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Vol. XXXIV, Number 24 N March 15, 2013

Report: City, school should share Cubberley Page 3

Local inventors work to make robots part of daily life PAGE 22

Transitions 14

Spectrum 16

Title Pages 18

Eating Out 31

Movies 33

Puzzles 70

NArts The Who keyboardist has Palo Alto roots

Page 27

NSports Gunn grad skis to NCAA cross-country title

Page 35

NHome Mommy and tots: Learning to grow their own

Page 41


G U I D E TO 2013 S U M M E R C A M P S F O R K I D S

For more information about these camps, see our online directory of camps at http://paloaltoonline.com/biz/summercamps/ To advertise in a weekly directory, contact 650-326-8210

Academics Early Learning Camp Connection listing

Palo Alto

Write Now! Summer Writing Camps Emerson School of Palo Alto and Hacienda School of Pleasanton open their doors and offer their innovative programs: ExpositoryWriting, Creative Writing, Presentation Techniques, and (new!) Test-Taking Skills. Call or visit our website for details. www.headsup.org

Emerson (650) 424-1267 Hacienda (925) 485-5750

Foothill College

Los Altos Hills

Two Six-Week Summer Sessions Beginning June 10. These sessions are perfect for university students returning from summer break who need to pick up a class; and high school juniors, seniors and recent graduates who want to get an early start. 12345 El Monte Rd. www.foothill.edu

650.949.7362

Harker Summer Programs

San Jose

K-12 offerings taught by exceptional, experienced faculty and staff. K-6 morning academics - focusing on math, language arts and science - and full spectrum of afternoon recreation. Grades 6-12 for-credit courses and non-credit enrichment opportunities. Sports programs also offered. www.summer.harker.org

408-553-0537

iD Tech Camps - Summer Tech Fun

1-888-709-TECH (8324)

iD Teen Academies Gaming, Programming & Visual Arts

Stanford

Gain a competitive edge! Learn different aspects of video game creation, app development, filmmaking, photography, and more. 2-week programs where ages 13-18 interact with industry professionals to gain competitive edge. iD Gaming Academy, iD Programming Academy, and iD Visual Arts Academy are held at Stanford, and other universities. www.iDTeenAcademies.com

1-888-709-TECH (8324)

ISTP’s Language Immersion Summer Camp

Palo Alto

ISTP Summer Camp is designed to give participants a unique opportunity to spend their summer break having fun learning or improving in a second language. Students are grouped according to both grade level and language of proficiency. Our camp offers many immersion opportunities and consists of a combination of language classes and activities taught in the target language. Sessions are available in French, Mandarin, Chinese and English ESL and run Monday through Friday, 8am-3:30pm, with additional extnding care from 3:30-5:30pm. www.istp.org

Busy Bees & Astro Kids Summer Adventure Camps

Mountain View

Join us for these half-day camps designed for 3-8 year olds as we have fun, participate in games and crafts, and go on fun field trips! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue

650-251-8519

Academic enrichment infused with traditional summer camp fun--that’s what your child will experience at Camp Socrates. Sessions begin June 24 and end August 9, with the option for campers to attend all seven weeks, or the first four (June 24-July 19). Full or half-day morning or afternoon programs are available. www.StratfordSchools.com/Summer

(650) 493-1151

Mountain View

50+ creative camps for Gr. K-8! Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Musical Theater, School of Rock, Digital Arts, more! One- and two-week sessions; full and half-day enrollment. Extended care available. Financial aid offered. www.arts4all.org

650-917-6800 ext. 0

DHF Wilderness Camps

Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve

Children ages 6-14 can meet the livestock, help with farm chores, explore a wilderness preserve and have fun with crafts, songs and games. Older campers conclude the week with a sleepover at the Farm. Near the intersection of Hwy 85 and Hwy 280

www.sfhs.com/summer

TechKnowHow Computer & Lego Camps

650.968.1213 x446

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Sunnyvale

Fun and enriching technology classes for students, ages 5-14 Courses include LEGO and K’NEX Projects with Motors, Electronics, NXT Robotics, 3D Modeling, and Game Design. Many locations, including Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Sunnyvale. Half and all day options. Early-bird and multi-session discounts available. Www.techknowhowkids.com

650-638-0500

YMCA of Silicon Valley

Peninsula

What makes Y camps different? We believe every child deserves the opportunity to discover who they are and what they can achieve. Y campers experience the outdoors, make new friends and have healthy fun in a safe, nurturing environment. They become more confident and grow as individuals, and they learn value in helping others. We offer day, overnight, teen leadership and family camps. Financial assistance is available. Get your summer camp guide at ymcasv.org/summer camp. Youth camps (ages 5 - 17) run June 17 - Aug. 16 . Half-day and full-day options. Fees vary. 1922 The Alameda 3rd Floor, San Jose www.ymcasv.org

(408) 351-6400

Mountain View

Club Rec Juniors and Seniors is open for youth 6-11 years old. These traditional day camps are filled with fun theme weeks, weekly trips, swimming, games, crafts and more! Monta Loma Elementary School, 490 Thompson Ave. http://mountainview.gov

Foothills Day Camp

Palo Alto

What will you discover? Foothills Day and Fun Camps, for youth ages 8-10 and 5-7 respectively, includes canoeing, hiking, animal identification games, crafts, and more- all for less than $5 an hour. Registration begins February 15th for residents. (February 22nd for non-residents.) Hurry, spaces are limited! cityofpaloalto.org/enjoy

650-463-4900.

J-Camp

Palo Alto Community Child Care (PACCC)

Exciting programs for kindergarteners through teens include swimming, field trips, sports and more. Enroll your child in traditional or special focus camps like Surfing, Archery, Animal Adventure, Circus Camp and over 50 others! Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way

Palo Alto

PACCC summer camps offer campers, grades kindergarten to 6th, a wide variety of fun opportunities! K-1 Fun for the youngest campers, Neighborhood Adventure Fun and Ultimate Adventure Fun for the more active and on-the-go campers! New this year: Sports Adventure Camp for those young athletes and Operation Chef for out of this world cooking fun! Swimming twice per week, periodic field trips, special visitors and many engaging camp activities, songs and skits round out the fun offerings of PACCC Summer Camps! Registration is online. Open to campers from all communities! Come join the fun in Palo Alto! www.paccc.org

650-493-2361

Theatreworks Summer Camps

Palo Alto

In these skill-building workshops for grades K-5, students engage in language-based activities, movement, music, and improvisation theatre games. Students present their own original pieces at the end of each two-week camp. www.theatreworks.org/educationcommunity

Western Ballet Children’s Summer Camp

650-493-7146

Mountain View

Students attend ballet class and rehearsal in preparation for the recital of either Peter Pan or The Little Mermaid at the end of the two week session. Separate Saturday classes are also offered. Ages 4-9. 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View

Western Ballet Intermediate Summer Intensive

Mountain View

Students obtain high quality training in ballet, pointe, character, jazz, and modern dance, while learning choreography from the classical ballet Paquita. The students dance in featured roles in a final performance. Ages 9-12. Audition required 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View

Mountain View

Summer at Saint Francis provides a broad range of academic and athletic programs for elementary through high school students. It is the goal of every program to make summer vacation enriching and enjoyable!

http://mountainview.gov/

mountainview.gov

http://westernballet.org/documents/summerpre-intermediate.html

Summer at Saint Francis

We offer swim lessons for ages 6 months to 14 years. Following the American Red Cross swim lesson program, students are divided into one of the 11 different levels taught by a certified instructor. Rengstorff Park Pool, 201 S Rengstorff Ave and Eagle Park Pool,650 Franklin St.

Club Rec Juniors & Seniors Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA)

http://westernballet.org/documents/summerchildrens.html

Stratford School - Camp Socrates 17 Bay Area Campuses

Mountain View

http://mountainview.gov

Held at Stanford

Take interests further! Ages 7-17 create iPhone apps, video games, C++/ Java programs, movies, and more at weeklong, day and overnight programs held at Stanford and 60+ universities in 26 states. Also 2-week, teen-only programs: iD Gaming Academy, iD Programming Academy, and iD Visual Arts Academy (filmmaking & photography). www.internalDrive.com

City of Mountain View Swim Lessons Rengstorff and Eagle Parks

Arts, Culture, Other Camps

Western Ballet Advanced Summer Intensive

Mountain View

http://westernballet.org/documents/summer_int_adv.html

Summer at Peninsula School

Kim Grant Tennis Academy & Summer Camps

(650) 223-8622

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Redwood City

Fun and Specialized junior camps for Mini (3-5), Beginner, In-termidate 1&2, Advanced and Elite Players. Weekly programs designed by Kim Grant to improve players technique, fitness, agility, mental toughness and all around tennis game. Camps in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Redwood City. Come make new friends and have tons of FUN!! www.KimGrantTennis.com

Nike Tennis Camps

650-752-8061

Stanford University

Dick Gould’s 43rd Annual Stanford Tennis School offers day camps for bothjuniors & adults. Weekly junior overnight & extended day camps run by John Whitlinger & Lele Forood. Junior Day Camp run by Brandon Coupe & Frankie Brennan. www.USSportsCamps.com/tennis

1-800-NIKE-CAMP (645-3226)

Spartans Sports Camp Spartans Sports Camp offers multi-sport, week-long sessions for boys and girls in grades 3-6 as well as sport-specific sessions for grades 6-9. There are also strength and conditioning camps for grades 6-12. Camps begin June 10th and run weekly through August 2nd at Mountain View High School. The camp is run by MVHS coaches and student-athletes and all proceeds benefit the MVHS Athletic Department. Lunch and extended care are available for your convenience. Register today! www. SpartansSportsCamp.com

Spring Down Camp Equestrian Center

650-479-5906

Portola Valley

Spring Down Camp teaches basic to advanced horsemanship skills. Ages 6-99 welcome! Daily informative lecture, riding lesson, supervised hands-on ski-ll practice, safety around horses, tacking/untacking of own camp horse, and arts/crafts.

Stanford Water Polo Camps

650.851.1114

Stanford

Ages 7 and up. New to sport or have experience, we have a camp for you. Half day or Full day option for boys and girls. All the camps offer fundamental skill work, position work, scrimmages and games. StanfordWaterPoloCamps.com

650-725-9016

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Menlo Park

This is a child’s delight with trees to climb, rope swings, and unpaved open spaces. Our engaging and creative program includes time to play and make friends. Peninsula School, 920 Peninsula Way. Visit website for class listings. www.peninsulaschool.org/pensummerschool.htm (650) 325-1584, ext. 39

Athletics City of Mountain View Recreation Division

www.paloaltojcc.org/jcamp

www.springdown.com

Students obtain high quality training in ballet, pointe, character, jazz, and modern dance, while learning choreography from the classical ballet Paquita. The students dance in featured roles in a final performance. Ages 13-23. Audition required. 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View

Palo Alto

Mountain View

Sports & Activity Camp (ages 6-12): This all-sports camp provides group instruction in a variety of field, water and court games. Saint Francis faculty and students staff the camp, and the focus is always on fun. The program is dedicated to teaching teamwork, sportsmanship and positive self-esteem. After camp care and swim lessons available. www.sfhs.com/summer

650.968.1213 x650

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Discover fun with us this summer through the many programs available with the City of Mountain View Recreation Division. From sports to traditional day camps, to cooking camps, dance camps and art camps... we have it all! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue

Advanced Sports Camps (5th-9th grades): We offer a wide selection of advanced sports camps desikgned to provide playhers with the opportunity to improve both their skills and knowledge of a specific sport. Each camp is run by a Head Varsity Coach at Saint Francis, and is staffed by members of the coaching staff.

http://mountainview.gov

www.sfhs.com/summer

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650.968.1213 x650


Upfront

Local news, information and analysis

Schools, city should share Cubberley, committee says With efficient design, joint use, a new high school and community center are possible by Chris Kenrick NEWHIGHSCHOOLˆASWELLASA COMPREHENSIVECOMMUNITYCEN TERˆAT#UBBERLEY#OMMUNITY #ENTER IN SOUTH 0ALO !LTO WOULD BE POSSIBLEIFTHE0ALO!LTOSCHOOLDIS TRICTANDCITYGOVERNMENTWORKTOWARD ACOMMONVISION ACOMMUNITYADVI SORYCOMMITTEESAYS

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)NITSLONG AWAITEDREPORT THE#UB BERLEY #OMMUNITY !DVISORY #OM MITTEECONVEYEDASENSEOFURGENCY FORTHECITYANDSCHOOLDISTRICTTODE VELOPAJOINT USEhMASTERPLANvOVER THENEXTSIXYEARSFORTHE-IDDLEFIELD 2OAD FACILITY 4HE GROUP ADVOCATES THEACCOMMODATIONOFBOTHCOMMU

