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Vol. XXXIV, Number 25 N March 22, 2013

Gunn counseling: Reforms could take three years Page 3 w w w.PaloA ltoOnline.com

Page 19

Neighborhoods 8

Transitions 15

Spectrum 16

Eating Out 30

Shop Talk 31

Movies 32

Puzzles 66

NArts Remi & Chloe: budding modern blues queens

Page 27

NSports Pinewood girls play for state basketball title

Page 34

NHome Housing conference: What’s next for seniors?

Page 41


G U I D E TO 2013 S U M M E R C A M P S F O R K I D S

For more information about these camps, see our online directory of camps at http://paloaltoonline.com/biz/summercamps/ To advertise in a weekly directory, contact 650-326-8210

Academics Early Learning Camp Connection listing

Palo Alto

Write Now! Summer Writing Camps Emerson School of Palo Alto and Hacienda School of Pleasanton open their doors and offer their innovative programs: Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Presentation Techniques, and (new!) Test-Taking Skills. Call or visit our website for details. www.headsup.org

Emerson (650) 424-1267 Hacienda (925) 485-5750

Foothill College

Los Altos Hills

Two Six-Week Summer Sessions Beginning June 10. These sessions are perfect for university students returning from summer break who need to pick up a class; and high school juniors, seniors and recent graduates who want to get an early start. 12345 El Monte Rd. www.foothill.edu

650.949.7362

Harker Summer Programs

San Jose

K-12 offerings taught by exceptional, experienced faculty and staff. K-6 morning academics - focusing on math, language arts and science - and full spectrum of afternoon recreation. Grades 6-12 for-credit courses and non-credit enrichment opportunities. Sports programs also offered. www.summer.harker.org

408-553-0537

iD Tech Camps - Summer Tech Fun

Held at Stanford

Take interests further! Ages 7-17 create iPhone apps, video games, C++/ Java programs, movies, and more at weeklong, day and overnight programs held at Stanford and 60+ universities in 26 states. Also 2-week, teen-only programs: iD Gaming Academy, iD Programming Academy, and iD Visual Arts Academy (filmmaking & photography). www.internalDrive.com

1-888-709-TECH (8324)

iD Teen Academies Gaming, Programming & Visual Arts

Stanford

Gain a competitive edge! Learn different aspects of video game creation, app development, filmmaking, photography, and more. 2-week programs where ages 13-18 interact with industry professionals to gain competitive edge. iD Gaming Academy, iD Programming Academy, and iD Visual Arts Academy are held at Stanford, and other universities. www.iDTeenAcademies.com

1-888-709-TECH (8324)

ISTP’s Language Immersion Summer Camp

Palo Alto

ISTP Summer Camp is designed to give participants a unique opportunity to spend their summer break having fun learning or improving in a second language. Students are grouped according to both grade level and language of proficiency. Our camp offers many immersion opportunities and consists of a combination of language classes and activities taught in the target language. Sessions are available in French, Mandarin, Chinese and English ESL and run Monday through Friday, 8am-3:30pm, with additional extending care from 3:30-5:30pm. www.istp.org

650-251-8519

Stratford School - Camp Socrates 17 Bay Area Campuses Academic enrichment infused with traditional summer camp fun--that’s what your child will experience at Camp Socrates. Sessions begin June 24 and end August 9, with the option for campers to attend all seven weeks, or the first four (June 24-July 19). Full or half-day morning or afternoon programs are available. www.StratfordSchools.com/Summer

Summer at Saint Francis

(650) 493-1151

Mountain View

Summer at Saint Francis provides a broad range of academic and athletic programs for elementary through high school students. It is the goal of every program to make summer vacation enriching and enjoyable! www.sfhs.com/summer

TechKnowHow Computer & Lego Camps

City of Mountain View Recreation Division

Arts, Culture, Other Camps

650.968.1213 x446

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Sunnyvale

Busy Bees & Astro Kids Summer Adventure Camps

Mountain View

Join us for these half-day camps designed for 3-8 year olds as we have fun, participate in games and crafts, and go on fun field trips! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue http://mountainview.gov

Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA)

Mountain View

50+ creative camps for Gr. K-8! Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Musical Theater, School of Rock, Digital Arts, more! One- and two-week sessions; full and half-day enrollment. Extended care available. Financial aid offered. www.arts4all.org

650-917-6800 ext. 0

DHF Wilderness Camps

Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve

Children ages 6-14 can meet the livestock, help with farm chores, explore a wilderness preserve and have fun with crafts, songs and games. Older campers conclude the week with a sleepover at the Farm. Near the intersection of Hwy 85 and Hwy 280 mountainview.gov

Palo Alto Community Child Care (PACCC)

Palo Alto

PACCC summer camps offer campers, grades kindergarten to 6th, a wide variety of fun opportunities! K-1 Fun for the youngest campers, Neighborhood Adventure Fun and Ultimate Adventure Fun for the more active and on-the-go campers! New this year: Sports Adventure Camp for those young athletes and Operation Chef for out of this world cooking fun! Swimming twice per week, periodic field trips, special visitors and many engaging camp activities, songs and skits round out the fun offerings of PACCC Summer Camps! Registration is online. Open to campers from all communities! Come join the fun in Palo Alto! www.paccc.org

650-493-2361

Theatreworks Summer Camps

Palo Alto

In these skill-building workshops for grades K-5, students engage in language-based activities, movement, music, and improvisation theatre games. Students present their own original pieces at the end of each two-week camp. www.theatreworks.org/educationcommunity

Western Ballet Children’s Summer Camp

650-493-7146

Mountain View

Students attend ballet class and rehearsal in preparation for the recital of either Peter Pan or The Little Mermaid at the end of the two week session. Separate Saturday classes are also offered. Ages 4-9. 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View http://westernballet.org/documents/summerchildrens.html

City of Mountain View Swim Lessons Rengstorff and Eagle Parks

Mountain View

We offer swim lessons for ages 6 months to 14 years. Following the American Red Cross swim lesson program, students are divided into one of the 11 different levels taught by a certified instructor. Rengstorff Park Pool, 201 S Rengstorff Ave and Eagle Park Pool,650 Franklin St. http://mountainview.gov/

Club Rec Juniors & Seniors

Mountain View

Club Rec Juniors and Seniors is open for youth 6-11 years old. These traditional day camps are filled with fun theme weeks, weekly trips, swimming, games, crafts and more! Monta Loma Elementary School, 490 Thompson Ave. http://mountainview.gov

Foothills Day Camp

Palo Alto

What will you discover? Foothills Day and Fun Camps, for youth ages 8-10 and 5-7 respectively, includes canoeing, hiking, animal identification games, crafts, and more- all for less than $5 an hour. Registration begins February 15th for residents. (February 22nd for non-residents.) Hurry, spaces are limited! cityofpaloalto.org/enjoy

650-463-4900

J-Camp

Palo Alto

Exciting programs for kindergartners through teens include swimming, field trips, sports and more. Enroll your child in traditional or special focus camps like Surfing, Archery, Animal Adventure, Circus Camp and over 50 others! Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way www.paloaltojcc.org/jcamp

Kim Grant Tennis Academy & Summer Camps

650-223-8622

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Redwood City

Fun and Specialized junior camps for Mini (3-5), Beginner, Intermediate 1&2, Advanced and Elite Players. Weekly programs designed by Kim Grant to improve players technique, fitness, agility, mental toughness and all around tennis game. Camps in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Redwood City. Come make new friends and have tons of FUN!! www.KimGrantTennis.com

Nike Tennis Camps

650-752-8061

Stanford University

Dick Gould’s 43rd Annual Stanford Tennis School offers day camps for both juniors & adults. Weekly junior overnight & extended day camps run by John Whitlinger & Lele Forood. Junior Day Camp run by Brandon Coupe & Frankie Brennan. www.USSportsCamps.com/tennis

1-800-NIKE-CAMP (645-3226)

Students obtain high quality training in ballet, pointe, character, jazz, and modern dance, while learning choreography from the classical ballet Paquita. The students dance in featured roles in a final performance. Ages 9-12. Audition required 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View http://westernballet.org/documents/summerpre-intermediate.html

www. SpartansSportsCamp.com

Western Ballet Advanced Summer Intensive

Spring Down Camp Equestrian Center

Mountain View

Students obtain high quality training in ballet, pointe, character, jazz, and modern dance, while learning choreography from the classical ballet Paquita. The students dance in featured roles in a final performance. Ages 13-23. Audition required. 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View http://westernballet.org/documents/summer_int_adv.html

Menlo Park

650-638-0500

www.peninsulaschool.org/pensummerschool.htm (650) 325-1584, ext. 39

YMCA of Silicon Valley

Peninsula

Athletics

This is a child’s delight with trees to climb, rope swings, and unpaved open spaces. Our engaging and creative program includes time to play and make friends. Peninsula School, 920 Peninsula Way. Visit website for class listings.

Alan Margot’s Tennis Camps

Atherton

Alan Margot’s Tennis Camps provide an enjoyable way for your child to begin learning the game of tennis or to continue developing existing skills. Our approach is to create lots of fun with positive feedback and reinforcement in a nurturing tennis environment. Building self-esteem and confidence through enjoyment on the tennis court is a wonderful gift a child can keep forever! Super Juniors Camps, ages 3-6; Juniors Camps, ages 6-14. www.alanmargot-tennis.net

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650-400-0464

650-479-5906

Portola Valley

Spring Down Camp teaches basic to advanced horsemanship skills. Ages 6-99 welcome! Daily informative lecture, riding lesson, supervised hands-on ski-ll practice, safety around horses, tacking/untacking of own camp horse, and arts/crafts. www.springdown.com

Stanford Water Polo Camps

Www.techknowhowkids.com

(408) 351-6400

http://mountainview.gov

Spartans Sports Camp

Mountain View

Summer at Peninsula School

www.ymcasv.org

Discover fun with us this summer through the many programs available with the City of Mountain View Recreation Division. From sports to traditional day camps, to cooking camps, dance camps and art camps... we have it all! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue

Spartans Sports Camp offers multi-sport, week-long sessions for boys and girls in grades 3-6 as well as sport-specific sessions for grades 6-9. There are also strength and conditioning camps for grades 6-12. Camps begin June 10th and run weekly through August 2nd at Mountain View High School. The camp is run by MVHS coaches and student-athletes and all proceeds benefit the MVHS Athletic Department. Lunch and extended care are available for your convenience. Register today!

Western Ballet Intermediate Summer Intensive

Fun and enriching technology classes for students, ages 5-14 Courses include LEGO and K’NEX Projects with Motors, Electronics, NXT Robotics, 3D Modeling, and Game Design. Many locations, including Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Sunnyvale. Half and all day options. Early-bird and multi-session discounts available.

What makes Y camps different? We believe every child deserves the opportunity to discover who they are and what they can achieve. Y campers experience the outdoors, make new friends and have healthy fun in a safe, nurturing environment. They become more confident and grow as individuals, and they learn value in helping others. We offer day, overnight, teen leadership and family camps. Financial assistance is available. Get your summer camp guide at ymcasv.org/summer camp. Youth camps (ages 5 - 17) run June 17 - Aug. 16 . Half-day and full-day options. Fees vary. 1922 The Alameda 3rd Floor, San Jose

Mountain View

650.851.1114

Stanford

Ages 7 and up. New to sport or have experience, we have a camp for you. Half day or Full day option for boys and girls. All the camps offer fundamental skill work, position work, scrimmages and games. StanfordWaterPoloCamps.com

650-725-9016

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Sports & Activity Camp (ages 6-12): This all-sports camp provides group instruction in a variety of field, water and court games. Saint Francis faculty and students staff the camp, and the focus is always on fun. The program is dedicated to teaching teamwork, sportsmanship and positive self-esteem. After camp care and swim lessons available. www.sfhs.com/summer

650.968.1213 x650

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Advanced Sports Camps (5th-9th grades): We offer a wide selection of advanced sports camps designed to provide players with the opportunity to improve both their skills and knowledge of a specific sport. Each camp is run by a Head Varsity Coach at Saint Francis, and is staffed by members of the coaching staff. www.sfhs.com/summer

650.968.1213 x650


Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

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ERALRECOMMENDATIONS "UT THEY PRESSED 'UNN OFFICIALS FORCLEARERCOMPARISONSWITHCOUN SELING SERVICE LEVELS AT 0ALY 4HEY ALSOASKEDFORADEFINITIVE THREE YEAR TIMETABLE AS TO WHEN ALL  OF THE ADVISORYCOMMITTEESRECOMMENDA TIONSWILLBEFULLYIMPLEMENTED 4HEYEXPRESSEDUNWILLINGNESSTO VOTE ON !PRIL  TO APPROVE 'UNNS YEAR ONE hACTION PLANv WITHOUT A MOREDETAILEDCALENDARFORFULLIM PLEMENTATIONINTHREEYEARS

'UNN PARENT AND ADVISORY COM MITTEE MEMBER !MY "ALSOM SUP PORTED HAVING A LONG TERM PLAN IN PLACE "ALSOM WHO EARLIER HAD BEENAMONGTHESTRONGESTCRITICSOF 'UNNSTRADITIONALPROGRAM PLEADED WITHTHEBOARDTOHOLDTHESCHOOLAC COUNTABLEFORALLREFORMS h)DONTWANTTOLOSEMOMENTUM HERE vSHESAID h7HILETHEFIRST YEARACTIONPLAN (continued on page 12)

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Peery family revealed as Paly gym donor )TSNOTABOUTATHLETICSSOMUCHASYOUTH FAMILIESPLAYINGTOGETHER $AVE0EERYSAYS by Chris Kenrick HE FAMILY OFFERING TO BUILD A NEW ATHLETIC CENTER FOR 0ALO !LTO(IGH3CHOOLSAYSITWANTS TO GIVE BACK IN WAYS THAT ENABLE YOUTH AND FAMILIES TO SPEND MORE TIMEPLAYINGTOGETHER h7E AIM TO SUPPORT INITIATIVES WHICHNURTURETHEWHOLECHILDAND PROVIDE SOME BALANCE IN THE FAST PACED WORK OBSESSEDENVIRONMENT WELIVEIN vSAID$AVE0EERY A 0ALYGRADUATE 0EERYISTHESONOF0ALYGRADUATE 2ICHARD0EERYWHO ALONGWITHHIS BUSINESS PARTNER *OHN !RRILLAGA MADEAFORTUNEAFTERPROPERTYTHEY ACQUIREDINTHESIN3ANTA#LARA #OUNTY BECAME VALUABLE 3ILICON 6ALLEYCOMMERCIALREALESTATE 4HE0EERYFAMILYSOFFERTOBUILD ANATHLETICCENTERˆWITHTHEEXACT DOLLARFIGURESTILLUNSPECIFIEDˆIS CONSIDERED POTENTIALLY THE LARGEST SINGLEGIFTTOTHESCHOOLDISTRICTINITS HISTORY)TORIGINALLYWASTOBEMOD ELED AFTER THE  MILLION INDOOR ATHLETICCENTERTHATOPENEDIN AT-ENLO3CHOOLIN!THERTON 4HE FAMILYS OTHER LOCAL PHILAN THROPYINCLUDESPROJECTSIN%AST0ALO !LTOS2AVENSWOOD#ITY3CHOOL$IS TRICT ASWELLASPLANSTOBUILDANEW GYM FOR %AST 0ALO !LTO 0HOENIX !CADEMY A CHARTERSCHOOL 4HE FAMILY ALSO SUPPORTS ANTI POVERTYEFFORTSAROUNDTHEWORLDAND HAS FUNDED A 3OCIAL %NTREPRENEUR SHIP 0ROGRAM AT "RIGHAM 9OUNG 5NIVERSITY h4HE CORE MISSION OF THE 0EERY &OUNDATIONISTOSUPPORTYOUTHAND FAMILIES IN POVERTY v $AVE 0EERY SAIDh2ECOGNIZINGTHAT0ALO!LTOIS NOT EXACTLY AN IMPOVERISHED COM MUNITY MYDADISATAPOINTINHIS LIFE WHERE HES MOTIVATED TO GIVE BACK TO HIS HOMETOWN IN A MEAN INGFULWAYv

T VIDEO: Remembering the 10th anniversary of the Iraq War +AREN-EREDITHSTANDSAMONGTHEMORETHANPAIRSOFSHOESINFRONTOF0ALO!LTO#ITY(ALLON 3ATURDAY -ARCH INREMEMBRANCEOFTHEMENANDWOMENKILLEDINACTIONDURINGTHE)RAQ7AR -EREDITH¤SSON -OUNTAIN6IEWRESIDENTST,T+EN"ALLARD WASKILLEDIN)RAQIN4HESPECIAL PROGRAMHONOREDTHEFALLENANDRECOGNIZEDTHETHANNIVERSARYOFTHEBEGINNINGOFTHEWAR4HIS VIDEOANDOTHERSCANBEVIEWEDATHTTPWWWYOUTUBECOMPAWEEKLY6IDEOBY3ANDRA'ARCIA

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Palo Alto looks to ban smoking at all small parks #ITY#OUNCILCOMMITTEEVOTESTOPROHIBITSMOKINGATEVERYPARKSMALLERTHANACRES by Gennady Sheyner ORE THAN HALF OF 0ALO !LTO PARKS WOULD BECOME SMOKE FREE ZONES UNDER A LAW CHANGE THAT A #ITY #OUNCIL COMMITTEEABRUPTLYPROPOSED4UES DAYNIGHT -ARCH 4HECOUNCILS0OLICYAND3ERVICES #OMMITTEE WAS SCHEDULED TO CON SIDER A SMOKING BAN IN ONLY THREE PARKSˆ,YTTON0LAZAAND#OGSWELL 0LAZAINDOWNTOWNAND3ARAH7AL LIS 0ARK IN THE #ALIFORNIA !VENUE "USINESS$ISTRICT"UTASSOONASTHE DISCUSSIONBEGAN COMMITTEE#HAIR ,IZ+NISSPROPOSEDADDING*OHNSON 0ARKIN$OWNTOWN.ORTH#OUNCIL WOMAN+AREN(OLMANARGUEDTHAT

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CREATE A BROADER BAN AND SPECIFY WHICHPARKSWOULDNOTBEINCLUDED h)MWORRIEDWEMAYBELEAVING OUTPARKSTHATINTHEIRPROFILEDONT LOOKVERYMUCHDIFFERENTTHAN"RI ONESAND*OHNSON v+LEINSAID 4HE COMMITTEE AGREED AND DE CIDED TO APPLY THE NEW POLICY TO ALL  CITY PARKS THAT ARE SMALLER THANACRES 4HECOMMITTEEALSOVOTEDUNANI MOUSLY TO EXPAND THE EXISTING NO SMOKINGBUFFERZONEAROUNDENCLOSED PUBLICPLACES SUCHASRESTAURANTSAND STORES FROMFEETTOFEET (continued on page 12)

2ICHARD 0EERY ESTABLISHED THE FAMILYS FOUNDATION IN  WITH AMISSIONTOhSTRENGTHENYOUTHAND FAMILIESTOBUILDLIVESOFDIGNITYAND SELF RELIANCEv 4HEYOUNGER0EERYSAIDHISFATHER IS UNCOMFORTABLE WITH PUBLICITY PREFERRING PRIVATE PEOPLE ORIENTED PHILANTHROPY OFTEN DISCUSSED OVER HAMBURGERS AT +IRKS IN 4OWN  #OUNTRY6ILLAGE h4HIS PROJECT AND OTHERS IN THE PIPELINE WILL COMBINE HIS LOVE OF PEOPLE WITH HIS BACKGROUND IN DE VELOPMENT v$AVE0EERYSAID (E SAID THAT HIS BROTHER *ASON 0EERY HAS DONE MOST OF THE DIRECT WORKWITH0ALY *ASON 0EERY IS A FOUNDER OF THE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE FIRM 0EERY 0ARTNERS AS WELL AS A PRINCIPAL AT 0EERY !RRILLAGA $AVE 0EERY MAN AGESTHEDAY TO DAYOPERATIONSAND OVERALLSTRATEGYOFTHE0EERY&OUN DATION 4HE0ALO!LTO(IGH3CHOOLPROJ ECTTOOKSHAPEAFTER*ASON0EERYAP PROACHED 0ALY 0RINCIPAL 0HIL 7IN STON h7E BASICALLY SAID @7HAT ARE YOURGOALSANDHOWCANWEEXPAND THISINTOSOMETHINGMOREAMBITIOUS SOMETHING THAT WILL OUTLIVE ALL OF USv$AVE0EERYSAID h)FWEREGOINGTODOIT WEWANT TODOITRIGHTANDFORTHELONGTERM 0ALY AND THE 0ALO !LTO 5NIFIED 3CHOOL $ISTRICT HAVE BEEN GREAT TO WORKWITHv 4HE"OARDOF%DUCATION4UESDAY APPROVEDCONCEPTUALPLANSFORTWO SUNKENGYMSONEITHERSIDEOF0A LYSAQUATICCENTER TOBECONNECTED BYACOVEREDWALKWAYARCHITECTUR ALLY ECHOING THAT WHICH CONNECTS 0ALYS 4OWER "UILDING WITH (AY (continued on page 13)

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Upfront QUOTE OF THE WEEK

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

way By the Ba d a o y Presents Br CATS

OLIVER

APRIL 6 - 21

JULY 12 - 21

CABARET

GUYS AND DOLLS

SEPTEMBER 13 - 29

NOVEMBER 8 - 17

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A RADIO PLAY DECEMBER 26 - 29

2215 Broadway St., Redwood City

650.FOX.7770 Tickets are On Sale Today

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter @FoxtheatreRWC

w w w.FoxRwc .com

E ASTER

BRUNCH BUFFET SUNDAY MARCH 31st, 2013 10:00AM - 2:00PM

$20/Adult $12/Child (5-11 years) Join us Poolside for a delicious brunch buffet perfect for the whole family! Reservations are recommended but not required

Dinah’s Poolside Restaurant 4261 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Reservations & Inquires - (650) 798-1314

EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Elena Kadvany (223-6519) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns Rebecca Duran, Ranjini Raghunath ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Christine Afsahi (223-8582), Adam Carter (2236573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 223-6569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. ©2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

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PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505)

We need to be held accountable to achieve this. — Amy Balsom, Gunn High parent and advisorycommittee member, on proposed reforms to the school’s counseling program. See story on page 3.

