDTHEAPPONABOUT  FUND INGTHATWASGRANTEDBY&ACEBOOKS LOCALCOMMUNITYFUNDTHATLAUNCHED IN$ECEMBER "AYSHORE %XECUTIVE $IRECTOR 2OLANDO :ELEDON WHO HAS A MAS TERS DEGREE IN ENGINEERING FROM (continued on page 8)

(/53).'

Mobile-home residents ask for help as compensation announced 2EPORT"UENA6ISTAHOMEOWNERSWOULDGETAMINIMUMOF TORELOCATE BOUT  0ALO !LTO RESI DENTSˆINCLUDINGMORETHAN  CHILDREN IN LOCAL PUBLIC SCHOOLSˆFACERELOCATIONWITHTHE PLANNEDCLOSUREOFTHE"UENA6ISTA -OBILE (OME 0ARK ON %L #AMINO 2EALIN"ARRON0ARK THE"OARDOF %DUCATIONWASTOLD4UESDAY "UENA 6ISTA RESIDENTS AND THEIR SUPPORTERSPACKEDTHESCHOOLBOARD CHAMBER TO PLEAD FOR HELP IN THEIR QUESTTOSTAYPUTˆORATLEASTTOKEEP THEIRKIDSIN0ALO!LTOSCHOOLS 4HEIR PLEA CAME A DAY BEFORE THE CITY RELEASED A REPORT FROM THE LANDOWNERSTATING"UENA6ISTARESI DENTSWOULDRECEIVEAMINIMUMOF   ˆ   AS hRELOCATION ASSISTANCEvAND ORMOREPER HOMEBASEDONASSESSEDFAIR MARKET VALUE 4HOSE ABLE TO MOVE THEIR HOMES WOULD RECEIVE THE   ONLY 4HEDEVELOPER 0ROMETHEUS PLANS TO REPLACE THE  MOBILE HOMES WITHAPARTMENTS !LL FIVE SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS INDICATEDTHEYWOULDBACKAhSTATE MENT OF SUPPORTv FOR "UENA 6ISTA STUDENTSANDTHEIRFAMILIESTOhPART NERvWITHTHEM THECOMMUNITYAND THE #ITY OF 0ALO !LTO hAS WE SEEK

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FAVORABLEEDUCATIONALOUTCOMESFOR THECHILDRENv "UENA6ISTACHILDRENMAKEUP PERCENTOFTHEENROLLMENTAT"ARRON 0ARK%LEMENTARY3CHOOL h4HISISAMAJORPOTENTIALDISLOCA TION WITH IMPACTS NOT ONLY ON STU DENTS LEAVING BUT ON STUDENTS STAY ING vBOARDMEMBER-ELISSA"ATEN #ASWELLSAID 3CHOOL BOARD MEMBER #AMILLE 4OWNSEND ALAWYER SAIDSHESOFAR HAS COME UP SHORT IN A SEARCH FOR LEGAL WAYS TO KEEP CHILDREN IN THE DISTRICT WHO DO NOT LIVE WITHIN ITS BORDERS h/BVIOUSLY WE HAVE THE 4INSLEY PROGRAM ADMITTING SOME CHILDREN FROM THE 2AVENSWOOD #ITY 3CHOOL $ISTRICT BUT THAT WAS A COURT OR DERED AGREEMENT OF DESEGREGATION MANYYEARSAGO v4OWNSENDSAID h4HE CURRENT POLICY IS THAT CHIL DREN CAN STAY UNTIL THE END OF THE SEMESTER AFTER THEIR PARENTS LEAVE BUT THAT DOESNT SOLVE IT EITHER v 4OWNSENDSAID h4HERES NO NEAT CATEGORY INTO WHICHTHISUNIQUEANDDIFFICULTSITU ATION FALLS ˆ NO EASY SOLUTION YET BUTTHATDOESNTMEANWERENOTGO INGTOWORKONTHIS ANDITSGOINGTO

TAKESOMETIMEv 4ERMAN -IDDLE 3CHOOL SEVENTH GRADER !LVARO (ERNANDEZ TOLD THE BOARDHEWOULDBESADTOLEAVE h-YFAMILYAND)MOVEDHEREFROM %AST0ALO!LTOACOUPLEOFYEARSAGO BECAUSE0ALO!LTOISSAFER7HENWE LIVEDIN%AST0ALO!LTOSOMEROBBERS CAMEINTOOURHOUSEWITHGUNS AND ITWASVERYSCARY ANDTHATSWHY) DONTWANTTOMOVETOANOTHERCITYv !LVARO SAID HE DREAMS OF STUDY INGHARDAT'UNN(IGH3CHOOLAND ATTENDING3TANFORD5NIVERSITY h)TWILLBEVERYSADFORMEANDMY SISTERS TO LOSE OUR HOMES SCHOOLS ANDFRIENDS vHESAID 3UPPORTERS OF THE "UENA 6ISTA RESIDENTS4UESDAYINCLUDED3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY0ROFESSOR!MADO0ADILLA WHOSERVEDONTHE0ALO!LTOSCHOOL BOARDFROMTO h-ANYOFTHE"UENA6ISTAADULTS WORKIN0ALO!LTOORINIMMEDIATELY SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES WHERE THEYAREEMPLOYEDINTHESERVICEIN DUSTRY INCONSTRUCTION ANDASNAN NIESORHEALTHCAREWORKERS h4HUS THEADULTSLIVINGIN"UENA 6ISTAAREIMPORTANTFORTHECONTRIBU TIONSTHEYMAKETOENSURETHAT0ALO !LTO IS THE GREAT PLACE THAT WE ALL

Veronica Weber

by Chris Kenrick and Sue Dremann

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Upfront

Postal

(continued from page 3)

  SQUARE FEET TO THE 53 0OSTAL3ERVICESOTHATITSRETAIL OUTLETCOULDREMAINATITSPRES ENTLOCATION 0LANNING $IRECTOR #URTIS 7IL LIAMSTOLDTHE7EEKLYTHATPLACING THE$EPARTMENTOF0LANNINGAND #OMMUNITY %NVIRONMENT AT THE POSTOFFICEMAKESECONOMICSENSE BECAUSEITWOULDALLOWTHECITYTO STOP LEASING SPACE OUTSIDE #ITY (ALL!TTHESAMETIME ITWOULD MAKETHECITYSPERMITTINGOPERA TIONSMOREEFFICIENT HESAID h4HEREAREISSUESFROMTIMETO TIMEINVOLVINGINTEGRATINGPLAN NINGANDBUILDINGANDUSBEING ABLETOTALKTOEACHOTHERANDBE AROUNDEACHOTHERSOTHATWECAN ANSWER QUESTIONS MORE EXPEDI TIOUSLYFORCUSTOMERS v7ILLIAMS SAID 0ALO !LTOS PURCHASE OF THE HISTORIC BUILDING IS FAR FROM A SURETHING7HILE0OSTAL3ERVICE OFFICIALS INDICATED LAST YEAR THAT THEYWILLCONSIDERTHECITYSOFFER THEYMADENOINDICATIONTHAT0ALO !LTOWILLGETANYDISCOUNTSORANY PREFERENCEOVERPRIVATEPURCHAS ERS4HECITY HOWEVER HASSOME LEVERAGE4HESITEISZONEDh0UB LIC &ACILITY v WHICH MEANS THAT ANYDEVELOPERLOOKINGTOCHANGE THEBUILDINGSUSEWOULDNEEDTO GETPERMISSIONFROMTHECITY 4HE POST OFFICE IS ALSO LISTED ONTHE.ATIONAL2EGISTEROF(IS TORIC 0LACES WHICH MEANS THAT ANYDEVELOPERLOOKINGTORETROFIT OREXPANDITWOULDHAVETODOSO WHILE PRESERVING THE BUILDINGS hHISTORIC DEFINING CHARACTERIS TICS v AS DEFINED BY THE 3ECRE TARYOF)NTERIORSTANDARDS4HESE ELEMENTS INCLUDE THE BUILDINGS FIRST FLOORLOBBY WHICHINCLUDES

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Palo Alto running out of patience with Mitchell Park Library delays #ITYANNOUNCESINTENTTOSTARTDEFAULTPROCEEDINGSAGAINSTCONTRACTOR by Gennady Sheyner

A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (May 6)

Salaries: The council discussed a proposal to align the salaries of managers and professionals with median salaries at benchmark cities. The council directed the Finance Committee to further study the proposal. Yes: Berman, Burt, Holman, Klein, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd No: Price Absent: Kniss Stanford funds: The council discussed funds from the Stanford University Medical Center development agreement. The council directed its Policy and Services to establish guiding principles for using these funds. Yes: Berman, Burt, Holman, Klein, Price, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd Absent: Kniss

Board of Education (May 7)

Teacher pay: The board approved 3 percent pay raises for teachers, staff and most managers, retroactive to the start of the 2012-13 school year, as well as a one-time bonus of 1 percent. Yes: Unanimous Mobile home park: The board heard testimony from residents of Buena Vista Mobile Home Park asking for help keeping the park’s 100-plus children in Palo Alto schools pending closure of the park. Action: None

Finance Committee (May 7)

Budget: The committee tentatively approved the proposed fiscal year 2014 budgets for the offices of City Manager, City Clerk and the City Attorney; for the City Council and for the Human Resources Department. Yes: Unanimous

Planning and Transportation Commission (May 8)

California Avenue: The commission discussed the proposed area concept plan for the California Avenue/Fry’s Electronics area. Commissioners expressed support for the idea of creating a “technology corridor” on Park Boulevard. Action: None

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Veronica Weber

CityView

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(continued from page 3)

THEN GAVE ITS STAMP OF APPROVAL TO THEBUDGETSOFNUMEROUS#ITY(ALL DEPARTMENTS INCLUDING OFFICES OF THE #ITY !TTORNEY #ITY #LERK THE #ITY -ANAGER AND AN /FFICE OF 3USTAINABILITY WHICHWILLMAKEITS DEBUTTHISYEAR 4HE NEW OFFICE WILL BE STAFFED WITH A MANAGEMENT POSITION THE CHIEF SUSTAINABILITY OFFICER FOR WHICH+EENESAIDTHECITYISNOW INTERVIEWING CANDIDATES 4HIS OFFICIAL WILL REPORT TO A BOARD OF

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Upfront PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 *****************************************

THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA – SPECIAL MEETING – COUNCIL CHAMBERS May 13, 2013 - 5:30 PM CLOSED SESSION 1. US Post OfďŹ ce 2. Labor Negotiations CONSENT 3. Approval of a Resolution Delegating Authority to the City Manager, or his Designee, to Execute and Administer the Northern California Power Agency Agreement Regarding the use and Non-Disclosure Information 4. Resolution Summarily Vacating Several Public Utility Easements Which Have Been Relocated At 4329 El Camino Real 5. Adoption of a Resolution Amending Utility Rule and Regulation 3 (Description of Utility Services), 5 (Service Contracts), 18 (Utility Service Connections and Facilities on Customers’ Premises), and 20 (Special Electric Utility Regulations) 6. Policy and Services Committee Recommendation to Accept the Auditor’s OfďŹ ce Quarterly Report as of March 31, 2013 7. Policy and Services Committee Recommendation to Accept the Discussion of Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Hotline Pilot and the City Auditor’s Recommendation to Continue the Hotline Beyond the Pilot Phase 8. Approval of a Contract Amendment with RBF Consulting in a Total Amount Not To Exceed $484,088 for Design Services for the California Avenue Transit Hub Corridor Project (PLNG) 9. City of Palo Alto Response to Plan Bay Area Final Draft and Environmental Impact Report 10. Approval of Solar Water Heating Program Administration Contract with the Center for Sustainable Energy California 11. Approval of Contract with Summit Uniforms for Five Years for an Amount Not to Exceed $520,000 for the Purchase of Police, Fire, and Park Ranger Uniforms and Related Equipment 12. Appeal of an Recommendation to Uphold Director’s Architectural Review Approval of the Co-location by AT&T Mobility LLC of One Pole-Mounted Wireless Communication Antenna and Associated Equipment Boxes on the Existing Utility Pole Within the City’s Public Utility Easement on 3704 Carlson Circle. ACTION 13. From Finance: Long Range Financial Forecast 14. Cubberley Community Center and Ventura School Site 15. Policy and Services Committee Recommendation To Council For The Adoption of An Ordinance Amending Chapter 9.14 (Smoking And Tobacco Regulations) of the Palo Alto Municipal Code to Establish New Smoking Restrictions for Parks Under Five Acres; Increase No-Smoking Buffer Zones from 20 to 25 feet for Consistency with LEED Standards; and Make Findings Regarding the Purpose of NoSmoking Regulations Restrict Smoking In City Parks 16. Consider City Offer to Purchase US Post OfďŹ ce

STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Technology and the Connected City Committee will meet on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 at 4 P.M. to discuss; 1) History of Fiber in Palo Alto, 2) Field Status, 3) Workplan, 4) Initial Steps, 5) Creation of Citizen Advisory Committee, 6) Palo Alto 311, 7) June Hackathon, and 8) Upcoming City Technology Initiatives. The Finance Committee will be meeting on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 at 5:00 PM to discuss: 1) Budget Hearings for Utilities (capital & operating), and 2) Utilities Advisory Commission Recommendation to Adopt a Resolution Approving Power Purchase Agreements for the Acquisition of Project Output over 30 Years from Three Solar Photovoltaic Facilities for a Total Not to Exceed Amount of $350 Million. The Policy and Services Committee will be meeting on Tuesday, May 14, 2013 at 7:00 P.M. to discuss; 1) Update to Consideration of Approaches to Address Concerns Related to Human Habitation of Vehicles, and 2) Update of the 1st Floor Remodel The City/School Committee will be meeting on Thursday, May 14, 2013 at 8:30 A.M The Finance Committee will be meeting on Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 4:00 PM to discuss: 1) Budget Hearings for Police, Fire, OfďŹ ce of Emergency Services, General Fund Capital, FY 14 Proposed Muni Fee Schedule, Public Works: General Fund, Storm Drain, Refuse, Wastewater Treatment, Airport, Vehicle Replacement, Special Revenue Funds (including Parking District & Stanford Development Agreement Fund), and non-departmental

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App

(continued from page 5)