NITYUSESANDAPOSSIBLETHIRDCOMPRE HENSIVEHIGHSCHOOLIN0ALO!LTO !N EFFICIENT RECONFIGURATION OF THE SPACE ˆ EITHER SINGLE STORY OR MULTI STORY ˆ WOULD ALLOW #UB BERLEYSACRESTOBEUSEDFORBOTH PURPOSES WITH ELEMENTS OF SHARED USE THECOMMITTEESAID "UTTIMEISOFTHEESSENCE MEM BERSSAID WARNINGTHATCONTINUATION OFTHESTATUSQUOWITHOUTPROACTIVE PLANNING COULD CLOSE OFF POSSIBILI TIESFORTHEFUTURE

4HE COMMITTEE PENCILED IN THE COSTOFANEWHIGHSCHOOLˆWHICH ITSAIDSHOULDCOMEWITHANAGREE MENT FOR JOINT USE ˆ AT  MIL LIONTOMILLION POSSIBLYTOBE FINANCED THROUGH A SCHOOL DISTRICT GENERALOBLIGATIONBONDIN 4HESCHOOLDISTRICTHASBEENVAGUE ASTOWHENITMAYNEED#UBBERLEY "UT CITING RECENT GROWING +  ENROLLMENT THEDISTRICTSAYSITMAY NEEDPARTORALLOFTHE ACRECAM PUSINTHENEXTORYEARS

0ALO !LTOS TWO EXISTING HIGH SCHOOLSAREBEINGRENOVATEDTOHOLD  STUDENTSEACH#URRENTENROLL MENTIS AT'UNN(IGH3CHOOL AND AT0ALO!LTO(IGH3CHOOL 4HEDISTRICTISSEEKINGTOEXPAND MIDDLE SCHOOL CAPACITY THROUGH POSSIBLEACQUISITIONOFPROPERTYAD JACENTTO4ERMAN-IDDLE3CHOOLBUT HASINDICATEDITCOULDNEEDATLEAST PART OF #UBBERLEY FOR THAT PURPOSE (continued on page 8)

PARKING

Palo Alto looks to build new downtown garage Parking shortage prompts city to explore range of options by Gennady Sheyner ITH DOWNTOWN RESIDENTS UP INARMSABOUTASHORTAGEOF PARKING THATS LED TO NEIGH BORHOOD STREETS BEING CLOGGED WITH PARKED CARS 0ALO !LTO OFFICIALS ARE CONSIDERING A SLEW OF SOLUTIONS IN CLUDINGMORESPOTSFORPERMITHOLDERS ATTWOCITYGARAGES AVALETPROGRAMAT ANOTHERGARAGE PARKINGRESTRICTIONSIN RESIDENTIALNEIGHBORHOODSANDANEW PARKINGSTRUCTURETHATWOULDBEJOINT LY DEVELOPED BY THE CITY AND ONE OF DOWNTOWNSMOSTPROLIFICDEVELOPERS 4HE #ITY #OUNCIL IS SCHEDULED TO DISCUSS -ONDAY THESE PROPOSALS FOR ALLEVIATING ONE OF THE CITYS MOST URGENT AND PUZZLING PROBLEMS 4HE COUNCILUNDERSCOREDTHEISSUESGROW INGPROFILELASTMONTH WHENITMADE hFUTUREOFDOWNTOWNAND#ALIFORNIA !VENUEvONEOFITSTHREEPRIORITIESFOR  4HE CITY IS ALSO NOW EMBARK INGONABROADSTUDYOFDOWNTOWNTO GAUGEHOWMUCHADDITIONALDEVELOP MENTTHEAREACANHANDLE 4HE PROBLEM HAS HIT A CRITICAL POINT IN THE LAST THREE YEARS WITH RESIDENTS FROM THE 0ROFESSORVILLE AND $OWNTOWN .ORTH NEIGHBOR HOODS PERSISTENTLY COMPLAINING THAT PARKING SPOTS IN FRONT OF THEIR HOMESAREDISAPPEARING4HINGSARE EXPECTED TO GET EVEN WORSE IN THE COMINGYEARSASANUMBEROFDOWN TOWNDEVELOPMENTSPROCEEDTHROUGH THECITYSAPPROVALPROCESS .EILS "UCHANAN A RESIDENT OF $OWNTOWN .ORTH ADDRESSED THE COUNCIL LAST -ONDAY ON THE TOPIC h4HE IMPACT OF EVER INCREASING PARKING IS VERY OBVIOUS TO US v HE SAID ANDTHENEIGHBORHOODISREACH ING A hSATURATIONv POINT WHEN IT COMESTOPARKING(EURGEDTHECITY TOACTEXPEDITIOUSLY h7E HOPE THE #ITY #OUNCIL WILL GIVEUSADEFINITIVESOLUTION ASYOU DID TO #OLLEGE 4ERRACE v "UCHANAN SAID REFERRING TO A NEIGHBORHOOD NEXTTO3TANFORD5NIVERSITYTHATHASA

W

Veronica Weber

‘And ... cut!’ Hollywood comes to Palo Alto Director Mike Judge, center, talks with actresses Lindsey Broad, right, and Angela Trimbur, far right, while shooting the pilot episode of a TV show about Silicon Valley for HBO on University Avenue in Palo Alto on Tuesday.

EDUCATION

Board to hire $150K communication officer District also agrees to add more teachers at middle, high schools by Chris Kenrick   COMMUNICATION OFFICER WILL JOIN THE STAFF OF THE0ALO!LTO5NIFIED3CHOOL $ISTRICT FOLLOWING THE 0ALO !LTO "OARD OF %DUCATIONS UNANIMOUS VOTE4UESDAYNIGHTASPARTOFA MILLIONBUDGETAPPROVAL -EMBERSSAIDTHEPOSITIONISNEED ED TO PROVIDE hTIMELY INFORMATION ANDTRANSPARENCYvTOAPUBLICMAK INGAHIGHVOLUMEOFINFORMATIONRE QUESTSTOANOVERWHELMEDSTAFF "UT CRITICS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT CHARACTERIZEDTHENEWPOSITIONASA POORLYTIMEDPUBLICRELATIONSPLOYTO HIDE PROBLEMS INCLUDING THOSE AS SOCIATEDWITHARECENTREPORTAGAINST THE DISTRICT BY THE /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTSINTHECASEOFTHEBULLYINGOF

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AMIDDLESCHOOLSTUDENT h4HISDISTRICTHASLURCHEDFROMMIS HANDLED CRISIS TO MISHANDLED CRISIS WITHNOTRANSPARENCYANDNOACCOUNT ABILITY vPARENT4RISH$AVISSAID h.O AMOUNT OF 02 IS GOING TO CLEANUPTHATMESS7ILLYOUCON TINUETOSERVETHEHEAR NO EVIL SEE NO EVILCROWDBYSHOVINGPROBLEMS UNDERTHERUGv "OARDMEMBER"ARB-ITCHELLNOT EDTHATTHEDISTRICTEMPLOYEDAPUB LIC INFORMATIONOFFICERINTHEPAST h4HE BENEFITS OF THIS POSITION WILLBECOMEEVIDENTTOEVERYMEM BEROFTHECOMMUNITYOVERTIME v -ITCHELLSAID 4HENEWCOMMUNICATIONSPOSITION WASONEOFBUDGETALLOCATIONSAP

PROVEDBYTHEBOARDINEXPENDITURES WHICHADDTOITSROUGHLYMIL LIONOPERATINGBUDGET 4HELARGESTCHUNKˆ ˆ WILL GO TOWARD BOOSTING PRINCIPALS DISCRETIONARYFUNDSFROMPERSTU DENTTOPERSTUDENT4HEFUNDSGO TOWARD CLASSROOM SUPPORT SUPPLIES SUPPORTSTAFFANDNEWPROGRAMS 4HE BOARD ALSO ALLOCATED FUNDS TOHIREANEWTEACHERATEACHOFTHE DISTRICTS MIDDLE SCHOOLS AND HIGH SCHOOLS AND TO BOOST RESOURCES FOR HIGHSCHOOLCOUNSELING%LEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS WILL RECEIVE MORE COACHINGANDTECHNOLOGYSUPPORT 3OME OF THE BUDGET ADJUSTMENTS (continued on page 7)

RESIDENTIALPARKING PERMITPROGRAM +EN!LSMAN A0ROFESSORVILLERES IDENTWHOHASBEENONEOFTHEMOST OUTSPOKENCRITICSOFTHEDOWNTOWN PARKING POLICIES CALLED HIS NEIGH BORHOOD THE CITYS hBIGGEST PUBLIC PARKINGLOTvANDURGEDTHECITYNOT TOGIVEDEVELOPERSANYCONCESSIONS WHENITCOMESTOPARKING h7E HAVE BEEN GIVING MULTI MILLION DOLLAR GRANTS TO DEVELOPERS WHODONTNEEDITORDESERVEIT AND THE NEIGHBORS ARE PAYING FOR THAT v !LSMANSAID REFERRINGTOEXCEPTIONS THAT REDUCE THE NUMBER OF PARKING SPACESREQUIREDATNEWBUILDINGS /NEOFTHEIDEASTHATTHECOUNCIL IS SCHEDULED TO CONSIDER -ONDAY ISAPROPOSALBYDEVELOPER#HARLES h#HOPv+EENANTOHELPTHECITYBUILD A GARAGE NEAR HIS SOON TO BE CON STRUCTED OFFICE DEVELOPMENT AT  (AMILTON !VE 4HE GARAGE WOULD HAVEROOMFORSELF PARKEDCARS ORCARSUSINGTANDEMORSTACKED PARKING5NDER+EENANSPROPOSAL THE OFFICE DEVELOPMENT WOULD USE THETOPTWOFLOORSOFTHEFIVE STORY GARAGESPACES ORIFCARSARE STACKED THOUGHTHEYWOULDBECOME AVAILABLETOTHEPUBLICONWEEKENDS ANDAFTERPMONWEEKDAYS +EENANPROPOSESHAVINGTHECITY CONTRIBUTE  MILLION TOWARD CON STRUCTIONOFTHENEWGARAGE WITHHIS COMPANYTAKINGCAREOFTHEBALANCE OFTHEPROJECT WHICHHEEXPECTSTO COSTABOUTMILLION ACCORDINGTO HISPROPOSAL +EENANS BUILDING IS ONE OF ABOUT A DOZEN DOWNTOWN DEVEL OPMENTS THAT ARE CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTIONORGOINGTHROUGHTHE PLANNING PROCESS 4HESE INCLUDE THE ,YTTON 'ATEWAY PROJECT AT !LMA 3TREET AND ,YTTON !VENUE THENEWHOTELSLATEDFORTHE#ASA /LGASITEON(AMILTONAND%MER (continued on page 7)

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Learn the Guitar this Spring *“Starting to Play” meets for one hour each Monday night for nine weeks beginning March 25. Students are encouraged to bring their own guitar, but both nylon-string and steel-string loaner guitars are available. Other classes at more advanced levels are also offered. A full brochure is available at Gryphon.

Stringed Instruments Since 1969

650 U493 U2131 ,AMBERT!VENUEs0ALO!LTO www.gryphonstrings.com

way By the Ba d a o y Presents Br CATS

OLIVER

APRIL 6 - 21

JULY 12 - 21

CABARET

GUYS AND DOLLS

SEPTEMBER 13 - 29

NOVEMBER 8 - 17

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A RADIO PLAY DECEMBER 26 - 29 2215 Broadway St., Redwood City

650.FOX.7770 Tickets are On Sale Today

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter @FoxtheatreRWC

w w w.FoxRwc .com

Avenidas presents the 6th Annual

Housing Conference

Saturday, March 23 8:30 am - 2:30 pm Choose from three focus areas: y Do you want to sell your home and move? y Have you decided to stay in your own home? y Are you still exploring your options? Register at avenidas.org or call (650) 289-5435.

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505) EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Elena Kadvany (223-6519) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns Rebecca Duran, Ranjini Raghunath ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Christine Afsahi (223-8582), Adam Carter (2236573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 223-6569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. ©2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________

Resources and programs for positive aging

Special thanks to Presenting Sponsors Nancy Goldcamp, Coldwell Banker and Oshman Family Jewish Community Center Page 4ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…Ê£x]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

‘‘

Carol McComb’s “Starting to Play” workshop includes the FREE use of a Loaner Guitar for the duration of the classes.* Regular cost is just $160 for nine weeks of group lessons, and all music is included.

Upfront QUOTE OF THE WEEK

‘‘

No amount of PR is going to clean up that mess. — Trish Davis, parent, on the Palo Alto school district hiring a new $150K communication officer. See story on page 3.