Around Town RECUSE ME ... The issue of not enough parking downtown hits close to home for members of the Palo Alto City Council, and not just because they get an earful from exasperated downtown residents seemingly every week. Several council members live downtown or have interests in downtown property and thus by law can’t participate in any decisions that would impact the area. On Monday night, this almost became a problem. The nine-member council had no legal barriers in its discussion of big picture issues, such as valet parking in downtown garages or incentives for workers to eschew their cars for other transit modes. But things got hairy when conversation turned to zoning restrictions and parkingpermit programs, with one council member after another leaving the room to avoid a conflict of interest. Mayor Greg Scharff and Vice Mayor Nancy Shepherd stepped out of the room because they have interests in downtown properties; Councilwoman Karen Holman had to leave because she lives downtown and has received income from the downtown Palo Alto History Museum; and Councilman Marc Berman ducked out because his house is near the commercial downtown district. City Manager James Keene also had to miss for the second half of the discussion because he lives downtown. By the end of the discussion, only five council members remained behind the dais. At one point, Councilman Larry Klein had to stop talking because Councilwoman Gail Price left the room momentarily, depriving the council of a quorum. At another point, City Attorney Molly Stump advised the council that “there should be no parties going on in the backroom among those who recused.” One downtown resident pointed to the shrinking number of participating council members as evidence of the problem’s urgency and pervasiveness. “If we don’t get to this problem very quickly, the entire council will have to recuse itself,” Michael Hodos told the council. NOTES FROM THE UNDERGROUND ... In 1965, Lyndon Johnson established Medicare, Bob Dylan went electric and Palo Alto began a massive effort to bury its wires providing electricity underground. All three gifts have gone through transformations but keep on giving. Palo Alto has converted about 46 percent of the city’s overhead lines to underground, and

officials estimate that the expensive effort will take another 70 years to complete. At the City Council level, however, the project seems to be losing momentum. This week, the council nixed a proposal by staff to establish a new citizen committee to gauge community sentiment about the ongoing program. Some council members said the committee could be a valuable means of explaining to the public why a neighborhood’s electricity hasn’t been undergrounded yet. “I think very often it takes our public getting involved to be able to understand and explain to others why something hasn’t happened,” Councilwoman Liz Kniss reasoned. Mayor Greg Scharff alluded to the effort’s “astronomical costs” and said it’s important to have a committee that would engage the greater community on what he called a “lingering issue.” Councilman Larry Klein disagreed and said the council doesn’t need to create a “buffer zone” between itself and the community for the purpose of explaining to constituents that the city doesn’t have the dollars to bury the wires. He also argued that the city has recently become a little too eager in setting up citizen committees, which he said consume staff time and resources. “I’m in favor of birth control on committees,” Klein said. “We’ve been adding them quite rapidly in the last few years.” His argument carried the day and the council shot down the staff recommendation by a 4-5 vote, with Pat Burt, Karen Holman, Gail Price and Greg Schmid joining Klein in opposition. POLLS ... In November 2014, Palo Alto voters will likely head to the polls to vote on a bond measure to fund repairs of the city’s buildings, roads and other infrastructure. More immediately, though, city officials have polls of a different sort on their minds. The City Council on Monday discussed projects that may end up on the bond measure with its pollster, David Metz of the firm Fairbanks, Maslin, Maulin, Metz and Associates. The firm will start polling Palo Alto residents next month to gauge their “initial temperature” about the proposed projects, which range from building a bike bridge over U.S. Highway 101 to repairing sidewalks. The council agreed to drop acquisition of the downtown post-office building and completion of Byxbee Park from the list of potential bond-supported items and to add funding of the new Palo Alto History Museum. N


Upfront 4%#(./,/'9 ,!.$53%

Palo Alto reboots its dream of a fiber network !FTERPREVIOUSEFFORTSFIZZLED #ITY#OUNCILTOTAKEAFRESHLOOKAT@FIBERTOTHEPREMISE by Gennady Sheyner OR MORE THAN  YEARS 0ALO !LTOSDRIVETOWARDACITYWIDE FIBERNETWORKFLICKEREDONAND OFFLIKEAFAULTYDIAL UPCONNECTION WITHGUSTSOFENTHUSIASMREPEATEDLY STYMIEDBYLONGSTRETCHESOFINACTIV ITY FRUSTRATIONANDDISAPPOINTMENT 4HIS TIME OFFICIALS HOPE THINGS WILLBEDIFFERENT 4HE WORLD HAS CHANGED OVER THE LASTDECADE THEREASONINGGOES4HE CITYSFINANCIALPICTUREHASCHANGED THE #ITY #OUNCILS PRIORITIES HAVE CHANGED AND THE CITYS LUCK MIGHT CHANGEASWELL#ITIESLIKE3AN,E ANDRO #HATTANOOGA 4ENN AND +ANSAS#ITYAREPURSUINGCITYWIDE ULTRA HIGH SPEED )NTERNET NETWORK FORTHEIRRESIDENTSANDBUSINESSES -EANWHILE HIGH TECH 0ALO !LTO HAS AREAS WHERE BROADBAND SPEED ISSLOWERTHANIN2ANGOON "URMA ACCORDINGTO*ON&OSTER AMEMBER OFTHECITYS5TILITIES!DVISORY#OM MISSION(ESAIDHISFRIEND FORMER PLANNING #OMMISSIONER 3AMIR 4UMA HADRECENTLYSPENTSIXMONTHS IN "URMA AND HAD hSUBSTANTIALLY GREATERvBROADBANDTHAN&OSTER h3OMETHING IS WRONG WITH THAT v &OSTERSAID-ONDAYATTHECOMMIS SIONS JOINT MEETING WITH THE #ITY #OUNCIL "UT PERHAPS THE BIGGEST CHANGE BETWEENTHECITYSPREVIOUSSTABSAT THEFIBERPROJECTANDITSCURRENTEX PLORATIONHASTODOWITHPERSPECTIVE "EFORE CITYOFFICIALSVIEWEDTHEEF FORTSTRICTLYINUTILITYTERMS WITHLOW COSTSANDNORISKSBEINGKEYREQUIRE MENTS)N THECITYEXPLOREDA PARTNERSHIPWITHAN)NTERNETCONSOR TIUMTOCREATEAMILLIONCITYWIDE SYSTEM4HEGROUP LEDBY!XIA.ET MEDIA#ORPORATION WITHDREWFROM THE PARTNERSHIP IN -AY  AFTER THEGLOBALECONOMYTANKED ONEOF ITSFINANCINGPARTNERSWITHDREWAND THE CITY DECLINED TO SUBSIDIZE THE NETWORK WITH A CONTRIBUTION OF  MILLIONTOMILLIONANNUALLY #OST WAS ALSO THE LEADING FACTOR INTHE5TILITIES$EPARTMENTSRECOM MENDATIONLASTYEARTOSTOPEXPLORING

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Developer offers $13 million for school land 7ITHAPPROVALTOBUILDHOMESAT3AN!NTONIO 3UMMERHILLOFFERSPREMIUMOVERPRICE by Chris Kenrick HOUSING DEVELOPER HAS OF FEREDTOPAYMILLIONTO THE0ALO!LTOSCHOOLDISTRICT FOR A  ACRE PARCEL AT  3AN !NTONIO !VE THAT IT SOLD TO THE DISTRICTINFORMILLION 3UPERINTENDENT +EVIN 3KELLY DISCLOSED THE -ARCH  OFFER AT THE"OARDOF%DUCATIONMEETING 4UESDAYNIGHT 3UMMERHILL (OMES ˆ WHICH INOBTAINED#ITY#OUNCILAP PROVAL TO BUILD  HOMES ON THE SITEˆHASGIVENTHESCHOOLDISTRICT UNTIL-ARCHTODECIDEONITSALL CASHOFFERFORTHEPROPERTY WHICH ISCONTIGUOUSWITHDISTRICT OWNED LANDAT'REENDELL3CHOOLAND#UB BERLEY#OMMUNITY#ENTER 4HE PROPERTY WAS HOME FOR NEARLYYEARSTOTHE0ENINSULA $AY #ARE #ENTER WHICH CLOSED ITS DOORS IN *UNE  WHEN THE OWNERRETIRED 4HESCHOOLDISTRICTBOUGHTTHE PARCEL IN LATE  DISRUPTING A CONTRACTBETWEEN3UMMERHILLAND OWNERSOF0ENINSULA$AY#ARE "UT 3UMMERHILL PROCEEDED TO SECURECITYAPPROVALFORHOUSING DEVELOPMENT IN CASE THE SCHOOL DISTRICTPURCHASEFELLTHROUGH 4HE DISTRICT HAS BEEN LEASING 3AN!NTONIOONASHORT TERM BASISTOAPRIVATESCHOOLFORCHIL DRENWITHDYSLEXIA 4HE PROPERTY COMBINED WITH THE 'REENDELL CAMPUS AT  -IDDLEFIELD2OAD ISUNDERCON SIDERATIONBYACITIZENSCOMMIT TEECURRENTLYEVALUATINGPOSSIBLE LOCATIONS FOR A TH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4HAT COMMITTEE WHOSE REPORTISEXPECTEDTHISSPRING HAS BEENTOLDTOWEIGHTRADEOFFSBE TWEENOPENINGASCHOOLAT'REEN DELL3AN!NTONIOORATTHEFORMER 'ARLAND %LEMENTARY 3CHOOL AT .#ALIFORNIA!VE 3KELLY DID NOT HINT THAT THE SCHOOLDISTRICTWASENGAGEDINANY

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Upfront

News Digest City tries to fix parking problems &ACED WITH BOOMING DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AND A SEVERE PARKING SHORTAGE 0ALO!LTOOFFICIALSENDORSEDON-ARCHAWIDERANGEOFPO TENTIAL SOLUTIONS TO MAKE LIFE EASIER FOR DOWNTOWN RESIDENTS AND COM MUTERS 4HEMOSTCONTROVERSIALSOLUTIONINCLUDESTEAMINGUPWITHDOWNTOWN DEVELOPER#HARLESh#HOPv+EENANTOBUILDAPARKINGGARAGEACROSSTHE STREETFROM+EENANSPROPOSEDDEVELOPMENTAT(AMILTON!VE 5NDER+EENANSPROPOSAL HEWOULDPAYABOUTMILLIONFORTHENEW STRUCTUREANDTHECITYWOULDCHIPINABOUTMILLION)FAPPROVED THE NEWGARAGEWOULDSTANDONACITY OWNEDLOTACROSSTHESTREETFROMTHE (IGH3TREETGARAGE4HEOCCUPANTSOF+EENANSNEWBUILDINGWOULDOC CUPY THE TOP TWO STORIES OF THE NEW STRUCTURE WHICH WOULD REVERT TO PUBLICUSEONEVENINGSANDWEEKENDS 4HEPROPOSALRECEIVEDACOOLRECEPTIONFROMSOMEOFTHESPEAKERSAT -ONDAYS#ITY#OUNCILMEETING WITHSEVERALRESIDENTSURGINGTHECOUNCIL NOTTOGIVEUPVALUABLECITYLANDFORAPROJECTTHATWOULDBENEFITAPRIVATE DEVELOPER /THER PROPOSALS PROVED FAR LESS CONTROVERSIAL AND RESULTED IN SWIFT COUNCILAPPROVAL4HESEINCLUDEINTRODUCINGVALETPARKINGINACITYGARAGE ON(IGH3TREET SELLINGMOREPERMITSFORTHE"RYANT3TREETAND#OWPER 3TREETGARAGESANDREDUCINGTHENUMBEROFEMPLOYEESPOTSATTHE#ITY (ALL GARAGE BY GIVING WORKERS INCENTIVES TO TAKE ALTERNATE MODES OF TRANSPORTATION 4HECOUNCILALSOAGREEDTOTAKEANOTHERLOOKATELIMINATINGPARKING EXEMPTIONSFORNEWDEVELOPMENTSANDCONSIDERPARKINGRESTRICTIONSAT RESIDENTIALNEIGHBORHOODS AS0ROFESSORVILLEAND$OWNTOWN.ORTHRESI DENTSHAVELONGDEMANDED,ASTYEAR THECITYSEFFORTTOCREATEARESIDEN TIALPERMIT PARKINGPROGRAMINASECTIONOF0ROFESSORVILLEFIZZLEDWHEN THECOUNCILDECIDEDTHEAREASPARAMETERSWERETOONARROWANDDIRECTED STAFFTOCONSIDERBROADERANDMORECOMPREHENSIVESOLUTIONS3TAFFNOW PLANSTOPRESENTRECOMMENDATIONSABOUTPARKINGRESTRICTIONSINRESIDEN TIALNEIGHBORHOODSINEARLY3EPTEMBERN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

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CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (March 18)

Downtown: The council approved a series of measures to create more parking downtown, including an attendant-parking program at one garage, more permits sold at two garages and reduction of parking spaces allocated to employees at City Hall. Yes: Unanimous Garage: The council directed staff to explore construction of a new garage on High Street, between University and Hamilton avenues, in conjunction with developer Charles “Chop� Keenan. Yes: Berman, Burt, Holman, Klein, Kniss, Price, Scharff, Shepherd No: Schmid Infrastructure: The council voted to remove Byxbee Park from its list of projects to be considered in polling for a possible 2014 infrastructure bond measure. Yes: Berman, Burt, Holman, Klein, Kniss, Price, Scharff, Shepherd No: Schmid History museum: The council voted to add funding for the Palo Alto History Museum to a list of projects that would be included in polling for a possible 2014 infrastructure bond measure. Yes: Berman, Burt, Price, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd No: Klein Recuse: Holman Absent: Kniss

Board of Education (March 19)

Construction: The board approved “conceptual designs� for a new indoor athletic center at Palo Alto High School to be financed by a private donor. Yes: Unanimous Guidance counseling: The board heard presentation from the principals of Gunn and Palo Alto high schools about efforts to improve their guidance-counseling programs. Action: None

Council Policy and Services Committee (March 19)

Smoking: The committee voted to recommend banning smoking at all city parks smaller than 5 acres. Yes: Unanimous

Council Finance Committee (March 19)

Sweeping: The commission supported a staff recommendation for a pilot program to reduce the frequency of street sweeping for residential streets in non-leaf season to once every other week and to contract out some of the work. Yes: Burt, Schmid, Shepherd Absent: Berman Water rates: The commission voted to support a staff recommendation to raise water rates by 7 percent starting July 1. Yes: Burt, Schmid, Shepherd Absent: Berman

Architectural Review Board (March 20)

611 Cowper St.: The board held a preliminary review for a proposed 50-foot-tall, four-story office building with one residential unit at 611 Cowper St. Action: None 441 Page Mill Road: The board held a preliminary review for a proposed mixed-use building at 441 Page Mill Road featuring 32,524 square feet of commercial space and eight residential units. Action: None

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

FORMERHIGHSCHOOLCAMPUS h4HIS COMMUNITY PRIDES ITSELF ON DOING THINGS RIGHT AND HAVING OURCITIZENSˆEVERYONEFROMLITTLE BABIESTOSENIORSˆUSINGAFACILITY THATS FALLING APART ISNT SOMETHING ANYOFUSWANTTOBEAPARTOFv +LEINSAIDhSIGNIFICANTAMOUNTSOF MONEYvMUSTBESPENTINTHESHORT TERM TO MAKE SURE THAT #UBBERLEY DOESNThFALLAPARTv h) THINK WE HAVE A SHORT TERM TIMETABLE NOTALONG TERMONEv "EFORETHECITYSDEADLINEFORNO TIFICATION ON LEASE RENEWAL AT THE ENDOF THECOUNCILANDSCHOOL BOARD HAVE hMANY ISSUES DEALING WITHFINANCESINPARTICULARTOWORK OUT v+LEINSAID 4HECOMMITTEERECOMMENDEDTHAT ANYLEASERENEGOTIATIONCONTAINARE QUIREMENT THAT THE CITY AND SCHOOL DISTRICT WITHIN ONE YEAR DEVELOP A MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING TO DETERMINE STEPS FOR A #UBBERLEY MASTERPLANANDACOMMUNITYNEEDS ASSESSMENT 7HEELER WHO CHAIRED THE ADVI SORYCOMMITTEESFINANCESUBCOM MITTEE SAID FINANCING OPTIONS FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENT hWILL DEPEND ON DECISIONS THE ELECTED BODIES MAKEANDTHETIMINGOFTHOSEDE CISIONSv -ANY OPTIONS UNDER DISCUS SION COULD LEGALLY BE FINANCED BY A SCHOOL DISTRICT LED BOND MEASURE THAT WOULD REQUIRE APPROVAL BY  PERCENTOFVOTERS SHESAID "EYONDTHECOMPLICATIONSOFNEED INGSEPARATEELECTEDBODIESTOPLAN JOINTLYISTHEFACTTHATTHEIRJURISDIC TIONSARENOTCOMPLETELYALIGNED 4HE0ALO!LTOSCHOOLDISTRICTIN CLUDES RESIDENTS OF 3TANFORD 5NI VERSITYASWELLASSOMEPARTSOF,OS !LTOS (ILLS !ND RESIDENTS OF 0ALO !LTOS-ONROE0ARKNEIGHBORHOOD WHO PAY THE UTILITY USERS TAX THAT FINANCESTHE#UBBERLEYLEASE AREIN THE,OS!LTOSSCHOOLDISTRICT !LEX0ANELLIAND*IM/LSTAD WHO BOTHSERVEDONACITIZENSCOM MITTEETHATEXAMINED0ALO!LTOSIN FRASTRUCTURENEEDS SAIDTHEFINANC ING OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT THROUGH THE CITYS UTILITY USERS TAX DESERVES GREATERTAXPAYERSCRUTINY h) DONT ˆ AND ) THINK A LARGE NUMBER OF THE POPULATION OF THE CITYWONTˆTHINKWESHOULDJUST CONTINUE THE ADVOCACY OF SUBSI DIZATION WHETHER ITS THROUGH THE UTILITY USERS TAX OR OTHER DOLLARS OVERTOTHEDISTRICTSCOFFERS vSAID /LSTAD WHONOTEDHISCHILDRENALSO HADGONETHROUGH0ALO!LTOPUBLIC SCHOOLSN

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com What do you think the future of Cubberley should look like? What combination of school district and community use would be ideal? Share your opinion on Town Square, the community discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.


Upfront

REAL ESTATE TRENDS by Samia Cullen

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To stick, anti-bullying lessons must be imparted early and often, principals says &AIRMEADOWS@3TEPSTO2ESPECTISONEOFMANYPROGRAMSINLOCALSCHOOLS by Chris Kenrick HEREARENOQUICKFIXESWHENIT COMESTOKIDSANDBULLYING !S PART OF A PUSH TO TRAIN CHILDRENEARLYANDOFTEN STUDENTSAT &AIRMEADOW%LEMENTARY3CHOOLTHIS WEEK SHOWED OFF THEIR HAND MADE ANTI BULLYINGPOSTERSINTHESCHOOLS MULTI PURPOSEROOM h9OU CAN ALWAYS DO SOMETHING AND DONT LET BULLYING HAPPEN v WROTEAFIFTHGRADER h)TSNOTCOOL3TANDUPTOBULLIES ANDALWAYSBEASSERTIVEv !CCOMPANIED BY A STICK FIGURE DRAWING OF A CHILD SAYING h3TOP v A KINDERGARTNER WROTE h)F YOU GET BULLIEDYOUSHODTELTHETECHERv 0RINCIPAL 'ARY 0REHN WHO HAS LEDELEMENTARYSCHOOLSFORYEARS SAIDTHESOCIALCLIMATEOFANYSCHOOL PALPABLY AND MEASURABLY IMPROVES WHENANTI BULLYINGLESSONSAREEM BEDDEDINTHECURRICULUMANDREVIS ITEDONAREGULARBASIS h7HENEVERYONEISWORKINGONIT ITSLIKETHEANXIETYORTHEANGSTOF MANYKIDSDROPSANDTHERESASENSE OFCALM v0REHNSAID h)CERTAINLYSEEITHERE)TSDRAS TICALLYREDUCEDTHENUMBEROFKIDS WEDEALWITHAFTERRECESSORLUNCH TIMEv .EWER PROACTIVE ANTI BULLYING EFFORTSWORKBETTERTHANTRADITIONAL APPROACHES THAT TREAT BULLYING AS A BEHAVIORPROBLEM HESAID 4HENEWERCURRICULATEACHEMPATHY NOTJUSTFORTHEBULLIEDCHILDBUTALSO FORTHEBULLYˆANDENCOURAGEOTHER CHILDREN TO BECOME hUPSTANDERSv AGAINSTBULLYINGRATHERBYSTANDERS )T WORKS BETTER THAN THE OLDER MODELOFHAVINGCHILDRENhTALKOUTv THEIR DIFFERENCES WHICH WAS PROB LEMATICBECAUSEOFANIMBALANCEOF POWERBETWEENBULLYANDVICTIMSAID 3IGRID0INSKY A&AIRMEADOWPARENT AND 04! LEADER INVOLVED WITH THE PROGRAM &AIRMEADOWS CURRICULUM OF CHOICEISh3TEPSTO2ESPECTvˆONE

Page Mill Road (continued from page 5)

.ORTHWAYSAIDTHEBUILDINGSFAĂ€ADE ISCONSISTENTWITHWHATARCHITECTSAND CITYPLANNERSENVISIONFORTHEINCREAS INGLYURBANFUTUREOF0AGE-ILL2OAD WHICHRUNSTHROUGHTHEMIDDLEOFTHE CITYBETWEEN53(IGHWAYAND 53(IGHWAY h0ROBABLY IN FIVE YEARS THIS WILL BE REGARDED AS A CHARMING LITTLE BUILDINGSITTINGON0AGE-ILL2OAD v .ORTHWAYSAID 4HEPROPOSALISTHELATESTINALARGE PILEOFMIXED USEBUILDINGSCURRENTLY GOING THROUGH THE CITYS PLANNING PROCESS"UTWHILEMOSTOFTHESEˆ INCLUDINGPLANNEDFOUR STORYDEVELOP MENTSAT(AMILTON!VEAND #OWPER3TˆCONSISTLARGELYOFOF FICESPACEANDSMALLRESIDENTIALCOM PONENTSTHE(AMILTONPROJECTWOULD

Katie Brigham

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CEPTS ARE ESSENTIALLY THE SAME IN MANYOFTHESEPROGRAMS vHESAID "ACKINTHEMULTI PURPOSEROOM &AIRMEADOW STUDENTS EXPLAINED THEIRPOSTERSONDISPLAY h-INESAYS @)STANDUPFORPEOPLE GETTING BULLIED  SAID !RMANI A FIFTH GRADERh4HATMEANSIFSOME ONESBEINGBULLIED)WALKUPTOTHAT PERSONANDSAYITSNOTRIGHTANDTHEY SHOULDSTOP h!LLTHEYREDOINGISHURTINGOTHER PEOPLEANDTHEYWONTENDUPHAVING ANYFRIENDSv !CROSSTHEROOM ARECIPEFORh2E SPECT,ASAGNAvBYASECOND GRADER NAMED %MMA WAS POSTED ON THE WALL4HEhRECIPEFORRESPECTvINCLUD EDhONESCOOPOFHUGS ASPRINKLEOF NON ARROGANCE TWOCUPSFRIENDSHIP ADASHOFAPOLOGY FIVETABLESPOONS OFRESPECTFULWORDS TWOTEASPOONS OFHONESTY AHALF CUPOFSMILESAND AQUARTERCUPOFATTENTIONvN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

INCLUDETWOUNITSANDTHE#OWPERONE WOULD INCLUDE ONE THE 0AGE -ILL BUILDINGWOULDINCLUDEEIGHTRESIDEN TIALUNITSONTHETHIRDFLOOR 4HEFIRSTFLOOROFTHETHREE STORY  FOOT TALL BUILDING WOULD BE DE VOTEDTORETAILANDTHESECONDFLOOR TOOFFICES4HREEOFTHESEUNITSWOULD BE AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR WHICH THEREISAGAPINGNEEDIN0ALO!LTO 4HENEWPROPOSALISTHELATESTSTEP INTHEONGOINGINTENSIFICATIONOFTHE AREAAROUNDTHE#ALIFORNIA!VENUE "USINESS$ISTRICT4HECITYISTARGET INGTHEAREAFORGREATERDEVELOPMENT BECAUSEOFITSLOCATIONNEARTHE#AL TRAINSTATIONANDNEARTHE#ALIFORNIA !VENUE COMMERCIAL STRIP !MONG THEMOSTAMBITIOUSPROJECTSTHATTHE CITYISCURRENTLYLOOKINGATISAPRO POSALBY*AY0AULTOBUILDTWOOFFICE BUILDINGSTOTALLY SQUAREFEET NEARTHE!/,BUILDINGS 4HE PROPOSAL BY .ORTHWAY ON

BEHALF OF PROPERTY OWNER .ORM 3CHWAB ISNOWHERENEARTHESCALEOF THE*AY0AULS"UTACCORDINGTOARE PORTFROM0ALO!LTOSPLANNINGSTAFF NEIGHBORS HAD EXPRESSED CONCERNS ABOUTANINCREASEINTRAFFIC LOSSOF PRIVACY AND THE BUILDINGS DENSITY .ORTHWAYRESPONDEDBYPLACINGTHE BUILDINGFARTHERFROMTHEREARPROP ERTYLINE PLANTINGAROWOFTREESAS A BUFFER AND SETTING THE BUILDINGS THIRDSTORYFURTHERBACK 4HE BOARD HAD A FEW SUGGESTIONS ONTHEDESIGNOFTHEFAĂ€ADEANDPLACE MENT OF THE BALCONY WITH MEMBER !LEX,EWURGING.ORTHWAYTOREPO SITIONTHEBALCONIESSOBUILDINGRESI DENTS COULD SEE THE FOOTHILLS "OARD MEMBER,EE,IPPERTALSOSUGGESTED .ORTHWAYCONSIDERAMOREhBOLDvDE SIGN POSSIBLYWITHGREATERHEIGHTN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

The Danger of Overpricing your Home I received a call from a buyer who was surprised to read online about a price reduction for a house on a desirable street in Palo Alto. I conďŹ rmed that the property had recently experienced a price reduction. The fact of the matter is that even in Palo Alto and in our competitive market, a home typically will not sell unless the list price is in line with the fair market value. While some sellers are tempted to list their property at a high price to test the market and then negotiate down the price, this strategy often is counterproductive. As the house stays longer on the market, it can develop a stigma that the house is not selling because there is something wrong with it. The seller will start getting lowball offers and may end up eventually selling at a price

below fair market value. Sellers, ask your agent to prepare a market analysis and then price your home in line with the mid-range of the comparables. In this market it is safer to underprice than overprice your home. By visiting open houses, you can get a reality check about what you’re up against and see how your home’s strengths and weaknesses compare with those of other homes that potential buyers will see. If your home is well-priced you will most likely end up receiving multiple offers, thereby driving up the sale price of the home. This strategy works very well when, like now, the market is hot. By avoiding the temptation to overprice your home, you can sell your home quickly and increase the amount you receive for your home.

If you have a real estate question or would like a free market analysis for your home, please call me at 650-384-5392, Alain Pinel Realtors, or email me at scullen@apr.com. For the latest real estate news, follow my blog at www.samiacullen.com

TRUNK SHOW Saturday March 30th

2012

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Upfront

Neighborhoods

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AROUND THE BLOCK MAKING A BIG SPLASH ... The second annual Greenmeadow Association Big Splash event, a group jump into the association’s pool at 303 Parkside Drive, will take place Saturday, March 23, at exactly 10:15 a.m. The event marks the opening of the association’s pool and is followed by hot chocolate, coffee and doughnuts.

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Small wonders 0EOPLEAREUSINGBOOKS FRONTYARDSTOFOSTER NEIGHBORLINESS by Jocelyn Dong

EDGEWOOD EATS RETURNS ... The popular food-truck gathering displaced from Edgewood Shopping Center returned on March 18, just blocks away at the First Congregational Church of Palo Alto parking lot. The City of Palo Alto granted Edgewood Eats a one-time specialuse permit for the event, which featured eight food trucks. Event organizer Susie Hwang said residents who would like Edgewood Eats to continue as an ongoing event can drop an email of support to edgewoodeats.paloalto.ca@gmail.com or post support at facebook.com/ edgewoodeats. Future events will be posted on the Facebook page. NEIGHBORHOOD TREE PRUNING ... City of Palo Alto Urban Forester Walter Passmore has announced that contractor West Coast Arborists is pruning street trees this month in the area bounded by Embarcadero and Middlefield roads and San Francisquito Creek. Neighborhoods include Crescent Park, Community Center and Duveneck/St. Francis. Pruning can initially make the tree look different, but trees will recover quickly, he said. To contact Urban Forestry, residents can call 650-496-5953.