3TANFORD5NIVERSITY APPLIEDFORTHE GRANT 4HE FUNDS COVERED A LAPTOP !NDROID PHONE MEAL AND FACILITY COSTS AND AN INCENTIVE IN THE FORM OF A LUNCH AND SHOPPING AFTERNOON WITHTHEGIRLSANDTHEIRMENTORSIN 3AN &RANCISCO ,INKED)N ALSO CO SPONSOREDTHETEAM :ELEDONSAIDHEALSOHOPESTOUSE THE REMAINING GRANT FUNDS ˆ THE TOTALWAS ˆTOOFFEREITHERA PROGRAMMING OR APP DEVELOPMENT COURSEANDANINSTRUCTORTORUNIT THISSUMMER /N -ONDAY NIGHT THE GIRLS RE CALLED HOW THEIR SUCCESSFUL TEAM GOT OFF THE GROUND 4WO #HICA 3QUAD MEMBERS -ARGARITA AND !SHLEY BOTH OF WHOM ARE SOFT SPOKEN AND ATHLETIC COMPETED IN 4ECHNOVATION LAST YEAR WITH %AST SIDE0REP4HEPAIRDIDNTJOINTHIS YEARSTEAMUNTILTHEFOURTHORFIFTH WEEK AFTERTWOOTHERGIRLSDROPPED OUT LEAVING 2OSIE AND 6ANESSA SCRAMBLING FOR THE REQUIRED FOUR TEAMMEMBERS 6ANESSA SHARED A COMPUTER SCI ENCECLASSWITH!SHLEYANDBUGGED HERhDAILYvUNTILSHERELENTED h4HENBOTHOFUSKINDOFBULLIED -ARGARITAINTODOINGIT vSAID6AN ESSA WHOSE ENTHUSIASM AND SMILE AREQUICKLYCONVINCING :ELEDONSAIDTHATTHEMAJORITYOF THE TEAMS COMPETING IN 4ECHNOVA TION WERE SCHOOL BASED MEANING THEYHADMOREBUILT INRESOURCESAND SUPPORTTHANTHE#HICA3QUAD "UT THE GIRLS PUSHED ON REGARD LESS ANDALLOFTHEMAREDEDICATED TOWORKINGONTHEAPPTHISSUMMER TOEITHERGETMOREFUNDINGTOPUB LISH THE APP OR TO LAUNCH IT THEM SELVES 4HEY ALSO HAVE NUMEROUS hFUTUREFEATURESvTHATTHEYWERENT ABLE TO EXECUTE IN THE  WEEKS SUCH AS A MAP FEATURE THAT SHOWS ALLTHETAGGEDLOCATIONSANDCLEANUP EVENTSASWELLASACCESSTOSHARETHE APPSINFORMATIONON&ACEBOOKAND 4WITTER :ELEDON ASKED THE GIRLS -ONDAY WHY THE COMMUNITY NEEDS THEIR APP h)FACOMMUNITYLOOKSGOOD ITRE FLECTSPOSITIVITY v6ANESSASAIDh)TS NOTONLYHOWITLOOKS BUTITMIGHT INSPIREPOSITIVECHANGEINTHECOM MUNITYv 6ANESSASAIDTHATWORKINGONTHE APPALSOPUSHEDHERTOTAKE!0COM PUTERSCIENCENEXTYEAR h)T OPENED MY EYES TO A NEW BRANCHTHAT)MIGHTLIKETOLOOKINTO INCOLLEGEv :ELEDON TOO HASHIGHHOPESFOR THEGIRLSANDTHE4ECHNOVATIONPRO GRAM HOPING TO CREATE A SIMILAR CONCEPTFORYOUNGMENNEXTYEAR h/URVISIONISTOBEABLETOHAVE AN%0!DESIGNTEAMOFHIGHSCHOOL ERS TO CREATE APPS FOR THE CITY FOR ORGANIZATIONS v HE SAID h) WANT TO MAKE SURE THE GIRLS LEAD THAT PRO CESS)WANTTHEMTOOWNITv h#OULDYOUIMAGINEAN%0!APP WOULDNTTHATBECOOLvHEASKEDTHE GIRLSATTHERECEPTION 4HEYALLNODDEDINAUNANIMOUS h9ESvN %DITORIAL !SSISTANT %LENA +AD VANYCANBEEMAILEDATEKADVANY PAWEEKLYCOM

News Digest Hopes rekindled for new police building 0ALO!LTOSPLANTOBUILDANEWPOLICEHEADQUARTERSAT0ARK"LVD ROAREDBACKTOLIFE4UESDAY -AY WHENCITYOFFICIALSANDTHEIRCONSULT INGARCHITECTANNOUNCEDABREAKTHROUGHINDESIGNINGTHEPROPOSEDFACIL ITY WHICHJUSTTHREEWEEKSAGOWASSEENASHIGHLYUNLIKELYTOMEETTHE NEEDSOFTHE0OLICE$EPARTMENT 5NDER THE PROPOSAL THAT THE #ITY #OUNCILS )NFRASTRUCTURE #OM MITTEEDISCUSSED THENEWPOLICEBUILDINGWOULDBECONSTRUCTEDBY THE *AY 0AUL #OMPANY AS A hPUBLIC BENEFITv IN EXCHANGE FOR THE CITYSPERMISSIONTOCONSTRUCTTWO FOUR STORYOFFICEBUILDINGSWITH  SQUAREFEETOFCOMMERCIALSPACEBETWEENTHEM4HEBUILD INGSWOULDGOUPAT0AGE-ILL2OAD NEXTTO!/,S3ILICON6ALLEY HEADQUARTERS 4UESDAYSDISCUSSIONCAMEJUSTWEEKSAFTERTHE)NFRASTRUCTURE#OM MITTEELEARNEDTHATTHESITEPROPOSEDFORTHEPOLICEBUILDINGMAYNOTBE OPERATIONALLY FEASIBLE 0OLICE #HIEF $ENNIS "URNS EXPRESSED CONCERNS THATTHEBUILDINGWASBEINGhSHOEHORNEDvINTOASITETHATWOULDNOTFIT THEDEPARTMENTSNEEDS!FTEREXPRESSINGSURPRISEATTHISDEVELOPMENT COMMITTEEMEMBERSAGREEDATTHEIR!PRILMEETINGTOINVITETHECITYS CONSULTING ARCHITECT -ICHAEL 2OSS OF THE FIRM 2OSS$RULIS#USENBERRY !RCHITECTURE FORAPRESENTATIONONTHEPROJECT 3INCETHEN THEPROJECTHASTAKENANUPSWING3TAFFFROMTHECITYAND FROMTHE*AY0AULCOMPANYHAVEBEENREVISINGTHEPROPOSEDDESIGNTO MAKEITWORKFORTHEDEPARTMENT 4HEBIGGESTCHANGEINTHENEWDESIGNISTHATTHEPOLICEBUILDINGISNOW A DISTINCT STRUCTURE 5NDER THE PRIOR PROPOSAL THE POLICE HEADQUARTERS WASATTACHEDTOAGARAGETHATWASSHAREDBYTHEDEPARTMENTANDTHEOF FICEWORKERS.OW THEDEPARTMENTWOULDBEHOUSEDINITSOWNBUILDING WHICHWOULDBEEQUIPPEDWITHPARKINGSPACESFORPOLICEVEHICLESN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

Palo Alto ponders ways to spend Stanford funds 4WOYEARSAFTER0ALO!LTOAPPROVEDADRAMATICEXPANSIONOF3TAN FORD5NIVERSITY-EDICAL#ENTER CITYOFFICIALSARELOOKINGFORWAYSTO SPENDTHECASHTHAT3TANFORDHADCONTRIBUTEDASPARTOFTHEDEVELOP MENTDEAL )NEXCHANGEFORGETTINGTHECITYSPERMISSIONTOEXPANDITSHOSPITALFA CILITIESINWHATOFFICIALSOFTENCALLTHELARGESTCONSTRUCTIONPROJECTIN0ALO !LTOSHISTORY 3TANFORDHADAGREEDTOCONTRIBUTEMILLIONTOTHECITY 7HILESOMEOFTHESEFUNDSAREEARMARKEDFORPARTICULARCATEGORIESˆ HEALTH INFRASTRUCTUREANDAFFORDABLEHOUSINGANDSUSTAINABILITYˆMOST OFTHEMONEYFALLSUNDERTHE#ITY#OUNCILSDISCRETION/N-ONDAYNIGHT THECOUNCILKICKEDOFFTHEPROCESSFORFIGURINGOUTHOWTOSPENDTHEFUNDS BYDIRECTINGITS0OLICYAND3ERVICES#OMMITTEETOHAMMEROUTTHECITYS GUIDINGPRINCIPLESFORUSINGTHEMONEY 3OFAR 0ALO!LTOHASRECEIVEDABOUTMILLIONFROM3TANFORD WITH ANOTHERMILLIONDUEAROUND SAID$AVID2AMBERG ASSISTANT DIRECTOROFTHE!DMINISTRATIVE3ERVICES$EPARTMENT4HECITYHASALREADY SPENTORLOANEDMILLIONOF3TANFORDFUNDS WITHTHELIONSSHARE MILLION GOINGTOAFFORDABLEHOUSING 4HISSTILLLEAVESTHECOUNCILWITHMORETHANMILLIONTODISTRIBUTE #OUNCILMEMBERSAGREED-ONDAYTHATTHEFUNDSSHOULDNOTBESAVEDAS ANENDOWMENTBUTRATHERSPENTONhTRANSFORMATIVEPROJECTSvTHATWOULD BEENJOYEDBYMULTIPLEGENERATIONSN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

Police roll out strategies against gang violence /UTRAGEDBYTHE#INCODE-AYO$AYSHOOTINGOFFIVEPEOPLEATABUS STOP %AST0ALO!LTO0OLICE#HIEF2ONALD$AVISAND-AYOR2UBEN!BRICA VOWEDON-ONDAYTOHAMMERHARDONTWOGANGSBELIEVEDRESPONSIBLEFOR ASURGEINVIOLENCEINTHECITYSINCE*ANUARY 4HEBRAZENNESSOFTHEPMSHOOTING INWHICHTWOYOUNGMEN STOPPEDINACARON"AY2OADNEAR-C$ONALDSRESTAURANTANDOPENED FIREONFOURYOUNGMEN AGRANDMOTHERANDA YEAR OLDCHILDWAITINGFOR ABUS HASUNNERVEDTHECOMMUNITY $AVISSAID h.OVIOLENCEISTOLERATED BUTTHEREAREDEEPERLEVELSOFVIOLENCETHAT SHOCKOURSENSEOFHUMANITY ANDTOJUSTPULLUPANDFIREINTOACROWDOF SIXPEOPLEWHENALITTLECHILDISTHEREISBEYONDTHEREALMSOFHUMANITY v $AVISSAID %AST0ALO!LTOHASHADEIGHTSHOOTINGSINEIGHTDAYS $AVISSAID&OUR HOMICIDESHAVEOCCURREDSOFARTHISYEAR)NTHEREWERESEVEN $AVISSAIDTHECURRENTGANGSRESPONSIBLEFORTHECRIMEARENOTMEMBERS OFTHELOCAL4ALIBANOR$A6ILLGANGS WHICHCAMEUNDERINTENSESCRUTINY LASTYEARAFTERASERIESOFSHOOTINGSIN-ENLO0ARKAND%AST0ALO!LTO (EDECLINEDTONAMETHETWOCURRENTGANGS"UTHESAIDEFFORTSAGAINST THE4ALIBANAND$A6ILL WHICHBEGANIN.OVEMBER SHOWTHESTRATEGIES CURRENTLYUSEDAREWORKING4HOSEINCLUDE/PERATION3-!243TRATEGIC -ULTI !GENCY2ESPONSE4EAM WHICHINVOLVESJOINTINVESTIGATIONSWITH LOCAL STATEANDFEDERALLAWENFORCEMENT ANDOFFERSOFSERVICESTHATAD DRESSTHEROOTPROBLEMSOFCRIME !SIMILARSTRATEGYWILLBEIMMEDIATELYAPPLIEDTOTHECURRENTVIOLENT GANGSN ˆ3UE$REMANN

Upfront

COMMUNITY MEETING

#)6),2)'(43

Feds rebuke district over email to parents 0ALO!LTOSCHOOLADMINISTRATORSWARNEDABOUTCOMMUNICATIONS WITH$UVENECKPARENTSONACTIVEBULLYINGINVESTIGATION by Palo Alto Weekly staff LETTER SENT TO ALL $UVENECK %LEMENTARY 3CHOOL PARENTS ON !PRIL  BY THE SCHOOLS PRINCIPALABOUTANEWINVESTIGATION INTOBULLYINGATTHESCHOOLBROUGHTA SHARPANDIMMEDIATEREBUKEBYTHE FEDERAL/FFICEFOR#IVIL2IGHTS AC CORDING TO DOCUMENTS OBTAINED BY THE0ALO!LTO7EEKLY $EPARTMENT OF %DUCATION /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS /#2 SUPERVIS INGATTORNEY:ACHARY0ELCHATCALLED $UVENECK 0RINCIPAL #HRIS 'RIER SONS NOTIFICATION OF PARENTS ABOUT AN OPEN COMPLAINT INVESTIGATION hHIGHLY UNUSUALv AND SAID IT RAISED CONCERNSABOUTTHEPRIVACYRIGHTSOF THECOMPLAINANTANDTHEIMPACTON THEINVESTIGATION ACCORDINGTOALET TER TO 3UPERINTENDENT +EVIN 3KELLY

DATED!PRIL 0ELCHATALSOWARNEDTHATTHEDIS TRICT EXPOSES ITSELF TO NEW CHARGES OFRETALIATIONIFTHEFAMILYBELIEVES ITS COMPLAINT HAS LED TO INTIMIDA TIONORHARASSMENTBYTHESCHOOLOR DISTRICT 'RIERSONS EMAILED LETTER WHICH WASQUICKLYFORWARDEDTOTHE7EEK LY BY $UVENECK FAMILIES WAS ODD BECAUSEOFTHEDISTRICTSPRIORSTEAD FASTINSISTENCEONNOTPROVIDINGANY DETAILSONBULLYINGCASESTHATMIGHT LEAD TO THE IDENTITY OF THE STUDENTS INVOLVED )NANINTERVIEWWITHTHE7EEKLY DAYSEARLIER 3KELLYDECLINEDTONAME THESCHOOLORPROVIDETHEAGEORGEN DEROFTHESTUDENTINVOLVEDINTHELAT ESTCASE CITINGPRIVACYPOLICIESAND

CONCERNS4HE7EEKLYSINITIALSTORY DIDNOTNAME$UVENECK ALTHOUGHIT WASUPDATEDAFTER'RIERSONSEMAIL WASSENTOUT 3KELLYTOLDTHE7EEKLYAFTERWARD HE HAD APPROVED 'RIERSONS LETTER TOPARENTSANDTHATITSPURPOSEWAS TOhIMPROVECOMMUNICATIONSATTHE SITEvGIVENTHEFACTTHE7EEKLYWAS INTENDINGTOPUBLISHASTORY !MONG OTHER STATEMENTS 'RIER SONHADCALLEDTHENEWINVESTIGATION ARESPONSETOAhNATIONALRALLYCRYON BULLYINGv "UT /#2 ATTORNEY 0ELCHAT CHAS TISEDTHEDISTRICTONTHATPOINT STAT ING h0LEASENOTETHATTHE/#2DOES NOTOPENCOMPLAINTSBASEDONA@NA

Bully

WE NEED SOME REPRESENTATIVES AT THEBOARDANDPLACESTOTAKEPEOPLE WHOHAVECONCERNSˆAPLACETOGO TOTHATSWELL STAFFED BROADLYREPRE SENTEDFROMTHESCHOOLS THATWOULD HELPUSFRAMETHESEISSUESv "OARD MEMBERS SAID ITS IMPOR TANTTOHAVECLEARDEFINITIONSOFBUL LYING AND DISABILITY BASED HARASS MENTTHATARECOMMONLYUNDERSTOOD AMONGSTUDENTS PARENTSANDSTAFF -EMBER -ELISSA "ATEN #ASWELL SUGGESTEDCHECKLISTSFORUSEBYAD MINISTRATORS h)FYOUCHECKTHESETHINGSTHENIN FACT YOU HAVE DISABILITY BASED HA RASSMENT)FYOUDONTCHECKTHEM YOU MAY HAVE HARASSMENT BUT NOT DISABILITY BASEDv #ASWELL ALSO SUGGESTED THAT PAR ENTS PARTICULARLYMINORITYANDSPE CIAL EDUCATIONPARENTS BEINCLUDED INTHESUMMERTASKFORCE 3EVERAL COMMUNITY MEMBERS WHOATTENDEDTHE4UESDAYMORNING SESSION COMPLAINED THAT ITS TIMING DURINGTHEWORKDAYPRECLUDEDPAR TICIPATIONBYSOMEPARENTS h4O SET UP A MEETING IN WHICH THE WORKING FAMILIES CANT COME TO TALK ABOUT SOMETHING THAT SO DIRECTLY AFFECTS OUR STUDENTS PUTS SUCHABADFACEONADISTRICTWHICH ALREADYLOOKSLIKETHEYDONTCARE

THATMUCH ORTHEYRENOTSUPPORT INGTHOSEMEMBERSOFTHECOMMU NITYTHATDONTHAVEASMANYOFTHE RESOURCESASMANYOFTHEMEMBERS DO v!NDREA7OLFSAID 3EVERAL PARENTS IN THE AUDIENCE ASKEDTHATANTI BULLYINGCURRICULAIN THEDISTRICTSELEMENTARYSCHOOLS BECONSISTENTSOTHATSTUDENTSARRIVE AT MIDDLE SCHOOL WITH A COMMON BACKGROUND AND LANGUAGE TO WORK OUTPROBLEMS 0ARENT3TACEY!SHLUND AMEMBER OFTHE#OMMUNITY!DVISORY#OM MITTEE FOR 3PECIAL %DUCATION SAID ITSPOSSIBLEFORPARENTSANDTHEDIS TRICTTOWORKTOGETHERhINAPRODUC TIVE AND COLLABORATIVE WAY WHICH DOESNT NECESSARILY MEAN FILING A LAWSUIT h7E WANT PARENTS TO UNDERSTAND HOW TO MAKE THINGS HAPPEN IN THE DISTRICT WITHOUT THIS HUGE EXPENSE ANDORDEAL FEDERALLAWSUITS)REALLY BELIEVE AND HOPE WE CAN AGREE ON THATANDMAKEPROGRESSONTHATTHIS COMINGSCHOOLYEAR v!SHLUNDSAID ! RECORDING OF THE MEETING IS AVAILABLEONTHEWEBSITEOFTHE-ID PENINSULA#OMMUNITY-EDIA#EN TER WWWMIDPENMEDIAORGN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