Around Town

SNUFFED OUT ... Visitors to Palo Alto’s small downtown parks might be surprised to learn that there is a smoking problem. But the city has apparently been getting complaints from some residents in the famously health-conscious city about the high level of smoking at small urban parks such as Lytton Plaza and Cogswell Plaza. According to a new report from the city, complaints have focused on “environmental quality, litter, fire safety and a combination thereof.” Now, the City Council is considering taking action. On Tuesday night, the council’s Policy and Services Committee will consider banning smoking at Lytton Plaza, Cogswell Plaza (both near University Avenue) and Sarah Wallis Park (near California Avenue). This won’t be the first time the city considered beefing up the city’s smoking rules. In the 1970s and early 1980s, the city imposed smoking bans on theaters, restaurants and workspaces. In 2008, the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission considered expanding the ban further, but concluded by a 5-2 vote that the city’s laws are strong enough. And two years ago, the council’s Policy and Services Committee agreed with a staff recommendation that the city has fallen behind its neighbors when it comes to smoking laws and that it’s time to consider other ordinance revisions. Even then, some members were not convinced that smoking is a burning issue in Palo Alto. At that time, Councilman Larry Klein noted that he almost never sees people smoking downtown and called smoking “a problem that has virtually disappeared from Palo Alto.” SWEPT AWAY ... Palo Alto streets might get a bit leafier in a few months as the city explores new options for its street-sweeping service. The goal is to cut costs in the refuse budget by making street-sweeping on residential streets less frequent. According to a report from the Public Works Department, the city currently sweeps residential streets once per week and downtown streets three times a week. Most surrounding cities sweep residential streets every other week and Palo Alto may soon join this group. On Tuesday night, the City Council Finance Committee will consider three options for the future street-sweeping program. One would leave things the way they are, with in-house staff handling all the sweeping duties. The second option would

reduce street sweeping in residential and light-commercial areas to every other week in non-leaf season (March through October) and hire a contractor to perform this service. Under this option, downtown and California Avenue would continue to get swept three times per week. The third option would have the same frequency, though it would allocate downtown sweeping to a contractor and leave the residential streets to in-house staff (contractors would supplement staff’s work during leaf season). Staff is recommending the third option, which, according to the report, “saves money but balances the need to reduce costs with the desirability of maintaining an in-house capability.” They estimate that the second option would save about $441,000 annually while the third option would save $675,000. Public Works officials believe reducing the sweeping on residential streets will not have a significant impact on residential streets, at least in the nonleaf season. “The small amount of debris during the non-leaf season can be readily left in place until the following week and collected then,” the new report states, noting that this is what most cities already do. FRIENDS FROM ABROAD ... Twenty years ago, Palo Alto and Tsuchiura, Japan, formed a casual friendship based on student exchanges. Four years ago, this friendship became stronger and more formal when the two became “sister cities.” And in 2011, the ties became firmer still when Palo Alto responded to the massive earthquake and tsunami in Japan by sending donations to a relief fund for earthquake victims. On Monday — which marked a two-year anniversary of the 8.9-magnitude earthquake — a delegation of students and chaperones from Tsuchiura made their annual pilgrimage to Palo Alto and thanked the City Council for Palo Alto’s years of friendship. “We will never forget your heartfelt concern,” said Etsuo Sato, one of the chaperones of the student delegation, adding that Tsuchiura officials look forward to developing further exchange opportunities. The Palo Alto council responded by passing an official proclamation, read by Mayor Greg Scharff, which alluded to the “mutually beneficial” nature of the cities’ relationship, before Japanese students and Palo Alto councilmen gathered on the floor of the Council Chambers for a series of photo-ops. N


Upfront GOVERNMENT

Ceremonies in Palo Alto, San Jose for Palo Altan by Elena Kadvany ORMER STATE 3EN *OE 3IMITIAN WILLOFFICIALLYBESWORNINASTHE 3ANTA#LARA#OUNTYSUPERVISOR ATCEREMONIESIN0ALO!LTOON3UNDAY -ARCH AND3AN*OSEON-ARCH 3IMITIAN WHO ASSUMED OFFICE THEFIRSTWEEKOF*ANUARY ISSUPPLE MENTINGTHETRADITIONALCOMMEMO RATIVECEREMONYWITHAFILMCALLED h4HE7AITING2OOM vWHICHDOCU MENTSHOURSINANOVERCROWDED /AKLANDHOSPITALEMERGENCYROOM 4HE CEREMONY IS hAN OPPORTUNITY TO SHINE A LIGHT ON THE HEALTH CARE CHALLENGESWEFACEBOTHHEREINTHE COUNTY AND ACROSS THE COUNTRY v 3IMITIANSTATEDINAPRESSRELEASE !FTERSERVINGINTHESTATE3ENATE FOREIGHTYEARS 3IMITIANANNOUNCED HISCANDIDACYFORSUPERVISORIN.O VEMBER  AT ,UCIE 3TERN #OM MUNITY#ENTERIN0ALO!LTO(EWON THEELECTIONLAST*UNE REPLACINGFOR MERSUPERVISOR,IZ+NISS 3IMITIAN REPRESENTS $ISTRICT  WHICH INCLUDES #UPERTINO 3ARATO GA ,OS!LTOSAND,OS!LTOS(ILLS THENORTHWESTERNHALFOF3UNNYVALE -OUNTAIN6IEWAND0ALO!LTO4HIS ISTHESECONDTIMEHEHASSERVEDAS COUNTYSUPERVISOR HAVINGFIRSTBEEN INOFFICEFROMTO "UT0ALO!LTOISWHEREHISPOLITI CALROOTSARE 3IMITIAN IS A LONGTIME RESIDENT WHOSEPOLITICALCAREERCANBETRACED BACK TO 0ALO !LTO (IGH 3CHOOL WHEN HE WAS ELECTED STUDENT BODY PRESIDENTIN !T  YEARS OLD 3IMITIAN BE CAMETHEYOUNGESTPERSONTOUPSET AN INCUMBENT FOR A SCHOOL BOARD SEAT (E SERVED ON THE 0ALO !LTO 5NIFIED 3CHOOL $ISTRICT "OARD OF %DUCATIONFROMTO IN CLUDINGASTINTASPRESIDENT (IS NEXT VENTURE WAS THE 0ALO !LTO #ITY #OUNCIL ON WHICH HE SERVED FROM  TO  INCLUD INGAYEARASMAYOR(ESPEARHEADED VARIOUSLOW INCOMEHOUSINGPROJECTS FORTHEELDERLY HOMELESSANDDEVEL

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Courtesy of Tolbert Design Architects

Simitian to be sworn in Sunday as county supervisor

EDUCATION

Palo Alto High School’s proposed athletic facilities would consist of two gyms on either side of the existing aquatic center, connected by a covered walkway.

Michelle Le

Design of new Paly gym building echoes school’s original architecture Groundbreaking for donor-funded athletic center projected for 2014 by Chris Kenrick

Joe Simitian OPMENTALLY DISABLED (E WAS ALSO AN EDUCATION ADVOCATE HELPING TO RE APPROPRIATE  MILLION IN FED ERAL FUNDS TO THE 2AVENSWOOD #ITY 3CHOOL$ISTRICTIN%AST0ALO!LTOAND FIGHTINGTHESTATEONMILLIONIN CUTSTOBASIC AIDSCHOOLDISTRICTS 3IMITIAN WAS NEXT ELECTED TO THE STATE !SSEMBLY IN  AND STATE 3ENATEIN 4HE 3UNDAY AND 4UESDAY EVENTS WILLEACHINCLUDEABRIEFSWEARING IN CEREMONY THE FILM SCREENING AND A 1!SESSIONWITH3IMITIANANDh4HE 7AITING2OOMvPRODUCER"ILL(IRSCH 4HEOATHOFOFFICEWILLBEOFFICIAL LYADMINISTEREDBY532EP!NNA '%SHOOIN0ALO!LTOANDBY3ANTA #LARA#OUNTY"OARDOF3UPERVISORS 0RESIDENT+EN9EAGERIN3AN*OSE 4HE 0ALO !LTO CEREMONY WILL BE HELD AT THE 0ALO !LTO #HILDRENS 4HEATRE AT  -IDDLEFIELD 2OAD ATAM4HE3AN*OSEEVENTWILL TAKE PLACE AT THE #OUNTY 'OVERN MENT#ENTER"OARD#HAMBERSAT 7EST(EDDING3TATAM "OTHEVENTSWILLBEFREE BUTSEAT INGISLIMITED2ESERVATIONSCANBE MADE AT HTTP$ISTRICT&IVEEVENT BRITECOMN Editorial Assistant Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@ paweekly.com.

ONCEPTUALDESIGNSFORANEW DONOR FUNDEDINDOORATHLET ICCENTERAT0ALO!LTO(IGH 3CHOOLWILLBEUPFORAPPROVALBY THE"OARDOF%DUCATIONNEXT4UES DAY -ARCH 3CHOOL OFFICIALS 4HURSDAY DE CLINEDTOIDENTIFYTHEANONYMOUS 0ALO !LTO FAMILY WHO HAS PROF FERED A POTENTIAL DONATION OF UP TOMILLION 3CHOOL BOARD MEMBERS 4UES DAYEXPRESSEDENTHUSIASMFORTHE PRELIMINARYDESIGNS WHICHWERE PRESENTED BY ARCHITECT *EREMIAH 4OLBERT 7ITH ARCHITECTURAL ECHOES OF THE OLDER BUILDINGS ON 0ALYS CAMPUS THE FACILITY WOULD IN CLUDE TWO NEW GYMS ON EITHER SIDEOFTHEEXISTINGAQUATICCEN TER THAT WOULD BE CONNECTED BY A COVERED WALKWAY EVOKING THE OPEN AIRHALLWAYWHICHNOWCON NECTS0ALYS4OWER"UILDINGWITH (AYMARKET4HEATRE 4HE PROPOSED CENTER ˆ ON AN ACCELERATED TIMETABLE BE CAUSE OF THE PROSPECTIVE DONA TION ˆ WOULD HAVE A *UNE  GROUNDBREAKING WITHOCCUPANCY PROJECTED FOR !UGUST  4HE SCHOOL DISTRICT WOULD CONTRIBUTE MILLION

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EDUCATION

Bullying recommendations delayed until April 9 Community interests, ‘changing legal environment’ complicate the work, superintendent says by Chris Kenrick HE 0ALO !LTO SCHOOL DISTRICT WILL UNVEIL ITS RECOMMENDA TIONSFORANEWPOLICYONBUL LYING!PRIL 3UPERINTENDENT+EVIN 3KELLYSAIDTHISWEEK 3KELLY ORIGINALLY HAD SCHEDULED THEPROPOSALFORTHE4UESDAY -ARCH  MEETING BUT POSTPONED IT TO hMAKESUREWEGETITRIGHT vHETOLD THE"OARDOF%DUCATION (E SAID THE RECOMMENDATION WILL COME AFTER A SCHEDULED hCON VERSATIONvWITHTHE/FFICEFOR#IVIL 2IGHTS A REFERENCE TO THE OFFICE WITHINTHE53$EPARTMENTOF%DU

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CATIONTHATRECENTLYFOUNDTHE0ALO !LTO SCHOOL DISTRICT HAD VIOLATED A STUDENTSCIVILRIGHTS 4HE $ECEMBER /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTSREPORTSAIDA0ALO!LTOMID DLESCHOOLSFAILURETOSTOPTHEONGO INGBULLYINGBYPEERSOFASPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENT AMOUNTED TO A hHOSTILEENVIRONMENT vRISINGABOVE ASOCIALORDISCIPLINEPROBLEMTOBE COMEACIVIL RIGHTSISSUE )N A hRESOLUTION AGREEMENTv SIGNED BY 3KELLY $EC  THE DIS TRICT ADMITTED NO VIOLATION OF THE LAWBUTPLEDGEDTOUNDERTAKETRAIN

INGS MODIFYHANDBOOKSANDCOM MUNICATE WITH STUDENTS PARENTS AND STAFF AS SPECIFIED IN DETAIL BY THEFEDERALOFFICE 0RINCIPALSOFALLPUBLICSCHOOLS IN0ALO!LTOˆASWELLASTHEDIS TRICTSADULTSCHOOLˆWERETRAINED 4UESDAYINAPROGRAMCALLEDh#RE ATING A 3YSTEMIC )NFRASTRUCTURE TO 3UPPORT !NTI "ULLYING %FFORTS v 3KELLYSAID )N EXPLAINING HIS POSTPONEMENT OF THE BULLYING POLICY RECOMMEN DATION 3KELLYTOLDTHESCHOOLBOARD 4UESDAYTHATDEALINGWITHTHEISSUE