3END ANNOUNCEMENTS OF NEIGHBORHOOD EVENTS MEET INGSANDNEWSTO3UE$REMANN .EIGHBORHOODS EDITOR AT SDREMANN PAWEEKLYCOM /R TALK ABOUT YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS ON 4OWN 3QUARE AT WWW 0ALO!LTO/NLINECOM

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Jocelyn Dong

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Veronica Weber

NEIGHBORHOOD MEETINGS ... The College Terrace Residents Association will hold its annual meeting Saturday, March 23, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Escondido Elementary School Multipurpose Room, 890 Escondido Road, Stanford. Topics will include the election of CTRA board members, “State of the Terrace� by CTRA President Brent Barker and a presentation by Palo Alto Mayor Greg Scharff. The Midtown Residents Association will hold its general meeting on Tuesday, April 16, at 7 p.m. at Friends Meeting Hall, 957 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto, to discuss the proposed Matadero Creek bike and pedestrian path. Neighborhood associations wanting a free public notice in the Weekly’s monthly Neighborhoods section can email information by the second Friday of each month to Sue Dremann at sdremann@paweekly.com.

WEEK ALLTHEBOOKSWEREGONE 4HENEXTWEEK SOMEOFTHEORIGI NAL BOOKS CAME BACK ALONG WITH SOMEDIFFERENTONES (ORGANSAID 3HE CREDITS THE POPULARITY TO THE LOCATION 4HE LIBRARY LIES ALONG A DESIGNATEDPATHTO/HLONE%LEMEN TARY3CHOOL ANDABOUTCHILDREN WALKBYEACHDAY 3TILL INACITYWITHNOLACKOFAC CESSTOBOOKS h)WASSURPRISEDKIDS HAVEUSEDITSOMUCH v(ORGANSAID /N 7EDNESDAY SHE THUMBED THROUGHTHEEVER EVOLVINGCOLLECTION h)WOULDTHINKTHERES MAYBE v SHE SAID COUNTING THE ASSORTMENT WHICHNOWINCLUDESTHEBOARDBOOK h(AND (AND &INGERS 4HUMBvAND THEHUMOROUSh#LICK #LACK -OO #OWSTHATTYPEv .OT ONLY ARE THERE CHILDRENS BOOKS BUT SOMEONE LEFT A #$ OF h4REASURE )SLANDv AND TWO PARENT INGBOOKSASWELL h)TTAKESONALIFEOFITSOWNBE CAUSEYOUNEVERKNOWWHOISGOING TOUSEIT v(ORGANSAID )N BETWEEN THE INSTALLATIONS OF "ROCKSTWOLIBRARIES ANOTHERLOCAL

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Upfront NOTICE OF TRANSPORTATION SURVEY

5.)6%23)493/54(

Of the City of Palo Alto

One drop at a time

The City of Palo Alto is releasing its first ever Transportation Survey to help better understand the travel mode and patterns of the community. Residents and persons travelling into Palo Alto to work are encouraged to complete the survey.

,OCALMUSICIANBUILDS COMMUNITYWITH@RAIN MAKINGEVENT by Sue Dremann

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Katie Brigham

ERB-OORESAYSHEKNOWSHOW TOMAKERAIN EVENONASUNNY DAY 3ITTING IN (ERITAGE 0ARK IN0ALO!LTOON7EDNESDAYMORNING -OORE AMUSICIAN DISPLAYEDANAR RAYOFINSTRUMENTSMADEFROMFOUND OBJECTS AND SCRAP MATERIALS 7ITH THEM HECANSIMULATEARAINSTORM A FOOT LONGPLASTICDRAINPIPEFILLED WITHPEBBLESˆTHETUMBLINGSTONES MAKE A SOUND LIKE TORRENTIAL RAIN OLDTUNACANSRUBBERBANDSPLINKING AGAINSTJARLIDSANDSHEETALUMINUM WHICHSOUNDSLIKECLAPPINGTHUNDER 7ATERIS-OORESFAVORITEELEMENT !QUARIUSISHISASTROLOGICALSIGN! SEMI RETIREDTECHNICALWRITER HEIS ALIFELONGMUSICIANWHOHASPLAYED INSTRUMENTS FROM FOUND MATERIALS SINCETHES(ECALLSTHEARTOF MAKING MUSIC WITH FOUND OBJECTS 3CRAPOPHONY 7ATER FASCINATES HIM BECAUSE IT IS SOOTHING 0HILOSOPHICALLY AND PHYSICALLY HE FEELS ALIGNED WITH WATER HESAID h)TISABIGPARTOFOURBODIESWE NEED IT TO LIVE )T IS TREMENDOUSLY POWERFULMETAPHORICALLYˆTHEWA TERCOURSEWAY vHESAIDOFTHE4AOIST PHILOSOPHYOFADAPTINGLIKEFLOWING WATERTOLIFESPROBLEMS /N&RIDAY -ARCH HEPLANNED TOGATHERWITHRESIDENTSTOCREATEA hRAIN ORCHESTRAv IN THE PARK 4HE PLINKING AND PLUNKING OF WATER DROPLETS THE CRASH OF THUNDER AND EVENTUALDOWNPOUROFSOUNDWOULD BEPARTOF"EA$ROPINTHE"UCKET ACOMMUNITY BUILDINGEVENTTHATCO INCIDED WITH THE TH ANNIVERSARY OFTHE5NITED.ATIONS7ORLD7ATER $AY WHICH ADVOCATES SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENTOFWATERRESOURCES 2AIN MUSIC IS A METAPHOR FOR BUILDING COMMUNITY TO SOLVE LIFES PROBLEMS HESAID!SINDIVIDUALSIN A FAST PACED SOCIETY MANY PEOPLE FEEL OVERWHELMED BY THE PROBLEMS ATTHEIRDOORSTEP"UThINDIVIDUALLY WE ARE LIKE ONE DROP BUT TOGETHER WECANFILLABUCKET vHESAID

The survey is comprised of 12-15 questions and takes only a few minutes to complete. Please provide your input before May 5th, 2013 by taking the survey online. Data from the survey will be used to develop future transportation programs, projects and policies.

(ERB-OOREPLAYSMUSICALINSTRUMENTSTHATHEMADEFROMRECYCLED MATERIALSAT(ERITAGE0ARKON-ARCH -OORESAIDHISPHILOSOPHYOFhMU SICASCOMMUNITYvISMEANTTOBRING PEOPLETOGETHERˆTOFINDWAYSWITH IMPROVISATIONALNEIGHBORHOODMUSI CALEVENTSTOEXPLOREIDEASANDNEW APPROACHESTOPROBLEMS (EALSOSOUGHTNEWAPPROACHESTO MAKING MUSIC (E STARTED PLAYING ATRADITIONALINSTRUMENTˆAGUITAR ˆWHILEAYOUTHIN-C,EAN 6A)N THEPARKINGLOTSWHEREMENHUNGOUT TO JAM -OORE PICKED UP THE hREAL ORALv TRADITION OF #ARTER &AMILY STYLE3COTCH )RISHMUSIC HESAID "UTHESTARTEDMAKINGMUSICWITH SCRAP MATERIALS INCLUDING A XYLO PHONE WHENHECOULDNTAFFORDMORE EXPENSIVEPROFESSIONALINSTRUMENTS HESAID(ESOONBECAMEINTERESTED INEXPLORINGALLKINDSOFSOUNDS -OORE SPENT FIVE YEARS RECORDING THESOUNDSOFWATER FROMRAINDROPSTO RUSHINGRIVERS(ETRAVERSED"AY!REA MOUNTAINSANDWENTINTOTHE3IERRAS TOEXPANDHISAURALCANVAS&ROMHIS COLLECTIONOFSOUNDSCAPES HECREATED A#$ENTITLEDh( /VERTUREv (E ALSO COLLABORATED WITH 0ALO !LTOARTIST3TEVE#URLONASLIDESHOW CALLEDh7ATER#OLOR-USIC vWHICH CAN BE VIEWED AT -OORES WEBSITE WWWMELOSYNCCOM h)THINKOFMUSICASBEINGLIKEA COSMIC RIVER THAT IS ALWAYS THERE &ROM TIME TO TIME WE SCOOP UP A BITOFTHERIVERANDPUTITINTOBOTTLES OFDIFFERENTSHAPESANDCOLORSWHICH WE CALL SONGS SYMPHONIES OPERAS ORWHATEVER/RMAYBEWECREATEA MOREFREEFLOWINGFOUNTAINIMPRO VISATION vHENOTESONHISWEBSITE -OORECREATESATAPESTRYOFSOUND TAKING INTO CONSIDERATION AMBIENT SOUNDASTHECANVASFORTHECOMMU NITYSOUND PAINTINGS HESAID 3INCELANDINGIN0ALO!LTOIN

HE HAS PERFORMED SCRAPOPHONY AT 3TANFORD -ENLO 0ARKS 0ENINSULA 3CHOOL 0ALO!LTONEIGHBORHOODAND COMMUNITYVENUESTHATINCLUDEFARM ERSMARKETS DANCECLASSESAND#OM MON'ROUNDSGARDEN SHAREEVENTS (E PERFORMED AT 3TANFORD AT THE LATECOMPOSER*OHN#AGESh-U SICIRCUSvEVENT ANDCREATEDMUSICFOR THE *ULY  DANCE PERFORMANCE h!LONGTHE2IVERvBY+ARIN#ABELLO -ORIARTY4HELATTEREVENTTOOKPLACE AT !NDY 'OLDSWORTHYS 3TONE 2IVER SCULPTURE OUTSIDE 3TANFORD 5NIVER SITYS#ANTOR!RTS#ENTER $URING SEVERAL DAYS THAT YEAR HE RECORDEDTHEVOCALIZATIONSOF3OPHIA 3ACHS A0ALO!LTOTODDLERWHOHADA RARE GENETICDISORDERCALLED.EIMANN 0ICK4YPE!(EWROTEMUSICBASED ONTHENUMERICALSEQUENCEASSOCIATED WITH THE ENZYME THE CHILD LACKED INCORPORATING HER VOICE 3OPHIA WAS SAIDTOPULSEHERHANDSTOTHEMUSIC -OORE HAS ALSO USED HIS MUSIC AT CORPORATE WORKSHOPS AND TEAM BUILDINGEVENTS h)TS A GOOD METAPHOR FOR TEAM WORK vHESAID(ESEESHIMSELFAS THECATALYSTFORCONVERSATION BUTHE DOESNTHAVEABIGAGENDA HEADD ED"UTSOMETIMESCONVERSATIONSDO COMEOUTOFPLAYINGTHEMUSIC h)TISAWAYIFNOTHINGELSEFORPEO PLETOJUSTHAVEAGOODTIME)THINK MUSICISWONDERFUL)NOURCULTURE WHATWEVEDONEISWEVETENDEDTO MAKEMUSICASPECIALIZEDARTFORM WHERE WE HAVE STARS AND WE THINK ONLY A FEW PEOPLE CAN PLAY MUSIC 7EVE LOST A LITTLE BIT OF THAT SENSE OFMUSICASAPARTICIPATORYACTIVITY v HESAIDN 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

Survey is available at http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/ts2013.

For further information regarding the survey please contact: Ruchika Aggarwal – ruchika.aggarwal@cityofpaloalto.org or (650)617.3136.

Thursday March 28, 2013 7:00 - 8:30 pm

A free “How To” workshop for Family Caregivers

at Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center 270 Escuela Avenue Mountain View

How to Understand Depression in the Elderly

Please RSVP to 650-289-5499 Light refreshments will be served.

with Richard Winetzky, LMFT Senior Program Therapist OATS Program El Camino Hospital

Free professional care for your loved one is available so you can attend the workshop—just call us 48 hours in advance to make arrangements.

Quality Daytime Care for Older Adults

Enjoy the ride.

171 University Ave., Palo Alto

s

650.328.7411

s

www.paloaltobicycles.com

s

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 10am - 7pm, Sat. 10am - 6pm, Sun. 11am - 5pm ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊ>ÀV…ÊÓÓ]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 9


Peninsula Easter Services Journey to Easter You Are Invited Sunday, March 24th Sunday, March 31st

11:00a.m. 11:00a.m.

Palm Sunday Easter Service

WESLEY UNITED METHODIST

470 Cambridge Ave (one block off California) Rev. Jerry Fox

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF PALO ALTO .#ALIFORNIAAT"RYANTs  sWWWFBC PALOALTOORG March 28, 6PM Maundy Thursday Soup Supper followed by Service March 29, 12-3PM 7:30PM

Good Friday, Sanctuary Open for Prayer and Meditation Tenebrae Service at Covenant Presbyterian, 670 E. Meadow

March 31, 6:30AM 10AM 11:30AM

Sunrise Service and Pancake Breakfast at Mitchell Park EASTER WORSHIP CELEBRATION Brunch & Children’s Easter Egg Hunt

ST. MARK’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH PALO ALTO Maundy Thursday— March 28 V6:15pm

Monastic Supper & Liturgy of the Word followed by Holy Eucharist & Stripping of the Altar

Good Friday — March 29 V Noon to 2:00pm Stations of the Cross with Reflections V 2:00 to 3:00pm

Labyrinth Stations: A Walking Meditation

V 7:30 to 8:30pm

Tenebrae: The Office of Shadows

V 5:30am

Easter Vigil, Eucharist & Baptism

Easter — March 31 V 8:00 to 9:30am

Festive Breakfast & Family Easter Activities

V 10:00am

Festive Holy Eucharist

600 Colorado Ave, P.A. (650) 326-3800 www.saint-marks.com

Holy Week & Easter

Join Us For Holy Week & Easter

at

St. Bede’s

Episcopal Church 2650 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park

!!      12 noon Foot Washing & Holy Eucharist 6:30pm Agape meal & Holy Eucharist 8:00pm-midnight Vigil in the church  

 

12 noon Communion from reserved sacrament & music approx. 1 hr 7:30pm Tenebrae approx. 1Âź hr     7:30pm Great Vigil of Easter approx. 1Âź hr     8:00am Eucharist with Hymns 10:15am Sung Eucharist w/choir 11:30am Easter Egg Hunt Nursery available 10-11:30am

The great question of Easter is about us: where are the tombs in our life that God is inviting us to leave and where is new life rising in us? Join us at Trinity as we celebrate the promise and possibility of new life. Palm Sunday, March 24: 10:00 am* Maundy Thursday (The Last Supper) March 28, 6:00 pm* (with simple meal) Good Friday, March 29 7:00 am, Noon, 7:00 pm The Great Vigil of Easter Baptisms & First Easter Communion Saturday, March 30, 7:00 pm* Easter Sunday, March 31 6:30 am in the Memorial Garden 8:30 am* & 10:30 am* in Church with Festival Choir *Indicates child care available. 330 Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park (650) 326-2083 www.trinitymenlopark.org

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ST. ANN ANGLICAN CHAPEL A TRADITIONAL EPISCOPAL CHURCH 541 Melville Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94301 650-838-0508

The Most Reverend Robert S. Morse, Vicar Reverend Matthew Weber, Assistant March 31 Easter Sunday 11am Choral Eucharist & Sermon Child Care Provided

Peninsula Easter Services

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH UCC

Covenant Presbyterian Church

1985 Louis Road, Palo Alto (650) 856-6662 www.fccpa.org

Maundy Thursday, March 28th

March 24 Palm/Passion Sunday 10:30 a.m. Worship Procession of the Palms

Soup Supper & Communion, 6:30pm, Service of Tenebrae, 7:30pm

Good Friday, March 29th Service of Contemplation, Noon

March 28 Maundy Thursday 6:00 p.m. Dinner and Worship at First Baptist Church 305 N California Ave, Palo Alto

Easter Sunday Celebration Worship at 9:30 am & 11:00 am Oxford Street Brass & The Hallelujah Chorus Easter Egg Hunt 10:30am

March 29 Good Friday 7:30 p.m. Tenebrae Scripture readings, music, and the extinguishing of lights comprise this powerful service of remembrance

An open and affirming congregation of the United Church of Christ

March 30 Holy Saturday 10:00 a.m. Children’s Easter Egg Hunt Activities to celebrate Easter

Holy Week Services March 28 6:00 pm

Seder Dinner

March 29 Noon & 7:00 pm Good Friday Services

Join us for EASTER March 31, 2013 10:30 AM Worship 1140 Cowper St.

11:30 AM Easter treats 650-325-5659

www.fprespa.org

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS PARISH HOLY WEEK 2013

March 31 9:30 am

Easter Festival Service

Children’s Easter Egg Hunt after the service!

Bethany Lutheran Church 1095 Cloud Avenue, Menlo Park 650.854.5897 www.bethany-mp.org

March 31 Easter Sunday 6:30 a.m. Sunrise Service at Mitchell Park Bowl Sunrise meditation. Breakfast follows. 10:30 a.m. Worship A Celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ with music, scripture, proclamation of the Word and Communion. Bring fresh flowers for the Easter Cross. Rev. Dr. Margaret Boles Covenant Presbyterian Church, 670 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto 94306 (650) 494-1760 www.CovenantPresbyterian.net

HOLY WEEK AT ALL SAINTS’ ALL ARE WELCOME March 24 PALM SUNDAY 8am Holy Eucharist 10am Palm Procession & Eucharist

8:00 PM EASTER VIGIL SAT. MARCH 30, 2013

St. Albert the Great 1095 Channing Ave.



EASTER SUNDAY MARCH 31, 2013: ST. ALBERT THE GREAT 1095 Channing Ave. 9:00 AM (English) OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY 3233 Cowper St. 9:00 am (Spanish) 10:30 am (English) ST. THOMAS AQUINAS 751 Waverley St. 7:30 am (English) 8:45 am (English) 10:30 am (English) 12:00 noon (Gregorian)

March 28 MAUNDY THURSDAY Celebrant: Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves 6pm Light Supper 7pm Eucharist with Mandatum

Peninsula Easter Services is a resource for

March 29 GOOD FRIDAY Celebrant: Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves Noon Veneration of the Cross & Holy Communion 6pm Solemn Evensong of the Burial of Christ

March 30 HOLY SATURDAY 8pm Great Vigil of Easter followed by Champagne Reception

Let’s Celebrate Easter Together

March 31 EASTER SUNDAY 8am Eucharist 10am Festival Eucharist Special Music – The Whole Noyse Brass Egg Hunt & Easter Brunch

ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Peninsula Easter Services, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

All Saints’ Episcopal Church Palo Alto 555 Waverley @ Hamilton www.asaints.org

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Upfront

Smoke

(continued from page 3)

3TAFF HAD PROPOSED THE MORE LIMITEDBANBECAUSEOFCOMPLAINTS FROMRESIDENTSANDDOWNTOWNBUSI NESSES!CCORDINGTOASTAFFREPORT THESE COMPLAINTS MAINLY INVOLVED hENVIRONMENTALQUALITY LITTER FIRE SAFETYORACOMBINATIONTHEREOFv! PROHIBITIONATTHEDOWNTOWNPARKS THE REPORT STATED IS EXPECTED TO hREDUCELITTERANDENHANCETHEEN JOYMENT OF THE PARK FACILITIES FOR SHOPPERS VISITORSANDRESIDENTSOF THEDOWNTOWNAND#ALIFORNIA!V ENUECOMMERCIALAREASv "UT THE MAIN REASON FOR THE BAN

ISTHEIMPACTOFSMOKINGONPUBLIC HEALTH 4HE 5NITED 3TATES $EPART MENTOF(EALTHAND(UMAN3ERVIC ES#ENTERSFOR$ISEASE#ONTROLAND 0REVENTION ESTIMATED THAT   DEATHSINTHE5NITED3TATESAREAT TRIBUTABLE TO TOBACCO EVERY YEAR AND   OF THEM ARE ATTRIBUTED TOSECONDHANDSMOKING +NISS SAID THAT WHILE SHE ISNT AWAREOFCOMPLAINTSFROMTHEPUB LIC ABOUT SMOKING DOWNTOWN THE PUBLIC HEALTHARGUMENTISCOMPEL LING ENOUGH TO WARRANT THE NEW BAN WHICH THE FULL COUNCIL WILL HAVE TO SIGN OFF ON BEFORE IT BE COMESOFFICIAL h4HECOUNCILISAGUARDIANOFTHE PUBLICHEALTHOFTHECOMMUNITY AND

)D SAY THIS IS APPROPRIATE v +NISS SAIDOFTHEBROADERBAN (OLMANSAIDSHEWOULDSUPPORT BANNING SMOKING IN EVERY PARK LARGE AND SMALL THOUGH NEITHER SHENORANYOFHERCOLLEAGUESWERE PREPARED TO EXPAND THE ITEM THAT FAR4UESDAYNIGHT4HECOMMITTEE WASCONCERNEDABOUTTHEFACTTHAT THE MEETING AGENDA AND THE STAFF REPORTONLYTALKEDABOUTIMPOSING THEBANATTHREEPARKS !S IT IS THE BAN WOULD APPLY TO MORE THAN HALF OF THE CITYS PARKS #OMMUNITY3ERVICES$IRECTOR'REG "ETTS SAID 0ALO !LTO HAS  PARKS AND FOUR OPEN SPACE PRESERVES 3OME OF THE LATTER HAVE THEIR OWN RESTRICTIONS &OOTHILLS 0ARK FOR EX

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AMPLE PROHIBITS SMOKING ON TRAILS BUT ALLOWS IT IN THE MEADOWS AND PICNICAREAS "ETTSSAID 4HECOMMITTEESVOTEWASJUSTTHE LATEST IN THE CITYS MULTI YEAR CON SIDERATIONOFNEWSMOKINGLAWS)N /CTOBER THE0ARKSAND2ECRE ATION#OMMISSIONVOTED NOTTO CHANGE THE LAW REASONING THAT THE EXISTING ORDINANCE IS FINE THE WAY ITIS!NDLASTYEAR THE0OLICYAND 3ERVICE #OMMITTEE DIRECTED STAFF TOCONSIDERABROADERSMOKINGPRO HIBITION DESPITE A STATEMENT FROM +LEINATTHATTIMETHATSMOKINGHAS BECOMEANON ISSUEIN0ALO!LTOIN RECENTDECADES 3INCE  OTHER NEIGHBORING CITIES HAVE PROCEEDED WITH THEIR

to all the local restaurants who

joined together to make a difference in the lives of children and families at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford!

Palo Alto Ace of Sandwiches Anatolian Kitchen Asian Box Baja Fresh CalaďŹ a CafĂŠ and Market A Go Go California CafĂŠ California Pizza Kitchen Celia’s Mexican Restaurant Campo Pizzeria Crepevine Curry Up Now Good Earth CafĂŠ & Bakery Gordon Biersch Gravity Bistro

Hobee’s Restaurant House of Bagels Il Fornaio La Morenita Restaurant Lotus Thai Bistro Lyfe Kitchen Mango Caribbean Monique’s Chocolates Nola Palo Alto Creamery Fountain & Grill Downtown Palo Alto Creamery Stanford Panda Express Patxi’s Pizza PF Chang’s China Bistro Pinkberry Pizz’a Chicago

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Pizza My Heart Pluto’s Poolside Grill Reposado Restaurant Soleil Round Table Pizza Quattro Siam Orchid Organic Fine Dining Sprinkles Tacolicious Thaiphoon The ProliďŹ c Oven 3rd Door Trellis Restaurant Tootsie’s at the Stanford Barn Village Cheese House Yogurtland

Menlo Park Amici’s East Coast Pizzeria Ann’s Coffee Shop Celia’s Mexican Restaurant Lutticken’s Menlo Grill Bistro and Bar Phil’s Kitchen Quiznos Round Table Pizza Rubio’s Fresh Mexican Grill Los Altos Armadillo Willy’s Baskin-Robbins Bumble Chili’s

OWN SMOKING RULES !CCORDING TO THE STAFF REPORT #AMPBELL #UPER TINO -OUNTAIN6IEW 3ARATOGAAND ,OS 'ATOS HAVE ALL ADOPTED ORDI NANCESTHATBANSMOKINGINCERTAIN PUBLICAREAS /N 4UESDAY THE COMMITTEE HAD FEW RESERVATIONS 7ITHIN HALF AN HOUR MEMBERS AGREED THAT THE SMALL PARKSSMOKINGBANISTHEWAY TOGOANDRECOMMENDEDTHATTHEFULL #ITY#OUNCILPASSTHEORDINANCE h)N PRINCIPLE ) LIKE THE IDEA OF BEINGALITTLEMOREASSERTIVEONTHIS ITEM v0RICESAIDMINUTESBEFORETHE VOTEN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

Counseling

(continued from page 3)

WASAPPROVEDBY'UNNDEPARTMENT HEADS )M WORRIED ABOUT WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE SECOND YEAR AC TIONPLANMEETSRESISTANCEWITHINTHE SCHOOLCOMMUNITY h7ERENOTGOINGTOGETCOMPARABLE SERVICES AND OUTCOMES WITH 0ALY UNLESS WE GO THE FULL DISTANCE 7E NEEDTHEBOARDANDDISTRICTLEADERSHIP TOREALLYHOLD'UNNACCOUNTABLE AND )MTALKINGVERYCOLLECTIVELY h7E CANT TAKE THE EASY STUFF ANDLEAVETHEHARDSTUFF7ENEED TOBEHELDACCOUNTABLETOACHIEVE THIS v"ALSOMSAID $IRECTOROF3ECONDARY%DUCATION -ICHAEL-ILLIKENSTRESSEDITWASNO SMALL TASK FOR THE  WIDELY DIVER GENTMEMBERSOF'UNNS'UIDANCE !DVISORY#OMMITTEETOREACHCON SENSUS ASWELLASTOEARNTHEhFULL SUPPORTv OF 'UNNS ACADEMIC DE PARTMENTHEADS 4HE ADVISORY COMMITTEE INCLUDED STAUNCH DEFENDERS OF 'UNNS TRADI TIONAL STYLE COUNSELING PROGRAM AS WELLASHARSHCRITICSOFTHEPROGRAM WHOFORTWOYEARSHAVEURGED'UNNTO ADOPTA0ALY STYLEhTEACHERADVISORYv MODEL4HATMODELUSESMORETHAN TEACHERSTOAUGMENTASMALL FULL TIME COUNSELING STAFF ENABLING MONTHLY SMALL GROUPMEETINGSWITHADVISEES !T4UESDAYSMEETING 'UNNAND 0ALY ADMINISTRATORS TOLD THE BOARD THEYVESHAREDIDEASONHOWTOIM PROVE THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNSELING PROGRAMS"UTBOARDMEMBER-E LISSA"ATEN#ASWELLSUGGESTEDTHEY GO FURTHER CREATING A SHARED WEB SITEINTHEAREAOFCOLLEGEANDCAREER INFORMATIONANDALSOPOSSIBLYINTHE AREAOFPARENTEDUCATION 3TUDENTS AT 'UNN AND 0ALY ARE LIKELYTOHAVEEXACTLYTHESAMEQUES TIONSINTHOSEAREAS SHESAIDN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

Corrections The Feb. 22 article “Plans to transform California Avenue win praise� incorrectly stated the year the streetscape project officially began. The streetscape plan was proposed in 2006 by the California Avenue Area Development Association. Also, in the March 15 cover story on robots, the general manager for RoboteX was misidentified. His name is Eric Ivers. The Weekly regrets the errors. To request a correction, contact Editor Jocelyn Dong at 650-223-6514, jdong@ paweekly.com or P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302.