A

(continued from page 3)

THE INITIATIVE AND PRESENT RECOM MENDATIONSTOTHEBOARDEARLYINTHE FALL SHESAID 4HE DISTRICTS HANDLING OF BUL LYINGANDDISABILITY BASEDHARASS MENT HAS BEEN A SOURCE OF COM MUNITYCONCERNSINCEAFINDINGIN $ECEMBERBYTHE53$EPARTMENT OF %DUCATIONS /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS /#2 THAT A 0ALO !LTO MIDDLESCHOOLSTUDENTSCIVILRIGHTS WEREVIOLATEDINADISABILITY BASED BULLYINGCASE 4HE/FFICEFOR#IVIL2IGHTSISNOW INVESTIGATING TWO OTHER COMPLAINTS AGAINSTTHEDISTRICT ONEINAMIDDLE SCHOOLALLEGINGRACIALDISCRIMINATION ANDTHEOTHERACOMPLAINTCHARGING DISABILITY BASED BULLYING AT $UVE NECK%LEMENTARY3CHOOL !SSOCIATE3UPERINTENDENT#HARLES 9OUNGSAIDTHEDISTRICTISINTHEMIDST OFCOMPLYINGWITHTERMSOFARESOLU TIONAGREEMENTWITHTHE/FFICEFOR #IVIL2IGHTSINTHE$ECEMBERCASE 4RAINING SESSIONS HAVE BEEN HELD AND THE DISTRICT IS AWAITING /FFICE FOR#IVIL2IGHTSAPPROVALOFVARIOUS DOCUMENTS INCLUDING A POLICY ON BULLYING THAT WOULD COMPLETE THE COMPLIANCEPROCESS HESAID 4HENEWACTIONPLANISNOTPARTOF THE/FFICEFOR#IVIL2IGHTSCOMPLI ANCEBUTISBROADER HESAID !MONG THE LESSONS ADMINISTRA TORS HAVE LEARNED FROM THE /FFICE FOR#IVIL2IGHTSCASES 9OUNGSAID ARE THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING A CLEARLYIDENTIFIEDhPOINTPERSONvAT EVERYSCHOOLANDATTHEDISTRICTLEVEL CONCERNINGBULLYINGANDDISABILITY BASEDHARASSMENT !LSO HESAID STAFFTRAINING CLEAR DEFINITIONS DOCUMENTATION OF INCI DENTS AND PROACTIVE INVESTIGATIONS AREKEY /N 4UESDAY BOARD MEMBERS RE ACTED TO THE 3AFE AND 7ELCOMING 3CHOOLS !CTION 0LAN WITH SOME SUGGESTINGTHATSTAFFNEEDTOBETTER DEFINE THE FUNCTION OF THE BOARD LEVELCOMMITTEE 3KELLY SAID h4HE BASIC IDEA IS

Matadero Avenue-Margarita Avenue Bicycle Boulevard The City is soliciting public input on design elements of the proposed Bicycle Boulevard between Park Boulevard and the Bol Park Path

Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 6:30 - 8:00pm Barron Park Elementary School, 800 Barron Avenue The Matadero Avenue-Margarita Avenue Bicycle Boulevard is proposed in the City’s Bicycle & Pedestrian Transportation Plan 2012. The community meeting will focus on soliciting areas of concern to help guide the design of the bicycle boulevard. Questions/Comments: Please contact City of Palo Alto – Transportation Division at (650) 329-2442 or transportation@cityofpaloalto.org

(continued on page 11)

G C

GARDEN COURT HOTEL

Downtown Palo Alto

Mother’s Day Brunch Sunday May 12th

Introducing executive chef Clive Berkman

BUY 1 ENTREE AND GET THE 2ND ONE

with coupon (Not valid Friday & Saturday)

,UNCH"UFFET- 3s3UNDAY/NLY "ROWN2ICEs2ESERVATIONS!CCEPTED

369 Lytton Avenue Downtown Palo Alto (650) 462-5903 Fax (650) 462-1433

Family owned and operated for 17 years

Garden Court Hotel 520 Cowper Street at University Avenue Downtown Palo Alto www.gardencourt.com Tickets at http://mothersdaygch.eventbrite.com/#

w w w. j a n t a i n d i a n r e s t a u r a n t . c o m ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ>ÞÊ£ä]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 9

Upfront

California Ave (continued from page 7)

THATTHEAREAWOULDBESTBEUSEDFOR MIXEDUSE #OMMISSIONER-ICHAEL !LCHECK CAME OUT AS THE STRONGEST SUPPORTERFORSWITCHINGUPTHEAREAS ZONING h9OUHAVETOGOBACKTHREEYEARS TOFINDAGOOD9ELPREVIEWONIT vHE SAID h4HE REVIEWS ARE SHOCKINGLY ANDCONSISTENTLYABYSMALv 6ICE#HAIR-ARK-ICHAEL WHILE SUPPORTIVEOFTHEMIXED USECONCEPT

FOR THE AREA CAUTIONED THAT ELIMI NATINGALUCRATIVESOURCEOFINCOME FOR THE CITY LIKE &RYS BY TURNING THEAREAINTODENSELYPACKEDHOMES COULDBURDENTHEINFRASTRUCTUREAND CAUSETHECITYTOLOSEOUTONVALUABLE TAXREVENUE "UT -ICHAEL A 0ALO !LTO NATIVE SAID THE #ALIFORNIA !VENUE AREA IS RIPEFORREVITALIZATION h)T REALLY HASNT CHANGED IN  YEARS ANDTHATSNOTAGOODTHING v HESAID !LCHECKSAIDTHAT#ALIFORNIA!VE NUES#ALTRAINSTATIONWILLMAKEITAN

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News” in the left, green column.

Ravenswood names finalist for superintendent !NADMINISTRATORFROMA3ACRAMENTO AREASCHOOLDISTRICTHASBEEN NAMEDTHEFINALISTTOREPLACETHERETIRINGSUPERINTENDENTOF%AST0ALO !LTOS2AVENSWOOD#ITY3CHOOL$ISTRICT(Posted on May 9, 9:51 a.m.)

Menlo Park man arrested in drug-sales probe !WEEKS LONGINVESTIGATIONCULMINATEDINTHEARRESTOFA-ENLO0ARK MAN 4UESDAY FOR ALLEGEDLY SELLING COCAINE -ENLO 0ARK POLICE AN NOUNCED(Posted on May 9, 9:28 a.m.)

Tesla delivers on first-quarter profit promise 4ESLADELIVEREDONITSPROMISEFORTHEFIRSTQUARTEROFTOBEITS FIRSTPROFITABLEONE EARNINGMILLIONINPROFITFROMMILLION INREVENUE(Posted on May 8, 4:23 p.m.)

Palo Alto to celebrate ‘Bike to Work Day’ Thursday

       

-EMBERSOF0ALO!LTOSENTHUSIASTICBICYCLECOMMUNITYAREEXPECTED TOPUTONTHEIRHELMETS PUTAWAYTHEIRCARKEYSANDCOMEOUTENMASSE 4HURSDAYMORNINGFORTHECITYSTHEANNUALh"IKETO7ORK$AYv(Posted on May 8, 3:02 p.m.)

Six people injured in East Palo Alto shooting

     

              

&IVEPEOPLEWERESHOTANDA YEAR OLDGIRLWASINJUREDIN%AST0ALO !LTOON3UNDAYAFTERNOONNEARA-C$ONALDSON5NIVERSITY!VENUE ACCORDINGTOPOLICE(Posted on May 5, 5:13 p.m.)

East Palo Alto shooting seriously injures one 0OLICEIN%AST0ALO!LTOAREINVESTIGATINGASHOOTINGTHATLEFTONEMAN INJUREDON3ATURDAYNIGHT(Posted on May 5, 1:18 p.m.)

May Fete rolls through Palo Alto 2EVELERSANDPARADE MARCHERSALIKEFLOCKEDTODOWNTOWN0ALO!LTO 3ATURDAY -AY TOCHEERONANDPARTICIPATEINTHESTANNUAL-AY &ETEPARADE(Posted on May 4, 6:15 p.m.)

Caltrain hits car in Mtn. View, halting service !#ALTRAINHITACARATTHERAILROADCROSSINGAT2ENGSTORFF!VENUE AND#ENTRAL%XPRESSWAYAROUNDPMEVENING -AY#ALTRAIN OFFICIALSSAIDTHECARWASEMPTYWHENITWASHITANDTHATNOONEWAS INJURED(Posted on May 3, 6:51 p.m.)

Caltrain ridership skyrockets !FTERYEARSOFSEEKINGEMERGENCYFUNDINGTOKEEPFROMDRASTICALLY SLASHINGSERVICES #ALTRAINISONTRACKTOBALANCEITSBUDGETINFISCAL YEAR  AFTER HIGH RIDERSHIP NUMBERS THIS YEAR RAIL OFFICIALS AN NOUNCEDON4HURSDAY(Posted on May 3, 10:22 a.m.)

No injuries, little damage in Opportunity Center fire !SMALLFIREONTHEFOURTHFLOOROFTHE/PPORTUNITY#ENTERIN0ALO !LTOEARLYTHISMORNINGWASQUICKLYPUTOUTBYTHEBUILDINGSSPRINKLER SYSTEMBEFOREANYINJURIESORMAJORDAMAGETOTHEBUILDINGOCCURRED ACCORDINGTOA0ALO!LTOFIREOFFICIAL(Posted on May 3, 10:13 a.m.)

            



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Mitchell

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Upfront

Feds

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TIONAL RALLY CRY #OMPLAINTS ALLEG INGHARASSMENTBASEDONDISABILITY AREOPENEDWHENTHEYALLEGESUFFI CIENTFACTSTHAT IFTRUE WOULDBEA VIOLATIONOFTHE$ISTRICTSOBLIGATIONS UNDER3ECTIONOFTHE2EHABILITA TION!CTOFAND4ITLE))OFTHE !MERICANSWITH$ISABILITIES!CTv )NRESPONSETOTHE/FFICEFOR#IVIL 2IGHTSWARNINGLETTER 3KELLYSTATED INANEMAILTOTHE/#2THATTHEDIS TRICT WAS UNDER hSCRUTINYv BY THE MEDIAANDFORWARDEDCOPIESOFRE QUESTSFORDOCUMENTSSUBMITTEDBY THE7EEKLY 3KELLYDECLINEDTOCOMMENTTOTHE 7EEKLYONWHYTHEEMAILSPECULATED THEINVESTIGATIONWAShADDRESSINGA NATIONALRALLYCRYv 'RIERSONS EMAIL SAID THAT A PAR

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Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week

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CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session to consider making an offer for the U.S. Post Office building at 380 Hamilton Ave.; and to discuss the status of the city’s labor negotiations with the Utilities Management and Professional Association of Palo Alto (UMPAPA) . The council will then discuss the city’s long-range financial forecast for 201323; consider next steps for negotiations on Cubberley Community Center; discuss a possible ban on smoking at public parks smaller than 5 acres; and consider the purchase of the U.S. Post Office building. The closed session will begin at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, May 13. The regular meeting will follow in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss the history of fiber optics in Palo Alto; recent change in the field of high-speed Internet since the city’s last effort to establish citywide Internet service; and establishment of a Citizen Advisory Committee; and the hackathon that the city will sponsor on June 1. The meeting will begin at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, May 14, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL FINANCE COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to review the proposed budgets for the Utilities Department and consider a recommendation for three power-purchase agreements. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 14, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss a potential ordinance concerning human habitation of vehicles. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 14, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

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BULLYING, HARASSMENT, AND CIVIL RIGHTS:

What’s it all about? Representatives from the U.S. Department of Education OfďŹ ce for Civil Rights will be providing a workshop on bullying/harassment based on race, sex, or disability on

Thursday May 16, 6:30-8:30pm Ohlone School MP Room, 950 Amarillo Ave, Palo Alto

HISTORIC RESOURCES BOARD ... The board plans to review 329 Lincoln Ave., an application to redesign, enlarge and build a two-story addition to a Colonial Revival residence in Professorville; and 505 Embarcadero Road, a proposed restoration, alteration and addition to a residence. The meeting will begin at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, May 15, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

The presentation will include: Âť A brief introduction to the OfďŹ ce for Civil Rights (OCR); Âť Information about bullying/harassment based on race, national origin, disability, or sex (including not conforming to gender stereotypes):

ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board plans to discuss 711 El Camino Real, a request by HKS on behalf of Pacific Hotel Management for demolition of a 3,200-square-foot commercial building and construction of a new four-story 22,957-square-foot hotel with 23 guest units. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, May 16, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

3 how a school learns about bullying/ harassment; 3 appropriate response and possible remedies; 3 how to ďŹ le a complaint with OCR;

SCHOOL/CITY LIAISON COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to review recent meetings of the City Council and the school board and discuss the district’s and the city’s library services. The meeting will begin at 8:15 a.m. on Thursday, May 16, at school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). COUNCIL FINANCE COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss the proposed budgets for the Police, Fire and Public Works departments. The meeting will begin at 4 p.m. on Thursday, May 16, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PUBLIC ART COMMISSION ... The commission is tentatively scheduled to discuss commission policies and procedures. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 16, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

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Âť Q&A with OCR attorneys; Âť Who to contact if you have more questions.

Childcare will be provided. For more information contact Mary Vincent at maryvincent999@yahoo.com or email info@wecandobetterpaloalto.org

Sponsored by:

PASS Parent Advocates for Student Success

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Palo Alto Chamber Orchestra Concert #4: A Presto ‘al Italia Saturday, May 18, 2013, 8PM Benjamin Simon, Conductor

Cubberley Theatre 4000 MiddleďŹ eld Road, Palo Alto

FREE Vivaldi: Concerto in B minor for Four Violins; Featuring soloists from PACO Stephen Spies: Tribute to Giovanni Gabrieli - 2013 Youth for Youth Commission (world premiere) Puccini: Chrisantemi Gershwin: Lullaby Donizetti: Allegro Raymond Scott (Arr. Jeremy Cohen): The Penguin We present this ďŹ nal concert of PACO’s 47th season in preparation for our summer concert tour to the hills, towns and lakes of Umbria and Tuscany. From Vivaldi’s exuberant quadruple violin concerto, featuring four soloists from our orchestra, to an World Premiere by the young American composer Stephen Spies, this program weaves music from Italy and the United States into a bright tapestry of virtuosic music for string orchestra.

  sWWWPACOMUSICORGsINFO PACOMUSICORG

Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto May 2-May 8 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Child abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Theft related Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Counterfeiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Embezzlement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .4 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .8 Vehicle accident/property damage . . . 10 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Animal call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Casualty/fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .3 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Menlo Park May 2-May 8

Good for Business. Good for You. Good for the Community.