)NADDITIONTOTHEGYMS THENEW CENTERWOULDINCLUDEANEWWRES TLINGMULTI PURPOSE ROOM POOL LOCKER ROOMS AND A NEW DANCE ANDYOGAROOM 0ALY 0RINCIPAL 0HIL 7INSTON SAID THE NEW ATHLETIC CENTER WOULD hTRANSFORM THE EXPERI ENCEvFORSTUDENTS h4HISWILLCHANGENOTJUSTTHE PHYSICAL LANDSCAPE BUT THE FEEL ING ON THE CAMPUS AT 0ALY FOR EVER v7INSTONSAID h)T IS SOMETHING WE NEED AND COULDNOTBEMORETHRILLEDABOUTv $URING CONSTRUCTION MUCH OF 0ALYS ATHLETIC PROGRAM AND PHYSICAL EDUCATIONCLASSESWOULD BEOPERATEDFROMPORTABLECLASS ROOMSNOWSITUATEDINTHEQUAD OFFICIALSSAID 4HE PORTABLES NOW IN USE BY ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS WILL BE VACATED WHEN A NEW TWO STORY  CLASSROOMBUILDINGOPENSOVER THE WINTER BREAK IN $ECEMBER THEYSAID 2ESPONDING TO THE ARCHITECTS DRAWINGS SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER -ELISSA "ATEN #ASWELL SAID h)F ITS COMPLETED AND IT LOOKS LIKE THAT ) DONT THINK ANY DISTRICT AROUNDUSWOULDBEABLETOHOLD ACANDLE)DONTTHINKANYOFTHE

IShHARDFORALOTOFREASONS&ORE MOSTISTHATBULLYINGISADARKPART OFOURCOLLECTIVEHUMANNATUREAND AHARDPROBLEMBOTHONANINSTITU TIONALANDANINDIVIDUALLEVEL h4RYINGTOCAPTURETHECOMMUNITY SPIRIT AROUND THINGS AND MAKING IT UNDERSTOODFORMEMBERSOFTHECOM MUNITYISHARDWORKTHATMUSTBAL ANCEOURLEGALREQUIREMENTSASWELL ASOURLOCALINTERESTS vHESAID !RAPIDLYCHANGINGLEGALENVIRON MENTASWELLASSTATEANDFEDERALLAWS THAThARENTALWAYSALIGNEDvCOMPLI CATETHEANTI BULLYINGWORK HESAID h7ERE IN THE VANGUARD OF SOME OFTHISASWEWEREAFEWYEARSAGO WHENWEDIDTHEPOLICYAROUNDSUI CIDE PREVENTION AND WE WANT TO MAKESUREWEGETITRIGHT vHESAID (E SAID HE HOPES FOR A FINAL SCHOOLBOARDVOTEONANEWBULLYING POLICY!PRILFOLLOWINGADISCUS SION!PRIL

PRIVATE SCHOOLS WILL BE ABLE TO HOLDACANDLEv !DDRESSINGEQUITYISSUESRAISED BY ACCEPTING A LARGE DONATION DIRECTED AT A PARTICULAR SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS SAID THEIR GEN ERAL GOAL IS hPROGRESSIVE PARITYv OF STUDENT EXPERIENCE ACROSS THE DISTRICT 7ITHOUT THE NEW 0ALY CENTER hTHE STUDENT EXPERIENCE FOR IN DOOR ATHLETICS AT 0ALY WILL NOT BEOFTHESAMEQUALITYASINDOOR ATHLETICS AT 'UNN ONCE THE NEW 'UNNGYMSARECOMPLETED v#AS WELLSAID h-Y GOAL IS NOT HOW MUCH MONEY IS PUT INTO EACH CAMPUS BUTTHATWEHAVEAPARITYOFEXPE RIENCEINVOLLEYBALL INBASKETBALL IN YOGA AND OF COURSE IN ALL OUR CORE ACADEMICS )T SHOULD BE AN EQUALEXPERIENCEv "OARD MEMBER "ARB -ITCHELL ALLUDEDTOAHIGHANDGROWINGDE MANDFORINDOORATHLETICFACILITIES ATTHEHIGHSCHOOLS 7HEN 0ALYS EXISTING GYMS WEREBUILT hTHEONLYINTER CONFER ENCE SPORTS FOR GIRLS WERE TENNIS ANDSWIMMING vSHESAIDN Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@ paweekly.com.

"OARD MEMBERS APPEARED TO AC CEPT 3KELLYS REASONS TO DELAY THE BULLYINGRECOMMENDATIONS BUTSEV ERALCOMMUNITYMEMBERSTOOKISSUE WITHHISREMARKS h4HE /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS SETTLEMENT DOESNT REQUIRE A NEW POLICY IT JUST ASKS US TO FOLLOW EX ISTING POLICY v SAID +EN $AUBER A COFOUNDEROFTHECOMMUNITYGROUP 7E#AN$O"ETTER0ALO!LTO WHO UNSUCCESSFULLYRANFORASEATONTHE SCHOOLBOARDLAST.OVEMBER h4HEPROBLEMISTHATWEFAILEDTO FOLLOWPROCEDURESTHATWERECLEARLY ESTABLISHEDINLAW4HELAWHASNT CHANGEDINTHISAREA SOWESHOULDNT PRETENDTHATSTHEPROBLEMv $AUBER AND SEVERAL MEMBERS OF HIS GROUP HAVE CALLED FOR AN INDE PENDENTINVESTIGATIONOFWHATWENT WRONGINTHE BULLYINGCASE THAT WAS THE SUBJECT OF THE FEDERAL REPORTN

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Upfront EDUCATION

School lawyer: ‘We are not rehashing this any more’ District’s attorney calls discussion of bullying case ‘tiresome, distracting, unproductive’ by Palo Alto Weekly staff ALLING THE CONTROVERSY OVER A FEDERALCIVIL RIGHTSINVESTIGATION AhTIRESOME DISTRACTINGANDAN UNPRODUCTIVE LOOP v THE ATTORNEYFOR THE0ALO!LTOSCHOOLDISTRICTHASAD VISEDHERCLIENTSTOhSENDTHEMESSAGE THATWEAREMOVINGFORWARDv !TTORNEY ,AURIE 2EYNOLDS A PARTNERWITHTHE/AKLANDLAWFIRM OF &AGEN &RIEDMAN AND &ULFROST MADE HER SUGGESTIONS IN AN EMAIL TO 3UPERINTENDENT +EVIN 3KELLY ON &EBAFTERREBUFFINGREPEATEDAT TEMPTSBYTHE7EEKLYTOCONTACTHER AFTERHER&EBPRESENTATION 3KELLYFORWARDEDHERADVICETOEACH OFTHEFIVESCHOOL BOARDMEMBERS4HE 7EEKLYOBTAINEDTHEEMAILTHROUGHA 0UBLIC2ECORDS!CTREQUEST h)VE BEEN ROLLING AROUND IN MY HEADHOWWEBREAKFREEOFTHISTIRE SOME DISTRACTINGANDUNPRODUCTIVE

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LOOP v2EYNOLDSEMAILED3KELLY h)D LIKE TO SEE THE DISTRICT SEND THE MESSAGE THAT WE ARE MOVING FORWARD7EAREFOCUSEDONTHEIM PORTANTWORKOFDEVELOPINGPOLICIES CONDUCTING TRAINING AND PROVIDING NECESSARY EDUCATION 7E ARE NOT REHASHINGTHISANYMOREWEWONT LETITDISTRACTUSFROMTHISIMPORTANT WORK v2EYNOLDSWROTE 3CHOOLBOARD0RESIDENT$ANA4OM AND6ICE0RESIDENT"ARBARA-ITCH ELL APPEARED TO FOLLOW 2EYNOLDS ADVICE WITH THE PUBLICATION LAST &RIDAY -ARCH OFAGUESTOPINION PIECEINTHE7EEKLY 2EYNOLDS EMAILED 3KELLY AS THE 7EEKLY WAS ATTEMPTING TO OBTAIN CLARIFICATIONFROMHERONASSERTIONS SHEMADEATTHEBOARDMEETINGTHAT CONFLICTEDWITHDOCUMENTSRELATEDTO THECASEOFAMIDDLESCHOOLSTUDENT

WHOHADBEENREPEATEDLYBULLIED !FTERFOUREFFORTSTOREACHHERBY PHONEANDEMAIL 7EEKLYPUBLISHER "ILL*OHNSONRECEIVEDAREPLYh)TIS OURFIRMSPRACTICENOTTOSPEAKWITH REPORTERSONBEHALFOFCLIENTSORRE GARDINGCLIENTMATTERSv )NTHEONLYPUBLICPRESENTATIONON THE /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS /#2 INQUIRYINTOTHESCHOOLDISTRICTSHAN DLINGOFTHEBULLYINGCASE 2EYNOLDS TOLDTHEBOARD&EBTHEDISTRICTOF FEREDTODOSUBSTANTIALLYMORETRAINING ANDOTHERACTIONSTHANTHE/FFICEFOR #IVIL2IGHTSHADINITIALLYREQUESTED 3HESAIDWHENTHEDISTRICTRECEIVED THEFIRSTDRAFTLAST!PRILOFTHE/FFICE FOR#IVIL2IGHTSLISTOFREMEDIALAC TIONSITWANTEDTAKEN THEDISTRICTRE SPONDEDBYSAYINGTHEYWEREhGREATv BUTWANTEDTODOMORETHANWHATWAS BEINGASKED!CCORDINGTO2EYNOLDS

h)TWASKINDOFANAMUSINGMOMENT v SHE SAID h4HEY WERE STONE SILENT 4HEYSAID@7OW/+v 2EYNOLDSEXPLAINEDTOTHEBOARD THATTHE/FFICEFOR#IVIL2IGHTSONLY WANTED TRAINING DONE AT THE ONE MIDDLE SCHOOL THE BULLYING VICTIM ATTENDED BUTTHATTHEDISTRICTWANT EDTODOITATALLDISTRICTSCHOOLS "UTINTHEFIRSTDRAFTOFTHEAGREE MENT THE /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS ORIGINAL LANGUAGE WAS h4HE $IS TRICTWILLPROVIDEANNUALMANDATORY TRAININGONDISABILITY BASEDHARASS MENTTOALLMIDDLEANDHIGHSCHOOL SITE ADMINISTRATORS AND TEACHING STAFF /#2 IS AVAILABLE TO PROVIDE THEFIRSTTRAININGv 4HEFINALAGREEMENTSIGNEDIN$E CEMBER REFLECTINGTHEENHANCEMENTS 2EYNOLDS DESCRIBED STATED h4HE $ISTRICT WILL PROVIDE MANDATORY

TRAININGONDISABILITY BASEDHARASS MENT TO ALL SCHOOL SITE ADMINISTRA TORSINTHE$ISTRICT/#2ISAVAILABLE TOPROVIDETHEFIRSTTRAININGv )TCONTINUEDh$ISTRICTSITEADMIN ISTRATORSWILLTHENTRAINTHETEACHERS ATTHEIRSCHOOLSITESWITHINTHEFIRST THREEMONTHSOFTHESCHOOLYEARv )T ADDED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRIN CIPALSTOTHOSEBEINGTRAINEDBUTRE MOVED THE REQUIREMENT FOR ANNUAL TRAININGANDFORTHEIMMEDIATEAND FORMALTRAININGOFTEACHERS.EITHER AGREEMENT WAS LIMITED TO THE ONE MIDDLESCHOOLAS2EYNOLDSASSERTED TWICEINHERCOMMENTSTOTHEBOARD $ISTRICTADMINISTRATORSWHOWERE PRESENTATTHEMEETINGANDFAMILIAR WITH THE ORIGINAL DRAFT OFFERED NO CORRECTIONTO2EYNOLDSCOMMENTS

BANSAREILLEGALBECAUSETHEYVIOLATE THESTATES&OOD#ODE WHICHGUARDS HEALTHANDSANITATION3AN&RANCISCO WITHSTOODALEGALCHALLENGEFROMTHE GROUPWHENAJUDGEUPHELDITSBAN ON BAGS A DECISION THAT THE GROUP PLANS TO APPEAL ACCORDING TO #ITY !TTORNEY-OLLY3TUMP 4HE RESTAURANT INDUSTRY ALSO HAS SOME CONCERNS ABOUT 0ALO !LTOS NEW BAN *AVIER 'ONZALEZ DIRECTOR OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AF FAIRSFORTHE#ALIFORNIA2ESTAURANT !SSOCIATION ASKEDTHECOUNCILTO EXCLUDERESTAURANTSFROMTHENEW ORDINANCE 0LASTIC BAGS HE SAID ARE BETTER SUITED THAN PAPER BAGS FOR MANY OF THE CONTAINERS USED BYRESTAURANTS HESAID ANDREUS ABLE BAGS CAN POSE A HEALTH HAZ ARD WHEN CUSTOMER USE THEM FOR THINGSOTHERTHANFOOD h#ROSS CONTAMINATION AND FOOD BORNEILLNESSESAREAMAJORCONCERN ANDLIABILITIESTHATOURMEMBERSDONT WANTTOTAKEUP v'ONZALEZSAID "UTMOSTOFTHESPEAKERSAT-ON DAYS MEETING WERE IN FAVOR OF THE BAN CHARACTERIZINGITASANEXAMPLE OFGOODENVIRONMENTALSTEWARDSHIP &ORMER -AYOR 0ETER $REKMEIER WHO HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN CLEAN UP EVENTS AT THE 3AN &RANCISQUITO #REEKSINCE SAIDHEHASSEEN ADECLINEINGARBAGEINTHEPASTFEW YEARS BUT PLASTIC WASTE REMAINS 7HILE THESE BAGS ARE CONVENIENT $REKMEIERSAID hTHEPROBLEMSTHEY CAUSEOUTWEIGHTHEBENEFITSv h7EVE MADE A LOT OF PROGRESS BUTWENEEDTOTAKETHENEXTSTEP v $REKMEIERSAID 4HE NEW BAN WILL TAKE EFFECT ON *ULYFORRETAILESTABLISHMENTSAND ON.OVFORFOOD SERVICEESTABLISH MENTS WHICH INCLUDES EVERYTHING FROM RESTAURANTS AND DELIS TO FOOD TRUCKS )N ADOPTING THE NEW ORDI NANCE THE COUNCIL STRAYED SLIGHTLY FROM SEVERAL STAFF RECOMMENDA TIONS 7HILE STAFF PROPOSED CHARG INGCENTSFORAPAPERBAGINTHE FIRST YEAR AND THEN INCREASING IT TO  CENTS THE COUNCIL DECIDED TO