Upfront

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

HP increases dividends to stockholders (EWLETT 0ACKARD TODAY ANNOUNCED THAT IT WILL RAISE THE QUARTERLY DIVIDENDITPAYSOUTTOSHAREHOLDERSBYPERCENT TOCENTSPER SHARE(Posted March 21, 9:55 a.m.)

East Palo Alto schools seek new superintendent Courtesy of the Peery family

3OMEMEMBERSOFTHE0EERYFAMILYINAPHOTOTAKENIN

Donor

(continued from page 3)

MARKET4HEATRE 4HE GYM PROJECT WOULD INCLUDE AMONGOTHERFEATURES ANEWWRES TLINGMULTI PURPOSE ROOM POOL LOCKERROOMSANDANEWDANCEAND YOGAROOM h4HIS WILL CHANGE NOT JUST THE PHYSICALLANDSCAPEBUTTHEFEELINGON THECAMPUSAT0ALYFOREVER v7INSTON SAIDh)TISSOMETHINGWENEEDAND COULDNOTBEMORETHRILLEDABOUTv $AVE 0EERY SAID THE LEASE LEASE BACK ARRANGEMENT ˆ A LEGAL ALTER NATIVETOCOMPETITIVEBIDDINGUNDER THE #ALIFORNIA %DUCATION #ODE ˆ WOULDFACILITATEAHIGH QUALITYAND SPEEDYCOMPLETIONOFTHEPROJECT 0LANSCALLFORGROUNDBREAKINGIN *UNEANDOCCUPANCYBY!UGUST  WITH ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES OPERATING OUT OF PORTABLE CLASSROOMS DURING CON STRUCTION h7EFELTTHATSINCEWEARECONTRIB UTINGTHEMAJORITYOFTHEFUNDSTOTHIS PROJECTTHATITMADETHEMOSTSENSE TOTAKETHISAPPROACHANDMAKESURE ITGETSDONERIGHT v0EERYSAIDOFTHE LEASE LEASEBACKMETHOD "UT HESAID h7EDONTHAVEANY PRICINGYET ANDTHESIZEOFTHECON TRIBUTION AND HOW IT WILL ALL COME TOGETHERISSTILLUNDERDISCUSSIONv 0EERY FAMILY MEMBERS WERE AMONGTHOSEWHORECENTLYPARTNERED WITH0INEWOOD3CHOOLIN,OS!LTOS (ILLSTOBUILDAGYMNASIUMON&ABI AN7AYIN0ALO!LTOFORUSEBY0IN EWOOD FROMWHICHTWOOF2ICHARD 0EERYSFOURCHILDRENGRADUATED .EITHER 2ICHARD 0EERY NOR HIS TWO CHILDREN WHO WENT TO 0ALY PLAYED VARSITY ATHLETICS ALTHOUGH HISGRANDSONPLAYS0ALYBASKETBALL AGRANDDAUGHTERPLAYSLACROSSEAND HISSISTERWASA0ALYCHEERLEADER h)TSNOTREALLYABOUTSPORTSORATH LETICSPERSE v$AVE0EERYSAID h4HISISMUCHMOREABOUTPROVID INGBALANCEINTHELIVESOFOURBUSY YOUTH !DDITIONALLY THESE FACILI TIESWILLBEAVAILABLETOTHEBROADER COMMUNITYv 4HE 0EERY FAMILYS HISTORY IN 0ALO!LTODATESTOWHEN$AVE 0EERYS GRANDFATHER 4AYLOR 0EERY ARRIVEDAT3TANFORD5NIVERSITY RUN NING AN ORANGE JUICE COMPANY TO SUPPORTHISSTUDIES

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!SEARCHFIRMISSEEKINGAREPLACEMENTFOR2AVENSWOOD#ITY3CHOOL $ISTRICT3UPERINTENDENT-ARIA$E,A6EGA WHOHASANNOUNCEDSHE WILLRETIREIN*UNE4HE+ DISTRICTEDUCATES CHILDRENONSEVEN CAMPUSESIN%AST0ALO!LTOANDEASTERN-ENLO0ARK (Posted March 21, 9:50 a.m.)

East Palo Alto police bust duo for gun arsenal %AST0ALO!LTOAND-ENLO0ARKPOLICEARRESTEDTWOMENINCONNEC TIONWITHAGUNARSENAL POLICESPOKESWOMAN/FFICER6ERONICA"ARRIES SAID4UESDAY -ARCH(Posted March 20, 4:14 p.m.)

Baby born on El Camino Real in Palo Alto 4HEPARENTSOFABABYGIRLGOTASURPRISEWHENTHECHILDWASBORNAS THEYDROVEDOWN%L#AMINO2EALIN0ALO!LTOON4UESDAYAFTERNOON 0ALO !LTO&IRE"ATTALION#HIEF$OUG#ONNSAID(Posted March 20, 11:40 a.m.)

ShareThis raises $23M, acquires Socialize 3HARE4HIS THE 0ALO !LTO BASED MAKERS OF THE UBIQUITOUS hSOCIAL SHARINGvBUTTONSONTHEWEB TODAYANNOUNCEDTHATITSECUREDMIL LIONIN3ERIES#FUNDINGANDACQUIRED3OCIALIZE WHICHHELPSTOMAKE MOBILEAPPSSOCIAL(Posted March 20, 9:48 a.m.)

Police arrest East Palo Alto man for cocaine $RUGENFORCEMENTUNITSFROM-ENLO0ARKAND%AST0ALO!LTOPOLICE DEPARTMENTSARRESTEDAMANIN%AST0ALO!LTOON-ARCH AFTERALLEG EDLYFINDINGCOCAINEINHISRESIDENCE(Posted March 19, 9:45 a.m.)

Suit claims high-speed-rail officials ‘misled’ public

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council has no meetings scheduled this week. PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the renovation of the Palo Alto Municipal Golf Course, the redesign of El Camino Park and the new report from the Cubberley Community Advisory Committee. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 26, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the Urban Forest Master Plan and a colleagues memo urging the City Council to direct staff to explore options for prioritizing and monetizing community benefits associated with planned-community zones. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 27, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL RAIL COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to hear updates about recent meetings of the California High-Speed Rail Authority board of directors and the Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board. The committee also plans to hear a report from its Sacramento lobbyist and discuss possible changes to the California Environmental Quality Act. The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. on Thursday, March 28, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

*UST WEEKS AFTER #ALIFORNIAS HIGH SPEED RAIL PROJECT WITHSTOOD A COURTCHALLENGEFROMAGROUPOF0ENINSULACITIES THEAGENCYISFACING ANOTHERSUITFROMPROJECTCRITICS WHOARGUETHATTHEAGENCYBUILDING THETRAINSYSTEMHASMISLEDTHEVOTERSANDISACTINGINVIOLATIONOFSTATE LAW(Posted March 18, 4:56 p.m.)

City Council wants public opinion on infrastructure 7HENITCOMESTO0ALO!LTOSAGINGBUILDINGSANDOTHERINFRASTRUC TURE THEREAPPEARSTOBENOSHORTAGEOFPROJECTSTHECITYCOULDTACKLE FIRST(Posted March 18, 9:57 a.m.)

Palo Alto startup sells for as much as $100 million /RCHESTRA THE0ALO!LTO BASEDMAKEROF-AILBOX APOPULARI0HONE EMAILAPP WASBOUGHTBY$ROPBOXFORASMUCHASMILLION(Posted March 18, 9:38 a.m.)

EPA orders NASA to clean up contaminated soil 4HE 53 %NVIRONMENTAL 0ROTECTION !GENCY ON &RIDAY ORDERED .!3!TOTAKEIMMEDIATEANDLONG TERMACTIONSTOCLEANUPCONTAMI NATEDSOILSAT!MES2ESEARCH#ENTERAT-OFFETT&IELD ACCORDINGTOTHE %0!(Posted March 18, 9:36 a.m.)

Simitian sworn in as county supervisor 3ANTA#LARA#OUNTY3UPERIOR#OURT*UDGE*OSEPH(UBEROFFICIALLY SWOREINFORMERSTATE3EN*OE3IMITIANAS3ANTA#LARA#OUNTYSUPER VISORATACEREMONYIN0ALO!LTO 3UNDAY -ARCH (Posted March 17, 12:42 p.m.)

COUNCIL INFRASTRUCTURE COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss reports summarizing objectives for the 2013 baseline infrastructure survey and outlining the infrastructure communication plan and messaging concepts. The meeting will begin at 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 28, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

County grows, with international migration’s help 3ANTA#LARA#OUNTYSPOPULATIONHASGROWNPERCENTSINCE ANDMORETHANHALFTHATGROWTHCANBEATTRIBUTEDTOPEOPLEWHOMIGRAT EDTOTHECOUNTYINTERNATIONALLY ACCORDINGTOTHE53#ENSUS"UREAU (Posted March 16, 2:33 p.m.)

LIBRARY ADVISORY COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the 2013 Performance Report from the Office of City Auditor, hear an update on Library Foundation fundraising activities and room dedications; discuss the library privacy policy; and plan for its joint meeting with the City Council. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 28, in the Downtown Library (270 Forest Ave.). SCHOOL/CITY LIAISON COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss the city’s annual Service Efforts and Accomplishments report and hear an update on the school budget. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, March 29, in the school district headquarters, Conference Room A (25 Churchill Ave.).

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Transitions Maxine Nathanson

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PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL STANDING COMMITTEES CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ********************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL STANDING COMMITTEE AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp

STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The City Council Rail Committee will meet on Thursday, March 28, 2013 at 9:00 A.M. to discuss: 1) CEQA Changes, 2) Rail Committee Guiding Principles Revisions, 3) Grade Separation Issues, and4) Below Grade Alternatives. The Council Infrastructure Committee will meet on Thursday, March 28, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. to discuss: 1) April 2013 Baseline Survey, 2) Interim Communication Plans and Messaging Concepts, and 3) Project Update and Grant Applications that may offset the cost of Infrastructure Projects. The School/City Committee will meet on Friday, March 29, 2013 at 8:30 A.M. at the PAUSD OfďŹ ces to discuss: 1) City Annual SEA Report.

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Inspirations

a guide to the spiritual community

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC

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This Sunday: Singing and Shouting Required Rev. David Howell preaching Easter Worship at 9:30 and 11:00 on March 31 Egg Hunt for children between services

ST. ANN ANGLICAN CHAPEL A TRADITIONAL E PISCOPAL

CHURCH

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Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

Jon R. Stephens

May 26, 1942 - February 15, 2013 My father, Jon Stephens, died on February 15, 2013 at his new home in PaciďŹ ca, California. Born in Great Falls, Montana in 1942, he was 70 when he died. He lived in Palo Alto for 42 years. It seemed that dad hurt his back in the move to PaciďŹ ca and so he lived most of his last two months in his new master bedroom. His bed room view of an unimproved hillside reminded him of Ryan Dam, his beloved childhood home on the Missouri river some 15 country miles outside of Great Falls, Montana (his father, Oscar Stephens, was an engineer at the dam’s power plant). The back pain, we later learned, was actually caused by small cell carcinoma, a rare and brutal treatment-resistant cancer. Two of dad’s favorite activities as a child were pushing large rocks off the cliffs below the falls at Ryan Dam and searching for Native American artifacts. At the time there were eleven small residences at the dam. He grew up in the tenth, but it and several others have since been destroyed. Memories of the tiny home live on in myriad form in the powerful artwork of his older brother Keith E. Stephens, a San Diego artist. Dad graduated from Great Falls High School in 1960 then got his BA in mathematics and philosophy from the University of Chicago. He moved to Palo Alto to pursue a career in educational publishing and later studied graduate

statistics at UC Berkeley. After semi-retiring from a career in publishing he both volunteered and worked tutoring children, teens and adults in all levels of math. He had a gift for simplifying the complex, and occasionally, when working with teens or adults, would teach an entire course in geometry or calculus with just a notepad and pen. Dad loved math, coffee good and bad, Joan Jett, sharp writing, Nero Wolfe mysteries, and all things Montana. When I was a boy he coached several of the soccer teams that I was on, and though he probably wasn’t a very good coach I never cared and have always loved him dearly for his efforts. When I attended law school he took a semester or two himself through an online school so that he could better understand what I was learning and experiencing. Dad served in the Vietnam War, and was able to return to Vietnam as a tourist last year. He had no religion but found camaraderie in the Palo Alto Humanist Community. Until he died he was the editor of the Humanist Community’s monthly newsletter. Jon Stephens is survived by Marie, his dear wife of nearly 43 years; his only child Mike, an attorney, and Mike’s wife Tala; two grandchildren whom he adored, Jezreale and Casandra; his 80-year-old brother Keith; and Keith’s extended family. PA I D

OBITUARY

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Editorial High school counseling reforms inch forward Lack of district leadership continues to impede progress on bringing high school guidance programs to ‘comparability’ or those who don’t have kids in the schools or don’t carefully follow the nuances of school policy and governance, it must seem surreal that the subject of high school counseling is still an unresolved and controversial topic in this community.

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Surely, after establishing it as a district priority two years ago, and then agreeing last June to give Gunn the time to form a committee of parents, staff and students to develop recommendations for its program, there would be a clear understanding of goals, metrics and the lens through which high school counseling options would be evaluated. But sadly, we are still mired in a leadership vacuum that persists in spite of the school board’s growing frustration and impatience. As one board member after another asked Tuesday night in various ways, how can proposed changes to the high school counseling programs be evaluated by the board and community if there is not yet an overall common mission, goals and metrics for the district? And if the one firm requirement that the board agreed to almost a year ago was “comparability” of counseling services between the two high schools, how is it possible that the district staff has not yet developed a definition of comparability to guide the work being done? The astonishing answers, proferred Tuesday by Associate Superintendent Michael Milliken and Superintendent Kevin Skelly, were that they decided to defer that work until after Gunn had developed its recommendations, and that, according to Skelly, the staff is “struggling with defining comparability.” It is but another indication of a disconnect between the expressed wishes of the school board and the actions of the superintendent and his lieutenants, and the result is a process that is upside down, grossly inefficient and a set-up for frustration and further discord. Teams at both Gunn and Paly have been working hard to analyze and develop plans and tactics for improving their counseling program without knowing what the overarching common strategy is for the district other than a still-to-be-defined concept of “comparable services and outcomes.” District administrators seem as determined as ever to deflect responsibility and accountability for policy development to the school sites, even when the board takes the unusual step of directing the formulation of common, district-wide policy and goals. No well-functioning organization develops tactics, programs or products without having first determined strategies and goals, yet that is exactly what has been taking place regarding high school counseling for the last two years. Administrators told the school board this week they wouldn’t be able to return with proposed common district counseling goals and metrics until early fall. Yet by then the Gunn and Paly staffs will be well on their way to implementing changes to their counseling programs. Regardless of what one thinks about the different counseling models at the high schools, this is an absurd way to operate a unified school district, and we are pleased to see board members express their frustrations more openly than they have in the past. The community owes thanks to the Gunn counseling advisory committee, which worked hard and under the challenges of a consensus decision-making model came up with 40 recommendations aimed at giving students expanded counseling opportunities. These recommendations, if fully implemented, should increase the number of connections Gunn students have with an adult on campus, one key goal expressed by many in the community. The Gunn staff, put under severe time pressure to report this week for no apparent reason, drafted an implementation plan that all agree needs more work and that wasn’t ready for board discussion. Over the next few weeks, at the request of the board, the Gunn staff will develop a clearer presentation on how and when it proposes to implement the recommendations over a three-year time period, the metrics for success and an outline for who will be accountable for the work. To its credit, the board made clear that it doesn’t want a rushed, partial plan from Gunn, but one that makes clear to the community exactly how the Gunn counseling system will be changing. In the continued absence of a clear district policy on counseling, that is, unfortunately, about the best we can hope for. Page 16ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…ÊÓÓ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Sidewalk trip hazards Editor, We have a rental unit in San Francisco. Last year we had a notice from the city that trip hazard heights had to be under a half inch. This year the city modified the trip factor height to a quarter inch. What is our objective for trip hazard height for Palo Alto? I’ve had two falls on sidewalk trip hazards in Old Palo Alto in the last year. I decided to do a little study on the trip factors in my neighborhood. I used the more lax half-inch measurement to identify trip hazards for the blocks where I take my daily walks between Emerson Street, Churchill Avenue, Cowper Street and Seale Avenue. That area contained a total of 31 blocks and, testing both sides of each block, 62 sidewalk segments. I found 10 (about 16 percent) segments with NO trip hazards, and 52 (about 84 percent) segments WITH trip hazards. It’s not only dangerous for walking, it’s incredibly difficult for people with walkers or wheelchairs. I tried going on walks with my mother who was using a walker two times, and concluded that it was way too risky for her. Is this what we want for walkers and people using walkers in Palo Alto? Is the city prepared for the liability that this situation will create? I don’t think so. Laura Cory Emerson Street Palo Alto

Address parking issues Editor, I am writing to urge the Palo Alto City Council to further consider the Palo Alto parking situation. I believe it is at a stage that is starting to affect public safety. This goes beyond the intrusions of business employees parking in our neighborhoods. The neighborhoods and the downtown are now full with irate drivers hunting for nonexistent spaces and pedestrians trying to avoid being hit by those drivers as they compete for a shrinking number of spaces. Please consider what I believe to be an issue that is affecting Palo Alto as a whole. Chris Pickett Ramona Street Palo Alto

What schools need Editor, I am appalled that the president of the Santa Clara Board of Education and the board appear to be biased against public education and for the expansion of charter schools. I also found no evidence that the president has credentials, experience or training in the field of education. Free public education was first established in the 17th century in this country and has continued to educate all our children to this day. Every child is accepted, regardless of his/her condition or circumstance. None are excluded. It is the

genius of this concept that has made our country great, leading to countries around the world seeking to copy our methods and success. No large institution is without problems, nor the necessity to work to solve them. Nevertheless, the current effort to privatize public education is not the answer. Clearly, studies have shown that charter schools as a whole are no better, and are often worse, at improving performance. Public education is increasingly underfunded in our state. If billionaires and others are truly interested in better educational results, they should see to it that underperforming public schools get the resources, including new methods and techniques, and the highly trained teachers they need to accelerate progress. I hope that both the president and the board will work to see that all the children have what is needed to succeed. Mae Stephen Sand Hill Road Palo Alto

A phone-less future Editor, As the parent of a phone-less, Facebook-less eighth grader, I would like to thank Marc Vincenti for his heartbreaking description of life at Gunn

(“Hidden bruises, safe schools”). I applaud his courage in even proposing a phone-less school day. I think it would be liberating, for all the reasons he details. Sadly, I bet that this would be a rare issue on which parents and teens would unite – they will never agree to a day without a phone. No matter how numerous or how deep the wounds are that Mr. Vincenti so poignantly describes. Suzanne Jacobs South Court Palo Alto

Where are the flowers? Editor, We support the California Avenue beautification project, but see no mention of flowers. Every beautiful town in the world has one or more live flower displays decorating their roadways. Mountain View’s Castro Street has them, as do many restaurants, retail stores and industries. Sculpture success depends on the taste of the beholder but everyone loves flowers. I know flowers are more trouble to maintain, but in our view they’re definitely worth it. Gary Breitbard Jena Rauti San Jude Avenue Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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How would you fix downtown parking problems?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.


Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

On Deadline When ‘bullying’ in a Palo Alto school became a federal civil-rights case by Jay Thorwaldson ince “bullying” recently became a federal case in Palo Alto schools, with a scorching indictment under a “denial of civil rights” report last December, there has been an eruption of commentary on the topic in the Town Square forum at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Everyone seems to have an opinion, many conflicting, on the topic. News stories reported in detail on the 10page report from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, Region IX (California) late last year — once the report became public through no action by the Palo Alto Unified School District or Board of Education. The report, oddly, was dated Dec. 26, 2012 — the day after Christmas. Someone worked long hours on it. It is a compelling read, available at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/ pivot/?CivilRightsReport. Also available is an agreement quietly signed by Superintendent Kevin Skelly in mid-December, outlining steps the district will take to tighten its anti-bullying/harassment efforts, training and overall response: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/ pivot/?CivilRightsAgreement. It took the initiative of the student’s parents and the Weekly to dig out the agreement, of which school board members weren’t aware when it was signed. It raises last year’s question of “transparency is as transparency does,” at the time relating to non-public emails between Skelly and board members.

S

The report details a difficult case of a student who was subjected to repeated and long-term harassment by other students, whose names were known. It outlines some of the efforts made by school officials to respond and ease the situation. It reflects the frustrations of the student’s family that ultimately led them to transfer the student to another school. But what hasn’t been covered, other than in some indirect references, is the serious and long-lasting damage bullying can do to someone, the emotional and psychological scarring that literally can alter the person’s life. Setting aside some of the “just get over it” sentiments expressed in the mostly anonymous online-forum comments (hmm, from a former bully?), the effects can be real and last for decades. They are not just hurtful and cruel passing jabs. Bullying isn’t new. It was around when I was in grade school in Los Gatos more than a half century ago. And it’s been a topic in Palo Alto for well over a decade. In 2001, Jonathan Angel, a former communications student of mine at Stanford University circa 1977, wrote a candid guest opinion for the Weekly detailing his Palo Alto ordeal as something of a different kind of kid. It’s worth reading, at www.paloaltoonline. com/weekly/morgue/spectrum/2001_Mar_14. GUEST14.html. His column followed announcement in February 2001 of a new anti-bullying program in schools, spearheaded by the Northern County Juvenile Officers Association. “I appreciated reading about this training program, but I must confess that my first reaction was selfish, as in: ‘Where were you guys 30 years ago?’ “That’s because I was bullied throughout my Palo Alto childhood. It started at Walter Hays,

reached a peak at Jordan and continued on at Paly. It changed my life, just as San Jose Police officer Curtis Reeves warned attendees at his February training session. “At Walter Hays, I merely paid the price for being a fat, bookish, unathletic boy who was often put in charge of the film projector or the ‘science closet.’ “At Jordan, however, the abuse was as constant as a hailstorm, and went way beyond the usual ‘don’t pick him for our team’ jibes. From day one, I was reminded that I was subhuman,” he wrote. “Only those who have been the victim of bullying truly understand the feeling of ‘having no place to go.’ ... I withdrew from classes I had really enjoyed taking, such as art and journalism, because there was no protection there from my abusers. My lack of interest in sports and physical expression was compounded. Only in Latin and advanced-placement courses could I find the safe company of fellow misfits.” Teachers were mostly unaware of the situation, except for one: “Jordan’s extraordinary coach, Mark Christine, tactfully tried to protect me and develop my limited skills in P.E.” Bullying waned in college, but by then “I’d learned to become invisible. The message I’d absorbed was: ‘Put your head up, raise your hand, ask someone out, be remembered in any way and you will be hurt.’ These feelings of being apart from, and less than, other people took a lot of time and therapy to shake. “If this sounds like a litany of self-pity, it’s not meant to. The kids who bullied me weren’t bad; they merely took their own insecurities out on an easily identifiable victim.” Now, more than 40 years hence, Jonathan sees a broader perspective, and recognizes his own role in the complex dynamic between bul-

lies and bullied. “Each of us can be our own strictest jailer and critic,” he said of his acute sense of apartness, in a telephone chat this week. He said it took until his late 40s before he felt completely free of the effects of childhood bullying, long after his graduation from Stanford and after a career in written communications. He also notes that it “really speaks to our luck and our privilege (in Palo Alto) to be able to even speak about bullying, when there are districts where all the kids are gang members.” “It’s part of an unfortunate mix. But I will emphatically say bullying leaves a mark much longer than it’s generally recognized.” Yet, he adds, “I still do not forgive the bullies and I do not forgive the system for bullying being more tolerated then.” In 2004-05, Barron Park Elementary School implemented an anti-bullying program based on the “Steps to Respect” curriculum of Seattle-based nonprofit Committee for Children. Several other Palo Alto schools have followed. Now Skelly and school administrators are busy responding to the civil rights case: training staff and implementing numerous steps to improve the district’s response. Can bullying be eradicated? I’m doubtful, but it can be minimized through prompt intervention and coordinated, consistently enforced policies — sparing future generations of “different” kids. N Former Weekly Editor Jay Thorwaldson can be emailed at jthorwaldson@paweekly. com with a copy to jaythor@well.com. He also writes blogs posted on the Weekly’s community website, www.PaloAltoOnline.com (below Town Square).