Theft related Attempted theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Vehicle related Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Bicycle accident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .5 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Tampering with a vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Alcohol or drug related Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Animal call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Coroner case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Juvenile problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Located missing person . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Probation violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Warrant arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Atherton May 2-May 8 Violence related Child abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle accident/property damage . . . .4 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Miscellaneous 911 hang-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

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Transitions Births, marriages and deaths

Harry Press memorial service A celebration of Harry Press’ life will be on Sunday, May 19 at 2 p.m. at Stanford’s Sunken Diamond ballpark. He was a newspaperman in Anaheim, Palo Alto and, for the majority of his time, in San Francisco, working for the Anaheim Bulletin, Palo Alto News, San Francisco News, and finally the San Francisco CallBulletin. In 1966 he left his city editor position to return to his alma mater, Stanford University, where he worked for until 1989 as both editor of the Stanford Observer and managing director of the Knight Journalism Fellow-

ships Program. He died on Feb. 6. He is survived by two of his children, daughter Tina, of Fayetteville, N.Y., and Tony, of Brisbane, Calif.; four grandchildren, Jessica, Patience, Katie and Andy; and four great-grandchildren, Keith, Clark, Finn and Georgia. Contributions in his honor can be sent to the Friends of the Stanford Daily -- Harry Press Scholarship, and mailed to the Stanford Daily, 456 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 943065. For details about his memorial service, please visit: http://knight. stanford.edu/harry-press

Pulse

Warrant attempt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Welfare check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

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VIOLENT CRIMES

CPS referral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Disturbing/annoying phone calls . . . . . .1 Fire call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Palo Alto Unlisted block Fulton St., 5/2, 2:56 p.m.; child abuse/physical Unlisted block Welch Road, 5/5, 2:42 p.m.; child abuse/physical 691 Seale Ave., 5/6, 3:30 p.m.; family violence/battery

Atherton

Lee Sault He died on April 3rd from complications due to diabetes. Lee graduated from Gunn High School and attended Foothill College and Colombia College. He was a truck driver with amazing spatial knowledge and a keen sense of direction that kept him on course. He is remembered for his sense of humor and his “good Samaritan” work, helping those in distress when their cars broke down or got stuck. He is survived by his mother, Helen Drachkovitch, his sister, Nicole Sault, and his brother-in-law, Peter Reynolds of Palo Alto. A Mass will be said at Our Lady of the Rosary Church in Palo Alto on Saturday, May 11 at 1:00, followed by a reception to honor his life. Donations may go to: Redwood Fund: www.sempervirens.org/tribute.php or Surfrider Foundation: www.surfrider.org PA I D

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O B I T UA RY

Kathleen Cairns

February 12, 1930 - April 14, 2013 Kathy Cairns died peacefully in her home on April 14 surrounded by her children and grandchildren. Kathy lived in Palo Alto many years while married to David Reese and attended First United Methodist Church. She sang in the Chancel Choir. She moved to Santa Cruz 20 years ago where she was involved with the UCSC Arboretum and Norrie’s Gift Shop, loved playing bridge and attending concerts both in Santa Cruz and the Bay Area. She is survived by her 4 children: Susan

Eisenhower and Karen Brown of Wheat Ridge, CO; David Reese (Eva Johnson) of Burlingame, CA; Kevin Reese (Mary Hall Surface) of Washington, DC, and grandchildren Philip and Lara Eisenhower, Melissa Peterson, Meredith, Jessica, and Barret Reese, and Malinda Reese. A memorial service is planned for August in Santa Cruz. Donations in her honor should be made to UCSC Arboretum, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 or online at http:// arboretum.ucsc.edu/donate

Unlisted block San Benito Avenue, 5/2, 8:08 a.m.; child/elder abuse

PA I D

OBITUARY

James Jay Horning 1942 - 2013

Visit

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/obituaries

James Jay Horning, almost always called Jim, died calmly and quietly early in the evening on January 18. His strength gone, but his mind clear, with his deeply saddened wife Jane by his side, her sister Pauline Olsen and her husband Donald Lessard, and a close family friend, Susan Owicki, giving generous and loving support. His sister, Patricia Horning Benton, could not be present, but he talked about her, and she was much on his mind in the last hours. He was 70 years old, with a long marriage and a long and rewarding career in computer science. His undergraduate degrees were in math and physics, but it was no secret his main interests were in computer science. He started college the summer he was 16, keen to get some prerequisite courses out of the way, so he could take more upper level classes as soon as possible. The small college had a Bendix G-15 computer. Around the time of his 17th birthday (on July 24, 1959) he wrote his first program which ran the first time, and he was hooked. It is hard to remember how new this was. Jim was doing graduate work in physics at UCLA when Stanford started a graduate program in computer science. Jane still had a year to go at UCLA, so Jim spent one year as director of the computer science lab at Loma Linda University. He applied to Stanford, was accepted, did well (and enjoyed it immensely), finished his thesis in the summer of 1969, and after that

the way seemed to open up. First, eight very good years as a young faculty member at the University of Toronto. Then a move back to Palo Alto in 1977 to join Bob Taylor’s legendary group at Xerox PARC. When Taylor moved to start Digital Equipment’s Systems Research Center in Palo Alto, Jim followed him. During the years of many Silicon Valley startups, Jim was offered a position in Victor Shear’s new company, which came to be called InterTrust. He later worked with other important Silicon Valley companies until he (brief ly) retired. Victor Shear again brought him into a new small group he was forming called AET (Advanced Elemental Technologies). He was working with this group of highest calibre people until the weekend he collapsed, and had emergency surgery for a serious brain bleed at Stanford Hospital. Two very difficult months of complications and setbacks followed. Near the end he chose only palliative care. His death was expected, but not that day, that hour, that minute. How much he is missed. A memorial service will be held on May 11, 2013, at 2:30 PM in the Unitarian Universalist Church in Palo Alto, 505 East Charleston Road. In lieu of f lowers, the family suggests a gift to the good cause of your choice. Questions and comments can be sent to Jane at Jane@Horning.net. PA I D

OBITUARY

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Editorial

A parallel universe Palo Alto school trustees work to move forward in midst of continued controversies he poor school board just can’t catch a break. Try as they might to follow the advice of their attorney and send the message they won’t be “distracted” and are “moving forward” from the controversy over bullying cases, one thing after another drags them back into turbulent waters. But one thing you have to admire: They are very good at compartmentalizing. Faced with a seemingly never-ending stream of communication or administrative missteps and the resulting public criticisms, school trustees have shown a remarkable ability to power through as best they can as the school year draws to a close. Juggling issues as diverse as labor contracts with its employees, adoption of a new strategic plan, planning for the opening of a new elementary school, school calendars, sorting out new policies and controversies on bullying and counseling, hiring a “communications officer,” and the evaluation of Superintendent Kevin Skelly, the last few weeks have been a whirlwind at 25 Churchill. The bright spots are the work around the strategic plan and the district’s improved financial condition, making possible well-deserved pay increases for our teachers and other district employees. The strategic plan, an impressive outline of the district’s aspirations over the next five years, is the best work we’ve seen produced in many years. Overseen by consultants at McKinsey & Company who are parents in the district, the study included well-designed surveys of parents, students, teachers, staff and administrators, outreach meetings and the preparation of an outstanding document that will hopefully help the district to improve in a number of key areas, including many that have been the subject of controversies. The board has worked hard on digesting the information and crafting the final language and deserves praise for it. It’s exactly the way a good policy body should be working. Ironically, however, it took less time to produce a comprehensive, data-driven five-year strategic plan for the school district than it has taken to produce a still-incomplete district high school counseling policy or a yet-to-be produced simple list of bullying prevention programs being used at each school. So what is wrong with this picture? Contrast how well the strategic planning process worked with these recent actions: s!LETTERWASSENTTOALL$UVENECKPARENTSBYTHEPRINCIPALINFORMING them that a fellow parent had filed a complaint about ongoing disabilitybased bullying at the school. The unusual letter, approved by Superintendent Kevin Skelly, prompted the Office for Civil Rights to send a letter to the district expressing concerns about the privacy rights of complainants and warn it about intimidation and retaliation. s4HEDISTRICTAGREEDTOCO SPONSORAPUBLICEDUCATIONSESSIONTOBE presented May 16 by attorneys for the Office for Civil Rights, along with other school groups, but then withdrew its support without explanation. Superintendent Skelly, who personally approved the sponsorship, initially told the Weekly the district had never agreed to sponsor it, but then said he withdrew support after hearing that some people might use the meeting to encourage more complaints against the district. s!SPECIALBOARDSTUDYSESSIONDESIGNEDTOLAYOUTAMAJORNEWDISTRICT initiative on bullying and report on “lessons learned” from the recent federal investigations was scheduled for 10 a.m. this last Tuesday, when working parents could not attend. The “lessons learned” presentation was three minutes long and, as trustee Melissa Baten Caswell noted, offered no new insights or analysis on how the district failed to respond properly to bullying complaints. The new “Stepping Up to Safe and Welcoming Schools” initiative proposed a summer task force to plan for a permanent committee, with one or two board members, that would meet monthly and be “a place for people with concerns to go,” according to Skelly. Trustee Camille Townsend was right on the mark with her response that the concept was not well-defined, lacked a clear purpose and seemed like a staff, not board, responsibility. s)NPRESENTINGANEWBOARDCOUNSELINGPOLICY4UESDAYNIGHT THESTAFF recommended that reference in the current policy to the teacher-advisory system at Paly be removed because the TA system wasn’t district-wide. But that recommendation was contradicted by assistant superintendent Scott Bowers, who said the law required that it be in the policy if it is offered at any school. The board sent it back to be sorted out. None of these items are horrible, but taken together, along with many others, they suggest a staff that is overwhelmed, cutting corners, making mistakes and rushing its work. There seems to be great hope that the hiring of a $150,000 district communications officer will turn things around, but we would have preferred that money go toward a consultant to conduct an organizational assessment of the district office. There are simply too many times when the school board is left needing to fix or re-do the work of the staff, and the reasons for that need to be understood and fixed. A great strategic plan will not succeed if the staff is not capable of doing the work, and by now it is obvious that is in question.

T

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Need for true dog parks Editor, There is no place in Palo Alto, or anywhere nearby, where you can run, hike or exercise with a dog off leash. The “dog parks” are tiny; you can’t even use a throwing stick because you would throw the ball out of the park. They are just places where people can socialize while the dogs do the same. I would prefer, instead of or in addition to a new minipark, that the city designate certain parks or athletic facilities for off-leash play on dates and times when that would not interfere with other scheduled activities. Michael Willemsen Elsinore Drive, Palo Alto

The city must listen Editor, From the April 26 edition of the Weekly, on the Barron Park grievances with the city over the proposed housing for Maybell Avenue: “Residents ... feared that the Mayfield ... Project would become a traffic and safety nightmare for a neighborhood already plagued with cut through traffic from Arastradero Road.” “The heart of the residence frustration is City policies they deem arrogant toward residents and harmful to quality of life.” In the same paper: “Facing protests, council agrees to public hearing on Cubberley.” Same edition, on the possible move of the Julia Morgan Hostess House to El Camino Park. If I were a Martian arriving in Palo Alto for the first time, I’d wonder why the inhabitants of Palo Alto allow such things to happen to them, when they clearly do not like what the government is doing. Add in College Terrace’s upset over traffic from upper California development, its impact on Hanover Street, stir in the University neighborhood’s frustration over parking, add a slosh of upset, city-wide, over the monster developments, at the sidewalk, and “public benefits,” which no one in the public thinks are beneficial, and you’ve got a series of disconnected brush fires. Put all these together and we have a powerful voice of the citizens that the council can’t ignore. It’s time to organize neighborhood associations around a powerful agenda: Staff and City Council are not listening and that MUST change. I stopped a paramedic truck as it traveled towards Stanford on Hanover, as occurs daily, if not multiple time daily. Asked how they would navigate at 8 a.m. with school mothers dropping off kids

and 188 cars trying to get to work on time at Stanford. The fireman told me that they see the potential for real problems! He urged me to talk with City Council. It’s time to organize, and make sure Jaime Rodriguez gets it — that he works for us, not that we have to put up with his stupid ideas. Lee Brokaw Hanover Street, Palo Alto

Reframe gun question Editor, If our current discussion centers on allowing people to have guns, we will not find a solution. The question must be reframed in terms of responsibility. It would be difficult for even the NRA to argue against responsibility. Gun shops are acting in a responsible way by requiring people to complete a background application before selling a weapon. A parent who keeps firearms under lock and key, to prevent an accidental killing, is acting responsibly. Based on what we know of the

Newtown killer, one must ask, was his Mother acting responsibly when purchasing high-firepower weapons? Did she store her weapons in a responsible manner? Was the neighbor of the butcher who killed the firefighters in Ohio acting responsible when purchasing guns for a felon? Have parents, treating physicians and governmental regulatory agencies acted responsibly when dealing with individuals who have significant mental and emotional issues? Is the entertainment industry acting responsibly with its violence-centered games, movies and TV programs? When gun manufacturers sell military assault weapons to civilians, is this acting responsibly? Has Congress, when enacting gun legislation, or courts, when interpreting statutes, acted responsibly? Before attempting legislation, let’s get agreement on responsibility. Nancy Yeend Ensign Way, Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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Should the city try to save the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

FORTY YEARS LATER, ARTIST’S PORTRAIT SERIES RECALLS THE HIGH EMOTION OF THE WATERGATE HEARINGS

THE FACES OF

SCANDAL

by Rebecca Wallace

F

orty years ago, political drama at the highest level captivated the country through television and radio. A fascinated Trudy Reagan sat on her Palo Alto couch and watched the Watergate hearings unfold. Then she recorded the lead players, not secretly and not on tape. Her oil-pastel, pencil and crayon portraits continue to tell the story of the 1973 U.S. Senate hearings investigating the scandal. There’s ferret-faced Hugh Sloan, treasurer of the Committee to Re-elect the President (CREEP); adversarial advisor John Ehrlichman, complete with lip curl; beach-boy presidential aide H.R. Haldeman. “I was riveted,” Reagan says. Every spring evening when PBS replayed the day’s hearings of the Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities, she was in her living room drawing away. As an anti-war activist, she was fascinated by the politics; as an artist, she had to capture the perfect oval of convicted Watergate burglar James McCord’s face. “Such a cast of characters, central casting could not have imagined them. And the drama!” she would write later. “They were so colorful that, in spite of the fact that I was watching them on a black-and-white TV, I drew them in colors, ones that seemed to match their personalities.” Strong red for the skeptical senator Lowell Weicker, for example, and sickly green haze for New York “hush money” deliverer Tony Ulasewicz. “Like he was in a New York City subway station,” Reagan says, looking up at her drawing. Today, the artist, who often goes by the art name Myrrh, is marking the 40th anniversary of the Watergate hearings with an exhibit of her 16 portraits at Palo Alto’s Midpeninsula Community Media Center. The lead players, heroes and fallen heroes and miscreants all, line a yellow hall off the center’s main entrance. Most are done in oil pastel, with a few in pencil or crayon. Sideburns and hornrimmed glasses abound. The portraits have been shown from time

Trudy Reagan’s drawings of Watergate figures include, clockwise from top right, presidential advisor John Ehrlichman, CREEP treasurer Hugh Sloan and U.S. Sen. Sam Ervin.