LEAVEITATCENTSFORATLEASTTO MONTHS AFTERWHICHTIMETHECITY CANREEVALUATETHEPRICING 4HE COUNCIL ALSO MODIFIED THE STAFFS PROPOSAL FOR THE TYPE OF BAGS THAT QUALIFY AS hREUSABLEv SO THATBAGSTHATARESMALLBUTDURABLE WOULD QUALIFY ,ASTLY THE COUNCIL AGREEDTOREMOVEAREQUIREMENTTHAT REUSABLEBAGSHAVELABELSBRANDING THEMASECOLOGICALLYFRIENDLY 4HIS REQUIREMENT WAS REMOVED UPON REQUEST FROM !PPLE WHICH ARGUED THAT THE NEW ENVIRONMEN TALLOGOSWOULDTARNISHTHELOOKOF ITS ICONIC DRAW STRING BAGS MAK INGTHEMLESSLIKELYTOBEREUSEDBY CUSTOMERS h0UTTINGANUGLYLABELONABAGTHAT WEWORKEDREALLYHARDTOMAKECLEAN ANDBEAUTIFUL ANDSOMETHINGPEOPLE WANT TO REUSE IS REALLY COUNTERPRO DUCTIVE v*ASON,UNDGAARD !PPLES MANAGERFORSTATEANDLOCALGOVERN MENTAFFAIRS TOLDTHECOUNCIL 4HECOUNCILWASLESSSYMPATHETIC TO 'ONZALEZS REQUEST THAT RESTAU RANTSBEEXEMPTFROMTHENEWBAN /NLY#OUNCILWOMAN+AREN(OLMAN WAS RECEPTIVE TO EXEMPTING FOOD ESTABLISHMENT FROM THE ORDINANCE "UT SHE ULTIMATELY JOINED -AYOR 'REG 3CHARFF #OUNCILWOMAN 'AIL 0RICE AND #OUNCILMEN 0AT "URT AND'REG3CHMIDINVOTINGFORTHE BROADERBAN (OLMANSVOTEPROVEDKEYASONLY FIVEOFNINECOUNCILMEMBERSWERE PRESENTFORTHEDISCUSSION-ARC"ER MANRECUSEDHIMSELFFROMTHEDIS CUSSIONBECAUSEOFANINVESTMENTIN ACOMPANYCONNECTEDTOBAGS6ICE -AYOR .ANCY 3HEPHERD #OUNCIL WOMAN,IZ+NISSAND#OUNCILMAN ,ARRY+LEINWEREALLABSENT )NVOTINGFORTHEBAN #OUNCILMAN 'REG3CHMIDCALLEDPLASTICBAGShA BLIGHTv AND SAID IT MAKES SENSE TO hMOVEMORESTRICTLYAGAINSTTHEMv 0RICESAIDTHENEWORDINANCESHOWS THECITYShCOMMITMENTTOENVIRON MENTAL GOALS AND ZERO WASTEv AND SAIDNOTADOPTINGSUCHABANWOULD BEhIRRESPONSIBLEvN

(continued on page 8)

ENVIRONMENT

Plastic bags banned at stores, restaurants City Council votes to ban plastic bags, require a 10-cent charge on paper bags HEERAOFPLASTICBAGSISABOUT TOCOMETOANENDATSHOPSAND RESTAURANTS THROUGHOUT 0ALO !LTO AFTER CITY OFFICIALS DECIDED -ONDAYNIGHT -ARCH TOGREATLY EXPAND THE CITYS EXISTING BAN ON THENOTORIOUSCREEKPOLLUTERS #ONTINUING A TREND THAT THE CITY LAUNCHEDMORETHANTHREEYEARSAGO THE#ITY#OUNCILVOTED -ONDAY NIGHTTOEXTEND0ALO!LTOSEXISTING

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by Gennady Sheyner BAN ON SINGLE USE PLASTIC BAGS AT SUPERMARKETS 4HE NEW ORDINANCE EXTENDSTHEBANTOALLOTHERRETAILERS ANDFOODESTABLISHMENTS)TALSORE QUIRESSTORESTOCHARGECENTSPER PAPERBAG3TAFFWILLREVISITTHISFEE INTOMONTHS )N ADOPTING THE NEW BAN 0ALO !LTO IS JOINING A LIST OF ABOUT  JURISDICTIONS IN #ALIFORNIA THAT ARE CURRENTLY WORKING ON SOME SORT OF

News Digest Tesla delays electric SUV )N&EBRUARYOFLASTYEAR 0ALO!LTO BASED4ESLA-OTORSSAIDITWOULD BEGINPRODUCTIONONITNEWESTLINEOFALL ELECTRICVEHICLES THE-ODEL8 ATTHEENDOF !CCORDINGTOITSMOSTRECENT3%#FILING THATNOLONGERAPPEARSTOBE THECASE )NITSANNUALFINANCIALREPORT 4ESLASTATEDTHATPRODUCTIONOFTHEVEHICLE WOULDACTUALLYBEGININLATE EFFECTIVELYPUSHINGTHESCHEDULEBACK AYEAR )NA6ALENTINES$AYPRESSRELEASELASTYEAR 4ESLACALLEDTHE-ODEL8 hTHEFASTESTSELLING4ESLAYET vEXCEEDINGMILLIONINADVANCESALES AFTERJUSTONEDAY 4HE-ODEL8ISAN356BUILTONTHESAMEPLATFORMASTHE-ODEL3 SEDAN ONLYWITHALL WHEELDRIVEANDTHECAPACITYTOFITSEVENADULTS 4HEFILINGDOESNTMAKEREFERENCETOTHEPREVIOUSSTATEMENTABOUTTHE CARSPRODUCTIONSCHEDULEANDDOESNTSPECIFICALLYEXPLAINWHYPRODUC TIONHASBEENDELAYED 4ESLAHASBUILT OFITS-ODEL3SEDANSANDHASDELIVEREDANOTHER  4HEREARERESERVATIONSFORSTILLANOTHER OFTHECARS4HE FILINGSTATESTHATTHECOMPANYEXPECTSTOBEPROFITABLEBYTHEENDOFTHE YEAR (OWEVER ITINCURREDANETLOSSOFMILLIONIN WHICHADDS UPTOMORETHANBILLIONINNETLOSSESSINCETHECOMPANYSINCEPTION IN 4HEFILINGSTATESTHECOMPANYSRELIANCEONAMILLIONLOANFROM THE53$EPARTMENTOF%NERGYASONEOFTHERISKFACTORSFORINVESTING)T AGREEDTOTHELOAN WHICHITUSEDINPARTFORRESEARCHANDDEVELOPMENTOF THE-ODEL3 INANDAGREEDTOPAYITBACKBY4HEFILINGSTATES THAT4ESLAHASMODIFIEDTHEAGREEMENTTOREPAYTHELOANBYN — Eric Van Susteren Page 6ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…Ê£x]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

BAGRESTRICTION4HECITYEMERGEDAS ALEADERINTHISFIELDIN WHEN ITBANNEDSINGLE USECHECKOUTBAGS FROMSUPERMARKETSDESPITECONCERNS FROM SOME GROCERS AND A LAWSUIT FROMTHEPLASTIC BAGINDUSTRY3INCE  ABOUT  CITIES AND COUNTIES THROUGHOUT THE STATE HAVE ADOPTED SIMILAR ORDINANCES ACCORDING TO A NEWSTAFFREPORT4HELAWSUIT MEAN WHILE WAS SETTLED WHEN THE CITY AGREED TO CONDUCT AN ENVIRONMEN TAL IMPACT REPORT BEFORE ADOPTING ANYFURTHERBANS 4HE NEW BAN WILL APPLY ONLY TO CHECK OUTBAGS NOThPRODUCTBAGSv THATARECOMMONLYUSEDFORPRODUCE AND SOUP CONTAINERS 4HE GOALS OF THE BAN ARE TO REDUCE PLASTIC BAG POLLUTION IN LOCAL CREEKS BAYLANDS ANDOTHEROPENSPACESCUTBACKON THENUMBEROFALLBAGSDISTRIBUTEDBY LOCALESTABLISHMENTSANDPROMOTEA hSHIFTTOWARDTHEUSEOFLONG LASTING ANDDURABLEREUSABLEBAGSBYRETAIL CUSTOMERS IN 0ALO !LTO v ACCORD INGTOANEWREPORTFROMTHE0UBLIC 7ORKS$EPARTMENT *ULIE 7EISS AN ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALIST IN THE 0UBLIC 7ORKS $E PARTMENT SAID THAT WHILE THE SU PERMARKET BAN HELPED REDUCE THE NUMBER OF PLASTIC BAGS IN THE CITY THEY REMAIN IN WIDE USAGE )N THE LAST TWO CREEK CLEANUP EVENTS VOL UNTEERS COLLECTED ABOUT  PLASTIC BAGSFROMTHECREEKS SHESAID h7EKNOWWEHAVEAPROBLEMBE CAUSEWERESEEINGITINOURCREEKS v 7EISSSAID 4HE NEW BAN DREW A SOMEWHAT PREDICTABLEREACTION WITHLOCALEN VIRONMENTALISTSAPPLAUDINGTHECITY ANDOPPONENTSTHREATENINGTOSUEIT 4HE3AVETHE0LASTIC"AG#OALITION THE INDUSTRY GROUP THAT HAS SUED 0ALO !LTO AND OTHER CITIES IN THE PAST CONTINUEDTOMAINTAINTHATSUCH


Upfront

Parking

Proposed changes to downtown parking

(continued from page 3)

City’s proposals to improve parking in downtown Palo Alto

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SON 3TREET ANDA FOUR STORYPROJ ECT PLANNED FOR  7AVERLEY 3T 4HESE PROJECTS WILL BRING ABOUT   SQUARE FEET OF NON RESI DENTIALDEVELOPMENT PUSHINGTHE DOWNTOWN AREA WELL BEYOND THE THRESHOLD FOR NEW DEVELOPMENT THAT THE CITY APPROVED IN  2EACHING THAT   SQUARE FOOTLIMITREQUIRESTHECITYTOCON DUCTANANALYSISOFDOWNTOWNAND CONSIDER WHETHER IT CAN ACCOM MODATEFURTHERDEVELOPMENT4HE CITYPLANSTOSENDOUTREQUESTSFOR PROPOSALSFORTHENEWSTUDYBYTHE ENDOFTHISMONTH 4HENEWREPORTFROMTHEPLANNING DEPARTMENT NOTES THAT DOWNTOWN BUILDINGS VACANCY RATES ARE NOW BELOW  PERCENT AND LEASE RATES FOR OFFICES ARE IN THE  TO  PERSQUAREFOOTRANGEˆAMONGTHE HIGHESTINTHECOUNTRY h-ANYOFTHENEWEROFFICEDEVEL OPMENTS HOWEVER HAVENOTPROVIDED PARKINGTOTHELEVELREQUIREDBYTHE ZONINGCODE ASEXEMPTIONSAREPRO VIDED FOR TRANSFERABLE DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS AND OTHER PROVISIONS v THE REPORT STATES h-ANY APPROVED OR UPCOMINGPROJECTSHAVEPOTENTIALTO ADD TO THE SQUARE FOOTAGE OF OFFICE SPACEDOWNTOWNORTOIMPACTDOWN TOWNORNEARBYPARKINGORTRAFFICv #ITYSTAFFPLANSTOINTRODUCEPRO POSALS IN THE COMING MONTHS TO ELIMINATE SOME OF THESE PARKING

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Sales of more parking permits for the Byant Street and Cowper Street garages, valet parking at the High/Alma South garage, reduced parking for city employees under City Hall, more restrictions on neighborhood parking and a new garage on High Street are under consideration by the City of Palo Alto.