Streetwise

What is your opinion of the proposed ban on smoking in public parks? Asked on Cambridge Avenue, Palo Alto. Interviews and photographs by Ranjini Raghunath.

Charlotte Jacobs

Medical oncologist Stanford campus “From a health perspective, the more places you can ban smoking in, the better.”

Jacinta Bouwkamp

Studio coordinator Ash Street, Palo Alto “I think it will be effective; it will definitely keep smokers out of the parks.”

Jeff Frick

Tech executive Old Palo Alto “Smoking is already banned in so many places, I don’t think this will have a significant impact.”

Carolyn Caligiuri

Retiree Menlo Park “I don’t like people smoking in parks, especially dropping their cigarette butts where toddlers can pick them up. I support the ban.”

Taylor Johnson

Swim coach Barron Park, Palo Alto “The ban is understandable; people go to parks to get away from civilization and go back to nature. But without proper enforcement, it will end up just being ‘lip service.’”

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POLICE CALLS Palo Alto March 14-20 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Shoplifting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .3 Lost/stolen plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .8 Vehicle accident/property damage . . . .5 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Sale of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous

Animal call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .2 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Casualty/fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Menlo Park March 14-20 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .2 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/property damage . . . .2 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Accident/no injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Alcohol or drug related Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Miscellaneous Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Possession of stolen property . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Warrant arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Atherton March 14-20

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Theft related Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Bicycle recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Parking/driving violation . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Accident/no injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle/traffic hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Alcohol or drug related Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Distutrbing/annoying phone calls . . . . .1 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Probation violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Property for destruction . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .2

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Unlisted block El Camino Real, 3/14, 1:02 a.m..; domestic violence. Unlisted block El Camino Real, 3/16, 4:42 p.m.; domestic violence/battery.

Menlo Park 1100 block Carlton Ave., 3/14, 11:29 p.m..; domestic battery.

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Cover Story

City’s quest for health care reform stokes tensions with labor unions

PALO I ALTO’S PAINFUL DILEMMA

n 2009, Palo Alto’s elected leaders and top management responded to the financial walloping of the Great Recession by embarking on

a path toward benefit reform. Despite a worker protest in front of City Hall, a one-day strike by the city’s largest union and a brief legal skirmish, the city succeeded in imposing a new contract on the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), 521, which represents about half the city’s workforce. Under the new conditions, union members were forced to chip in for their pensions and health care costs — expenses for which the city had traditionally picked up the tab. Over the next three years, the city negotiated similar concessions with all other labor groups, with the police union last year becoming the latest to adopt a cost-sharing contract. Palo Alto’s economic fortunes have flipped since then, with vacancies in downtown buildings now below 2 percent and sales-tax revenues rising steadily. But the city’s effort to further curb benefits continues. Pension and health care costs are rising at an alarming rate all around the state, recently pushing cities such

by Gennady Sheyner

(continued on page 22)

City of Palo Alto health care expense (medical, dental & vision) $40M

$30M

$27.4 $1.7

$25M

$23.7

$22.9 $21.6 $4.7

$20M

$15.4

$15M

$10M

$5M

$0M

$14.1 $10.0 $1.9

$11.5 $2.4

$12.5

$3.2

$3.6

$16.4

$4.9

$13.2

$3.5

$6.5

$8.2

$10.8

$10.9

$17.3 $15.9 $14.9

$8.1

$9.1

2002Actual

2003Actual

2004Actual

$12.0

$4.2

$2.8

$9.7

$2.3

$2.1

$24.1 $1.6

$2.7 $5.4

$29.0 $1.7 $1.9

$31.8 $1.8

$34.8 $2.0

$10.9

$11.8

$12.2

$13.3

$13.5

$13.7

2005Actual

2006Actual

2007Actual

2008Actual

2009Actual

2010Actual

ACTIVE EMPLOYEES

RETIREE MEDICAL

RETIREE LIABILITY

$14.3

2011Actual

2012Budget

$14.5

201520132014Budget Projected Projected

EMPLOYEE CONTRIBUTION

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Cover Story

What percentage workers pay of their premiums

Percentage of firms offering retiree health benefits*

30%

30%

28% 27%

63% 60%

25%

50%

23% 20%

70%

20%

40%

18% 30%

25%

23%

15%

14%

20%

18%

12% 10%

10% 0%

Public All Non-Profit Private Employers Employers Employers Employers

*Employers with more than 200 workers that offer health benefits to employees

5%

Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2012

0%

Single Coverage

PRIVATE EMPLOYERS

PUBLIC EMPLOYERS

Family Coverage NON-PROFIT EMPLOYERS

ALL EMPLOYERS

Source: Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Benefits, 2012

Easter Brunch at Allied Arts

Benefiting Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford EASTER BRUNCH BUFFET >ÀV…ÊÎä̅ÊUÊÊ££>“Ê̜ÊÓ\Î䫓 `ՏÌÊf{xÊUÊ …ˆ`Ài˜Ê՘`iÀÊ£{ʇÊfÓx Tickets include a photo booth with Easter Bunny, Easter Egg Hunt throughout the property and a delicious brunch buffet.

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Health care

(continued from page 19)

as Stockton, Vallejo and San Bernardino into bankruptcy. Palo Alto is nowhere near that point, and the city intends to keep it that way, City Manager James Keene said in a recent interview. “The reality is out there in the world when you look at the bankrupt cities around the state and their inability to pay their bills,” Keene said. “We keep coming back to the fact that we’re not in that position and we’re not anywhere close to it. That’s because we keep focusing on how to manage these long-term costs and how we will get more savings or more cost-sharing.”

Today, bringing down the city’s health care costs is the highest and most contentious financial priority. Though the city has achieved some concessions since 2009, the City Council remains committed to a broader overhaul of benefits for the hundreds of workers who are covered. Some of the changes may start surfacing by the end of this year, when the SEIU’s contract expires, and next summer, when the police and fire unions are up for new contracts. The topic of employee benefits has been recurring since last July, when four council members — Pat Burt, Karen Holman, Greg Scharff and Greg Schmid — released a memo (continued on page 24)


Cover Story

Veronica Weber

Catherine Elvert, from left, Peter Pirnejad, Khashayar “Cash” Alaee, Brenna Rowe and Tori Anthony stretch before beginning their weekly run with fellow city employees on March 13.

‘Wellness’ E revolution comes to Palo Alto City looks to motivate workers to adopt healthy habits by Gennady Sheyner

very Wednesday, just after work, Palo Alto City Manager James Keene and a group of employees gather in front of City Hall for a little stretching, some casual chitchat and a brisk run through the Stanford University campus. Keene, a marathon runner, instituted the group event about a month ago. Last week, about a dozen workers from different corners of the City Hall bureaucracy turned out: planning, human resources and utilities. Though the run is breezy, casual and open to all, so far it is largely preaching to a choir of established runners. Most of the workers trailing Keene on the sunny afternoon look like they know their way around a marathon course, a weight bench and a winding trail. City leaders hope this will soon change. Like other agencies around the state and across the nation, Palo Alto is now in the midst of designing a broad wellness program geared to provide incentives and opportunities for employees to pick up healthy habits. The City and County of San Francisco has had a citywide wellness program called “Shape Up San Francisco” since 2006. The program includes a walking challenge for employees in the spring, and representatives from all departments

participate. In 2010, the city partnered with organizations such as Weight Watchers and UCSF on health initiatives that include weight loss, stress management and smoking-cessation programs. The city also offers workers biometric-screening events and classes on yoga and Zumba, according to a presentation offered by the city last November. State departments are also ea-

rein in health care costs, which are expected to rise by more than 7 percent annually in the coming years (see main bar). The CalPERS system, which administers the city’s plan, aggregates health care costs among all agencies and does not provide individual cities with information about its employees. Even so, the city is plowing forth out of a belief that promoting wellness is a

‘In the same way we’ve been pushing on how we can be innovative as a city, because that’s the culture, we believe in having a healthy organization.’ — JAMES KEENE, CITY MANAGER, PALO ALTO

gerly pursuing wellness plans, particularly ones targeting preventable chronic conditions, which accounted for 22 percent of the state’s health care spending in 2008, according to Ruth Holton-Hodson from the state Comptroller’s Office. Even a 5 percent reduction in these conditions would save the state $18 million annually, she said at a recent Town Hall meeting on wellness programs. In Palo Alto’s case, the drive for wellness will do little to

noble end with probable benefits. After its Feb. 4 discussion of health care, the City Council passed a motion that directs staff to “identify best wellness practices and health plan benefits that emphasize, teach and reward wellness.” “We plan to proceed with developing wellness programs for their own good and for the benefit of our employees regardless of whether or not we can capture direct cost savings through our health care provid-

ers, which we can’t right now,” Keene said. Wellness programs would include the “whole gamut” of components promoting physical and mental health, Keene said in an interview with the Weekly. The program will be put together in collaboration with employees and will be completely voluntary. “We want to have a healthy organization. We want to have a healthy community,” Keene said. “In the same way we’ve been pushing on how we can be innovative as a city, because that’s the culture, we believe in having a healthy organization.” The Palo Alto Police Department has had such a program since 2004. The voluntary program couples officers with Sequoia Hospital physicians who administer annual tests of fitness, blood pressure, strength and lipid profile; identify risk factors; prescribe exercises; and hold counseling sessions. Officers who participate are allowed to take one hour of onduty time a day for exercise. It appears to be working. In 2003, before the program took effect, participating officers used 897 hours of sick leave in the first and second quarters of the year, according to a city (continued on page 26)

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Cover Story

City of Palo Alto workers in CalPERS health plan ACTIVE EMPLOYEES Health care

(continued from page 22)

sounding alarms about this trend in costs. The council members noted that employee benefits amounted to just 23 percent of salaries in 2002 and to 54 percent in 2010. Today, they account for 63 percent, and in 2022, they are expected to exceed salaries. The city’s benefits, the memo stated, are “reducing the funds available for our community’s necessary and valued services and infrastructure.” Since then, the city has been holding regular meetings to discuss further reforms, with the most recent one, centered on health care, taking place last month. The problem is a sizable one even during financial good times. In 2012, the rising cost of benefits largely wiped out any savings the city had hoped to get through staff cuts and the recent employee concessions. According to employee-compensation data that the city released last month, the city’s spending on employee benefits jumped by 8 percent between 2011 and 2012, canceling out the city’s 3 percent decrease in salary expenditures and leaving the overall spending on employee compensation mostly flat. While pensions and medical costs both contribute to this trend, it is the latter that will likely take center stage in contract negotiations that will kick off later this year. With pensions, the city already took giant strides when it negotiated new contracts with more cost sharing by employees and additional tiers with less generous pension formulas for newly hired workers. The measures seem to be working. According to the new salary data, workers chipped in nearly $1 million toward their pensions in 2012, a balance that would have been picked up by the city in years past. In October, Keene suggested that the city has already “maxed out” on the actions it can take to reduce pension costs under the restrictions of the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), the mammoth fund that administers Palo Alto’s pension and health care programs. Health care, meanwhile, remains a sore subject for budget officials, a painful one for employees and a puzzling one for the council, which is trying to strike the delicate balance between attracting top talent and keeping costs down. The city’s health care costs per employee have

risen from $609 in 2004 to $901 in 2009 to $1,080 in 2012, according to the latest Long Range Financial Forecast, an annual snapshot of the city’s financial situation. The figures are expected to increase by an even faster rate in 2014, when new mandates from the federal Affordable Care Act kick in, raising premiums for the city by an estimated 9 to 10 percent. While formal negotiations with the SEIU are yet to kick off, the city’s early efforts to launch informal conversations with workers about health care reforms have not gone well. After two informal forums on the subject, employees submitted a letter accusing management of ignoring their concerns. The city, the union leaders claimed, “has clearly pre-engineered” the forums so it can “check the box on employee engagement.” The unions also claimed that the city has failed

RETIREES of benefits in the future, we’re going to have to manage costs better and have better cost-sharing or else the results would be much worse,” Keene said in an interview last week. “We can’t just pretend that we can continue on this path that has led a lot of cities toward bankruptcy.”

T

he idea of reforming Palo Alto’s health care system isn’t new. Fresh ideas resurface every few years and typically involve tense bargaining and incremental progress. The city’s last effort, in 2009, resulted in a cost-sharing arrangement for the city and its employees, an agreement under which the city would pay 90 percent of the health care costs and employees (including new retirees) would pay 10 percent (the city had previously footed the entire bill). The contentious reform helped push dozens of

looked attractive when compared to the one offered by the city. When the city chose CalPERS in 1993, its driving philosophy was “providing employees with choice and stabilizing cost,” the Human Resources report states. But the switch came at a price. Agencies participating in CalPERS are governed by the Public Employees Medical and Hospital Care Act, which requires agencies to provide contributions to active employees and retirees on an equal basis. Information the city can obtain about its workers’ health care needs is far more limited now because costs and risks are aggregated among all participating agencies. And the number of health care plans employees can choose from has shriveled from 12 to six since the city joined. In recent discussions, council members have frequently voiced concerns about the many limitations

Health care, meanwhile, remains a sore subject for budget officials, a painful one for employees and a puzzling one for the council, which is trying to strike the delicate balance between attracting top talent and keeping costs down. to answer its questions about how the changes will impact long-term workers and retirees. “All the employee groups question the wisdom and productivity of moving forward with even further changes in benefits when we can’t even get a straight answer about the past change and what they mean for long-term employees,” the union leaders wrote. “Collectively, we believe it will be difficult for any of us to gain support from our members for new benefit changes unless the inequity in retirement medical that was created by the last round of changes is resolved.” But from management’s perspective, health care reform is the only option for keeping the city’s finances in order. Last year, the council kicked off a series of meetings aimed at exploring options for reducing benefit costs. With pension reforms already in effect, health care is next. The city is exploring a range of options, including raising the employee portion of the burden and creating new plans that give the city more flexibility in managing costs. “To really protect the availability

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midlevel managers and other senior employees to retire to avoid the reduced benefits and prompted a protest and a one-day strike from SEIU, the city’s largest union and the first to deal with the benefit concessions. The city ultimately imposed the reduced benefits unilaterally. These reforms, however controversial, were far less drastic than the ones the city had considered in the more distant past and the one it plans to explore in the near future. For many decades, Palo Alto administered a self-funded health plan that provided retirees (though not their dependents) with medical coverage. According to a recent report from the Human Services Department, this changed in the 1980s, when the cost of providing this coverage shot up by about 50 percent over a threeyear period, forcing the city to seek alternatives. That’s when Palo Alto joined dozens of other California cities in signing up for CalPERS, the fund that now provides health care coverage to 1.3 million people. At the time, CalPERS rates were rising by about 6.2 percent annually, a relative bargain, and its 12 different plans

that the CalPERS system imposed on the city, with Larry Klein saying that the system in some ways “straight jackets” the city. And Liz Kniss, a leading proponent of wellness programs, bemoaned the fact that CalPERS doesn’t provide cities with information on offering incentives for wellness programs. She called these programs “one of the most promising areas in the whole sphere” of health care. “I’m disappointed that CalPERS doesn’t provide that kind of information. This is the kind of thing that makes an enormous difference in employees and in costs over the long run,” Kniss said at the council’s Feb. 4 discussion of health care reform. Even so, CalPERS remains the only viable alternative for the city. An attempt by Palo Alto and other cities to start a health care cooperative about five years ago fizzled when costs proved too high. Today, buying insurance on the open market remains cost prohibitive because of the city’s large number of expensive retirees. And the city’s risk is compounded by the fact that if it leaves CalPERS, it would not

be allowed to return to the system for five years. Faced with these limitations, Palo Alto has spent the last decade babystepping toward reform. In 2006, it switched from a five-year vesting schedule for retiree benefits to a 20year vesting schedule, which gradually increases health care benefits based on tenure (after 20 years, the city would pay 100 percent of the cost). Recent cost-sharing measures, which now apply to all unions (though the police union is rebuffing the city’s attempt to apply it to retirees), have also had some effect. In the current fiscal year, Palo Alto’s per-employee cost is expected to actually dip to $1,075 (a decrease of $5 from 2012). But the council and top management all agree that this is not nearly enough. For one thing, medical costs are expected to escalate far faster than the city’s revenues, with estimates ranging from 7 percent to 10 percent. For another, more than half of the city’s health care recipients are now retirees rather than active workers, which means that they get benefits without making any contributions. And while the number of retirees grows every year, the number of active employees stays largely static, making the situation even worse. “We’re in many ways carrying a whole shadow organization that is significantly larger than our active organization,” Keene told the council on Feb. 4, alluding to the retirees.

T

he most significant, and controversial, reform proposal currently on the table is one that would scrap the existing “defined benefit” system, which includes six bulky packages from which employees can choose and which keep the benefits steady even in the face of rising costs. Workers and retirees can currently choose to get their health care through one of two HMOs (health-maintenance organizatoins) — Blue Shield of California and Kaiser — or four PPOs (preferred provider organizations) — PERSCare, PERS Choice, PERS Select and the Peace Officers Association of California, which is only available to public-safety members. What CalPERS lacks, and what the city hopes to offer one day, is a low-cost or high-deductible option for employees who are healthy and would rather not pay for a fullservice plan. This option would be part of what


Cover Story

Health care choices The state’s CalPERS fund offers public employees and retirees plans for health care under a system known as “defined benefit.” The City of Palo Alto is considering offering additional options, called a “cafeteria” plan.

CalPERS defined benefit Includes six packages employees can choose from that keep the benefits steady even in the face of rising costs: two HMOs (health maintenance organizatoins) — Blue Shield of California and Kaiser — and four PPO (preferred provider organizations) — PERSCare, PERS Choice, PERS Select and the Peace Officers Association of California (available only to public-safety members).

are known as flexible “cafeteria plans,” which allow workers to pick the coverage of health care services they need rather than simply choosing a full-service plan. They would also give the city more power to buy only the services its employees need, rather than the ones selected by the CalPERS board of directors. These flexible plans, the thinking goes, would give employees more control over benefits and give the city more control over costs. The latter point is a particularly poignant one for Human Resources officials. During the detailed Feb. 4 discussion, Chief People Officer Kathryn Shen projected that health care will continue to increase at a rate that is 2 to 5 percent above the inflation level. She called this a “sobering thought.” “From a retiree perspective, you’re on a smaller income and your health care costs are going up more than inflation — that’s a problem,” Shen said. “It’s also a problem for the city because that same inflation-plus plan impacts our ability to provide health care.” Liliana Salazar, senior vice president for compliance for Wells Fargo Insurance Cities, the city’s insurance broker, predicted health care costs are expected to rise nationwide by 9 percent on the “lowest end of the scale” and most likely by about 10 percent in 2014, when new mandates from the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare) kick in. Salazar recommended the “flexible plan” as one action the council can adopt to manage these costs. She said many other agencies in California and elsewhere are now working through such changes. “Most agencies are transitioning from a defined structure to a much more flexible structure,” Salazar told the council. The council indicated at the meeting that it supports such a switch and directed staff to consider this option as well as others that “may be considered for negotiation with represented employees and discussion with management employees.” The main barrier for the city is getting employees to buy in, both literally and figuratively. A switch from a defined-benefit plan to a

Cafeteria plan The City of Palo Alto could allow workers to pick and choose coverage of the health care services they need rather than choosing a fullservice plan. That might involve a low-cost or high-deductible option for employees who are generally healthy. The city would buy only the services its employees need, rather than the ones selected by the CalPERS board of directors. These flexible plans would give employees more control over benefits and give the city more control over costs.

flexible plan would be subject to collective bargaining, and so far, employees have been opposed to seeing their recently reduced benefits pared down further. While formal negotiations are still months away, the unions have already made their positions clear. Rather than attend the Feb. 4 discussion, as they were scheduled to do, leaders from the main labor unions sat out the meeting, instead submitting letters that voiced frustration and hinted at future litigation. Employees, in a letter signed by most of the major labor groups, charged the city with ignoring their concerns and proceeding with a predetermined and largely unpopular outcome. Recent efforts by Human Resources officials to discuss the pending changes at forums did little to alleviate these concerns, according to the unions. At two meetings, workers were given a list of benefits and asked to place dots next to those they deem most valuable. Some were allegedly surprised that the issue of “retiree medical,” for many the hottest button, wasn’t on the list until employees requested it. Union leaders also claimed that staff “refused to answer questions” about how long-term employees would be affected by the cafeteria

plan. The forums, the letter stated, “ended with employees overwhelmingly expressing their desire to protect active and retiree medical benefits and leaving employees with no answers to their questions on retirement medical.” “Based on the outcome of recent prior collaborative efforts and the HR statement of a current desire by a very small number of city staff (in leadership positions) to implement a flexible benefit plan, the employee groups are frustrated by the lack of true engagement and lack of willingness to work with us or answer key questions about our promised benefits long-term employees are already vested in,” the letter stated. “Moving forward with a cafeteriatype plan for active employees has the potential to decimate the retirement medical coverage for longterm employees.” Shen and Keene both called the unions’ characterization of staff’s position unfair. Shen told the Weekly that the city hasn’t really started the cafeteria-plan discussion and isn’t sure this is the direction in which the city is going. “No doubt we talked about this as a possibility,” Shen said. “But we don’t have a cafeteria plan in our back pocket. We absolutely know it’s something that would be dis-

cussed in bargaining.” Keene said the initial meetings were an “invitation that HR offered to folks to describe some of the challenges we have and to talk about some of the alternatives.” “Nothing in the process is designed in that setting to drive to solution,” Keene said. Unions, for their part, say they remain committed to helping the city save costs and noted in recent correspondence with the Weekly that they are not currently in negotiations and that there are no formal “proposals” from the city at this point. Brian Ward, one of the SEIU leaders, said that all labor groups have joined together and “have proposed cost savings solutions in the past that were not given serious consideration by the city.” He also said labor groups have “recently requested to begin discussions with the city on ways to reduce expenditures to preserve city services. “We have not received a response from the city to date,” Ward said. He also criticized the city’s early attempts to introduce health care changes at the two employee meetings. “Labor groups did not feel this was productive or collaborative, and we have not heard back from the City on the outcome of those meetings,” he wrote. Sgt. Scott Savage, president of the Palo Alto Police Officers Association (PAPOA), said the union has not received any proposals from the

city for a cafeteria plan but remains “open to exploring any cost-saving opportunities in the area of employee health care costs.” “The PAPOA has supported proposals in the past that would have resulted in significant short- and long-term health care cost savings to the City,” Savage said in an emailed statement on behalf of the union. City officials maintained on Feb. 4 and in recent interviews that no decisions have been made and that nothing will happen until the two sides meet at the bargaining table. Both Keene and Shen said the unions had mischaracterized the city’s early attempts at informal talks about benefit changes. But in a recent interview, Keene made it clear that some change is inevitable. “We’re either going to do some course of looking at greatest costsharing — whether it’s 90-10 becoming 80-20 or whatever — or we can look at something like flexible benefits that give employees more choice and allow cities to focus on how much incremental cost we can provide on our side as a way to manage costs. “I think flexible benefits will have to be a big part of the discussion but not the only thing,” Keene said.

P

alo Alto officials often boast about the progress the city has made toward a balanced budget since 2009, when the Great (continued on page 26)

CITY OF PALO ALTO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council will hold a public hearing at the special Council meeting on Monday, April 8, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. or as near thereafter as possible, in the Council Chambers, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, to Consider Adoption of an Ordinance Amending the Zoning Map to add the Ground Floor Combining District Overlay to the CD-C and CD-S Zoned Properties fronting the 600 Block of Emerson Street. The Planning and Transportation Commission recommend that the Ground Floor Combining District be added to these properties as specified above.

DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC City Clerk ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊ>ÀV…ÊÓÓ]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 25


Cover Story

‘Wellness’

aim to teach, not to punish, Shen said. “It’s more about getting educated about chronic illnesses and how you can live a lifestyle that’s more healthy,� Shen said. While exploring the broader program, staff is also taking a softer approach to promoting healthier habits. Shen leads a walking group every Wednesday at the same time that Keene leads his running group. Newly hired Recreation Manager Lacee Korsten is preparing to launch Tuesday afternoon aerobics classes for employees at Lucie Stern Community Center. And Catherine Elvert, a Utilities Department accounts representative who took part in last week’s City Hall run, is organizing a 5K run in the Baylands on April 27 to promote water conservation. The primary goal is to raise awareness about water resources. But city officials see promoting running as a good secondary goal. “It’s not an ice-cream social,� Elvert said. “We’re getting out to enjoy the outdoors, do something healthy and do some walking and running with family and friends.� N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@paweekly.com.