(continued on next page

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Arts & Entertainment

Watergate

to time over the years, including an exhibit in San Francisco for the 30th anniversary. Even after decades as a full-time artist, Reagan is still happy with her handiwork from long ago. “I was pleasantly surprised when I got these out,” she says. If there’s a leading man here, it’s Sam Ervin, the Democratic senator from North Carolina who chaired the investigating committee. Reagan was so taken with his face that he’s the only one she drew twice. In one of the portraits, Senator Sam is set against a regal purple background, his nose and chin prominent, his eyebrows perpetually in motion. Ervin, Reagan wrote in her exhibit card, “was a crusty grandfather figure, drawing on immense knowledge. His outrage was also immense.” Still, the artist’s favorite is the portrait of fallen attorney general and Nixon pal John Mitchell, who would serve prison time for his Watergate role. Here he is tight-lipped and small-eyed. “It has a kind of subtlety to it,” she said of the drawing. Other players on the long yellow hall include White House counsel John Dean, head bowed, his eyes invisible behind his glasses; and the old heartthrob Jeb McGruder, with pursed lips and deep-set eyes. The CREEP deputy director, Reagan said, “came across as a guy who would do anything for Nixon.” Reagan is still disappointed that she didn’t get to draw Alexander Butterfield, whose testimony re-

Veronica Weber

(continued from previous page)

Artist Trudy Reagan, now also known as Myrrh, stands with her drawings. (John Mitchell is on the left.) vealed the secret taping system in from Stanford University. In 1980, the Oval Office. He was on the stand when Ronald Reagan was elected for only 10 minutes. president, she decided to give herself In a way, the portrait project was a different art name. Since then she therapeutic for Reagan after years has signed her works “Myrrh.” of the Vietnam War. “I’m a Quaker Many of the artist’s works have and involved in anti-war activities. I been inspired by science, not polijust got royally depressed during that tics. While she has very little trainperiod,” she says. ing herself, she comes from a scienReagan ended up sending one of tific family, with a geologist father her works to the Senate as a politi- and a physicist husband. “He was cal protest. Different from the drawn really my tutor,” she says of her husportraits, it was a block print made band, Daryl. “He would read to me from an image she carved into a books like ‘Are Quanta Real?’” styrofoam meat tray. Pictured was Reagan is drawn to patterns in Nixon, waving not the victory sign nature, views of the cosmos, rock but the finger. A copy of the print is formations, visual mathematics. in the exhibit. She’s explored them in painting, The Watergate works were part of printmaking, paper marbling and a long art career that extends to this batik. One favorite series is “Essenday. A resident of Palo Alto since tial Mysteries,” in which she looks at 1963, Reagan has a fine-arts degree large questions of science and math

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through large paintings on glowing Plexiglas circles. She also started an organization called YLEM: Artists Using Science and Technology in 1981, bringing together artists and scientists to publish journals and put on forums. These days, Reagan is writing her memoirs and poetry, and is part of the Palo Alto group Waverley Writers. Artwise, she has a newer series called “Artful Recycling,” in which she makes sculptures from old electronic equipment and maps. It pays to have a physicist husband and a son who works in electronics who can supply parts. Reagan has remained interested in politics and social issues. She has done portraits of Central American refugees, donating proceeds to Quaker projects in El Salvador. Other works have explored civil rights and advocated for compassion in the Middle East. In 1987, Reagan was again rapt in front of the television, watching the Iran-Contra hearings. She pulls out a sketchbook and displays some of the portraits she drew then. Elliott Abrams, assistant secretary of state, looks extremely hawkish. And here’s Fawn Hall, former secretary to Lt. Col. Oliver North. Oh, Fawn. That hair. Anyone looking at the sketchbook would be waiting for Ollie North, and Reagan does not disappoint. Here he is in all his boyish, gaptoothed glory, and yet Reagan found something enigmatic about him. She flips through one portrait after another. “It took me about three draw-

ings to realize that he had busted his nose at some point.” N What: “Watergate Villains and Heroes,” portraits by Trudy Reagan, also known as Myrrh Where: Midpeninsula Community Media Center, 900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto When: Through June 29, weekdays from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. (by appointment on weekday evenings). Cost: Free. Info: For more about the artist’s work, go to myrrh-art.com.

A&E DIGEST THEATREWORKS CASTS NEW ROLES ... TheatreWorks now has two new directors: new associate artistic director and director of advancement, that is. Leslie Martinson, longtime casting and stage director at TheatreWorks, will fill the first of these two staff positions. She’s been with the Peninsula company since 1984, and has helmed shows including “Time Stands Still” and “The Pitmen Painters.” Filling the development position is Jodye Friedman, who previously worked as director of advancement for Brandeis Hillel Day School in San Francisco. She has also worked with One World Theatre in Texas and with the Florida Philharmonic Orchestra.

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Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day Menu – May 12th Appetizers Bruschetta Al Pomodoro Toasted slices of Oven Baked Bread topped with Roma tomato cubes marinated with Olive Oil, Garlic and Fresh Basil Crispy Zucchini Cakes Served with marinated cucumber & mint yogurt Salad Summer in Sorrento Watermelon topped with Feta cheese square, Arugula, fresh figs, Sicilian olives with Vidalia onion dressing. Strawberry Fields Crisp Mixed Lettuce, Fresh Strawberries, Toasted Pecans, Gorgonzola Cheese and served with our tangy Vidalia Onion Dressing Entrees Filet Mignon Marinated with herbs served with in a mushroom sauce with spinach. Served with broccoli and a risotto cake filled with blue cheese. Braised Short Ribs in a light red wine sauce Served with Polenta and seasonal fresh cut Vegetables. Linguine Pescatore Fresh salmon, snapper, clams, mussels and prawns in a spicy tomato sauce. Hear t shape Ravioli A Portobello & Shitake mushroom filling with Roma tomatoes and fresh spinach, in a light Marsala cream sauce. Grilled Salmon Served with sautéed spinach wild rice and vegetables. Dessert

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Tiramisu Italian dessert, consisting of alternating layers of coffee-soaked lady fingers and sweet mixture of mascarpone cheese, eggs and sugar. Linzar Hearts Cookies & Gelato Old fashioned ground nut dough cut into hearts and sandwiched with raspberry jam served with your choice of vanilla or chocolate gelato.

Eating Out FOOD FEATURE

A sweet and savory Mother’s Day brunch 2ECIPESFROMLOCALRESTAURANTOWNERS FEATURESEASONALINGREDIENTS by Audra Sorman SACHILDIN'ERMANY %STHER .IO USED TO BAKE BREAD AND PASTRIESWITHHERMOTHEREVERY &RIDAY3ITTINGINHER,OS!LTOSCAFE RECENTLY SHE RECALLED THE AROMAS THATDANCEDAROUNDTHEKITCHEN &OODISCENTRALTOFAMILYTRADITION FOR MANY ESPECIALLY ON -OTHERS $AY4HOSELOOKINGTOCOOKA3UN DAYBRUNCHON-AYCANTRYOUT A SWEET OR SAVORY BRUNCH RECIPE PROVIDEDBY.IO OWNEROF%STHERS 'ERMAN"AKERY#AFEIN,OS!L TOSAND#HARLIE!YERS CHEFOWNER OF#ALAFIAIN0ALO!LTO"OTHFEATURE ASEASONALFRUITORVEGETABLE .IOS DISH THE 'ERMAN PFANN KUCHEN PANCAKE IS AKIN TO THE &RENCHCREPE THINANDSLIGHTLYCRISP 0FANNKUCHENISMOREFLAVORFULTHAN THE !MERICAN PANCAKE WHICH CAN BEDRYANDLOSEITSFLAVORBECAUSEOF ITSDENSITY SHESAID .IOANDHERHUSBAND WHOOPENED THEIRRETAILLOCATIONIN SERVE UP 'ERMAN PASTRIES BREADS AND DISHES 3HE SAID PFANNKUCHEN IS ONEOFTHEMOSTWELL KNOWNDISHES IN'ERMANY h%VERYBODYIN'ERMANYGREWUP WITHIT%VERYBODY!NDITSSOEASY TOMAKE ANDYOUCANPUTWHATEVER ON IT YOU LIKE v .IO SAID 0FANN KUCHENISSOEASYTOMAKETHAT.IOS FOURSONS AGES  AND OF TENCOOKTHEMATHOME SHESAID .IOSSONSENJOYPUTTINGJAMSAND CHOCOLATE HAZELNUT SPREAD ON TOP THOUGH THE CAFE TOPS THEM WITH A STRAWBERRYANDPOWDEREDSUGAR&OR FANSOF#ALIFORNIASSEASONALBERRIES .IO SAID PFANNKUCHEN WOULD ALSO BE DELICIOUS WITH BLUEBERRIES AND BLACKBERRIES #HARLIE!YERS WHOSERESTAURANT LOOKSTOPROVIDEAHEALTHFULTAKEON ,ATIN AND !SIAN INSPIRED CUISINE KNOWSPLENTYABOUTLOCAL SEASONAL PRODUCE !SPARAGUS IS ONE OF THE INGREDIENTS INCLUDED IN A DISH ON #ALAFIAS BRUNCH MENU h2OASTED !SPARAGUS 0OTATOES AND -AN CHEGO0IZZAvISARECIPECREATEDBY !YERS THE FORMER 'OOGLE EXECU TIVECHEF !LTHOUGH!YERSRESTAURANTMAKES ITSOWNPIZZADOUGH HESAIDPEOPLE COULDSIMPLIFYTHERECIPEWITHPRE MADE PIZZA DOUGH FROM A RETAILER (E NOTED THAT THE SAUCE MADE OF SHALLOTS VEGETABLE STOCK THYME AND 0ARMESAN CHEESE RESEMBLES A #AESAR SALAD DRESSING 0EOPLE LIKE THE PIZZA BECAUSE hTHE INGREDIENTS BALANCE VERY WELL AND THE SHALLOTS CREATE THAT WONDERFUL SWEET FLAVOR PROFILE vHESAID /FCOURSE IFPEOPLEDONOTWANTTO COOKATHOME %STHERSAND#ALAFIA

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Recipes Roasted asparagus, potatoes and Manchego pizza

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PENINSULA

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

Chef Chu’s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Ming’s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

STEAKHOUSE

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Sundance the Steakhouse

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

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Movies OPENINGS

The Great Gatsby

“THE BEST FILM OF THE YEAR.�

--

-Anna Klassen, Newsweek



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(Century 16, Century 20) It would be easy to have a knee-jerk reaction to Baz Luhrmann’s 3D “The Great Gatsby,â€? a movie that’s practically begging for such a response. But we’d do well to remember the old saw that there’s no accounting for taste. Some will thrill to Luhrmann tarting up, in the vein of his “Romeo + Juliet,â€? F. Scott Fitzgerald’s literary masterwork; others will consider the film gauche sacrilege, especially in gratuitous 3D that seems determined to turn a great American novel into a colorful pop-up book (coupled with a hip-pop soundtrack produced by Jay-Z). The truth, as usual, is somewhere between these extremes. All of Luhrmann’s “Gatsbyâ€? is absurdly over-produced and most of it is supremely annoying, but much of it makes its own kind of sense as one audio-visual interpretation, expressly designed for contemporary cinematic taste, of an 88-year-old story. As on the page, one Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire) tells the tale, in hindsight, of his unusual friendship with nouveau riche millionaire Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio), whose pointedly larger-than-life lifestyle suggests a uniquely American façade. Gatsby lives in the hope of reclaiming lost love Daisy Buchanan (Carey Mulligan), now married to “brute of a manâ€? Tom Buchanan (Joel Edgerton). Their Jazz Age tale plays out in Long Island, with Gatsby’s shoreside West Egg mansion positioned to longingly overlook the Buchanans’ East Egg property, its dock’s green beacon a symbol of Gatsby’s “extraordinary gift for hope.â€? Unsurprisingly, Luhrmann embraces Fitzgerald’s Romanticism but little of his realism, and the director’s reckless-abandon style favors images and ideas over story and character. When all four elements work in concert, “The Great Gatsbyâ€? achieves flashes of pop transcendence, but Luhrmann makes the fatal error of playing more than half the film at the pitch of all-out comedy. Add Maguire doing Carraway like Peter Parker and DiCaprio busting out his bizarro “oh, this one’s a period movie?â€? dialect (who has talked like this anywhere, ever?), and the movie loses hope of being taken seriously on dramatic terms. When the picture does get serious — too late — it begins to make a case for itself (and its cast), but the damage has been done. For the drama to be effective, one must be able to buy into these characters as real people. While we can understand Gatsby as head-over-heels lover and all-American con artist, Carraway as a destined-for-disillusionment hero-worshipper, and Daisy as a tragic, tragedy-inducing wastrel, Luhrmann approaches the story and directs his actors in ways that hold

Carey Mulligan going all tragedy-inducing in “The Great Gatsby.� them at a distance from us, making it difficult to buy into real people in a real world. The overkill plays less as bold art and more as lack of trust in the source material. As Nick says of one of Gatsby’s legendary parties, “It’s like an amusement park.� Exactly, old sport. Rated PG-13 for some violent images, sexual content, smoking, partying and brief language. Two hours, 23 minutes. — Peter Canavese

In the House ---1/2

(Aquarius) The teachers and students of LycĂŠe Gustave Flaubert have returned from summer vacances for another year that promises to be soul-deadening. The big new idea? Uniforms for students. But when literature teacher Germain Germain sits down to his first set of student writing, he finds a diamond in the rough — and a world of trouble. Here begins “In the House,â€? the latest picture from French filmmaker François Ozon (“Swimming Poolâ€?). Adapted by the director from Juan Mayorga’s play “The Boy in the Last Row,â€? “In the Houseâ€? amounts to an insinuating mash-up of “Election,â€? “Rear Windowâ€? and “Adaptation.â€? As 16-year-old Claude Garcia (Ernst Umhauer) begins producing seductive prose, he begins having a dangerous effect on his new mentor, Germain (Fabrice Luchini). Claude’s homework assignments describe his real-life obsession with the upper-middle-class home of a classmate: Claude idealizes the place and the stability it represents even as he embarks (unwittingly) on threatening the stability of others. Here’s a boy who’s clearly outsmarting all the adults around him,

and his lean and hungry look and seductive manner suggest he’s a prose dealer to Germain’s addict (we’re hooked, too, implicated by Ozon). The chapters Claude doles out (each ending in “To be continued ...�) keep Germain and his wife, Jeanne (Kristin Scott Thomas), on the proverbial edge of their marital bed, Claude’s voyeurism having gone viral. While it’s apparent that Claude is a stylistic wunderkind and Germain the archetypal “those who can’t do, teach� teacher, Germain keeps giving insistent writing advice (“No respite for the reader. Maintain suspense�), all of which amusingly parallels Ozon’s own effects on the viewer (“Riveting dialogue, exciting situations�). Germain’s repeated suggestions that Claude has lost his way apply as much to himself and Jeanne (who runs a gallery named, but of course, Le Labyrinthe du Minotaure), but for his superiority, Claude clearly has much to learn, about his own reckless ways and undisciplined emotional impulses. Inviting photography and a relentless pace complement Claude’s unfolding narrative, but the big thrills are in the deftly drawn characters (Luchini, in particular, has never been better, which is saying something) and the incisive satire: of teacher-student psychology, our increasingly voyeuristic global culture (thank you, Internet), our escapism into stories fictional and “reality,� capricious criticism and hypocrisy, and all colors of denial. “There’s a way into every house,� Claude insists, and Ozon has found a tempting set of keys. His house is your house. Rated R for sexual content and language. One hour, 45 minutes. — Peter Canavese

Arts & Entertainment NOW PLAYING

MOVIE TIMES

The following is a sampling of movies recently reviewed in the Weekly: At Any Price --1/2 The Midwest farm, she ain’t what she used to be, many long years ago. That’s the sociological underpinning of Ramin Bahrani’s new film “At Any Price,� in which agribusiness puts the squeeze on an Iowa farming family. Henry Whipple (Dennis Quaid) would like to see at least one of his sons show an interest in one day running the farm, but the elder boy, Grant, has relinquished his golden-boy status and gone away to see the world, leaving his younger brother, Dean (Zac Efron), to feel the brunt of Dad’s expectations. With Henry’s farm leveraged in the millions, he’s had to double as a salesman for Liberty Seeds, a Monsanto surrogate that has effectively taken ownership of American farms by enforcing its patents on GMO corn. Still, if Dean evaporates, Henry resonates, as emblematic of an American economy — and American soul — in crisis. And even if making a move toward the mainstream, after such micro-indies as “Man Push Cart� and “Chop Shop,� stymies Bahrani a bit in his conflicting impulses toward realism and the broader sweep and cinematic classicism afforded by the wide-open, widescreen-friendly Midwest setting and movie stars (not to mention the race cars), the subject of the changing farm landscape feels fresh, and the stinging critiques of corporate greed and mutable personal values are enough to make “At Any Price� a thought-provoking drama. Rated R for sexual content including a strong graphic image, and for language. One hour, 45 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed May 3, 2013) The Croods --1/2 Monty Python alum John Cleese once co-wrote a book called “Families and How to Survive Them.� Given that, I suppose my jaw shouldn’t have dropped, then, to see his co-story credit on the animated adventure “The Croods,� in which a bickering modern Stone Age family daily enthuses, “Still alive!� Nevertheless, Cleese’s name comes as a surprise after an hour and a half, given the degree to which “The Croods� — though set in a world of mortal danger — plays it safe. Writer-directors Kirk DeMicco and Chris Sanders (the latter best known for “How to Train Your Dragon�) carry the rock over the finish line with enough slapsticky action and mild gags to hold kids’ attention. But discerning audience members will wish for more in the plot department and greater courage in convictions. Even as it panders to kids, “The Croods� takes care not to offend parents too badly for being behind the times, as there’s also a theme of parental sacrifice and unspoken love, rewarded with hugs all around at the end. It’s just disappointing that “The Croods� feels an obligation to be reassuring and noncommittal, wrapping up with the thought “Anyone can change. Well, sort of.� Rated PG for some scary action. One hour, 38 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed March 22, 2013) Iron Man 3 --1/2 This ambitious third installment in the “Iron Man� franchise offers (Robert) Downey (Jr.) another opportunity to shine. He continues to add layers to an already complex character and infuse the often somber genre with comedic charm (this is a comic-book movie, after all). Despite a somewhat slow start and occasional plot missteps, “Iron Man 3� ultimately soars thanks to its charismatic leading man and director Shane Black’s man-on-wire balancing act of humor and action. After helping defend Earth from a horde of alien invaders and nearly dying in the process (as seen in 2012’s “The Avengers�), Tony Stark is content tinkering in his Malibu mansion and sharing a bed with his girlfriend/personal assistant Pepper Potts (Gwyneth Paltrow). But he’s quickly reminded of the pitfalls of being a high-profile superhero with the introduction of two new adversaries: Aldrich Killian (Guy Pearce), a fellow tech genius and founder of A.I.M. (Advanced Idea Mechanics); and a shadowy Osama bin Laden-esque terrorist known as The Mandarin (Ben Kingsley). The visual effects and action sequences are stunning, especially when Tony’s Iron Man armor(s) take flight. The costuming, however, is more hit-and-miss. Iron Man, with Downey playing pilot, continues to launch Marvel into the cinematic stratosphere. Rated PG-13 for intense sci-fi action/violence and brief suggestive content. 2 hours, 20 minutes. — T.H. (Reviewed May 3, 2013)