EXEMPTIONS "UT AS AN OVERTURE TO FRUSTRATEDDOWNTOWNRESIDENTS THE CITYISCONSIDERINGMORENEAR TERM SOLUTIONS/NEINVOLVESSELLING MORE PARKING PERMITS TOTAL AT THE "RYANT 3TREET AND #OWPER 3TREET GARAGES STARTING AT THE END OF THIS

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet with the Utilities Advisory Commission to discuss the potential expansion of the city’s fiber-optic network and the commission’s priorities. The council also plans to discuss near-term strategies for dealing with downtown’s parking shortages and consider projects for a potential infrastructure revenue ballot measure. The joint session will begin at 6 p.m. on Monday, March 18, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). The rest of the meeting will follow in the Council Chambers. BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will discuss reports from highschool principals on steps toward improvement of guidance-counseling services, and will be asked to vote on conceptual designs for a new, donor-funded indoor athletic facility at Palo Alto High School as well as an addition to Paly’s science building. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 19, in the boardroom of school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). COUNCIL FINANCE COMMITEE ... The committee plans to discuss potential changes to the city’s street-sweeping program, proposed changes to water rates and the ongoing cost-of-service study. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 19, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITEE ... The committee plans to discuss an ordinance banning smoking at three downtown parks; consider the process used to establish the city’s guiding principles and core values; and discuss potential changes to the city’s annual reorganization meeting. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, March 19, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board plans to discuss a request by AT&T for a wireless communication facility at the Palo Alto Airport and 411 Page Mill Road, a request by Stoecker and Northway on behalf of Norm Schwab for a review of a new 32,542-square-foot mixed-use building at 441 Page Mill Road. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, March 21, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PUBLIC ART COMMISSION ... The commission plans to see presentations from Gunn High School and Palo Alto High School students, each seeking approval for a mural. The commission also plans to discuss artwork donated to the collection and approve funds for collection maintenance. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 21, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Build a new garage on High Street between University Avenue and Hamilton Avenue, across from an existing parking structure. With five stories, it could fit 145 self-parked cars or 194 cars using tandem or stacked parking. It would be jointly funded by city and developer Charles “Chop� Keenan. Sell more parking permits. A total of 174 more parking permits would be sold for the Bryant Street and Cowper Street garages, where spaces reserved for permit-holder spaces are currently underused. Sales would start at the end of this month. Launch valet-parking program at the High Street garage be-

tween University and Hamilton. Having an attendant park cars would increase garage capacity by 20 percent but also drive up permit costs. Free up City Hall parking. By launching a program that encourages city employees not to drive to work, city hopes to free up 50 to 100 spaces in the City Hall garage. Identify more sites for garages. Five downtown parking lots are being evaluated as possible sites for garages: Hamilton Avenue and Waverley Street; Gilman Street and Bryant Street; Gilman and Waverley Street; High Street between Hamilton and University avenues; and Urban Lane.

MONTH A MOVE THAT IS EXPECTED TO REDUCE WAITING LISTS FOR DOWNTOWN PARKINGPERMITS4HECITYALSOPLANS TOINTRODUCEAVALETPROGRAMATTHE GARAGE ON (IGH 3TREET BETWEEN 5NIVERSITY AND (AMILTON AVENUES 4HIS ATTENDANT PARKING PROGRAM ISEXPECTEDTOINCREASECAPACITYAT THEGARAGEBYPERCENT THOUGHIT WOULDALSODRIVEUPPERMITCOSTS !NOTHERSHORT TERMMEASUREISRE DUCINGTHENUMBEROFPARKINGSPAC ESINTHE#ITY(ALLGARAGEALLOTTED TOCITYEMPLOYEES4HECITYPLANSTO INTRODUCEAhTRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENTv PROGRAM THAT WOULD GIVEWORKERSINCENTIVESTOTAKEAL TERNATIVE MODES OF TRANSPORTATION AMOVEEXPECTEDTOSAVETO SPACES !T THE SAME TIME STAFF AND ITS CONSULTANTAREEVALUATINGFIVEOTHER DOWNTOWNLOCATIONSASPOSSIBLESITES FOR PARKING GARAGES 4HESE INCLUDE LOTSON(AMILTON!VENUEAND7AVER LEY3TREETON'ILMAN3TREETAND"RY ANT3TREETON'ILMANAND7AVERLEY 3TREETON(IGH3TREETBETWEEN(AM ILTONAND5NIVERSITYAVENUESANDON 5RBAN,ANE3TAFFPLANSTOBRINGAN INTERIM REPORT TO THE COUNCIL ABOUT THESESITESIN-AYN Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

School

(continued from page 3)

WILL BE MADE IMMEDIATELY AND OTHERS WILL BE IMPLEMENTED IN THE  SCHOOLYEAR #HIEF"USINESS /FFICER#ATHY-AKSAID )NADDITIONTOTHEMILLIONIN NEWSPENDING -AKSAIDSHEINTENDS INTHENEARFUTURETOPROPOSEANEW  MILLION hPROFESSIONAL DEVELOP MENT FUNDv TO BE SET ASIDE FOR A THREE TOFIVE YEARPROFESSIONAL DE VELOPMENT PROJECT FOR TEACHERS AND OTHERDISTRICTSTAFFMEMBERSN Staff Writer Chris Kenrick can be emailed at ckenrick@paweekly. com. ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂŠ>Ă€VÂ…ĂŠÂŁx]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 7


Upfront

Cubberley

(continued from page 3)

Matched CareGivers

“There’s no place like home.�

When you, or someone you care about, needs assistance... you can count on us to be there. We provide Peninsula families with top, professional caregivers. Call now

(650) 839-2273 www.matchedcaregivers.com

SHOULDTHATPLANFALLTHROUGH 4HOUGHUNANIMOUSONMOSTQUES TIONS THE #OMMUNITY !DVISORY #OMMITTEEWASSPLITONWHETHERTHE CITYSHOULDRENEWITSLEASEOF#UB BERLEY FROM THE SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR FIVEYEARSORFORYEARS5NDERCUR RENTTERMS THECITYPAYSTHESCHOOL DISTRICTABOUTMILLIONAYEAR h4HEARGUMENTSFORASHORTERFIVE YEAR LEASETYPICALLYREVOLVEDAROUND THENEEDTOCREATEPRESSURETOGETTHE LONG TERMPLANNINGDONEINATIMELY MANNER vTHECOMMITTEESTATED h)T WAS FELT THAT A SHORTER LEASE WOULDHAVETHEEFFECTOF@PUTTINGTHE COLLECTIVEFEETOFTHECITYANDSCHOOL DISTRICTINTHEFIREv 4HE GROUP SAID IT IS PREMATURE TOINCLUDEFINANCINGOFALONG TERM PLANFOR#UBBERLEYINABALLOT

Lawyer

(continued from page 6)

4HEFINALAGREEMENTALSOREDUCED THE REQUIREMENTS FROM MANDATING ANNUAL AGE APPROPRIATE INSTRUCTION ON DISABILITY HARASSMENT TO REQUIR INGITFORONLYTHENEXTTHREEYEARS 2EYNOLDSALSOLEFTTHEPUBLICWITH THEIMPRESSIONTHATTHEDISTRICTHAD NO ABILITY TO SETTLE THE CASE WITH THE/FFICEFOR#IVIL2IGHTSPRIORTO THE /#2S ISSUANCE OF A REPORT ON THE CASE BECAUSE THE FAMILY OF THE

MEASURECONTEMPLATEDBYTHECITY 4HE  MEMBER COMMITTEE CO CHAIRED BY FORMER -AYOR -IKE #OBB AND FORMER SCHOOL BOARD 0RESIDENT -ANDY ,OWELL WORKED OVERANINE MONTHPERIODTOGENER ATEALENGTHY MULTI VOLUMEREPORT #OMMITTEEMEMBERSINCLUDEDOTHER FORMERCOUNCILMEMBERSANDSCHOOL BOARDMEMBERSASWELLASARANGEOF COMMUNITYACTIVISTS %ACH OF FOUR SUBCOMMITTEES ˆ ONSCHOOLNEEDS COMMUNITYNEEDS FACILITIES AND FINANCE ˆ GENERATED DETAILEDREPORTS WHICHAREINCLUDED INTHEFULLCOMMITTEESFINALREPORT 4HE COMMITTEE STUDIED PUBLIC JOINT USE PROJECTS IN A NUMBER OF OTHER COMMUNITIES AND CONCLUDED SUCHANARRANGEMENTWOULDBETHE BESTSOLUTIONFOR0ALO!LTO )T RECOMMENDED THAT ANY DEVEL OPMENT BE SCHEDULED IN PHASES TO PRESERVEPUBLICUSEOFATLEASTPARTOF THESITETHROUGHTHEPROCESS BULLIED STUDENT WOULDNT AGREE TO A PROCESS CALLED %ARLY #OMPLAINT 2ESOLUTION WHICHISAVAILABLEWHEN ACOMPLAINTISFIRSTRECEIVED )N FACT /FFICE FOR #IVIL 2IGHTS RULES CLEARLY STATE THAT AT ANY TIME DURINGANINVESTIGATION THEDISTRICT CAN OPT TO ENTER INTO A RESOLUTION AGREEMENT AND AVOID FORMAL AND POSSIBLEDAMAGINGLEGALFINDINGS 4HEDISTRICTSFAILURETOSEEKSUCH ANOUTCOMECOULDBECOSTLYBECAUSE THEFINDINGSOFNON COMPLIANCEWITH FEDERALLAWCANNOWBEUSEDINLITI GATIONAGAINSTTHEDISTRICTN

4HEADVISORYCOMMITTEESTRESSEDA SENSEOFURGENCYONLONG TERMPLANS FOR#UBBERLEY WHOSENEARLY YEAR OLDBUILDINGSAREINNEEDOFREPLACE MENTORSIGNIFICANTUPGRADES h+ICKING THE CAN DOWN THE ROAD BYRENEWINGTHELEASEWITHNOLONG TERMPLAN ISCLEARLYNOTASOLUTION v THECOMMITTEECONCLUDED h)TCOULDHAVETHECONSEQUENCEOF ELIMINATINGPOSSIBLESOLUTIONSANDEX ACERBATINGTHEEXISTINGPROBLEMSv

4HECOMMITTEEWASTOPRESENTITS FINDINGS4HURSDAYNIGHT -ARCH TOAJOINTMEETINGOFTHE#ITY#OUN CILANDTHE"OARDOF%DUCATIONN

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PaloAltoOnline.com A summary of the Cubberley meeting, which is taking place after the Weekly’s press deadline, will be posted on Palo Alto Online.

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (March 11)

Plastic bags: The council passed an ordinance banning plastic bags at local retail and food-service establishments and imposing a 10-cent charge on paper bags. Yes: Burt, Holman, Price, Scharff, Schmid No: Berman Absent: Klein, Kniss, Shepherd

Board of Education (March 12)

Budget: The board approved an interim financial report, including the addition of $2.6 million in allocations toward principals’ discretionary funds, new staffing at the school and district levels and technology support. Yes: Unanimous Paly construction: The board discussed “conceptual designs� for a new, donorfunded indoor athletic facility at Palo Alto High School as well as an addition to the Paly science building, with a final vote expected March 19. Action: None Special services: The board discussed a new policy for identifying and educating children with disabilities under Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, with a final vote expected March 19. Action: None

Planning and Transportation Commission (March 13)

Comprehensive Plan: The commission heard an update on staff’s progress to amend the city’s Comprehensive Plan. Action: None

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Upfront AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Law firms protest plan to close Buena Vista Mobile Home Park Palo Alto officials urged to oppose conversion of mobile park into housing complex by Gennady Sheyner CONTROVERSIALPROPOSALTOTURN 0ALO!LTOSSOLEMOBILE HOME PARKINTOADENSEHOUSINGDE VELOPMENTISFACINGOPPOSITIONFROM TWO AREA LAW FIRMS WHICH ARGUED INARECENTLETTERTOTHECITYTHATTHE CONVERSION WOULD CLASH WITH STATE LAWANDWITHTHECITYSOWNHOUSING POLICIES ,AW &OUNDATION OF 3ILICON 6AL LEYANDTHE7ESTERN#ENTERON,AW AND0OVERTYWROTEA-ARCHLETTER PROTESTING A PROPOSAL BY THE *ISSER FAMILY WHICHOWNSTHEPROPERTYON %L#AMINO2EAL ANDDEVELOP ER0ROMETHEUS2EAL%STATE'ROUPTO BUILD LUXURY APARTMENTS 4HE PRO POSAL THE LETTER STATES WOULD DIS PLACEHUNDREDSOFTHERESIDENTSAND hWREAK HAVOCv ON THE COMMUNITY OF"UENA6ISTA A UNITMOBILE HOMEPARKON%L#AMINO2EALTHAT HASBEENPROVIDINGAFFORDABLEHOUS INGSINCETHES 4HE PROPOSAL WOULD CONVERT THE PARK LOCATED NEAR ,OS 2OBLES !V ENUE IN THE "ARRON 0ARK NEIGHBOR HOOD INTOA UNITHOUSINGCOM PLEX 7HILE LOCAL LAW REQUIRES THE CITYTOTRYTOIDENTIFYhCOMPARABLEv HOUSINGFORTHEDISPLACEDRESIDENTS