(continued from page 23)

report. The number dropped to 794 hours in the first two quarters of 2004, when the program was first instituted, and to 518 hours in 2006. “It’s basically preventive maintenance, but instead of a car, it’s someone’s body,� Police Chief Dennis Burns said in a recent interview. “We try to help people be productive and enjoy their experience here, working for the city. We want them to not only stay here, but we want them to be healthy and illness-free.� Palo Alto’s Chief People Officer Kathryn Shen said the city has just started working with the League of Cities, an association of city officials, on setting up a broader program for the entire workforce. It has recently surveyed employees on wellness and hosted its first meeting on the subject last week. Shen, who worked for Kaiser before joining the city, said one major goal is to help people afflicted with obesity, diabetes and other chronic conditions. And while other agencies have mandatory programs and fines for unhealthy habits such as smoking, Palo Alto’s would

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Health care

(continued from page 25)

Recession took a heavy bite out of local tax revenues. But the reforms had one significant unintended effect: They prompted a wave of retirements from some of the city’s long-serving employees and put further pressure on the city’s already precarious health care picture. Today, there are 860 retirees and 844 employees enrolled in the city’s CalPERS health care plans, according to a recent report from the Human Resources Department. The high number of retirees puts the city in a difficult quandary, driving up costs and making a switch from CalPERS to the open market even less feasible. “The city’s ratio of early retirees to actives is so high that it is a barrier to obtaining coverage quotes from the open market, based on input from insurance representatives,� the report states. “Early retirees incur higher health care costs compared to active employees, which insurers specify as a reason to charge higher insurance premiums.� What makes matters worse is that many of these retirees have just left and remain too young to qualify for

Schmid said. “That’s scary.� Palo Alto’s legacy of generous medical benefits has helped fuel this trend. According to Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2012 Employer Health Benefit Survey, public employers generally contribute more and require their employees to contribute less than their counterparts in the private sector. An average employer contribution in the private sector for covered workers with families is $10,704. In the public sector, it is $12,381. Workers in the public sector also tend to use plans with higher premiums, according to the survey, with the employer picking up the lion’s share. For public employers, the average premium in 2012 was $5,997, with the employee paying $698 and the employer paying the rest (in the private sector, the average premium was $5,297, with workers paying $1,053). It is perhaps significant that up until three years ago, Palo Alto footed the entire medical bill, which made it a particularly attractive destination for new employees. “Cities that have the most generous retiree medical benefits act as magnets for employees late in their career, whether they’re ones coming from other jurisdictions or ones coming from the private sector,�

the so-called ‘90/10 plan.’� The biggest concerns come from the city’s longest-serving employees, who have long been banking on having the city fund their health care after retirement. Many are concerned that if active employees accept concessions on health care, these concessions would trickle down to retirees. Hoffman took issue with a recent report from the city, which states that “a few active employees under the 90/10 plan have expressed concern that in the future, the city benefit may be renegotiated to a lower employer contribution, which would flow to retiree medical as well.� “Contrary to the city manager’s suggestion, there are more than ‘a few active employees’ that have expressed their concerns,� Hoffman wrote. “Indeed the number would be much closer to ‘all of them’ — particularly among the city’s longesttenured employees who stand to see their promised retirement benefits eliminated, just as they approach the end of their careers.� Hoffman called the report “little more than a feeble attempt to begin preparing for the anticipated legal challenge.� Management has disputed the union’s claims about predetermined

‘From a retiree perspective, you’re on a smaller income and your health care costs are going up more than inflation — that’s a problem. It’s also a problem for the city because that same inflation-plus plan impacts our ability to provide health care.’ — KATHRYN SHEN, CHIEF PEOPLE OFFICER, PALO ALTO Medicare, a factor that further ups the city’s costs. Of the 860 retired employees, 377 are “early retirees,� according to the report. Things are likely to get worse before they get better. According to Shen, about half of the city’s workforce is set to retire in the next decade, further expanding what Keene called the city’s “shadow organization.� This demographical trend and its grim financial implications pose a particularly tricky challenge for the city council and top management. Councilman Schmid spoke at length about this topic Feb. 4, when he criticized the city’s tendency to hire workers who acquire experience in other cities, join the city at 35 or 40, work for a few years and then retire, saddling the city with retirement benefits for many years. “Why don’t we have younger workers — more younger workers who stay active for longer in the city or go somewhere else to retire?� Schmid asked. “Our financial outlook would be much better.� Schmid observed that as the council proceeded to trim its payroll by cutting positions, it has actually, in a way, made things less efficient. Now, he said, there are fewer active employees who contribute toward health care and more retirees who collect benefits without chipping in. “So if we meet our efficiencies by cutting employees, we are increasing our per-employee costs,�

Councilman Burt said Feb. 4. “To be able to retire with great medical benefits is a real attraction.� Getting retirees to chip in for health care has proven difficult for management. While most unions agreed, after long negotiations, to apply the 90/10 cost-sharing arrangement to new retirees, the police union has resisted this measure. Last year, when the PAPOA signed a new contract with the city, this issue was left conspicuously unresolved. The city and the union are now going through a process to determine whether the city has the right to reduce medical benefits for police retirees — a subject on which the two sides have clashed. Savage said in a statement that when it comes to cost-sharing on health care, the police union believes that “The city is contractually obligated to provide retiree health coverage to those hired before 2006.� “We are currently involved in a fact-finding mediation on this issue,� Savage wrote. “We are optimistic that the neutral fact-finding panel will reach the same conclusion.� The union’s attorney had a more vehement reaction to the city’s recent reform proposals. Peter Hoffmann of the San Francisco-based firm Rains, Lucia, Stern, PC, claimed in a Feb. 1 letter that the city’s focus on employee concessions “raises significant legal challenges� and will “likely perpetuate the gross inequity established under

outcomes and insufficient engagement. At the Feb. 4 meeting, Keene was adamant about the fact that no decisions have been made and that staff has been approaching the unions in good faith and with the understanding that any deals would have to be made through the bargaining process. But he also said that the city is committed to having more cost-sharing between the city and its employees — both active and retired. The drama will play out at the bargaining table in 2013 and 2014. While council members have encouraged staff to hold forums and conduct more outreach in hopes of easing the pain for employees, staff acknowledged at a recent discussion that when it comes to health care concessions, there really is no easy way to have a conversation. “I think the difficulty is going to be that consideration of greater contributions by employees, or sacrifices, are difficult conversations for people to have,� Keene said Feb. 4. “To sort of say, ‘I like that meeting. Let’s do that again’ — it’s not that pleasant.� N Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

About the cover: Illustration by Shannon Corey.


Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

Chloe Day Zilliac and Remi Wolf doing some of their songs at the Riekes Center for Human Enhancement near Menlo Park.

Brand-new blues Paly musicians Remi & Chloe give a fresh spin to classic tunes while crafting original songs Story by Rebecca Wallace. Photographs by Veronica Weber.

Y

ou’d never expect “Billie Jean” to sound so crazy-good sung by two high school girls. Yet here are Remi Wolf and Chloe Day Zilliac wailing away on the old Michael Jackson number, fingers pounding on their guitars. These sweet Paly juniors have a way of breathing brave new soul into a 30-year-old song about a paternity dispute. In between intense playing sessions, the two turn back into regular teens with matching long curls, exclaiming about the

bands their teachers have introduced them to: Deerhunter, Lake Street Dive, Pearl Jam. They’re all youthful enthusiasm, and at the same time they’re all poise. Most of the time, they finish each other’s sentences. “Everybody thinks that we’re like telepathic,” Wolf says. “Having good chemistry on stage is, I think, one of the most important things.” This mixture of talent and chemistry is already getting the pair gigs. They perform sometimes as the acoustic duo Remi

& Chloe, and sometimes with an electricguitar-fueled band called The Extracts. Today, they’re sitting in a recording studio at the Riekes Center for Human Enhancement near Menlo Park, alternately playing and talking about their budding music careers. They’ve been taking classes at the center, studying songwriting, guitar, harmony and theory. They need their enthusiasm to get them through this schedule of music classes, private voice lessons and performances. Oh, and being high

school juniors on the Palo Alto collegeprep track. The two met at Escondido Elementary School. By middle school, they were fast friends, singing for a while in a group called Citrus. Guided by a teacher, they sang upbeat, buttercuppy barbershop songs. They got their first taste of singing harmonies, but they were definitely beginners. (continued on next page)

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Arts & Entertainment

Brand-new blues (continued from previous page)

“Listening back on it now is —” Zilliac begins. “Is kinda painful,” Wolf finishes. By their sophomore year of high school, they were ready to go their own way and formed Remi & Chloe. They’re still young, but their music has a distinct character. Wolf’s powerhouse vocals, all flinty soul, blend deftly with Zilliac’s gentle voice. The use of many distinct changes in dynamics adds drama to their renditions. They both play guitar, and together they have written several original songs to go with their covers, which include Maroon 5’s “Sunday Morning,” Britney Spears’ “Toxic” and Young the Giant’s “Cough Syrup.” Even they find it tough to classify their music. Indie, definitely. Often acoustic, a little bit blues. Some funk, some roots, some jazz. “We started out covering songs that we liked on the radio. Then we decided to write an original song,” Zilliac says. Their first original song, “Carou-

OSHMAN FAMILY OFJCC

DON’T MISS

act at an open-mic, and they have continued to play there. Other venues have included the Britannia Arms in Cupertino and Angelica’s Bistro in Redwood City. They have another concert scheduled at the bistro on May 11. Remi & Chloe have also played at the Awaken Cafe in Oakland, where they thoroughly impressed Sarah Sexton, who books music for the cafe. In her blog, she described them as “confident,” “poignant” and “roaring with the voices of modern blues “Everybody thinks that we’re like telepathic,” says Remi Wolf, right, of her friendship queens.” with music partner Chloe Day Zilliac, left. Earlier this month, the pair performed sel,” seemed to just flow. They wrote song about body image, inspired at the opening of a it together without a lot of effort, and in part by a friend’s sister who had youth art exhibit at the Palo Alto Art it clearly resonates with them. It’s a an eating disorder. “You poor little Center. The girls are always lookchild, afraid to run wild, avoiding ing for new musicians to collaborate your own eyes,” the lyrics go. with, and they were surprised to see “Body image, that’s a really big two guys from school display an unpart of high school,” Zilliac says. expected rapping talent there. WINTER/SPRING “Carousel” was tapped for the “One of them sits behind me in soundtrack of a Castilleja student my history class! We had no idea film, and also drew applause at Red they could rap,” Zilliac says. Rock Coffee at Mountain View, the Besides hoping to collaborate with first place the friends played as a the newly discovered rappers, the duo. That was at an open-mic ses- two aspire to record a six-song EP, sion in September 2011. Red Rock and then a full album. They hope to soon booked them to be the featured keep working together even if they

An Evening with Authors Amy Tan & Louann Brizendine The beloved author of The Joy Luck Club and The Kitchen God’s Wife joins us in a lively interview with Louann Brizendine, M.D., author of The Female Brain and The Male Brain.

D A N C E

don’t go to the same college. “If we don’t go to the same school, we hope to go to ones within 100 miles of each other,” Wolf says. “Boston would be good,” Zilliac says, and Wolf nods. For now, they keep singing and writing, and covering their favorite tunes. At the Riekes recording studio, they break into “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay.” Wolf starts out singing in a low, bluesy voice, accompanied by a simple guitar part from Zilliac. Then suddenly she jumps up the octave, and the song breaks wide open, with fierce strumming on the guitar. Zilliac chimes in with a soft, endearing “Sittin’ here resting my bones ... ” It’s decades-old, but at this moment, the tune is fresh, bold and brand-new. N Info: Remi & Chloe are scheduled to play an hour-and-a-half set starting at 6 p.m. on May 11 at Angelica’s Bistro, 863 Main St., Redwood City. Tickets are $12 online and $17 at the door (dinner or two drinks also required). Go to angelicasbistro. com or call 650-365-3226.

WATCH IT ONLINE

www.PaloAltoOnline.com To watch a Weekly video of Remi & Chloe playing some of their original and cover songs at the Riekes Center near Menlo Park, go to PaloAltoOnline.com. The video was shot and edited by staff photographer Veronica Weber.

®

Transforming lives, one dance at a time. One of the most popular ballrooms in Northern California, this Mountain View studio is open seven days a week Dance Parties on four nights, Thursday - Sunday.

Celebrating four years of great dancing in Silicon Valley! Studio Anniversary - Two Nights! Thursday, March 28

Thursday, April 11 7:30 PM OFJCC Schultz Cultural Arts Hall For more information and to purchase tickets, visit

www.paloaltojcc.org/tanbrizendine. Oshman Family JCC 3921 Fabian Way | Palo Alto, CA | (650) 223-8700 www.paloaltojcc.org/arts

Page 28ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…ÊÓÓ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

8-9pm: Night Club Two Step Class Dancing until 11pm

Saturday, March 30

8-9pm: American Rumba Class Dancing until 1am

$15 in advance on each night. $20 at the door. Buy tickets @ 650.864.9150 or visit www.cherylburkedance.com and click on “Special Events” to pay by PayPal. Guest Instructor Steve Rebello will teach classes for all levels, beginning to advanced dancers. Cheryl Burke Dance Mountain View 1400 North Shoreline Blvd. #A-1, Mtn View © 2010-2013 Cheryl Burke Dance.


Arts & Entertainment

Worth a Look Art

Stanford Art Spaces A New Yorker with a background as a competitive gymnast, a poet, a samba teacher and a Japanese-print enthusiast: That’s painter Nicole Lomangino. After growing up in New York, Lomangino lived in São Paulo and then in the Sunset Dis-

Peninsula artist Nicole Lomangino finds inspiration in the woodblock prints of Japan’s Edo Period. Pictured is “Uzume,” a watercolor painting on paper.

trict of San Francisco. She had long created art to illustrate her poems, but living in an Asian neighborhood led to a new fascination with the Japanese woodblock prints of the Edo Period. She now crafts layered portraits of watercolor, gouache, ink and Japanese yuzen paper. Lomangino’s mixed-media paintings are among the works that will be featured this spring in a three-artist exhibit at Stanford Art Spaces. The show also contains paintings by Michelle Sakhai, whose landscapes can be misty, dreamy and pleasantly surreal. Her “Umbrella Bonsai II,” for example, is a work of oil, gold and copper leaf depicting a tree composed of bright umbrellas. Ink paintings by Chun-Hui Yu will also be on display, filled with calligraphic brush strokes and abstract landscapes. The free exhibit will be up March 29 through May 23 at the Paul G. Allen (C.I.S.) Art Spaces Gallery at 420 Via Palou at Stanford University. Exhibit hours are weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a reception set for April 5 from 5 to 7 p.m. Go to cis.stanford. edu/~marigros or call 650-725-3622.

Music

St. Lawrence String Quartet Stanford University’s resident St. Lawrence String Quartet marks Good Friday for the third year in a row in church — performing

a concert in the grand Memorial Church on campus, that is. Starting at 5 p.m. March 29, the foursome will play Haydn’s “Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross.” The meditative hour-long work, which is broken into seven sections, traces the last hours of the life of Christ. The piece is praised for its tone painting and unusual musical juxtapositions. Haydn originally wrote it as an orchestral work, then reportedly wrote versions for string quartet and piano, and an oratorio adaptation with choral voices. The Stanford performance will be interspersed with readings from the Good Friday service, given by Rev. Scotty McLennan, the dean for religious life at the university. Admission is free. First violinist Geoff Nuttall, violist Lesley Robertson, cellist Christopher Costanza and violinist Scott St. John make up the St. Lawrence String Quartet, which has been in residence at Stanford since 1998. For more about the concert, go to live.stanford.edu.

Cello Joe Call him a beat-boxing cellist, a classicalhip-hop musician or a bicycling tunesmith. He responds to any of those, but mainly to his stage moniker, Cello Joe. Also known as Joey Chang, the rambling musician likes to record himself playing cello right there on the spot with a looper, and then produce what he calls “intergalactic tapestries of harmony, melody and rhythm.” Call it beatboxing, dubstep, folk-rock, throat-singing or all of the above. Then mix it with plucking and bowing the cello, and you’ve got the man’s signature sound. It comes from his days with Palo Alto’s El Camino Youth Symphony, or perhaps from attending Berklee College of Music in Boston. It travels far and wide on his bicycle.

Cello Joe is set to perform a free gig this Saturday, March 23, at Red Rock Coffee in Mountain View. The show starts at 8 p.m. at 201 Castro St. For more, go to redrockcoffee. org or call 650-967-4473.

Books

‘Creative Writing at Stanford’ Stanford University’s creative-writing program has been around since 1946, when the environmentalist writer Wallace Stegner founded it. Thousands of undergrads and Stegner fellows have passed through the program since then, with many locals taking classes from these writers through the university’s continuing-studies program. On April 2, the continuing-studies program presents a panel talk by four luminaries who have been closely involved with creating writing at Stanford. Nancy Huddleston Packer, who was profiled last year in the Weekly, will moderate. The former director of the creative-writing program is also a former Stegner fellow and Stanford professor of English; her fourth collection of short stories, “Old Ladies,” was published last year. Also scheduled for the program is Eavan Boland, the Stanford English professor who currently directs the creative-writing program. Boland will be joined by former Stegner fellows Philip Levine, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and former U.S. poet laureate; and Scott Turow, the best-selling author of nine novels and two nonfiction books on the law. The free event starts at 7:30 p.m. in Cubberley Auditorium at Stanford’s school of education. Go to continuingstudies.stanford. edu for more information.

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Eating Out FOOD FEATURE

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Veronica Weber

by Rebecca Duran

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ShopTalk

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Veronica Weber

Eating Out

#HOCOLATETRUFFLESAT!LEGIO#HOCOLATEIN0ALO!LTO OFTYPESOFCHOCOLATES4HECHOCO LATES!LEGIOCARRIESNEVERHAVELESS THANPERCENTCOCOA4HEMOSTEX PENSIVECHOCOLATETHEYSELL THE PERCENTCOCOAWITHGINGER WASTHE FAVORITECHOCOLATEOFTHELATE3TEVE *OBS HE SAID /THER POPULAR OFFER INGSAREANPERCENTWITHCRYSTAL LIZEDSUGAR ONEMADEWITHORANGE ANDONEWITHhDRUNKENRAISINS vRAI SINSMACERATEDINLIQUOR 0ANAGOSSAIDHASSEENMANYPEO

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PENINSULA

by Daryl Savage

PIAZZA EXPANSION COMPLETE ... A sigh of relief has swept over Piazza’s Fine Foods at 3922 Middlefield Road in Palo Alto’s Charleston Shopping Center. The nearly $2 million, year-long expansion has finally come to an end. The remodel added 4,000 square feet to the grocery store, putting the finished product at 24,000 square feet. “The job turned out to be much bigger than we thought,� said store owner Gary Piazza, who shares ownership with his two brothers, John and Rick. “We moved walls, added refrigeration; we got new freezers (and) new milk cases; and we remodeled our two bathrooms,� he said. The aisles in the store were also transformed. “People were angry about the size of our aisles; they said they were too narrow. So we made them bigger. They are now 6 feet wide, even more in some places,� Piazza added. Another brand-new feature is the burrito bar. “I got the idea from our Hispanic cooks. We’re using their family recipes for some of the items like chicken mole and barbacoa. We’ve had a great response so far and we only opened two weeks ago,� he said. But the success of the grand remodel is bittersweet for Piazza. His father, Sicilian-born John Piazza Sr., who founded the grocery store in 1987, passed away last September. “I only wish my dad was here to see this,� he said. CONTAINER STORE AT STANFORD ... The Container Store has signed on to take over the former Andronico’s Market space at Stanford Shopping Center. The 37,500-square-foot site has been vacant since July 2011 when the highend grocer closed its doors after 14 years. The Container Store, a chain that offers large and small storage and organizational items for its cus-

tomers, is anticipating a fall opening. “We’re about to kick off our grand opening season. We’ve got six new stores opening this year, with the first three in Florida,� spokesperson Nina Smith said. The company has 58 stores in the country. NEW RETAIL AT SAN ANTONIO ... On time and on budget. That’s what spokesman Greg Geersten says when asked about the construction of Safeway in the new Village at San Antonio Center in Mountain View. Scheduled for an April 19 opening, Safeway is the first of about 20 new retailers that will occupy the center, located at the intersection of San Antonio Road and El Camino Real. At 65,000 square feet, “it’s the largest store Safeway does,� said Geersten, who is managing director of the project being developed by San Francisco-based Merlone Geier Partners. In addition to upgraded departments and a large outdoor-seating area, there will be rooftop parking, with space for more than 160 cars. Other retailers that have signed on include Paul Martin’s American Grill, which serves contemporary American classic dishes; The Counter, which has a nearby burger location on Palo Alto’s California Avenue; Jared Jewelers; Fidelity Investments; Sleep Number Bed; Starbucks; and a four-star boutique hotel, with a swimming pool and conference-room facilities; and “an eight- or nine-screen movie theater,� said Geersten. He added that three more restaurants “with well-known chefs� will be announced in the next few weeks.

(EARD A RUMOR ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE STORE OR BUSINESS MOV INGOUT ORIN DOWNTHEBLOCKOR ACROSS TOWN $ARYL 3AVAGE WILL CHECK IT OUT %MAIL SHOPTALK PAWEEKLYCOM

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

Chef Chu’s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Ming’s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

STEAKHOUSE

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Sundance the Steakhouse

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

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The Crood family may not always play it safe, but the (apparently heavily market-tested) movie does.

The Croods --1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) Monty Python alum John Cleese once co-wrote a book called “Families and How to Survive Them.� Given that, I suppose my jaw shouldn’t have dropped, then, to see his co-story credit on the animated adventure “The Croods,� in which a bickering modern Stone Age family daily enthuses, “Still alive!� Nevertheless, Cleese’s name comes as a surprise after an hour and a half, given the degree to which “The Croods� — though set in a world of mortal danger — plays it safe. Writer-directors Kirk DeMicco and Chris Sanders (the latter best known for “How to Train Your Dragon�) carry the rock over the finish line with enough slapsticky action and mild gags to hold kids’ attention. But discerning audience members will wish for more in the plot department and greater courage in convictions. The Croods inclood Grug (Nicolas Cage) and Ugga (Catherine Keener), daughter Eep (Emma Stone), son Thunk (Clark Duke) and feral baby Sandy (Randy Thom). There’s also Grug’s mother-in-law, Gran (Cloris Leachman), and, yes, there’s something meta about telling Stone Age mother-in-law jokes. Grug protects his family with brute strength and, more importantly, reinforcement of “routine and darkness and terror.� His mantra of “Never not be afraid� leads credulous Thunk to say things like “I will never do anything new or different.� Naturally, the curious Eep wants a whole new world, a new fantastic point of view, no one to tell her “no� or where to go or say she’s only dreaming. So one night she steals out of the family cave and, lo and behold, meets Guy (Ryan Reynolds), who’d be a teen pin-up were it not still a time of cave paintings. Not only because he is a guy, the literally evolved Guy represents everything Eep feels she has been sheltered from: ideas, innovation and, in short, “tomorrow.� (The hottie also comes with a cutie, his belt being a live, meep-meeping pet sloth voiced by Sanders.) When it becomes apparent that a fiery extinctionlevel event will soon tear through their homeland, the Croods hitch their survival to fire-bearer Guy, much to Grug’s dismay. Off they go in the direction of a verdant lost world of wonderment, an opportunity to animate crazy-colorful flora and fauna to supplant the rocks and dirt of home. There’s an obvious message here about parental overprotectiveness and a need to step out of that shadow and not allow one’s life to be defined by fear.

The irony is that “The Croods� appears to have been market-tested to within an inch of its life, so despite a theme of finding the capacity to evolve, the picture remains mired in the tar pit of formula. At a key turning point, the picture misses a climactic opportunity to address real-world consequences and inititate some conversation that runs deeper than “I liked the part where they played football with the egg!� Even as it panders to kids, “The Croods� takes care not to offend parents too badly for being behind the times, as there’s also a theme of parental sacrifice and unspoken love, rewarded with hugs all around at the end. It’s just disappointing that “The Croods� feels an obligation to be reassuring and noncommittal, wrapping up with the thought “Anyone can change. Well, sort of.� Rated PG for some scary action. One hour, 38 minutes. — Peter Canavese

Admission --1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) Who doesn’t want the inside track to the brutally competitive college-admission process? At its best, director Paul Weitz’s uneven comedy skewers students, parents and the Ivy League alike over the fat-envelope frenzy endured by so many. But like an applicant’s personal statement gone awry, the Tina Fey vehicle veers from an amusing College Confidential to a judgmental take on single women who choose to have children. The uneasy shift in tone places “Admission� in the “maybe� stack, instead of on top of the “acceptance� pile of must-see movies. Adapted from Jean Hanff Korelitz’s novel of the same title, the narrative focuses on admissions officer Portia Nathan (Fey). Armed with her share of orange folders representing 22,150 hopeful teen applicants — from whom the evaluators will select 1,008 for the Class of 2016 — Portia routinely says that the secret to getting into Princeton is “just be yourself.� And don’t send champagne or baked goods, or call. Portia and colleague Corinne (Gloria Reuben of “Lincoln�) are also competing to replace the dean of admissions (Wallace Shawn) upon his impending retirement. Fey excels at character-driven comedy, whether portraying the quirky “30 Rock� heroine Liz Lemon, whom she created, or stepping into the more sensible shoes of a woman who has spent 16 years recruit-


Movies ing students and reviewing heaps of paperwork. But even Fey can’t overcome the awkwardness of Karen Croner’s screenplay when Portia sleeps with former Dartmouth classmate John Pressman (Paul Rudd of “This Is 40�), who contends that the most gifted student (Nat Wolff) at his alternative high school might be the biological son that she secretly gave up for adoption while in college. What becomes the big reveal at the end of Korelitz’s novel changes the course of the movie at its midpoint. Portia’s orderly life starts to fall apart, particularly when John pushes her to give his prodigy’s application to Princeton an advantage. There’s nothing wrong with the chemistry between Fey and Rudd — and everything is more than right about Lily Tomlin’s showstealing performance as Portia’s no-nonsense, feminist mother. Yet the comedy feels surprisingly flat, considering Weitz’s comic chops as the director of “American Pie� and the more nuanced “About a Boy.� But Weitz has perfect timing when portraying Portia mulling over an application, envisioning the eager high school senior who subsequently plummets through an imaginary trapdoor near her desk when she stamps “reject� on the folder. Thousands of our nation’s best and brightest lead fulfilling lives, despite once being denied entry into the ivy-covered universities of their choice. Nor will the disappointing “Admission� define the future of its talented ensemble cast. Rated PG-13 for language and some sexual material. 1 hour, 57 minutes. — Susan Tavernetti

On the Road --

(Aquarius) Let’s face it: Making a film of Jack Kerouac’s “On the Roadâ€? is something of a fool’s errand, which explains a half-century of aborted attempts. A two-hour movie must conflate the sprawl of the novel’s mileage (and that of the social history it has come to represent), as well as Kerouac’s dense description and singing prose. Under the auspices of executive producer Francis Ford Coppola, screenwriter JosĂŠ Rivera and director Walter Salles at last cinematically retell the tale from Kerouac’s thinly veiled autobiographical novel, published in 1957. In it, Kerouac surrogate Sal Paradise comes to know rule-breaking, drug-taking sexual lightning rod Dean Moriarty as the pair travel with, to and from each other, be-bopping around America and Mexico in the late 1940s. The novel has not so many significant plot points but plenty of personalities based on real people, including Moriarty (Neal Cassady), Carlo Marx (Allen Ginsberg), Old Bull Lee (William S. Burroughs), Marylou (LuAnne Henderson) and Jane (Joan Vollmer). Cumulatively, they help to define a time of shifting social and cultural mores, with men determined to feel (and sow) their oats and women forced to the background, looking for autonomy wherever they can get it in a man’s world.