Note: Screenings are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise stated. 42 (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:50 a.m. & 3, 6:30 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 10:25 a.m. & 1:20, 4:20, 7:20 & 10:20 p.m. A Kiss Before Dying (1956) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri 5:45 & 9:15 p.m. At Any Price (R) ((1/2 Palo Alto Square: 2, 4:30 & 7:15 p.m. Fri-Sat also at 9:45 p.m. The Big Wedding (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m. & 1:50, 4:10 & 6:20 p.m. Sat-Sun 11:30 a.m. & 1:50, 4:10, 6:40 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:35 a.m. & 12:55, 3:15, 5:40, 8:25 & 10:45 p.m. Blazing Saddles (1974) (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed 2 & 7 p.m. The Company You Keep (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: noon & 2:45, 5:30 & 8:15 p.m. The Croods (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: Fri 12:40 & 3:20 p.m. In 3D 10:15 a.m. Sat-Sun 1:30 & 4:20 p.m. In 3D 10:50 a.m. Century 20: 10:45 a.m. & 3:55 & 9:10 p.m. In 3D 1:15 & 6:40 p.m. Disconnect (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 1:45, 4:30, 7:45 & 10:35 p.m. Double feature: Star Trek & Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed 9:15 p.m. The Great Gatsby (PG-13) (( Century 16: 10 a.m. & 1:40, 5:10 & 8:50 p.m. In 3D 11:10 a.m. & 12:10, 2:40, 3:30, 6:10, 7:10 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 10 & 11:40 a.m. & 1:15, 4:35, 6:20 & 7:55 p.m. In 3D 10:50 a.m. & 2:10, 3, 5:25, 8:45 & 9:35 p.m. In XD 12:30, 3:45, 7 & 10:15 p.m. Houseboat (1958) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat-Sun 5:30 & 9:20 p.m.

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In the House (R) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 1, 4, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) ((( Century 16: Fri 10 & 10:40 a.m. & 12:40, 1:10, 4, 4:40, 5:30, 7:40, 8:10 & 11:05 p.m. (Sun last show 10:40 p.m.) In 3D 11:20 a.m. & noon & 2:10, 2:50, 3:30, 6:20, 7, 9:40 & 10:30 p.m. (Sun last show 10:10 p.m.) Century 20: 10 & 11:30 a.m. & 1, 2:30, 4, 5:30, 7:05, 8:35 & 10:10 p.m. In 3D 10:30 & 11 a.m. & noon & 12:30, 1:30, 2, 3, 3:30, 4:30, 5, 6, 6:35, 7:35, 8:05, 9:05, 9:40 & 10:40 p.m. Kon-Tiki (2012) (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Palo Alto Square: 2:15, 4:45 & 7:25 p.m. Fri-Sat also at 9:50 p.m.

Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District NOTICE TO SENIOR CITIZENS ABOUT PARCEL TAX EXEMPTION

The Long, Long Trailer (1953) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat-Sun 3:40 & 7:30 p.m.

DEADLINE: MAY 31, 2013

Mud (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 10:10 a.m. & 1:05, 4, 7:20 & 10:25 p.m. (Sun last show 10:20 p.m.) Century 20: 10:30 a.m. & 1:25, 4:25, 7:25 & 10:25 p.m. Niagara (1953) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri 7:30 p.m. Oblivion (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 10:10 a.m. & 1, 3:50, 7:25 & 10:40 p.m. (Sun last show 10:25 p.m.) Century 20: 11:05 a.m. & 1:55, 4:50, 7:45 & 10:35 p.m. Oz the Great and Powerful (PG) ((1/2 Century 20: 3:45 & 9:50 p.m. In 3D 12:15 & 6:50 p.m. Pain & Gain (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Fri 10 a.m. & 12:55, 3:50, 7:10 & 10:20 p.m. Sat 10 a.m. & 12:55, 3:50, 7:10 & 10:20 p.m. Sun 10 a.m. & 12:55, 3:50, 7:10 & 10:20 p.m. Mon 10 a.m. & 12:55, 3:50, 7:10 & 10:20 p.m. Tue 10 a.m. & 12:55, 3:50, 7:10 & 10:20 p.m. Wed 10 a.m. & 12:55, 3:50 & 7:10 p.m. Century 20: 1:30, 4:35, 7:45 & 10:40 p.m. Peeples (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m. & 2, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m. & 1:40, 4:10, 7:15 & 10:45 p.m. The Place Beyond the Pines (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:40 a.m. & 3:10, 7 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 12:30, 3:40, 7 & 10:15 p.m. The Reluctant Fundamentalist (R) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 3 & 8:30 p.m. Renoir (R) ((1/2 Century 16: Fri 6:10 p.m. Sat-Sun 6:50 & 9:45 p.m. The Sapphires (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 12:30 & 6 p.m. Star Trek: Into Darkness (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed 12:01 a.m. In 3D 12:01 a.m. Thu 12:01 a.m. in 3D 11:30 p.m.

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Sports Shorts

Cardinal could battle USC once again in NCAA title match

Palo Alto junior Andrew Liang broke a 1967 meet record in the 100 fly held by Mark Spitz in addition to winning the 50 free in another school record while helping the Vikings win the SCVAL De Anza Division title.

CCS SWIMMING

New era of swim stars is surfacing Paly’s Liang, SHP’s Howe and Gunn’s Campbell looking to pick up where Tosky, Kremer and Acker left off by Keith Peters hen the final race was done and the last of the medals handed out at the 2012 Central Coast Section Swimming and Diving Championships, a special era was brought to a close. Gone from the local scene were Palo Alto’s Jasmine Tosky, Gunn’s Rachael Acker and Sacred Heart Prep’s Tom Kremer. Between them, they won six individual titles and accounted for five section records (one of them tied) in last year’s meet. Acker also swam on two winning relays that helped the Gunn girls win their first-ever CCS team title in the sport. A year earlier, Tosky set a national public schools record

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Gunn sophomore Jenna Campbell eyes CCS titles in the 200, 500 frees.

in the 100 fly. Tosky finished her career with eight individual CCS titles, Kremer had six and Acker had five overall, including three relays. While all three swimmers have moved on — Tosky to USC, Kremer to Stanford and Acker to Cal where she won an NCAA title — three more swimmers from the same schools are ready to leave their mark on the 2013 meet set for this weekend at the George F. Haines International Swim Center in Santa Clara. The “newcomers” include Palo Alto junior Andrew Liang, Sacred (continued on page 24)

ON THE AIR Friday College baseball: Oregon St. at Stanford, 6:30 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Saturday College baseball: Oregon St. at Stanford, 2 p.m.KZSU (90.1 FM)

Sunday College baseball: Oregon St. at Stanford, 1 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Tuesday College baseball: Santa Clara at Stanford, 5:30 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM) Keith Peters

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

by Rick Eymer n the brief 13-year history of the NCAA Women’s Water Polo Championship, three schools, and more specifically, three coaches, have proven dominant at the elite level. Stanford, coached by MenloAtherton High grad John Tanner, has qualified for every tournament so far, and has reached eight of the previous 12 championship matches, winning three times. USC, coached by Johan Vavic, has been to six championship matches, winning twice, while UCLA’s Adam Krikorian has won seven of his eight trips to the title game. Only California and Loyola Marymount have spoiled the party, each owning a national runner-up trophy. Those three coaches also have something else in common in that they have been involved with the United States (men’s and women’s) National Team program, with Krikorian leading the American women to their first gold medal in the sport in London last summer. USC, Stanford and UCLA (now coached by Brandon Brooks), are the top three seeds in this year’s championship tournament, to be held at Harvard University, near Boston, beginning Friday morning. Should the Cardinal and Women of Troy reach the title match on Sunday, which is expected, the pool will be filled with Olympians, and not just from the U.S. “There would be a significant group of the top players in the world, club or otherwise,” Tanner said. “The level of play is at an alltime high. Some of the starters for USC played major roles for their countries.” The Cardinal (27-2) features Olympians Maggie Steffens, Melissa Seidemann and Annika Dries. Canadian National Team member Anna Yelizarova is one of Stanford’s top scorers. Reigning National Player of the Year Kiley Neushul and Stanford goalie Kate Baldoni are also among the elite players. USC features sophomore Monica Vavic, certainly capable of playing at the Olympic level, Hungarian Olympic goalie Flora Bolonyai and Spanish Olympian Anni Espar. Bolonyai could be looking for a bit of redemption. Steffens scored seven goals against her in the Olympics, while Espar, who owns a silver medal, also could be looking to avenge Spain’s loss to the U.S. in the gold-medal game. “They play the game right,” Tanner said of USC’s Trojans. “They try to score in every phase, they are

I

Keith Peters

POLO NOTES . . . Sacred Heart Prep seniors Scott Jollymour, Zoltan Lazar and Alex Swart have committed to play water polo at four-year institutions next season. Jollymour and Lazar both will play for UC Davis, and Swart will attend George Washington University. All three were 2012 All-West Catholic Athletic League selections as well as members of the 2012 CCS Senior All-Star Team. They also were significant contributors to Sacred Heart Prep’s WCAL and CCS Division II championships in 2011 and 2012 . . . Palo Alto boys’ coach Brandon Johnson just finished his second season with University of Western Australia (UWA Torpedoes) of the Australian National (pro) League. They won the silver medal after making the playoffs for the first time since 2005. Johnson led the team in scoring with 50 goals. Brandon’s twin, Matt, who shared coaching duties last season, is now heading the Gunn boys’ program . . . The Palo Alto girls’ program, meanwhile, is searching for a new head coach following the departure of Spencer Dornin. Those interested in the job should contact Paly Athletic Director Earl Hansen at ehansen@pausd.org.

Stanford goes for a 3-peat

Keith Peters

HONOR FOR OAKS . . . Menlo College’s Jimmy Bosco earned top billing as Player of the Year as the 2013 NAIA West Group end-of-the-year honors were announced last weekend. Bosco, a junior outfielder from Granite Bay, batted .426 — second-best in the conference behind the .434 average of Lewis-Clark State’s Brady Steiger. Bosco’s home runs (15), slugging percentage (.805), and runs batted in (56) were all tops in the Group. He tied for first with Steiger in runs. Bosco’s impressive 2013 campaign also included a slew of top rankings on the national stage including first overall in: total bases (153), total bases per game (2.942), the aforementioned slugging percentage (.805) and fielding percentage (1.000). Bosco batted .533 (8-15) while leading the Oaks to a runner-up finish in the NAIA West Group Tournament last weekend in Portland, Ore. The Oaks lost to tourney host Concordia University, 4-3, in the finals. His eight tournament hits included a double and four RBI. Bosco also hit the tournament’s only home run at cavernous Porter Park. Bosco will also receive a Gold Glove award for his defense in the Oak’s outfield as he was not charged with a single error in 102 chances.

WOMEN’S WATER POLO

Sacred Heart Prep junior Ally Howe will be a big favorite to win her third straight section title in the 100 back and should contend for the 200 IM crown at the CCS Championships this weekend in Santa Clara.

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STANFORD ROUNDUP

Women’s tennis set for NCAA opener by Rick Eymer icole Gibbs has won her past three tennis matches, Kristie Ahn is 9-1 over her past 10 matches and both Krista Hardebeck and Ellen Tsay have won eight of their past 10 matches. In other words, the Stanford women’s tennis team is ready for a lengthy run in the NCAA Tournament, which gets underway Friday when the 12th-ranked Cardinal (16-4) hosts Mid-American Conference champion Miami of Ohio (1312) at 2 p.m. Rice and Pepperdine are also in the field at Stanford, with Saturday’s second-round match scheduled for 1 p.m. On the men’s side, Trey Strobel currently owns an eight-match winning streak as Stanford (12-11) travels to Malibu and a first-round match with No. 20 LSU (15-11) at Pepperdine on Friday. It’s been an interesting year for both tennis programs thus far. Four

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losses may not seem like much, but the Cardinal women are used to doing much better. That No. 12 ranking is also usually unheard of around the Taube Family Tennis Center. Stanford lost Mallory Burdette during the fall. The former NCAA doubles champion turned professional after a successful run through the pro circuit. Gibbs (13-4 overall) played the pro circuit through the fall, as well, and may have suffered from the fatigue of travel and playing so much tennis. The defending national singles champion took time off during the Pac-12 tournament. This is the time of the year, though, when Stanford usually steps up. The Cardinal still has plenty of talent and a possible Round-of-16 match with USC will be most telling. The Women of Troy handed Stanford its worst loss of the year, 6-1, in Los Angeles. Should they meet again, it would

Nicole Gibbs

Baseball plays host to second-place Oregon State, softball hosts Arizona while women’s golfers host an NCAA regional

Stanford junior Nicole Gibbs has won her past three matches and is playing some of her best tennis at the right time as the Cardinal women prepare to open the NCAA Tournament on Friday at home against Miami (Ohio). be at Illinois next weekend, where the Cardinal hopes things will be different. Three of Stanford’s losses have

Water polo (continued from previous page)

Keith Peters

well-prepared and it’s a pleasure to play them. I hope to get to the championship game.” For as intense as the rivalry has become, the Bruins could very well sneak into the title match. UCLA (26-6) lost a one-goal game to USC earlier in the season and five of its losses have been to Stanford and the Women of Troy. The Bruins also lost a one-goal game to up-and-coming Arizona State. “UCLA is a good team,” Tanner said. “They took USC to a last-second goal. They are defensive-minded and are finding more ways to score. We have to focus on Saturday.” USC is the top offensive team in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. Stanford ranks second. The Cardinal is the MPSF’s top defensive team. USC ranks second. Baldoni is the top-ranked goalie in the conference, even ahead of Bolonyai. “Our games with USC have traditionally very strategic and intense,” Tanner said. Stanford opens the tournament Friday morning against Iona (21-8). UCLA and Princeton play in the second game of the day, followed by USC and Pomona-Pitzer. Hawaii and UC San Diego, coached by Brad Kreutzkamp, whose brother Brian coaches for Sacred Heart Prep, meet in the final game. Stanford and UCLA are expected to meet in one semifinal Saturday at 4 p.m. The championship match is slated for Sunday at 2:15 p.m. The trip to Boston already has been memorable for Stanford, which toured Fenway Park on Wednesday and lunched at Copley Square on Thursday. The Cardinal received an added bonus when the team was allowed on the field just as the Minnesota Twins were beginning batting prac-

Stanford freshman and Olympian Maggie Steffens will be counted upon this weekend as the Cardinal defends its NCAA title. tice. They got a tour inside the Green Monster’s scoreboard. “It was incredible,” Tanner said. “We realized we were on hallowed ground.” The team even managed a picture against the Green Monster, even as balls were bouncing off the walls. The trip to Copley Square, site of the Boston Marathon bombings, carried mixed emotions. “It was something I thought we needed to look at,” Tanner said. “We

wanted to support those merchants, show our respect and pay homage. It was even odd to be at the pool.” Blodgett Pool was in lockdown after the bombings when it was learned one of the suspects had worked there as a life guard. The site since been been secured. Of course, there is more to Boston and Harvard than just recent events and Stanford will be looking to create a little history itself as it attempts to win a third consecutive title. N

been to teams ranked in the top 10, and the fourth was to St. Mary’s, 4-3, which is also in the field of 64. California and Florida are the other two with wins over Stanford. Hardebeck leads Stanford with 32 wins, against six losses. She’s followed by an impressive group that includes Tsay (29-8), Ahn (26-5) and Stacey Tan (20-8). Natalie Dillon (13-12) has been competitive most if the year, as well. The men have struggled most of the year, depending on a young lineup that has been without seniors Walker Kehrer and Matt Kandath for much of the year. Strobel is 21-10 overall. John Morrissey (21-13) and Nolan Paige (20-17) have also won at least 20 matches. Menlo School grad Jamin Ball is 10-7 overall. Baseball Stanford hosts second-place Oregon State this weekend in a Pac12 series, beginning Friday at 6:30 p.m. The series continues Saturday (2 p.m.) and concludes Sunday (1 p.m.). The Cardinal (11-10, 26-17) can make some waves in the conference with a good showing this weekend. Stanford took two of three from Arizona State last weekend and Mark Appel earned Pac-12 Pitcher of the Week honors. Appel (8-3, 1.56) has shown himself, again, to be one of the nation’s top pitchers. He has 106 strikeouts in 86 1/3 innings and has thrown four complete games. He averages 7 2/3 innings a start. Menlo School grad Danny Diekroeger owns a .308 batting average, second on the team to Justin Ringo’s .346. Diekroeger leads the team with 56 hits and is one of four players with nine doubles, second only to Wayne Taylor’s 11 doubles. Women’s lacrosse Stanford gets a second chance to make a good first impression when it plays Notre Dame in the first round of the NCAA tournament on Friday at 5 p.m. (PT) at Northwestern in Evanston, Ill.