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ANDPAYREASONABLERELOCATIONCOSTS THELETTERFROMTHELAWFIRMARGUES THATTHISCOULDBENEXTTOIMPOSSIBLE WITHOUTRESIDENTSHAVINGTOMOVETO ADISTANTLOCATION h"EING FORCED TO MOVE FROM THE 0ARK WILL CREATE A CONSIDERABLE HARDSHIPFORTHERESIDENTS vTHELET TER STATES h-OST RESIDENTS WILL NOT BE ABLE TO AFFORD TO LIVE ANYWHERE ELSE IN 0ALO !LTO ONE OF THE MOST EXPENSIVE PLACES IN THE COUNTRY TO LIVE WITHOUT SIGNIFICANT HOUSING SUBSIDIESOROTHERASSISTANCEv 4HELETTERARGUESTHATBECAUSETHE CITY IS hSIGNIFICANTLY INVOLVEDv IN THECLOSUREOF"UENA6ISTA ITCANBE CONSIDERED A hDISPLACING AGENCYv UNDER THE #ALIFORNIA 2ELOCATION !SSISTANCE!CT4HECITY THELETTER NOTES HAS BEEN FACILITATING COM MUNITYMEETINGSONTHEPROJECTAND HELPING 0ROMETHEUS FIND A RELOCA TION SPECIALIST AND APPRAISER 4HE CITYSINVOLVEMENT THELETTERSTATES MAKESRESIDENTSELIGIBLEFORBENEFITS UNDERTHE#2!! WHICHAPPLIESTO PROJECTS hUNDERTAKEN BY A PUBLIC ENTITYv 4HIS INCLUDES hSIGNIFICANT RELOCATION BENEFITS INCLUDING THE PURCHASEOFACOMPARABLEHOMEv

4HE LAW FIRMS ALSO ARGUE THAT CLOSINGTHEPARKWOULDhWREAKHAV OCINTHELIVESOFITSRESIDENTSINLESS TANGIBLEWAYSvBYSEVERINGTHETIES THATHAVEFORMEDBETWEENNEIGHBORS ANDELIMINATINGWHATHASBECOMEA hDISTINCTCOMMUNITYvIN0ALO!LTO 4HECONVERSIONWOULDALSOEXAC ERBATE 0ALO !LTOS ALREADY SEVERE SHORTAGEOFAFFORDABLEHOUSING THE LAWFIRMSARGUE ANDWOULDRUNCON TRARYTOTHECITYSHOUSINGELEMENT ITSOFFICIALVISIONDOCUMENTFORHOUS ING)TURGESTHECITYTODENYEFFORTS TOCONVERTTHEMOBILEPARKOR FAILING THAT TO ONLY APPROVE THE PROJECT IF ITS CONSISTENT WITH THE #2!! AND THECITYSORDINANCE h4HECLOSUREOF"UENA6ISTA-O BILE (OME 0ARK WOULD BE NOTHING SHORTOFCATASTROPHEFORMANYOFITS RESIDENTS ANDITWOULDCAUSETHELOSS OF AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF AFFORD ABLEHOUSINGINONEOFTHECOUNTRYS MOSTEXPENSIVECITIES vTHELETTERCO SIGNED BY ATTORNEYS FROM THE TWO FIRMSSTATES 4HE PROPOSAL TO CONVERT "UENA 6ISTATOANAPARTMENTCOMPLEXHAS

GREENBLOTT L A N D S C A P E

I N T E R I O R S

(continued on page 12)

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Peninsula Easter Services FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF PALO ALTO .#ALIFORNIAAT"RYANTs  sWWWFBC PALOALTOORG March 28, 6PM Maundy Thursday Soup Supper followed by Service March 29, 12-3PM 7:30PM

Good Friday, Sanctuary Open for Prayer and Meditation Tenebrae Service at Covenant Presbyterian, 670 E. Meadow

March 31, 6:30AM 10AM 11:30AM

Sunrise Service and Pancake Breakfast at Mitchell Park EASTER WORSHIP CELEBRATION Brunch & Children’s Easter Egg Hunt

Journey to Easter 11:00a.m. 11:00a.m.

You Are Invited Sunday, March 24th Sunday, March 31st

Palm Sunday Easter Service

WESLEY UNITED METHODIST

470 Cambridge Ave (one block off California) Rev. Jerry Fox

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH UCC 1985 Louis Road, Palo Alto (650) 856-6662 www.fccpa.org

Maundy Thursday, March 28th Soup Supper & Communion, 6:30pm, Service of Tenebrae, 7:30pm

Good Friday, March 29th Service of Contemplation, Noon

Easter Sunday Celebration Worship at 9:30 am & 11:00 am Oxford Street Brass & The Hallelujah Chorus Easter Egg Hunt 10:30am

’

An open and affirming congregation of the United Church of Christ

Holy Week Services March 28 6:00 pm

Seder Dinner

March 29 Noon & 7:00 pm Good Friday Services March 31 9:30 am

Easter Festival Service

Children’s Easter Egg Hunt after the service!

Bethany Lutheran Church 1095 Cloud Avenue, Menlo Park 650.854.5897 www.bethany-mp.org

HOLY WEEK AT ALL SAINTS’ ALL ARE WELCOME March 24 PALM SUNDAY 8am Holy Eucharist 10am Palm Procession & Eucharist

March 28 MAUNDY THURSDAY Celebrant: Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves 6pm Light Supper 7pm Eucharist with Mandatum

March 29 GOOD FRIDAY Celebrant: Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves Noon Veneration of the Cross & Holy Communion 6pm Solemn Evensong of the Burial of Christ

March 30 HOLY SATURDAY 8pm Great Vigil of Easter followed by Champagne Reception

March 31 EASTER SUNDAY 8am Eucharist 10am Festival Eucharist Special Music – The Whole Noyse Brass Egg Hunt & Easter Brunch All Saints’ Episcopal Church Palo Alto 555 Waverley @ Hamilton www.asaints.org

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Let’s Celebrate Easter Together

Peninsula Easter Services is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Peninsula Easter Services, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com


Peninsula Easter Services Holy Week & Easter at

St. Bede’s

Episcopal Church 2650 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park

!!      12 noon Foot Washing & Holy Eucharist 6:30pm Agape meal & Holy Eucharist 8:00pm-midnight Vigil in the church  

 

12 noon Communion from reserved sacrament & music approx. 1 hr 7:30pm Tenebrae approx. 1Âź hr

ST. ANN ANGLICAN CHAPEL A TRADITIONAL EPISCOPAL

CHURCH

541 Melville Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94301 650-838-0508 The Most Reverend Robert S. Morse, Vicar Reverend Matthew Weber, Assistant

HOLY WEEK Child Care Provided Wednesday, March 27 Palm Sunday

12 Noon

Thursday, March 28

Maundy Thursday 7 pm

Friday, March 29

Good Friday

Saturday, March 30 Sunday, March 31

Join us for EASTER

Distribution of Palms & Choral Eucharist Choral Eucharist

Holy Saturday

3 pm 7 pm 8 pm

The Way of the Cross Good Friday Liturgy Easter Vigil

Easter Sunday

11 am

Choral Eucharist

March 31, 2013 10:30 AM Worship 1140 Cowper St.

11:30 AM Easter treats 650-325-5659

www.fprespa.org

    7:30pm Great Vigil of Easter approx. 1Âź hr

ST. MARK’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH PALO ALTO

    8:00am Eucharist with Hymns 10:15am Sung Eucharist w/choir 11:30am Easter Egg Hunt Nursery available 10-11:30am

Maundy Thursday— March 28 V6:15pm

Monastic Supper & Liturgy of the Word followed by Holy Eucharist & Stripping of the Altar

Good Friday — March 29 V Noon to 2:00pm Stations of the Cross with Reflections

Covenant Presbyterian Church

March 29 Good Friday 7:30 p.m. Tenebrae Scripture readings, music, and the extinguishing of lights comprise this powerful service of remembrance March 30 Holy Saturday 10:00 a.m. Children’s Easter Egg Hunt Activities to celebrate Easter March 31 Easter Sunday 6:30 a.m. Sunrise Service at Mitchell Park Bowl Sunrise meditation. Breakfast follows.

Labyrinth Stations: A Walking Meditation

V 7:30 to 8:30pm

Tenebrae: The Office of Shadows

V 5:30am

Easter Vigil, Eucharist & Baptism

Easter — March 31 V 8:00 to 9:30am

Festive Breakfast & Family Easter Activities

V 10:00am

Festive Holy Eucharist

600 Colorado Ave, P.A. (650) 326-3800 www.saint-marks.com

March 24 Palm/Passion Sunday 10:30 a.m. Worship Procession of the Palms March 28 Maundy Thursday 6:00 p.m. Dinner and Worship at First Baptist Church 305 N California Ave, Palo Alto

V 2:00 to 3:00pm

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS PARISH HOLY WEEK 2013

8:00 PM EASTER VIGIL SAT. MARCH 30, 2013 St. Albert the Great 1095 Channing Ave.



EASTER SUNDAY MARCH 31, 2013: ST. ALBERT THE GREAT 1095 Channing Ave. 9:00 AM (English)

Join Us For Holy Week & Easter The great question of Easter is about us: where are the tombs in our life that God is inviting us to leave and where is new life rising in us? Join us at Trinity as we celebrate the promise and possibility of new life. Palm Sunday, March 24: 10:00 am* Maundy Thursday (The Last Supper) March 28, 6:00 pm* (with simple meal) Good Friday, March 29 7:00 am, Noon, 7:00 pm

10:30 a.m. Worship A Celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ with music, scripture, proclamation of the Word and Communion. Bring fresh owers for the Easter Cross.

OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY 3233 Cowper St. 9:00 am (Spanish) 10:30 am (English)

The Great Vigil of Easter Baptisms & First Easter Communion Saturday, March 30, 7:00 pm*

Rev. Dr. Margaret Boles Covenant Presbyterian Church, 670 E. Meadow Dr., Palo Alto 94306 (650) 494-1760 www.CovenantPresbyterian.net

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS 751 Waverley St. 7:30 am (English) 8:45 am (English) 10:30 am (English) 12:00 noon (Gregorian)

Easter Sunday, March 31 6:30 am in the Memorial Garden 8:30 am* & 10:30 am* in Church with Festival Choir *Indicates child care available. ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂŠ>Ă€VÂ…ĂŠÂŁx]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 11


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CREATED A SWELL OF ANXIETY AND OP POSITIONAMONGTHEPARKSRESIDENTS ABOUT  OF WHOM ATTENDED A #ITY #OUNCILMEETINGIN/CTOBERTOURGE THE COUNCIL TO OPPOSE THE PROJECT 3EVERALSAIDTHEDISPLACEMENTWOULD HAVEAPARTICULARLYHARSHIMPACTON THEIRCHILDREN WHOWOULDNOLONGER BEABLETOATTEND0ALO!LTOSCHOOLS 2ESIDENTS FROM THE SURROUNDING "ARRON0ARKNEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING ADVOCATES HAVE BEEN CRITICAL OF THE 0ROMETHEUS PROPOSAL AND HAVE FORMED WORKING GROUPS IN RECENT MONTHSTOCONSIDERWAYSTOHELPTHE ROUGHLY"UENA6ISTARESIDENTS 7HILETHECOUNCILHASYETTODIS CUSSTHEPROJECT THECITYS(UMAN 2ELATIONS #OMMISSIONS PASSED A RESOLUTION ON &EB  CALLING FOR THE CITY TO MAKE hEVERY EFFORTv TO HELP DISPLACED RESIDENTS RELO CATESOMEWHEREIN0ALO!LTO4HE COMMISSIONALSOURGEDTHESCHOOL DISTRICTTOALLOWCHILDRENOF"UENA 6ISTA RESIDENTS TO CONTINUE TO AT TENDLOCALSCHOOLSANDENSURETHAT

NORESIDENTSBECOMEHOMELESSBE CAUSEOFTHISPROJECT 4HE PROPOSED CONVERSION COMES ATATIMEWHENTHECITYISSTRUGGLING TO MEET REGIONAL MANDATES FOR AF FORDABLE HOUSING 7HILE THE CITY HASABOUTRENT CONTROLLEDUNITS THEYAREALLOCCUPIEDANDHAVELONG WAITINGLISTS"UENA6ISTARESIDENTS PAY BETWEEN  AND   IN MONTHLYRENT 7HILE THE MOBILE PARK LIES ON PRIVATEPROPERTY THECITYHASSOME LEVERAGEWHENITCOMESTOTHE0RO METHEUS PROPOSAL 4HE CONVERSION OFTHEMOBILEPARKTOANAPARTMENT COMPLEX WOULD REQUIRE A ZONE CHANGE BY THE #ITY #OUNCIL TO AL LOWGREATERDENSITYATTHESITE3UCH AZONECHANGEWOULDRUNCOUNTERTO AT LEAST ONE PROVISION IN THE CITYS #OMPREHENSIVE 0LAN THE OFFICIAL LAND USEBIBLE 4HE #OMPREHENSIVE 0LAN STATES THAThTOTHEEXTENTFEASIBLE THECITY WILLSEEKAPPROPRIATELOCAL STATEAND FEDERALFUNDINGTOASSISTINPRESERVA TION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE EXIST INGUNITSINTHE"UENA6ISTA-OBILE (OME0ARKvN Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Police investigate string of residential burglaries 0OLICE ARE INVESTIGATING A STRING OF FOUR RESIDENTIAL BURGLARIES IN 0ALO!LTO THREEOFWHICHOCCURREDONTHESAMEDAY (Posted March 14 at 9:43 a.m.)