Rivera and Salles previously collaborated on “The Motorcycle Diaries,� itself based on a famous memoir (that of Ernesto “Che� Guevara), and they’re about as credible a team as one could hope for at the present moment, though certainly more tasteful than Kerouac himself would have liked. With all due respect, Salles made his own pilgrimage following the burnt-rubber tracks of Kerouac and organized a Beat Generation seminar for the actors before hopscotching around Canada, America, Argentina, Chile and Mexico to shoot the picture. The results are hopelessly mixed. Salles’ understated style remains appealing, but it can also be at odds with Kerouac’s romantic vision of “the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones that never yawn or say a commonplace thing but burn, burn, burn like roman candles across the night.� This “On the Road� has more of a dispassionate “fly-on-the-wall� feel. All those who have ever been on a guided tour that went faster than they would like will recognize the frustration of the film’s elision, which necessarily forces the story into unnatural rhythms. With his jazz-influenced approach, Kerouac could make it all right on the page, contracting and elaborating at will, but Rivera and Salles must keep plunging onward. Sam Riley as Sal and Kristen Stewart as Dean’s horny sort-of wife Marylou come off as credible if dull, while Tom Sturridge adds some much-needed passion as pining poet Carlo. Cameos by well-known actors (Amy Adams, Kirsten Dunst, Viggo Mortensen, Steve Buscemi, Terrence Howard) distract, but Garrett Hedlund convincingly holds the picture’s center as Dean, whose high-on-life demeanor here masks an existential panic of aging out of youthful irresponsibility and into adult oblivion. Salles’ “On the Road� arrives at a handsome but reductive decorousness. This pretty period-pictorial companion piece to the novel fatally misses out on the brain-firing raw buzz that Kerouac felt and passed on to his readers, succeeding much more at capturing the novel’s emotional disappointments than its evocation of freedom through sex, drugs, jazz, the written word and unscheduled road-trip adventure. Rated R for strong sexual content, drug use and language. Two hours, four minutes. — Peter Canavese

MOVIE TIMES All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. Admission (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:05 a.m. & 1:55, 4:45, 7:40 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m. & 1:45, 4:55, 7:40 & 10:15 p.m. Argo (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 12:10 & 6:30 p.m. Century 20: 7:45 & 10:30 p.m. The Call (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:45 a.m. & 2:30, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m. & 12:40, 1:50, 3:10, 4:15, 5:30, 6:50, 8, 9:15 & 10:25 p.m. The Croods (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:40 a.m. & 2:25, 3, 5:10, 8, 9 & 10:30 p.m. In 3D 11 a.m. & 12:20, 1:40, 4:10, 6:10, 7 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m. & 12:35, 1:30, 4, 5:35, 6:30 & 9 p.m. In 3D 12:20, 1:20, 3:20, 4:25, 6:25, 7:30, 9:35 & 10:30 p.m. Dial M for Murder (1954) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: 5:30 & 9:50 p.m. Emperor (PG-13) (1/2 Century 20: 2 & 7:10 p.m. Escape from Planet Earth (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 11:40 a.m. & 4:40 p.m. In 3D 2:10 p.m. G.I. Joe: Retaliation (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Tue 7 p.m. Wed 10:50 p.m.; In 3D 10 p.m.

Century 20: Tue 7 p.m.

The Gatekeepers (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:30 a.m. & 2:10, 4:40, 7:25 & 10:05 p.m. Ginger & Rosa (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: noon & 2:40, 5, 7:55 & 10:20 p.m. Identity Thief (R) ((1/2 Century 20: 11:25 a.m. & 4:35 & 9:55 p.m. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (PG-13) (( Century 16: 11:20 a.m. & 1:50, 3:30, 4:20, 7:20, 9:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 12:30, 3, 5:35, 8:05 & 10:35 p.m. Jack the Giant Slayer (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 9:10 p.m. In 3D 6:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m. & 5 p.m. In 3D 2:10 p.m. Life of Pi (PG) (((1/2 Century 20: 1:25 & 7:15 p.m. In 3D 4:20 & 10:10 p.m. No (R) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 2:30, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. Olympus Has Fallen (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m. & 12:30, 2, 3:40, 5, 7:15, 8:20 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 12:50, 3:45, 6:40 & 9:35 p.m. In XD 11:25 a.m. & 2:15, 5:05, 7:55 & 10:45 p.m. On the Road (R) (( Aquarius Theatre: 1, 4, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Oz the Great and Powerful (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:15 & 11:50 a.m. & 2:20, 3:10, 6:05 & 9:20 p.m. In 3D 12:15, 3:20, 7:05 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m. & 2:30, 5:25 & 8:25 p.m. In 3D 12:20, 1:20, 3:20, 4:25, 6:25, 7:30, 9:35 & 10:30 p.m. Quartet (PG-13) ((( Guild Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m. Silver Linings Playbook (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m. & 1:45, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m. & 1:55, 4:50, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m. Snitch (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 20: 7:50 & 10:40 p.m. Spring Breakers (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: noon & 1, 2:25, 3:25, 4:45, 5:50, 7:05, 8:15, 9:30 & 10:40 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Sun 2, 3:30, 4:30, 6, 7:15 & 8:30 p.m. Fri & Sat also at 9:45 p.m. Stoker (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:10 a.m. & 1:35, 4, 7 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m. & 2, 4:30, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m. Vertigo (1958) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri 7:30 p.m. Sat-Sun 3:10 & 7:30 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, theater addresses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

WINNER

ONE OF THE 10 BEST

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE ÂŽ

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

“AMAZING.�

INDEPENDENT FILMS

OF THE YEAR

–A.O. Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES

NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW

THE GATEKEEPERS

Kenneth Turan

ACHINGLY ROMANTIC.

 "       

                     !                           

A FILM BY DROR MOREH

NOW PLAYING

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

CENTURY CINEMAS 16 1500 North Shoreline Blvd, Mtn View (800) FANDANGO

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.GATEKEEPERSMOVIE.COM

ACADEMY AWA RDŽ NOMINEE BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM “WEIRDLY FUNNY AND ROUSING, BOTH INTELLECTUALLY AND EMOTIONALLY.�

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square

-Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

WINNER CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

Fri and Sat 3/22 – 3/23

Spring Breakers 2:00, 3:30, 4:30, 6:00, 7:15, 8:30, 9:45 Sunday thru Thursday 3/24 – 3/28

Spring Breakers 2:00, 3:30, 4:30, 6:00, 7:15, 8:30

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

C.I.C.A.E. AWARD

                           EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, MAR 22 LANDMARK THEATRES AQUARIUS THEATRE 430 EMERSON STREET (650) 327-3241 PALO ALTO

WWW.THEMADONES.US

WINNER BEST PICTURE

HHHHH HIGHEST RATING

-Joshua Rothkopf, TIME OUT NEW YORK

SAN PAULO FILM FESTIVAL

Gael GarcĂ­a Bernal A film by Pablo LarraĂ­n

NOW PLAYING

CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.NOTHEMOVIE.COM

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Sports Shorts

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

A family affair for Tinkle

OF LOCAL NOTE . . . Palo Alto High graduate Allison Whitson, a member of the UC Davis women’s volleyball team, was named one of her school’s two Big West Scholar-Athletes of the Year. She received her honor last week in Anaheim. Whitson was among the male and female representatives from the other nine Big West schools who were recognized for outstanding academic and athletic achievements during the 2012, calendar year. Whitson, a 6-foot-1 outside hitter who completed her senior season this past fall, earned All-Big West first team accolades three times as an Aggie and is ranked among the top five all-time UC Davis players in four career categories. Whitson is majoring in managerial economics, is ranked in the top 15 percent of her class and plans to pursue an MBA after playing professional volleyball in Europe. Besides the Big West Scholar-Athletes of the Year, UC Davis was well-represented on the Big West’s Scholar-Athlete roll. A total of 121 student-athletes, representing all the conference sports, were named to the list for outstanding academic achievement . . . Another UC Davis senior, Kevin Meisel of Atherton and a Sacred Heart Prep grad, was a recipient of Western Water Polo Association’s Men’s All-Academic honors for the past fall season.

ON THE AIR Friday College baseball: Utah at Stanford, 7 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Saturday Men’s basketball: Stanford at Alabama, 9 a.m.; ESPN; KNBR (1050 AM) College baseball: Utah at Stanford, 2 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Sunday

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

J

oslyn Tinkle’s NCAA experience actually started two days earlier than her teammates. She was sitting in the stands Thursday night when No. 13 seed Montana and No. 4 seed Syracuse battled

in the second round of the men’s NCAA tournament at San Jose’s HP Pavilion. Tinkle’s own NCAA tournament journey, her final trip through March Madness as a Stanford women’s basketball player, begins Sunday when the fourth-ranked and top-seeded Cardinal (31-2) meets visiting Tulsa (17-16) in the opening round of the women’s tournament at Maples Pavilion at 2:20 p.m., to be televised on one of the many ESPN platforms. “I have mixed emotions,” Tinkle said. “This is it. There are only six

Stanford senior Joslyn Tinkle (44) will be keeping watch on her father’s team and sister’s team in the men’s and women’s NCAA tournaments while trying to help the Cardinal reach another Final Four over the next few weeks.

(continued on page 38)

MEN’S BASKETBALL

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

Stanford keeps NIT title hopes alive

Pinewood takes shot at sixth state crown

by Rick Eymer

S

(continued on page 39)

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by Rick Eymer espite suffering back-to-back losses in the new Open Division of the Central Coast Section basketball playoffs earlier this month, Pinewood girls’ coach Doc Scheppler has to be a big fan of the new addition to the postseason playoffs. Brookside Christian, which won the CIF Division V state championship last season, moved up to the Open Division this season and removed a big hurdle in the way of anyone harboring D-5 title hopes. “We were EXTREMELY fortunate that Brookside Christian was moved up to the Open Division,” said Scheppler. Had Brookside Christian remained in Division V, it’s quite possible Pinewood would not be in Sacramento at Sleep Train Arena on Friday morning playing for its sixth state championship. To that, Scheppler tips his cap to

D

tanford against Alabama. It was the perfect matchup the Cardinal wanted — during football season. That likely would have meant Stanford was playing for a national championship. This Stanford-Alabama matchup is decidedly different. The only eventual title at stake will be in basketball’s Postseason National Invitation Tournament for either team. It will be either the Cardinal or the No. 1-seeded Crimson Tide rolling in that direction following Saturday’s second-round matchup in Alabama at 9 a.m. (ESPN). “As far as looking forward to Alabama, once again they’re a good team,” said Stanford’s Dwight Powell. “Every year is a different year. We’re in this tournament and we’re going to try to win it.”

Grant Shorin/stanfordphoto.com

College baseball: Utah at Stanford, 1 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM) Women’s basketball: Tulsa at Stanford, 2:20 p.m.; ESPN2; KZSU (90.1 FM) Tuesday Women’s basketball: NCAA second round at Stanford, 6:30 p.m.; ESPN2; KZSU (90.1 FM)

by Rick Eymer

Don Feria/isiphotos.com

QUITE A SPLASH . . . Stanford sophomore Kristian Ipsen won the platform event and Stanford secured an unprecedented four divers into the NCAA Championships to wrap up the NCAA Zone Diving Championships last Saturday hosted by Air Force at Cadet Natatorium. Ipsen was one of three Cardinal divers to finish in the top five off the platform, winning the event with 856.60 points. Arizona State’s Rafael Quintero (828.25) was second. “This was our greatest meet in over 35 years,” Stanford diving coach Dr. Rick Schavone said. “Kristian was great in all events and still not fully rested, but the team effort was exceptional. I absolutely could not be more proud of how Connor (Kuremsky), Noah (Garcia) and Taylor (Sishc) competed. Four men qualifying for the NCAAs is unbelievable.”

Stanford senior will watch her dad and maybe face her sister

Stanford junior Dwight Powell had 12 points and 15 rebounds in a 58-57 win to open the Postseason NIT this week.

(continued on page 36)


PREP ROUNDUP

COLLEGE ROUNDUP

Palo Alto baseball on a roll

Stanford gets back to work Cardinal baseball hosts Utah, softball on road, swimmers at NCAAs

Vikings win their sixth straight while staying tied for first in division by Keith Peters fter having six different pitchers take the mound in Monday’s nonleague baseball win at Menlo School, Palo Alto coach Erick Raich could have paraded the same six on Wednesday against host Gunn. Raich, however, went with only one and that was plenty as senior Rohit Ramkumar limited the Titans to seven hits in a 6-1 victory in SCVAL De Anza Division action. Ramkumar (5-0) needed only 75 pitches as the Vikings (9-4 overall) improved to 4-1 and remained tied with Wilcox for first place, a game ahead of Los Altos, Homestead and Saratoga. Ramkumar’s seven-inning complete game featured no walks. The win was Paly’s sixth straight. Bowen Gerould, James Foug and Jack Cleasby all had two hits for Paly while Michael Strong drove in two runs. The Vikings got the winning run in the second on a walk by Rowen Thompson, a walk by Austin Kron and a single by Sean Harvey. The Vikings put the game away in the fifth as Gerould, Foug and Strong all singled and Austin Poore doubled as Paly grabbed a 4-0 lead before Gunn got its only run in the bottom of the fifth. Palo Alto will host Gunn on Friday to complete the season series at 3:30 p.m. The Vikings will play an important series with Los Altos next week while tuning up for their showdowns with Wilcox on April 17 and 19. On Monday, Palo Alto pounded out 18 hits in a 13-5 nonleague win over host Menlo. Thompson led the Vikings with four hits while Isaac Feldstein had three RBI, giving him 10 in his past four games. In PAL Bay Division action, junior Erik Amundson tossed a fivehit complete game and sophomore Matt McGarry lined a two-run, sixth-inning single as host MenloAtherton edged Burlingame, 3-2, in an opener for both teams on Wednesday. The victory improved M-A’s record to 6-3 overall, while Burlingame fell to 7-2. Burlingame starting pitcher Tommy Caulfield carried a no-hitter and a 2-1 lead into the bottom of the sixth inning. After yielding a leadoff walk to M-A catcher Charles Grose and retiring shortstop Alex Aguiar on a liner to left, the Burlingame lefthander surrendered his first hit -- a low line drive up the middle by junior first baseman Brett Moriarty on an 0-2 fastball. Courtesy runner Colin Martell and Moriarty then moved into scoring position on designated hitter AJ Lemons’ groundout, and McGarry smashed an 0-1 fastball to left, driving in two runs for a 3-2 M-A lead. Amundson improved his season record to 2-1 with the victory, strik-

by Rick Eymer ark Appel and the Stanford baseball team to open the Pac-12 Conference season on a good note when Utah visits to open a three-game series Friday night at 7 p.m. The Cardinal (10-5) opened the season winning 10 of its first 12 games but then ran into a top UNLV club that swept Stanford in a threegame sweep before the break for finals. The Runnin’ Rebels used superior pitching to stop Stanford bats, winning 3-2, 12-2 and 5-1. The Cardinal defense was also faulty. Appel (2-2, 1.20) allowed one earned run in his last outing and recorded a career-high 15 strikeouts. He has a conference-leading 43 strikeouts in 30 innings this season. Four of the nine runs scored against him are earned. Stanford has allowed 17 unearned runs through its first 15 games. The Cardinal pitching staff has been outstanding all season, recording a 2.08 ERA. Bobby Zarubin (1-1, 1.08), Dean McArdle (1-0, 2.00) and John Hochstatter (0-1, 3.31) have contributed to the success. Sam Lindquist (0-0, 1.93) has three of the team’s four saves. The Stanford offense struggled leading up to its two-week break, with Menlo School grad Danny Diekroeger leading the team with his .286 batting average, 18 hits and two home runs. Brian Ragira is next at .283 and the team average is .244. Utah (0-3, 9-9) was sweep by California in its conference opener but is coming off a 3-2, extra inning, victory over Utah Valley. “We’re looking forward to playing a really good team this weekend,” Utah coach Bill Kinneberg said. “Facing Mark Appel is going to be a fun challenge for our guys.” Utah will start Mitch Watrous (1-0, 3.80) on the mound on Friday, followed by Joe Pond (2-2, 5.81) on Saturday and Dalton Carroll (1-1, 5,40) on Sunday. Stanford is the last Pac-12 team to play a conference series. Oregon State, UCLA and California all swept series in their Pac-12 openers, while Oregon and Washington each won 2 of 3. Stanford also will host Utah on Saturday (2 p.m.) and Sunday (1 p.m.).

M

A

Keith Peters

Gunn senior pitcher Claire Klausner (center) tags out a Fremont runner after a comebacker to the mound during the Titans’ 15-1 softball romp in SCVAL El Camino Division action Wednesday. Klausner tossed a three-hitter. ing out six and walking just two batters while throwing 102 pitches over seven innings. Boys’ golf Menlo School remained perfect (3-0) in the West Bay Athletic League following a 191-227 win over Crystal Springs at Palo Alto Municipal on Wednesday. Menlo senior Andrew Buchanan repeated as medalist by shooting a 5-under 31. Riley Burgess shot an even-par 36 while fellow juniors Jordan Stone and Carter Burgess each carded a 41. Menlo’s freshman pairing of Jeff Herr and William Hsieh both shot 42. The match was played in overcast and windy conditions at the Palo Alto Muni front nine. Buchanan carded birdies on holes 3, 4, 5, 8 and 9. On Monday, Sacred Heart Prep traveled to Marin County for the Wildcat Invitational hosted by Marin Catholic. The Gators finished in fifth place in the 23- team field. Gators’ junior Bradley Knox and sophomore Derek Ackerman each recorded 4-over- par rounds of 75 to lead the team. Stanford-bound Maverick McNealy from Harker was the low individual with a 5-under-par 66. Menlo finished 10th as Hsieh shot 77 while Buchanan and SHP’s Willy Lamb tied for 26th with 78s. Keith Peters

Boys’ lacrosse Sacred Heart Prep moved into contention for first place in the SCVAL with a 14-8 victory over host Menlo School on Wednesday. The Gators (3-1, 4-3) were led by freshman Andrew Daschbach’s five goals and one assist while Frankie Hattler contributed five assists and two goals. Sean Mayle and Brian White each had two goals plus an assist and Paul Vetter also scored twice. Goalie Austin Appleton had 14 saves while helping drop the Knights to 1-2 in

Palo Alto senior Rohit Ramkumar pitched a complete-game seven-hitter in the Vikings’ 6-1 victory over host Gunn on Wednesday. league (1-4 overall). SHP opened the week with a big 19-11 romp over host Palo Alto as Noah Kawasaki scored four goals and added three assists. Girls’ lacrosse Palo Alto extended its winning

streak to seven on rainy Tuesday evening while beating visiting Gunn, 15-8. Nina Kelty scored four goals and added three assists to pace the Vikings while fellow senior Charlotte Biffar finished with four goals and one assist. Gunn got four goals from Victoria Nguyen. N

Softball No. 15 Stanford heads to No. 10 Oregon for a three-game series to open Pac-12 Conference play. The Cardinal (22-5) took an eight-game winning streak into finals break. Stanford brings a team batting average of .303 into its series with the Ducks, led by Kayla Bonstrom at .358. She also has 16 RBI, fourth (continued on page 39)

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NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB) 8:30 A.M., Thursday, April 04, 2013 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review filed documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. 50 El Camino Real [11PLN-00388]: Request by Huiwen Hsiao on behalf of The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University for Site and Design Review of the construction of a 70-room, three story, 51,948 square foot building on a 1.57-acre site, to house an expanded Ronald McDonald House program. The project includes a rezoning to Public Facility with a Site and Design Combining District (PF(D)) zone, and Comprehensive Plan re-designation (from Streamside Open Space to Major Institution/ Special Facilities), and a Conditional Use Permit amendment. Zone District: Community Commercial with a Landscape Combining District (CC(L)). Environmental Assessment: A Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared for the project in accordance with CEQA. 567-595 Maybell Avenue [12PLN-00453]: Request by Candice Gonzalez on behalf of Palo Alto Housing Corporation, for Architectural Review of a housing project that includes 15 single-family detached homes and a 60-unit multiple-family residential building providing affordable rental units for seniors. The project includes off-street parking, landscaping and other site improvements. A zone district change from Low-Density Residential (R-2) and Multiple-Family Residential (RM-15) to a Planned Community (PC) has also been requested. Environmental Assessment: a Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared for public review. Amy French Chief Planning Official

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the Palo Alto Planning & Transportation Commission Please be advised the Planning and Transportation Commission (P&TC) shall conduct a public meeting at 6:00 PM, Wednesday, March 27, 2013 in the Council Chambers, Ground Floor, Civic Center, Palo Alto, California. Any interested persons may appear and be heard on these items. Staff reports for agendized items are available via the City’s main website at www.cityofpaloalto.org and also at the Planning Division Front Desk, 5th Floor, City Hall, after 2:00 PM on the Friday preceding the meeting date. Copies will be made available at the Development Center should City Hall be closed on the 9/80 Friday. Public Hearing 1.

Urban Forest Master Plan - Presentation by City staff regarding the preparation of the Urban Forest Master Plan.

2.

Recommendations that Council Direct Staff to Explore Options for Prioritizing and Monetizing Community Benefits Associated with Planned Community Zones.

Questions. For any questions regarding the above items, please contact the Planning Department at (650) 329-2441. The files relating to these items are available for inspection weekdays between the hours of 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. This public meeting is televised live on Government Access Channel 26. ADA. The City of Palo Alto does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. To request accommodations to access City facilities, services or programs, to participate at public meetings, or to learn more about the City’s compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), please contact the City’s ADA Coordinator at 650.329.2550 (voice) or by e-mailing ada@cityofpaloalto.org. ***

Curtis Williams Director of Planning and Community Environment Page 36ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…ÊÓÓ]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Sports

Pinewood hoops (continued from page 34)

last year’s champ. Pinewood (23-8) will go after some more history when it takes on Sierra Canyon (26-9) of Chatsworth for the Division V state title. The Panthers are making their third trip to the finals in four years and seventh appearance all-time. No other Division V team in state history can match that. The title game matchup pits teams that knocked off No. 1 seeds in their respective NorCal and SoCal championship games. Sierra Canyon upended Horizon Christian, 63-62, and Pinewood toppled Eastside Prep, 48-36. “I’m not surprised we are playing in a championship game,” said Scheppler. “We have the ability to play at this level.” The Panthers proved that with their victory over Eastside Prep and their history of playing for state titles. “The team we’re playing is extremely long and athletic and can pose a significant problem for us, IF they play frenetically and create trapping situations. We haven’t handled those types of teams well this year because of our youth and basketball inexperience. We are still a work in progress.” With no time to do much scouting or planning for Sierra Canyon, Scheppler will stick with what got the Panthers to the finals. “We have a similar mindset — take away easy baskets inside and force non-shooters to beat you on the perimeter,” he said. “In big games, or any games for that matter, getting easy baskets is crucial in being successful offensively. You can do that by press, steal, layup . . . having an inside scorer . . . dominating the offensive boards . . . having set plays whose end product is a layup. “When our Pinewood teams are at a size disadvantage, we have to take the inside away by double teams in the post and holding our own on the boards. On the offensive end, we use our offensive skills to create the shots we want as a team — layups, floaters, 3’s and free throws. Our strongest asset is our shot selection. If they take away our 3’s, it leaves the rim open.” Pinewood will face another tall team that features 6-1 Kennedy Burke plus three other players standing 5-10 or 5-11. Then again, Eastside Prep put 6-3 Destiny Graham and 6-0 Hashima Carothers on the floor and Pinewood still found a way to win. “We are excited to be playing on this stage,” Scheppler said. “and I know this experience will greatly benefit their improvement as athletes.” Pinewood will lose only one player off this team, Angelina Mapa. Sophomores and juniors make up the core of the team that held opponents to an average of 29.3 points in three NorCal playoff games. One of the Pinewood youngsters is sophomore point guard Marissa Hing, who woke up earlier than usual last Saturday morning, full of energy and excitement. She was bent on exacting a measure of revenge from Eastside Prep, a team

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Leeana Bade

Isaac Feldstein

Pinewood School

Palo Alto High

The junior forward had 29 points, 13 rebounds and seven steals during two NorCal basketball playoff victories, including 18 points and six boards in a win over No. 1 Eastside Prep to earn a trip to the state finals.