The Cardinal (13-5) opened the season with a two-goal loss to the then-ranked No. 9 Irish at home. Opening the NCAA tournament with a victory would do wonders for the program. Stanford earned the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation automatic bid into the NCAA field by winning the conference tournament. Hanna Farr scored six goals in the conference tournament and was named the Most Outstanding Player. Women’s golf Stanford continues at the NCAA West Regional through Saturday, which the Cardinal is hosting at Stanford Golf Course. Softball Stanford, fresh off its first sweep of Pac-12 rival California, looks to finish the regular season strong with games against visiting Arizona Friday night (7 p.m.) and Saturday at noon. The Cardinal (12-9, 36-17) had won four straight and seven of eight overall entering Thursday night’s series opener. Teagan Gerhart’s next win will be No. 100 for her career. She’s 19-9 with a 2.54 ERA, 15 complete games and six shutouts. Track and field Stanford travels to the Pac-12 Championships on Saturday and Sunday at the new track at USC’s Loker Stadium. The Cardinal women are ranked No. 14 in the country by the USTFCCCA, and the men are unranked. Stanford’s women are seeking their first title since 2005 and the men their first since 2002. Combined, the Cardinal has 20 All-Americans among the two teams, and features two returning Pac-12 women’s champions —100meter hurdler Kori Carter and javelin thrower Brianna Bain. Both hold the nation’s best collegiate marks this year — Carter’s 54.71 in the 400 hurdles and Bain’s 183-10. N

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ>ÞÊ£ä]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 23

City of Palo Alto ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared by the Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. In accordance with A.B. 886, this document will be available for review and comment during an extension of the inspection period through May 30, 2013 during the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the Development Center, 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. The original notice was published on March 22, 2013. This item will be considered at a public hearing by the Planning and Transportation Commission, Wednesday, May 22, 2013 at 6:00 PM. in the Palo Alto City Council Chambers on the first floor of the Civic Center, located at 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Written comments on the Mitigated Negative Declaration will be accepted until 5:00 PM on May 30, 2013 in the Planning and Community Environment Department Civic Center offices on the fifth floor of City Hall. 567-595 Maybell Avenue [12PLN-00453]: Request by Candice Gonzalez on behalf of Palo Alto Housing Corporation, for a Comprehensive Plan Amendment and zone district change from Low-Density Residential (R-2) and Multiple-Family Residential (RM-15) to a Planned Community (PC). The request also includes Architectural Review for a housing project on the site that includes 15 single-family detached homes (approximately 1,900 to 2,400 square feet per home) and a 60-unit multiple-family residential building (approximately 57,000 square feet) providing affordable rental units for seniors. The project includes off-street parking, landscaping and other site improvements. *** Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, listening assistive devices are available in the Council Chambers and Council Conference Room. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice.

City of Palo Alto ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared by the Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. In accordance with A.B. 886, this document will be available for review and comment during a minimum 20-day circulation period beginning May 10, 2013 through May 30, 2013 during the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the Development Center, 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. This item will be considered at a public hearing by the Architectural Review Board, Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 8:30 AM. in the Palo Alto City Council Chambers on the first floor of the Civic Center, located at 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Written comments on the Mitigated Negative Declaration will be accepted until 5:00 PM on May 30, 2013 in the Planning and Community Environment Department Civic Center offices on the fifth floor of City Hall. 240 Hamilton Avenue [13PLN-00006]: Request by Ken Hayes of Hayes Group Architects on behalf of Forest Casa Real LLC. for Major Architectural Review Board review for the demolition of an existing 5,000 square foot, two — story commercial building and the construction of a four-story, 50 foot, mixed-use building with a new floor area of 15,000 square feet on a site located at 240-248 Hamilton Avenue. Environmental Assessment: an Initial Study and Mitigated Negative Declaration have been prepared. Zone District: Downtown Community Commercial (CD-C)(P)(GF) with Pedestrian Shopping and Ground Floor combining districts. Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, listening assistive devices are available in the Council Chambers and Council Conference Room. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice.

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Sports

Swimming (continued from page 22)

Heart Prep junior Ally Howe and Gunn sophomore Jenna Campbell. Of the three, only Howe has won a section title. Make that two — the 100 back in each of the past two CCS meets. Liang, however, is the top seed in both the 50 free and 100 fly while Campbell is seeded No. 2 in the 200 free and No. 3 in the 500 free. Howe, meanwhile, is No. 1 in the 100 back and No. 4 in the 200 IM. Moreover, all three are coming off respective league championship meets where they helped their teams capture team championships. All three won two individual titles and swam on a combined five winning relays. Palo Alto coach Danny Dye said Liang was close to a breakthrough season last year while taking second in the 50 free and 100 fly. “He should have won the 50 last year (losing to Bellarmine’s Mitchell Hamilton, 20.87 to 20.92). He just got out-touched,” Dye said. “In the fly, he made a nice run at it. This year, it has all come together. He has another year of experience and maturity, so he has a couple of years to really shine at CCS.” At the SCVAL De Anza Division finals last Friday at Paly, Liang won the 50 free in a school-record 20.59, won the 100 fly in a school-record in 47.88 (third-fastest time in CCS history) — breaking the oldest meet record (49.10) set by the legendary Mark Spitz in 1967 — in addition to anchoring the 200 free relay team to a 1:26.21 victory for school and meet records. To top it all off, Liang clocked a sizzling 44.58 anchor to help the Vikings win the 400 free relay in 3:10.57. Not too surprising, the Palo Alto boys successfully defended their league meet title. Howe was nearly as successful in the record-breaking department at the West Bay Athletic League finals last week in the Gators’ pool. She won the 50 free in 22.81 to set school and meet records, won the 100 back in a meet record of 53.57, led off the 200 medley relay that went 1:48.29 for another league mark and anchored the 400 free relay to victory (3:44.02) with a fast 50.32 time. Howe’s 50 free and 100 back times were automatic All-American times. The 50 is also one of the fastest in CCS history, but Howe will swim the 200 IM and 100 back at CCS. “The 200 IM is loaded with fast swimmers,” said SHP coach Kevin Morris. “It’s probably the strongest girls’ event, top to bottom, and anything can happen. But, Ally has been swimming so well. It actually won’t surprise me if a few people went under Jasmine Tosky’s CCS record (1:57.94), which (wow!), seemed inconceivable to even think a few years ago. “In the 100 back, Ally is probably more of a clear favorite, and she has an outside chance of breaking the national private schools record of 52.30, held by (2012 U.S. Olympian) Missy Franklin. She (Howe) went 53.57 at the WBAL meet untapered, having gone to practice that morning.”

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Brooke Stenstrom

Andrew Liang

Menlo-Atherton High

Palo Alto High

The freshman swimmer set meet and school records by winning the 50 and 100 free, and anchored the 200 medley and 400 free relays to victory with school records as the Bears won the PAL Bay Division finals.

The junior swimmer won the 50 free and 100 fly with school records (breaking a 1967 league mark by Mark Spitz in the fly) and swam legs on two winning relays to pace the Vikings to the SCVAL De Anza Division title.

Honorable mention Jennifer Campbell* Gunn swimming

Caroline Cummings Sacred Heart Prep lacrosse

Ally Howe Sacred Heart Prep swimming

Nina Kelty* Palo Alto lacrosse

Claire Klausner* Gunn softball

Sarah Robinson Gunn track & field

Chris Hinrichs Sacred Heart Prep swimming

Scott Jollymour Sacred Heart Prep swimming

William Lee Palo Alto swimming

Austin Poore Palo Alto baseball

Grant Raffel Palo Alto golf

Nick Sullivan Palo Alto track & field * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

Howe won the 100 back at CCS last season in 53.12, setting a section record of 53.11 in the prelims. She took second in the 200 IM in 1:58.61, a school record. Gunn’s Campbell, meanwhile, is ready to step out of Acker’s considerable shadow from last season. “Jennifer is indeed Rachael’s heir apparent,” said Gunn coach Mark Hernandez. “She’s someone who a program can build around, not just because she’s so proficient, but because her skills are in high demand. Elite distances swimmers are hard to come by, and nearly impossible to create in the span of a high school career, so having her be so consistently excellent in her field takes many worries from her coaches’ minds. “Of course, it’s also great that she’s as polished and proficient as she is at such a young age. Last year, she was one of the better swimmers in the section — as a ninth-grader. This year she’s ready to become — and very much wants to be — one of the dominant swimmers in the section.” At the De Anza Division finals, Campbell’s performance could be summed up as understated. She won the 200 free by nearly eight seconds in 1:50.78 and later took the 500 free

by 19 seconds in 4:59.00. Hernandez said she needed only a third gear to win comfortably. She also swam a leg on the winning 200 medley relay (1:48.44) and led off the 400 free relay that led until the final leg and finished second in 3:31.88. Most important, Campbell’s efforts help the Gunn girls win their first-ever league championship after taking the dual-meet and CCS titles last season. Clearly, the spotlight will be on Liang, Howe and Campbell at CCS. And, just at clearly, all three are ready to take their bows. The Paly boys will be out to end Bellarmine’s streak of 28 straight section titles with what Dye says “is the best team I’ve ever taken to CCS.” The Vikings scored 218 points last season to finish second to the Bells (389.5), but are deeper and have potentially more championship points than last year with William Lee, Alex Francis, Winston Wang, Andrew Cho and divers Cole Plambeck and Reed Merrit, among others. The Sacred Heart Prep boys will be hard-pressed to duplicate last season’s third-place finish now that Bret Hinrichs is out with a shoulder (continued on next page)

Sports (continued from previous page)

injury. Morris will bank on Harrison Enright, Chris Hinrichs and Scott Jollymour to have big meets. Gunn has senior Tommy Tai and freshman Daichi Matsuda (ranked No. 1 in the 500 free) to lead the way after finishing 14th in 2012. On the girls’ side, Hernandez sees Monta Vista as the team favorite. “I think, barring disaster, we’ll be somewhere in the top four. If our non-Jenna swimmers do well, we certainly have at least a puncher’s chance of repeating. But, we’’l have to do great and need a few breaks.� Palo Alto was third and Sacred Heart Prep seventh last year, but both could be surpassed by MenloAtherton. The Bears are coming off a standout effort at the PAL Bay Division Championships and certainly look to be a top-10 team. In league meet highlights from last week: The titles went to the Palo Alto boys and Gunn girls at the SCVAL De Anza Division finals, but the highlight reel belonged to Liang with all his record-breaking. “It’s just a good indication of the season, and of the work I’ve put in,� Liang said of breaking the mark held by Spitz. “It just shows I’m at a good place right now. It will be interesting to see what I can do at CCS.� Liang had no knowledge of the Spitz record until Dye informed him of the possible historical opportunities during lunch on Friday. “It’s history. It’s tradition,� Dye said of the old marks. I wanted him to realize that he could try and be a part of something special. I guess it was part motivation, but when you can say you’re better than Mark Spitz, that’s saying something. Now he’s jazzed and he knows where he stands.� Paly scored 491 points with Monta Vista second with 390 and Gunn third with 320. The Vikings won all three relays — taking the opening 200 medley in 1:37.32 to get things rolling — before getting a pair of wins from Lee in the 200 IM (1:53.57) and 100 back (50.36), the latter race breaking his own meet and school records. Lee also swam on the winning 200 free and 400 free relay teams. Merrit won the 1-meter diving on Tuesday with 504.70 point, missing the school record by less than one point.



   

Gunn was led by Matsuda, who won the 500 free with a school record of 4:34.31. He also swam second to Liang’s record-breaking 100 fly, clocking a 51.59 —second-best in Gunn history. Tai broke his own school record in the 100 breast while finishing third in 58.91. The Gunn girls, who tied with Monta Vista during the dual-meet season, needed only to beat the Matadors to claim their first-ever overall league championship. The Titans did just that by scoring 455 points. Palo Alto was second with 426 and Monta Vista third with 418. “This is more of a testament to the program,� Hernandez said “We got it done with our third and fourth swimmers.� Junior Gabrielle Bethke of Gunn clocked a season best of 23.94 to finish third in the 50 free and clocked another solid time of 52.38 to finish second in the 100 free. Senior Crystal Feri added a third place of 1:07.81 in the 100 breast and freshman Vivian Zhou was third in diving on Tuesday. Palo Alto had a pair of victories, junior Jayna Wittenbrink taking the 100 fly in a season best of 56.42 and freshman Mimi Lin in diving with 462.20 points. Serena Yee was second in diving, with Molly Zebker third in both the 200 IM (2:09.24) and 100 fly (58.68). Paly also was third in the 200 free relay in 1:40.97. For Palo Alto, its streak of 10 straight league meet titles came to an end. The Vikings had won 16 of the previous 18 championships. Gunn, meanwhile, ended its streak of finishing second three straight years. At the PAL Bay Division finals at Burlingame High on Saturday, the M-A girls backed up their perfect dual-meet season by splashing to victory. The Bears set four school and two meet records on the way to compiling a whopping 597 points to hold off regular-season runner-up and defending league champ Burlingame (490). The M-A boys, meanwhile, went down to the final 400 free relay before falling to dual-meet champion Burlingame, 465-453, in one of the closest meets ever. Menlo-Atherton also won the boys’ and girls’ frosh-soph titles as first-year head coach Lori Stenstrom had plenty to celebrate.