The senior helped lead the Vikings to three baseball victories during the week with six hits and seven RBI, including a pair of home runs and the game-winning tworun double in an 8-7 victory over San Ramon Valley.

Honorable mention Gabi Bade Pinewood basketball

Charlotte Biffar Palo Alto lacrosse

Marissa Hing* Pinewood basketball

Ally Howe Sacred Heart Prep swimming

Nina Kelty Palo Alto lacrosse

Kindle Van Linge Menlo-Atherton swimming

David Ball Menlo tennis

Andrew Buchanan Menlo golf

Andrew Liang Palo Alto swimming

Nico Robinson Sacred Heart Prep track & field

Avinash Sharma Gunn golf

Michael Strong Palo Alto baseball * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

that pounded Pinewood into submission three times during the West Bay Athletic League season. Hing knew something would be different when she hit her first two free throws less than a minute into the CIF Northern California Division V girls’ final at American Canyon High. The foul shots gave her Panthers a lead they never relinquished en route to No. 3-seeded Pinewood’s stunning upset of No. 1 Eastside Prep. “When I woke up (at 5:30 a.m.) I was already excited for this game,” Hing said. “It’s always good for me when I can make my first shot or free throw. It pumps me up.” Hing made all 13 of her freethrow attempts, including eight during a frantic fourth quarter that saw Eastside Prep pressuring Pinewood into nine of its 16 turnovers as it valiantly tried to recover from an 18-point deficit. “It was revenge time,” Hing said. “They took it to us right away all three times. We had good practices this week. We had a lot of new things, and coming up on the bus, we just got pumped up.” Hing scored 17 points, though she was 0 of 6 from long range, and junior Leeana Bade added 18 points

as Pinewood denied Eastside Prep its first trip to the state final. “We did a great job of executing our game plan almost to perfection,” Scheppler said. “The crucial part of the game was getting off to a good start and getting comfortable in this environment. We established control from the outset.” Pinewood extended its winning streak to four games by beating a team it had lost to by 24, 13 and 15 points in three previous meetings. “I thought we came out a little sluggish,” Eastside coach Donovan Blythe said. “The first three quarters it seemed like we were somewhere else. We just didn’t come out and play.” Pinewood worked out a game plan that included paying particularly close attention to Carothers, who is headed to USF on a basketball scholarship in the fall. Carothers finished with 10 points and 14 rebounds. She entered the game averaging 16.6 points and 11.2 rebounds a game. Bade had the primary responsibility on Carothers, with anyone else in the vicinity ready to help when she got the ball. Sophomore Gabi Bade, who had six points and nine rebounds, and Mapa were never far away N


Sports

Second Team Gabi Bade (Pinewood); Leeana Bade (Pinewood); Destiny Graham (Eastside Prep); Christina Haight (Mercy-SF); Meghan Holland (Sacred Heart Prep); Paige Vermeer (Castilleja) Honorable Mention Chaccity Cunningham (Eastside Prep); Kaelen Dunn (Menlo School); Chloe Eackles (Pinewood); Helen Gannon (Sacred Heart Prep); Nia Ilalio (Mercy-SF); Lauren Lete (Menlo School); Olivia Nicholls (Castilleja); Alexus Simon (Eastside Prep); Jazmin Williams (Menlo School)

ALL-SCVAL DE ANZA DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Joeseta Fatuesi Senior of the Year: Jackie Hudepohl (Lynbrook) Junior of the Year: Zoe Zwerling (Gunn) Sophomore of the Year: Olivia Tapia (Gunn) Freshman of the Year: Coco Lovely (Palo Alto) First Team Hannah Johnson (Saratoga); Josie Butler (Palo Alto); D’airrien Jackson (Wilcox); Caitlin Brown (Wilcox); Sara Dyslin (Lynbrook); Paige Song (Lynbrook); Leslie Tiongco (Milpitas) Second Team Charlie Boyle (Los Gatos); Claire Klausner (Gunn); Meghan Mahoney (Gunn); Shania Ratliff (Wilcox); Emily Fong (Lynbrook); Ellie Moller (Los Gatos); Maddie Atwater (Palo Alto); Brianna Gay (Milpitas) ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE FOOTHILL DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Hashima Carothers (Eastside Prep) Sr. First Team Charmaine Bradford (Eastside Prep); Drew Edelman (Menlo School); Marissa Hing (Pinewood); Melissa Holland (Sacred Heart Prep); Maddy Price (Menlo School)

ALL-SCVAL EL CAMINO DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Jessica Yu (Fremont) Fr. Offensive MVP: Sunny Lyu (Palo Alto) Jr. Defensive MVP: Krystal Lunda (Fremont) Sr.; Katherine Maniscalco (Palo Alto) Sr. MVP Goalie: Sena Herlly (Milpitas) Jr. Senior of the Year: Rachel Comstock (Santa Clara), Theresa Moffet (Lynbrook) Junior of the Year: Samia Adam (Santa Clara) Sophomore of the Year: Taylor Sanchez (Fremont), Sarina Bolden (Milpitas) Freshman of the Year: Jacey Pederson (Palo Alto) First Team Nina Kelty (Palo Alto) Sr.; Aoi Sugihara (Palo Alto) So.; Lena Chang (Palo Alto) So.; Katie Foug (Palo Alto) So.; Olivia Musil (Palo Alto) So.; Katie Luotto (Fremont) Sr.; Melanie Keegan (Fremont) Sr.; Michelle Doelling

(Fremont) Sr.; Kellee Cueller (Santa Clara) Jr.; Keira Frederito (Santa Clara) Jr.; Kelsee Katsanes (Santa Clara) Jr.; Shaelan Murison (Santa Clara) Fr.; Kristen Buchana (Milpitas) So.; Catalina Hernandez Milpitas) So.; Teresa Sanchez (Wilcox) Sr.; Stephanie Magellan (Cupertino) So.; Courtney Sharrah (Cupertino) Sr.; Natalie Vigent (Cupertino) Jr.; Kristen Wong (Lynbrook) Fr.; Kristen Chai (Lynbrook) Fr. Second Team (Palo Alto only) Megan Tall (Palo Alto) Jr.; Julia Kwasnick (Palo Alto Jr. ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE FOOTHILL DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Mariana Galvan (Priory) Sr. First Team Katherine Hobbs (Castilleja); Gabby Kaplan (Castilleja); Michelle Maemone (King’s Academy); Amanda McFarland (Menlo School); Maddie Morgan (Sacred Heart Prep); Tori Ramirez (King’s Academy); Sienna Stritter (Menlo School); Caitlyn Teoman (Priory); Schuyler Tilney-Volk (Menlo School); Jordan Tuttle (King’s Academy); Sarah Zuckerman (Priory) Second Team Danyele Allen (King’s Academy); Alex Bourdillon (Sacred Heart Prep); Deanna Geraci (Notre Dame-SJ); Kendall Jager (Sacred Heart Prep); Kaley Nelson (Castilleja); Hannah Rubin (Menlo School); Erin Simpson (Priory); Natasha Thorton-Clark (Crystal Springs); Kylie Von Richter (King’s Academy); Chandler Wickers (Menlo School) Honorable Mention Becky Berman (Crystal Springs); Jamie Corley (Menlo School); Julia Dressel (Menlo School); Katherine Ericson (Crystal Springs); Elena Gray (Menlo School); Ali Jordan (Sacred Heart Prep); Lindsay Karle (Menlo School); Emma LaPorte (Menlo School); Emma Marsano (Crystal Springs); Marissa Mount (Notre Dame-SJ); Maya Norman (Menlo School); Rachel Pinsker (Menlo School); Sam Rosensweig (Sacred Heart Prep); Sabrina Rousselot (Notre Dame-SJ); Taylor Ruegg (Sacred Heart Prep); Shelby Scanlan (Notre Dame-SJ); Margaret Shields (Priory); Allie Silkwood (King’s Academy); Erin Stevens (Notre Dame-SJ); Robyn Teruel (King’s Academy); Laura Wu (Priory) Victoria Yu (King’s Academy) SKYLINE DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Gaby AmosGrosser (Pinewood) First Team Maddy Augustine (Pinewood); Olivia Biggs (Pinewood); Sarah Cilker (Pinewood); Sondra Costa (Harker); Kayla Cullivan (Mercy-Burlingame); Sam Dean (Mercy-Burlingame); Sarah Feller (Mercy-Burlingame); Amrita Mecker (Pinewood); Kimberly Odaz (Mercy-Burlingame); Brenda Recinos (Mercy-SF); Wendy Shive (Harker)

Palo Alto’s Sunny Lyu Second Team Alyssa Amick (Harker); Nicole Colonna (Pinewood); Courtney Copriviza (Pinewood); Hannah Ditzler (Pinewood); Asia Flores (Mercy-SF); Emma Grillo (Pinewood); Safia Khouja (Harker); Gretchen Olsen (Pinewood); Joelle Ourtriague (Mercy-Burlingame); Nikita Parulkar (Harker); Dominique Sabins (MercySF) Honorable Mention Kelley Branson (Pinewood); Fernanda Delgadillo (Mercy-SF); Ashling Duffy (Mercy-Burlingame); Shannon Grady (MercyBurlingame); Gabbi Marconcini (Mercy-SF); Adrienne Mendel (Harker); Galilez Prado (Mercy-Burlingame); Kalei Raher (MercySF); Olivia Snipp (Mercy-SF); Vanessa Tostado (Eastside Prep) ALL-PENINSULA ATHLETIC LEAGUE BAY DIVISION Forward of the Year: Lauren Holland (Woodside) So. Midfielder of the Year: Melissa Wood (Carlmont) Jr. Defender of the Year: Giana Rosati (Woodside) Jr. Freshman of the Year: Kayla Fong (Carlmont) Fr. Goalie of the Year: Caitlyn Lanigan (Menlo-Atherton) Sr., Kitty Qu (San Mateo) Fr. Coach of the Year: Jose Navarrete (Woodside)

First Team Randall Stafford (Woodside) Sr.; Erika Negrete (Woodside) Jr.; Mary Cochran (Carlmont) Sr.; Kendall Jory (Burlingame) Sr.; Lena Mendelson (Burlingame) Sr.; Elizabeth Cruz (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Ashley Lentz (Aragon) Sr.; Dominique Gio (Terra Nova) Sr.; Lexie Gordon (Hillsdale) Jr. Second Team Heather Seybert (Woodside) Jr.; Madison Holland (Woodside) So.; Sabrina Proctor (Woodside) So.; Amelia Jacobs (Carlmont) Sr.; Maritza Gomez (Carlmont) Sr.; Veronica Pontis (Carlmont) So.; Rachel Byrd (Burlingame) Jr.; Greer Chrisman (Burlingame) Jr.; Cayla Stillman (MenloAtherton) Jr.; Olivia Del Rosso (MenloAtherton) Jr.; Jenny Winterbottom (Aragon) Sr.; Kelly Chiorso (San Mateo) Sr.; Renee Sweeney (Terra Nova) Sr.; Kayla Coleman (Hillsdale) Jr. Honorable Mention Lindsay Ringman (Woodside) Jr.; Jillienne Aguilera (Woodside) Fr.; Gabriella Reeder (Carlmont) Sr.; Emily Cox (Carlmont) Sr.; Nina Chikanov (Burlingame) So.; Alexis Prieta (Burlingame) Fr.; Kelsey Andrews (Burlingame) Fr.; Dana Gornick (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Cassie Stansberry (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Alexa Smith (Aragon) Sr.; Jordan Lewis (Aragon) Jr.; Katie Wischer (San Mateo) Jr.; Rosalyn Jeffries (San Mateo) Fr.; Jessica Simpson (Terra Nova) Jr.; Nicole Theroux (Hillsdale) So. All-league teams are selected by the coaches

Al Chang

Keith Peters

Hashima Carothers of Eastside Prep

SOCCER ALL-SCVAL DE ANZA DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Erica Higa (Mountain View) Jr. MVP Defense: Hannah Rosenberg (Los Gatos) Jr. MVP Offense: McKenzie Flood (Los Gatos) Jr. MVP Goalie: Carrie Wendelken (Los Altos) Fr. Senior of the Year: Mimi Akaogi (Monta Vista) Junior of the Year: Emma Tyrnauer (Homestead) Sophomore of the Year: Morgan Matthews (Mountain View) Freshman of the Year: Lauren Plesse (Saratoga) First Team Maddie Medved (Los Gatos) Jr.; Kayla McQuade (Los Gatos) Jr.; Angela Karamanos (Los Gatos) Jr.; Kristie BrakenGudke (Los Gatos) Jr.; Jessica Holmes (Los Gatos) Jr.; Audrey Mays (Los Altos) Sr.; Annie Gaffney (Los Altos) So.; Julia Goupil (Los Altos) Jr.; Taylor Morgan (Saratoga) Jr.; Stephanie Ho (Saratoga) Jr.; Neha Cheemalavagu (Mountain View) Jr.; Emma Donckels (Mountain View) Sr.; Morgan Matthews (Mountain View) So.; Ysabel Balyuot (Mountain View) Fr.; Caitlyn Wong (Homestead) Sr.; Meghan McCafferty (Homestead) Sr.; Caroline Anderson (Gunn) Jr. Casey Kute (Monta Vista) Sr.

Mariana Galvan of Priory

Al Chang

BASKETBALL

Keith Peters

Tim Aiken

Gunn’s Zoe Zwerling

ALL-PENINSULA ATHLETIC LEAGUE BAY DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Alana Simon (San Mateo) Sr. First Team Bryana Sui (Mills) Sr.; Madison Michaelis (Woodside) Sr.; Lauren Rally (Burlingame) Sr.; Emma Heath (Menlo-Atherton) Jr.; Alaina Wood (Sequoia) Sr.; Dana Michaels (Burlingame) Sr.; Anisah Smith (Carlmont) Jr. Second Team Katherine Hayse (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Nora Gustafson (Burlingame) Sr.; Brianna Deckman (Capuchino) So.; Nina Newman (Burlingame) Sr.; Sharnon Lionel (Woodside) Sr.; Taylor Brazil (Capuchino) Jr.; Tessie Rhodes (Woodside) Sr.; Corie Stocker (Aragon) Sr.; Madison Sui (Mills) Jr. Honorable Mention Alyssa Mangaoang (Aragon) Jr.; Kristen LaStofka (Mills) Sr.; Erin LaPorte (MenloAtherton) Sr.; Kara Ronberg (Hillsdale) So.

Palo Alto freshman Jacey Pederson (19) ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊ>ÀV…ÊÓÓ]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 37


Sports

Ninth Annual

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Learn the Guitar this Spring Carol McComb’s “Starting to Play� workshop includes the FREE use of a Loaner Guitar for the duration of the classes.* Regular cost is just $160 for nine weeks of group lessons, and all music is included. *“Starting to Play� meets for one hour each Monday night for nine weeks beginning March 25. Students are encouraged to bring their own guitar, but both nylon-string and steel-string loaner guitars are available. Other classes at more advanced levels are also offered. A full brochure is available at Gryphon.

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34th A N N U A L

Come Celebrate this Palo Alto Tradition Honoring Outstanding Citizen Ray Bacchetti Outstanding Professional Becky Beacom Outstanding Business Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Outstanding NonproďŹ t Breast Cancer Connections Global Impact Award John Hennessy Master of Ceremonies Hal M. Mickelson

April 10, 2013 Reception and Silent Auction: 5:30-7pm Dinner and Program: 7-9pm Crowne Plaza CabaĂąa Sponsors

INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION Reservation Deadline: Monday, April 1 Register Online at www.PaloAltoChamber.com Information: (650) 324-3121 ext 4 or 6 Page 38ĂŠUĂŠĂŠ>Ă€VÂ…ĂŠĂ“Ă“]ÊÓä£ÎÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

(continued from page 34)

possible games left.� Wayne Tinkle, Joslyn’s father, coached the Grizzlies into the NCAA tournament for a schoolrecord fourth straight year, with the team’s fourth consecutive 20-win season. Elle Tinkle, Josyln’s younger sister, is also in the NCAA tournament as a freshman at Gonzaga. Josyln will be able to watch her sister’s game as the 12th-seeded Lady Bullodgs play Saturday afternoon against No. 5 Iowa State. There’s even a chance Stanford and Gonzaga will play in the Sweet 16, in Spokane, if both teams keep winning. “It’s been a good year for the family, lots of basketball,� Tinkle said. “It’s exciting to share that with the family. We are each other’s greatest supporters.� Entering play Thursday, the Tinkle basketball connection had racked up an impressive 83-13 record on the season, a winning percentage of .8645. Tinkle hopes to enjoy her final run through the postseason, one that could lead to a sixth straight trip to the Final Four, which is being held in New Orleans. Should the Cardinal make it as far as Bourbon Street, Tinkle will have added to the success. She is enjoying her best season yet in a Stanford uniform, averaging 11.8 points and 5.7 rebounds a game.

Hector Garcia-Molina /stanfordphoto.com

Dates: Week 1: June 17-June 21 Week 2: July 29-August 2

Stanford women

Stanford senior Joslyn Tinkle (44) is closing out her career. She already has surpassed last year’s totals for minutes, points, 3-point goals, assists and blocked shots and is on pace for fewer turnovers. She was also named All-Pac12 by both the coaches and media for the first time in her career, with the media voting her to the All-Pac12 defensive team, as well. Tinkle is averaging double figures in scoring for the first time but it is her defensive work that may be even more impressive. She’s part of a unit that has made things very tough in the paint and she 61 blocked shots to show for it, more than the combined total (57) of her sophomore and junior years. “She wears a bow, she’s sweet and looks nice,� Stanford’s Chiney Ogwumike said. “But she is tough as nails. Her leadership is unspoken and she means so much for our team.�

City of Palo Alto ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared by the Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. In accordance with A.B. 886, this document will be available for review and comment during a minimum 20-day inspection period beginning March 22, 2013 through April 11, 2013 during the hours of 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. at the Development Center, 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. This item is tentatively scheduled to be considered at a public hearing by the Architectural Review Board, Thursday, April 4, 2013 14 at 8:30 AM. in the Palo Alto City Council Chambers on the ďŹ rst oor of the Civic Center, located at 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Written comments on the Negative Declaration should be provided to Tim Wong, Department of Planning and Community Environment, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301, or via email at tim.wong@cityofpaloalto.org, by 3:00 PM on April 11, 2013. 567-595 Maybell Avenue [12PLN-00453]: Request by Candice Gonzalez on behalf of Palo Alto Housing Corporation, for a zone district change from Low-Density Residential (R-2) and Multiple-Family Residential (RM-15) to a Planned Community (PC). The request also includes Architectural Review for a housing project on the site that includes 15 single-family detached homes (approximately 1,900 to 2,400 square feet per home) and a 60-unit multiple-family residential building (approximately 57,000 square feet) providing affordable rental units for seniors. The project includes off-street parking, landscaping and other site improvements. Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, listening assistive devices are available in the Council Chambers and Council Conference Room. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice.

Tinkle suffered from strep throat during the Pac-12 Conference tournament, a combination of practicing hard and studying for finals. She took a couple days off because of the illness and now she’s done with finals. “Jos loves to play,� Cardinal coach Tara VanDerveer said. “She’s a warrior.� Ogwumike, named the Pac-12 Player of the Year and the Defensive Player of the Year, is the heart and soul of the Cardinal and a reason, also with Mikaela Ruef, why the defense is so stingy. Stanford ranks second in the nation, allowing opponents to shoot a mere 31.5 percent from the field, and in the top 20 with its 50.7 points allowed per game. Ogwumike’s offensive prowess is well-documented, averaging over 22 points and over 13 rebounds a game. She also has 60 blocked shots and 45 steals. She’s also dramatically improved her free-throw percentage and reduced her fouls. “This team has exceeded expectations every step of the way,� VanDerveer said. “We’ve gotten great leadership, we’ve been able to stay healthy for the most part and a lot of people are contributing.� No one contributed more than sophomore point guard Amber Orrange, who took responsibility when UCLA shut down Ogwumike offensively in the tourney title game. Relying on instincts and bundles of natural ability, Orrange took the game to the Bruins, scoring the winning basket in the final seconds of a 51-49 victory. “That game showed a lot about the character of this team,� Tinkle said. “We were in a situation we weren’t used to but we showed how much we wanted to win. Amber stepped up big-time and showed maturity taking over that game.� Ogwumike, in foul trouble early, and on the brink of exhaustion, never really got into a flow against UCLA, making just one of nine shots and not scoring at all after the first two minutes of the game as the Bruins put the clamps on her. “I thought that was the most decisive game of the season,� Ogwumike said. “It was a perfect game leading into the tournament. That game was won by the players who had the most desire to win. That was a huge game for us.� The winner of the Stanford-Tulsa game will meet the winner of Sunday’s later game between No. 8 Michigan and No. 9 Villanova on Tuesday (6:30 p.m.), with a trip to Spokane and the Sweet 16 on the line. Looming on the other side of the bracket is California, the No. 2 seed in the Spokane Regional. The Bears, who play Fresno State in the first round, will have to win twice in Lubbock, Texas to advance to Spokane. If the seeding holds, there will be a Stanford-Cal showdown for a trip to New Orleans. Since losing to Fresno State at home in the second round of the 2007 tournament, Stanford is 22-5 in the NCAA tournament, with all five losses at the hands of the eventual national champion. This time the Cardinal would like to be the last tree standing. N


Sports

Stanford roundup (continued from page 35)

on the team. Bonstrom is one of six Cardinal players with a batting average above .301. Two others are at .292 and above. Jenna Rich is hitting .301 with a team-best 23 runs, 22 RBI and three home runs (with Erin Ashby). Hanna Winter (.327), Tegan Schmidt (.326), Leah White (.321), Ashby (.308) and Sarah Hassman (.303) are also above .300. Cassandra Roulund is hitting “just� .292 but has six double, five triples and driven in 18 runs. Jessica Plaza is at .295. Teagan Gerhart (11-3, 1.36) and Kelsey Stevens (9-2, 1.91) lead a strong pitching staff that also includes Nyree White (2-0, 1.00). Gerhart has 91 strikeouts in 87 innings and Stevens has 90 inb nearly 70 innings of work. The pitchers have combined for 11 shutouts on the season. Women’s swimming It was only a year ago that Rachael Acker was the proverbial big fish while swimming for Gunn High and helping the girls win their firstever Central Coast Section team championship. This week, Acker is still relatively a big fish but the pond has grown significantly. Acker is a freshman at Cal and will be counted upon to help the Bears seek a three-peat at the NCAA Women’s Swimming and

Diving Championships at the IU Natatorium in Indianapolis, Ind. The Bears won national titles in 2011 and 2012 after winning their first ever in ‘09. Acker has an opportunity to be a part of something special for Cal as one of 14 Golden Bears (13 swimmers, one diver) competing, including defending national champs Caitlin Leverenz and Cindy Tran. Leverenz is the team’s lone senior while Acker is one of five heralded freshmen that include Olympic gold medalist Rachel Bootsma plus 2013 Pac-12 Swimmer of the Meet Elizabeth Pelton. Acker also had a big Pac-12 meet as she won the 200-yard free (1:44.66), which ranks No. 11 in the nation, in addition to helping score points in the relays. Acker will swim the 100 free (Saturday) and 200 free (Friday) at the NCAA meet and will be a part of the relay pool. The Bears won the 200 and 400 medley relays at NCAAs last year. Acker is a likely relay member in the 400 free, which has the No. 2 seed time of 3:12.37. While Acker hopes to help Cal win its third straight NCAA title, USC freshman Jasmine Tosky from Palo Alto High will be battling to bring the No. 1-ranked Trojans their first national crown since 1997. Tosky is one of four USC swimmers making their NCAA debut and will be counted upon to provide some big points. She is the No. 3 seed in the 200 fly (1:53,98) in addition to having the 13th-fastest time in the 200 IM (1:56.43). N

Men’s basketball (continued from page 34)

Stanford (19-14) did just that last season by rolling to the NIT title. This season, the Cardinal isn’t on that kind of roll just yet after opening postseason play with a 58-57 win over visiting Stephen F. Austin. “We want to win this thing,� said Stanford head coach Johnny Dawkins. “We’re still playing. There are a lot of teams that aren’t playing anymore. We are one of the teams that are still competing for a championship, and I’m excited about that. Our kids are excited about that. Are we disappointed we didn’t make the (NCAA) field of 64? Absolutely. But, that doesn’t mean we can’t have a terrific season.� Senior Gabriel Harris sank one of two free throws to put Stanford ahead, 58-52, with 3:56 remaining to play. The Cardinal needed to make two critical stops to hang on at the end after missing its final six shots. The Lumberjacks (27-5) drew within 58-57 with 2:18 left. Dwight Powell, who scored 12 points and grabbed 15 rebounds, blocked a shot with 41 seconds remaining. Josh Huestis contested the final shot with a second remaining. The Cardinal was knocked out of the Pac-12 Conference tournament by Arizona State, 89-88, in overtime and lost at home to Colorado, 65-63, three weeks ago. Stanford has lost three other games by three points or less this season. N

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Palo Alto Weekly 03.22.2013 - Section 1