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The M-A girls won six events, three of them relays for a total of 160 points right there. Freshman Brooke Stenstrom — daughter of the head coach — had a very big hand in half those points as she won the 50 free, 100 free and anchored the 200 medley and 400 free relays to victory. In the opening 200 medley relay, M-A’s Nicole Zanolli, Maddie Pont and Kindle Van Linge (all juniors) set the table for Stenstrom’s anchor to bring the Bears home in 1:46.89, breaking the school record set in 2005. In the 50 free, Stenstrom set meet and school marks with her 23.54 victory. That erased the previous M-A record of 23.57 by Mary Edwards in 1988, the oldest girls’ mark still in the books. Stenstom came back to take the 100 free in 51.34, again breaking meet and school marks. Edwards held the previous M-A record of 51.60 from 1989. Steustrom topped off her debut effort in the league finals by anchoring the team of Pont, Zanolli and Van Linge to another recordbreaking effort of 3:34.33. That took down the previous M-A record of 3:35.28 from 2006. Zanolli added a victory in the 500 free (5:03.60) to go along with her relay legs and a second-place finish in the 100 back of 59.33. Pont added a second in the 200 free (1:55.40), Van Linge was second in the 200 IM (2:06.60), and Gaby Nighan was second in the 100 fly (1:01.97). In the boys’ meet, Burlingame sped off to a big early lead thanks to a PAL record in the 200 medley relay, having four in the top eight in the 200 free (vs. M-A’s one), and four in the top 11 in the 200 IM (vs. M-A’s one). The Bears clawed their way back and eventually drew even after placing three among the top five in the 500 free. Burlingame went up two points after the 200 free relay, was up by 13 after the 100 back and led by 10 following the 100 breast. That brought the meet to the final 400 free relay, where M-A needed to win the championship and consolation relays to force a tie. The ‘B’ relay did its job with Michael Hohl (52.27), Vincent Busque (51.27), Jack Beasley (51.80) and Vince Leoni (50.17) all splitting personal records while clocking M-A’s second-fastest relay time (3:25.51) of

CCS GIRLS’ SWIM RECORDS Event 200 medley relay 200 free 200 IM 50 free Diving 100 fly 100 free 500 free 200 free relay 100 back 100 breast 400 free relay

Time 1:44.17 1:43.26 1:57.94 22.24 506.05 51.92 48.61

Name

Team Burlingame Jasmine Tosky Palo Alto Jasmine Tosky Palo Alto Maddy Schaefer St. Francis Michaela Fossati Palo Alto Jasmine Tosky Palo Alto Maddy Schaefer St. Francis Jasmine Tosky Palo Alto 4:43.96 Jasmine Tosky Palo Alto 1:34.16 St. Francis 53.11 Ally Howe SH Prep 1:01.50 Sarah Liang Palo Alto 3:23.06 Gunn

Year 2012 2012 2009 2010 2007 2011 2010 2012 2009 2010 2012 2009 2012

CCS BOYS’ SWIM RECORDS Event 200 medley relay 200 free 200 IM 50 free Diving 100 fly 100 free 500 free 200 free relay 100 back 100 breast 400 free relay

Time 1:31.84 1:35.86 1:46.96 19.89 662.15 47.12 43.71 4:18.26 1:23.57 47.91 55.29 3:00.68

Name

Team Saratoga Sam Shimomura Bellarmine Ben Hinshaw Saratoga Shayne Fleming V. Christian Zhipeng Zeng King’s Academy Tom Kremer SH Prep Shayne Fleming V. Christian Michael Nunan Valley Christian Bellarmine Tom Kremer SH Prep Byron Sanborn Palo Alto Saratoga

the season. That left it to the championship heat where Connor Arrington (49.46), Jake Bassin (49.04), Gordon Williams (49.74) and Zach Goland (49.81) were six seconds under their season best while clocking 3:18.05. Burlingame’s Kawei Tan, however, split 47.92 on the anchor as the Panthers went 3:16.68 and wrapped up the league title. The Bears had no victories, but Bassin was second in the 50 free (21.96) and 100 free (49.25) while the 200 free relay team of Arrington, Basin, Williams and Evan McClelland finished second in 1:29.78. At the WBAL Championships, both SHP teams splashed their way to a fifth straight title — the girls scoring 472 points to out-distance Harker (317) and the boys tallying 585 points to defeat rival Menlo School (450). Howe factored in on four of SHP’s six victories as the Gators piled up the points with their depth. Selby Sturzenegger won the 100 fly in 58.18 and swam on the winning 200 free relay squad that clock 1:42.20. Menlo freshman Jocelyn Chan won the 200 free in 1:56.19 to help

Year 2009 2012 2009 2009 2011 2012 2009 2012 2012 2012 2012 2009

the Knights produce 179 points and finish fifth. Castilleja sophomore Heid Katter captured the 200 IM in 2:04.13 while helping the Gators score 216 points and finish fourth. In the boys’ meet in the SHP pool, the Gators won seven events with Jollymour and Hinrichs winning twice and swimming on two winning relays. The individual titles were their first in the WBAL finals. SHP won five titles a year ago and returned only one individual champion (Harrison Enright in the 500 free). Still, the Gators prevailed in a big way. Jollymour took the 50 free in a 21.83 to move among the top five in school history, and added a 48.80 season best in the 100 free. He also anchored the 200 free relay (1:29.79) and led off the 400 free relay that clocked a fast 3:18.55. Hinrichs anchored the 400 relay and was the third leg in the 200 free squad. He also won the 200 free (1:49.76) and 500 free (4:56.53). Teammate John Howard added a victory in the 100 back in 58.51. Menlo School managed a lone victory by Johnny Wilson in the 100 fly (55.57). N

Shop the Palo Alto Citywide Yard Sale Saturday, June 8 from 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. A full-page ad with sale locations and merchandise will be available in the June 7, 2013 edition of the Palo Alto Weekly. Maps and sale listings will also be available online in late May at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/yardsale For more information about the Yard Sale www.PaloAltoOnline.com/yardsale zerowaste@cityofpaloalto.org (650) 496-5910 ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ>ÞÊ£ä]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 25

Sports PREP ROUNDP

Paly girls eye a title in lacrosse M-A, SHP boys meet for lacrosse crown; golfers advance to CCS finals by Keith Peters his has been a season of redemption for the Palo Alto girls’ lacrosse team, and the Vikings have made the most of their opportunity. It was only a year ago that Paly was on its way to a possible title in the Santa Clara Valley Athletic League, only to discover it had to forfeit six league matches due to an ineligible player. The Vikings scrambled to make the postseason playoffs, only to be eliminated in the semifinals by St. Francis. With its goal clear for this season, Palo Alto roared through the SCVAL season unbeaten in 14 matches — twice handling the Lancers. The top-seeded Vikings now can complete a season that escaped them last season after defeating visiting Saratoga, 15-8, in a SCVAL semifinal Wednesday night. Palo Alto (18-2) will face Nina Kelty (surprise) St. Francis (15-4), a 17-3 winner over Los Gatos in the other semifinal, in Saturday’s championship match at Burlingame High at 10 a.m. The Vikings grabbed an early lead against the Falcons and never gave it up as eight different players scored. Seniors Nina Kelty and Charlotte Biffar led the way once again with Kelty contributing four goals and two assists while Biffar tallied Charlotte Biffar three times. Allie Peery and Gigi Lucas-Conwell added two goals apiece for Paly with Annemarie Drez, Anna Dairaghi, Maya Benetar and Paige Bara all scoring once. In the West Bay Athletic League playoffs, Menlo School hosted Menlo-Atherton and Sacred Heart Prep hosted Castilleja on Thursday in semifinals. The winners will meet for the title on Saturday at Harker (Saratoga campus) at 11 a.m. Menlo-Atherton advanced to the semifinals with a 13-11 victory over host Burlingame on Tuesday night. The Bears (6-12-1) got the gamewinning goal from freshman Beven Martin as M-A took a 12-11 lead with three minutes to play.

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Sudden dizziness, trouble walking, loss of balance or coordination (especially if associated with any of the above symptoms)

For any sign of stroke CALL 911 stanfordhospital.org/strokemonth 650.723.6469

HOSPITALS NATIONAL NEUROLOGY & NEUROSURGERY

(continued on next page)

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Sports (continued from previous page)

The Panthers appeared to have scored the equalizer with a minute left, but the goal was waived off due to an off-sides call. Emily Carlson cemented the triumph with a final goal with seven seconds left. She finished with three goals, as did Meredith Geaghan-Breiner. Burlingame grabbed an early 3-2 lead but M-A defenders Megan Wiseman, Hanah Wilson and Maya Israni made key defensive stops. Morgan Corona, Geaghan-Breiner and Sally Carlson scored three unanswered goals as the Bears took a 5-3 lead. Castilleja advanced by eliminating host Notre Dame-San Jose, 13-7, on Tuesday. Katherine Hobbs led the Gators with four goals with Biffar and Kaley Nelson each adding three. Charlotte Jones, Ellie Zales, and Laurel Nelson all scored once. Baseball Sacred Heart Prep and Menlo School are headed for a co-championship in the WBAL, barring an upset loss by either team on Friday. The Gators (8-1, 17-9) will visit King’s Academy in their final regular-season game while the Knights (8-1, 18-7) will host Harker, both at 4 p.m. On Wednesday, SHP’s offense came alive as Mike Covell and Chris Lee combined for six hits, five of them for extra bases, as the Gators pounded out 17 hits in a 15-2 victory over host Harker. Lee had four hits, including two doubles and one triple, while Covell slammed a homer and double and drove in five runs. Nick Sinchek and Fabian Chavez also had doubles as the Gators produced seven extrabase hits. That made it easy for starter Will Nahmens and relievers Robert Larson and Will Johnston, who combined on a four-hitter. On Tuesday, Menlo also pounded out 17 hits while rolling to an 11-2 victory over host Pinewood. Senior catcher Austin Marcus slammed two home runs among his four Austin Marcus hits and drove in five runs. Christian Pluchar added two doubles and three RBI while fellow junior Graham Stratford contributed three hits and two RBI. Menlo will head into the CCS playoffs next week for the 25th time in 26 years. In the PAL Bay Division, MenloAtherton kept its CCS hopes alive with a 4-1 victory over visiting Aragon. Junior Erik Amundson fanned 10 batters while allowing just four hits over six innings as to pace the Bears (7-6, 17-9). Aragon fell to 4-9 (1113). Erik Amundson With the victory, M-A held onto a share of fourth place in the Bay Division with Half

Moon Bay. Aragon mounted its biggest threat against Amundson in the sixth inning, when it loaded the bases with two outs following three walks by the M-A right-hander. On his 118th pitch of the game, however, Amundson induced the Dons’ No. 9 hitter to bounce into an inning-ending groundout. The victory improved Amundson’s record to 6-2, and lowered his ERA to 2.32. He leads the team with 72 strikeouts in 60 1/3 innings pitched. Third baseman James KollarGasiewski led M-A’s offense with a two-run single and two walks, while Amundson and DH Brett Moriarty also drove in runs for the Bears. Senior catcher Charles Grose had an infield hit and two walks, while center fielder Charlie Cain reached on a bunt single, scored two runs, and stole three bases. Shortstop Alex Aguiar had the Bears’ only extrabase hit — a third-inning double, his ninth of the season. Boys’ golf Menlo School, Palo Alto and Sacred Heart Prep all qualified teams to next week’s CCS Championships after finishing among the top four squads at the CCS Regional I and II this week at the par-71 Rancho Canada (West) in Carmel Valley. With senior Andrew Buchanan firing a 1-under 70, Menlo qualified for the section finals by finishing fourth at the CCS Regional II. The Knights shot a team score of 397 to make the cut. Buchanan, who tweaked his back at the WBAL To u r n a m e n t last week and had to withdraw before finishing, battled through continued tightness in his lower back to record seven birdies while Andrew Buchanan tying for second overall. Menlo’s Ethan Wong shot 76, William Hsieh shot 80, Riley Burgess had an 85 in his first CCS trip while hitting only three fairways and Max Garnick carded an 86 to round out the scoring. Wong had a key birdie on the eighth hole after hitting a big drive and putting his 9-iron to within three fee for a tap-in birdie. “The team really came through,” said Wong, “and we will be ready for next week.” Pinewood shot 406 and tied for seventh, but the Panthers’ Trevor Hernstadt shot 75 and qualified for the CCS finals as an individual. On Tuesday, SHP shot 377 and Palo Alto 384 while trailing R.L. Stevenson (358) and San Benito (373). Among the four teams failing to advance was Gunn (399). SHP was led by junior Bradley Knox, who fired a 1-under 70 while Derek Ackerman shot 75, Taylor Oliver 76 with Bradley Keller and Ryan Galvin adding 78s. Palo Alto was led by Patrick Fuery’s 73 and a 76 by John Knowles. Alex Hwang and Grant Raffel each shot 78 with Michelle Xie wrapping up the scoring with a 79. While Gunn missed qualifying as a team, the Titans had senior Avi-

nash Sharma (74) and junior Anson Cheng (76) advanced among the nine individual qualifiers. Boys’ lacrosse Sacred Heart Prep will have an opportunity to play for its first-ever title in the SCVAL following an 18-6 semifinal romp over visiting Palo Alto on Wednesday. The No. 2-seeded Gators (13-8) will take on top-seeded and defending champion Menlo-Atherton (15-6) on Saturday at Burlingame High at 6 p.m. The Bears (15-6) advanced with a 9-6 win over visiting Menlo School (8-11) in the other semifinal. SHP goalie Austin Appleton came up with 16 saves, 11 in the first half, to effectively shut down Paly’s offense. While the Vikings were being held in check, SHP’s Brian White and Andrew Daschbach each scored four times with Frankie Hattler and Noah Kawasaki each tallying a hat trick. Sacred Heart Prep, which defeated Paly by only 13-12 earlier in the season, held a comfortable 8-1 lead in the first half. Walker Mees led Paly (14-6) with three goals. Boys’ tennis Menlo advanced to the championship match of the CCS Team Tournament for the 15th time following a surprisingly easy 17-1 romp over 2012 runner-up Bellarmine on Wednesday. While reaching the finals on Friday at Courtside Club in Los Gatos (12:30 p.m. start) is no surprise, it definitely will have a different feel to it. For the first time, the top-seeded Knights will be facing Serra. The third-seeded Padres (19-1) will be playing in the finals for the first time in school history. Serra, with its deepest team ever, rolled into the title match with a 12-6 victory over No. 7 seed Saratoga at Los Gatos Swim & Racquet Club. Menlo (23-1), meanwhile, heads into the finals following one of its most dominating victories over No. 4 Bellarmine (21-4), which had played in the title match three of the past four years. Track and field The Menlo School boys and girls battled their counterparts at Sacred Heart Prep as last year’s WBAL Championships. It was a battle the Knights won as they swept the team titles. While Menlo has a shot at another sweep at Saturday’s league finals at Gunn High, the girls may be on target but not the boys. Menlo junior Maddy Price was a double-winner last year, in the 400 and 800, but she’ll be doubly busy Saturday when field events get under way at 9:30 a.m., with running events starting at 10 a.m. Price has qualified in four events — 100, 200, 400 and shot put. She is the Central Coast Section leader in both the 200 (24.50) and 400 (55.67), but trails Harker’s Isabelle Connell in the 100 (12.22 to 12.26) and was fourth in the shot put qualifying — in her first-ever attempt in the event. The WBAL title in the boys’ meet looks to be between Sacred Heart Prep and Menlo. The Gators appear to have the inside track heading into

the finals and should dethrone the Knights barring some major upsets. The Gators are led by senior Nico Robinson, who could win as many as four events — 110 high hurdles, 300 intermediate hurdles, long jump and high jump. The last event may be the toughest to win as Robinson will be competing against teammate Cameron Van. Robinson, however, can dominate in the other three. He ranks No. 3 in the CCS in the high hurdles (14.73), No. 3 in the long jump (22-8 1/2) and No. 4 in the 300 IH (39.43). At the PAL Championships on Saturday at Terra Nova in Pacifica, the Menlo-Atherton boys and girls will attempt to move up from last year’s third-place finishes. After three finals that were held last week during the prelims, however, the M-A girls are in eighth with five points while the boys are seventh with seven. Senior George Baier leads the Bears in the 800 and 1,600 while Kadri Green was the No. 1 qualifier in the 300 IH at last weekend’s trials. For the M-A girls, Annalisa Crowe, Taylor Fortnam and Madeleine Baier lead the distance crew. Crowe was the No. 2 qualifier in both the 800 and 1,600. On Friday night, the top athletes at Gunn and Palo Alto will compete at the SCVAL Championships at Los Gatos High, featuring the top qualifiers from the De Anza and El Camino Division finals. Field events begin at 4:30 p.m. N

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Inspirations

a guide to the spiritual community

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC

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This Sunday: The Wrong Story for Mother’s Day Rev. David Howell preaching An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

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Palo Alto Weekly 05.10. 2013 - Section 1