Movie theater proposed for San Antonio center $EVELOPER-ERLONE'EIERHASSIGNIFICANTLYREVISEDITSPROPOSALFOR PHASETWOAT3AN!NTONIO3HOPPING#ENTERTOINCLUDEANEIGHT SCREEN MOVIETHEATERTOGOWITHAHOTELANDOFFICEBUILDING(Posted March 14 at 8:40 a.m.)

Police arrest man for stealing 10,000 pills 0OLICEARRESTEDAMAN-ARCHFORSTEALINGMORETHAN PILLSOF PRESCRIPTIONNARCOTICSFROMACLOSEDPHARMACYATTHE0ALO!LTO-EDI CAL&OUNDATIONAT%L#AMINO2EAL(Posted March 13 at 2:50 p.m.)

Menlo Police look for ‘suspicious’ man in van -ENLO0ARK0OLICEARELOOKINGFORAMANWHOTRIEDTOCOMMUNICATE WITH YOUNG GIRLS ON THE  BLOCK OF !LMANOR !VENUE WHILE THEY WEREONTHEIRWAYSCHOOLON-ARCHATAM(Posted March 13 at 9:41 a.m.)

Palo Alto teen places 10th in national contest !0ALO!LTOTEENAGERHASPLACEDTHINANATIONALMATHANDSCIENCE COMPETITION TAKING HOME   IN THE  )NTEL 3CIENCE 4ALENT 3EARCH(Posted March 13 at 9:18 a.m.)

Armed robbery, assault occurs at Palo Alto hotel !MANWITHAKNIFEROBBEDAWOMANANDTHENSEXUALLYASSAULTED HERDURINGANARRANGEDMEETINGATAROOMINTHE'LASS3LIPPER)NNIN 0ALO!LTOON3ATURDAY -ARCH ACCORDINGTOPOLICE (Posted March 12 at 1:29 p.m.)

Stanford: strong link between sugar, diabetes 2ESEARCHERS HAVE THOUGHT FOR YEARS THAT EATING TOO MUCH OF ANY FOODCANCAUSEWEIGHTGAINANDPREDISPOSEPEOPLETODIABETES"UTA 3TANFORD5NIVERSITY3CHOOLOF-EDICINESTUDYHASNOWLINKEDSUGAR DIRECTLYANDINDEPENDENTLYTODIABETES(Posted March 10 at 2:35 p.m.)

Man chases robbers, gets his money back !MANWHOWASROBBEDOFATA-ENLO0ARKGASSTATION4HURSDAY PURSUEDTHETWOSUSPECTS RETRIEVEDTHEMONEY ANDTHENLEDPOLICETO THEIRVEHICLE WHERETHEPAIRWASARRESTED POLICEHAVEREPORTED(Posted March 9 at 10:18 a.m.)

Page 12ĂŠUĂŠĂŠ>Ă€VÂ…ĂŠÂŁx]ÊÓä£ÎÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“


Pulse

Albert Dadian

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto March 7-13 Violence related Armed robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Elder abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Shoplifting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . 10 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/property damage . . . .7 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle tampering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Other/misc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .3 Trespassing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Menlo Park March 7-13 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Theft undefined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .3 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .1 Accident/no injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Miscellaneous Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Parole arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Mental evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Welfare check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Atherton March 7-13 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Parking/driving violation . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Vehicle/traffic hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Accident/no injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Alcohol or drug related Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Fire call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Public Works call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Unlisted block Grant Ave., 3/7, 1:00 p.m..; elder abuse. Unlisted block Colorado Ave./Cowper St., 3/9, 2:07 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block El Camino Real, 3/9, 3:40 p.m..; armed robbery. Unlisted block St. Michael St., 3/10, 1:52 p.m.; domestic violence/battery. Unlisted block El Camino Real, 3/11, 1:40 a.m.; assault.

Menlo Park 1100 block Carlton Ave., 3/7, 5:13 p.m.; battery. 1300 block Hoover St., 3/7, 9:55 p.m.; domestic violence. 1300 block Willow Road, 3/7, 10:19 p.m.; robbery. 1300 block Henderson Ave., 3/10, 8:37 a.m.; battery.

Albert Dadian, a resident of Palo Alto for more than 58 years, longtime Stanford University employee, died peacefully in his sleep on Sunday, March 3, 2013. Albert just celebrated his 100th birthday with his family on October 6, 2012. Albert was born in Fresno, California in 1912 to Peter and Annie Dadian on a small 13 acre farm. After many years cultivating and selling fruits and vegetables through the region, the family moved to San Francisco. Albert attended Lowell High School, played third base on the school team, graduating in 1930. Photography became a lifetime infatuation observing the world through his many lenses & cameras. Albert’s passion led him to join the Palo Alto Camera Club in 1935 and was awarded numerous times in several photo categories over the course of six decades with special recognition to his work taking portraits WWII brought him and his camera to Espiritu Santo, South Pacific, to specifically catalog the war for the Navy. Returning from the war he continued with his work in book bindery in San Francisco, which led to his second hobby of repairing hundreds of old books for family and friends. His delight for film & the movies continued from when he was a little boy and throughout his life, along with many days spent at Seal Stadium watching such greats as DiMaggio.

He moved from San Francisco to Palo Alto after marrying Netha Paris in May of 1952 where he remained until May of 2009. His wife Netha of 42 years passed away in August of 1994. As a season ticket holder for many years, you could always find Albert with his wife Netha at a Stanford sporting event, or on the golf course or tennis courts with his friends. Baseball on the radio while working in his garden was his bliss. Albert retired from Stanford University’s offset printing facility in 1975, but continued working part-time in the Chemistry Department up until he was 91 years old, at which time he retired for good. His time spent with the students, professors and the staff always demonstrated great joy and energy to his day. Throughout his life, Albert was a faithful and active member of the Second Church of Christ Scientists in Palo Alto that included many volunteer activities. Albert is survived by his son David, daughter-in-law Bessie, step daughters Barbara and Nikki, grand children, Shannon, Colette, Jeremy, Jill, Kendal, Chad, and Eleni, nephews John, Mark, Robert, Larry, nieces Leona, Marjine and Jesama. He is predeceased by his four brothers, Charles, Harry, Leo, John, and sister, Rose. Memorial Services to be held in Palo Alto with a date to still be announced. PA I D

OBITUARY

Robert (Bob) Sikora Sept. 14, 1949-Feb. 24, 2013 Robert (Bob) Sikora, engineer, community volunteer and beloved husband of Gloria, died unexpectedly at his home in Palo Alto on Sunday February 24th. He was 63. Bob and Gloria celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary last November by returning once again to Paris, a favorite destination. The foundation of their relationship, they both said, was mutual appreciation for one other’s unique contributions to their marriage. Bob was eventempered, hard-working and reliable, yet light-hearted. His sense of humor was spontaneous and whimsical, as when he would teach the family cats, Eva and Cleo, to balance on his shoulders or dance with him in the living room. Bob was born in Decatur, Illinois. At the age of eleven his family moved to the New Jersey shore area. Bob was a natural athlete and multi-event track star in high school, setting a school record for victories in a single season. His athleticism was characterized by a combination of grace and stamina. Not long after moving to California in 1969 to attend college, Bob was vacationing in Big Sur when he saw a very young girl fall into the Big Sur River. He quickly jumped fully clothed into the deep, cold and swift current and brought the child to safety. A graduate of Santa Clara University and Stanford, Bob worked for decades as an engi-

neer, consultant and manager at a number of prominent high tech companies in Silicon Valley, most recently at KLA-Tencor. Bob was an engaged and caring neighbor, who described himself in his typically self-deprecating way as “compulsively useful.” In 2010 he was recognized by Palo Alto with the city’s Achievement Award for his contributions to CERT, the neighborhood disaster preparedness program. He was a key participant in several community improvement efforts along the El Camino corridor of his Barron Park neighborhood. To the delight and entertainment of his friends, Bob brought the same qualities to his many interests. He learned to play a variety of musical instruments but preferred the guitar, his favored instrument for nearly 50 years. In addition to music, cooking for family and friends, gardening, attending museum exhibitions and local theater, hiking in Yosemite, birding, and working around his home were all passions. An ardent Stanford sports fan, Bob’s tailgates, with his legendary red chili and green chili, were a highlight of the football season for his friends. He is survived by three brothers and three sisters, and by his wife Gloria, the love of his life. A rememberance gathering will be held Saturday, April 6, 2013, 1:00-3:00 PM, Lucie Stern Community Center – Ballroom, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto, CA. PA I D

OBITUARY

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Margaret Edith Jones November 24, 1919 – February 10, 2013 Margaret Edith Jones (née Crusius), a pediatrician specializing in well-baby care, an avid homemaker, and a lifelong advocate for social justice and environmental causes, died peacefully at home on February 10. Her son Keasley was at her side and she was surrounded by the love of her family. Born on November 24, 1919, Margaret (known to her friends as “Peggy”) grew up in Portland, Ore. and Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. She graduated from Mt. Holyoke College (class of 1941), with her junior year devoted to studies in Germany. In 1944, Peggy earned her medical degree from New York Medical College and launched a private pediatric practice in New York—an unusual feat in an era when the medical field was dominated by men. Married to fellow physician Henry Jones in 1951, Peggy moved to California when Henry was tapped to help launch the new Stanford Radiology department in San Francisco. First in Sausalito and then in a much-loved home on the Stanford campus, she and Henry raised three children, Virginia (born 1952), Henry C. (1954) and Keasley (1957). From 1966-1982, Peggy served as a traveling pediatrician for the Santa Clara County wellbaby and immunization clinics. Her typical workday often included driving from Stanford to Santa Clara or Gilroy to provide medical services for the children of migrant farm workers, then returning home to prepare dinner and supervise her own children’s homework. Peggy’s pediatric work with the migrant farmworker community was part and parcel of her lifelong support, financial and otherwise, of many social justice, environmental, and political organizations. Local, regional, state, national, and global, these included Amigas de las Americas, Amnesty International, CISPES, Common Cause, Environmental Defense Fund, Friends of the Earth, Heifer International, League of Women Voters, Marine Mammal Center, Mono Lake Committee, NARAL, Nature Conservancy, Ocean Conservancy, Peninsula Open Space Trust, Planned Parenthood, Point Reyes Bird Observatory, Save the Bay, Sempervirens Fund, Solar Cookers International, United Farm Workers, Wilderness Society, Yosemite Conservancy, and dozens more.

Professional acumen notwithstanding, Peggy was a great lover of domestic life. The keeper of the family’s cultural flame, she began dinner with a German blessing, celebrated Christmas according to German tradition, and baked countless Christmas cookies each year for friends and family. Lively, gregarious, and possessed of limitless energy, she loved to cook and entertain, and was usually either planning or presiding over a dinner party or celebration. Until the last years of her life, Peggy derived great joy from tending her large garden, which took up an impressive amount of backyard real estate. Initially an unpromising site full of hard-packed clay, the garden flourished due to Peggy’s persistent cultivation over the years, a perpetual work-in-progress that produced dozens of varieties of vegetables and fruits yearround. Many were eaten fresh from the stalk or vine; others, Peggy put up as preserves, along with copious quantities of peaches. No family members suffered from vitamin deficiencies. A grandmother late in life, Peggy adored her two grandsons, showered them with presents, and in her last days, would visibly brighten when she spoke with them on the phone. Peggy was married for 61 years to Henry, who predeceased her by just six months. They were enthusiastic fans of the Stanford basketball, football, and Lively Arts programs, and enjoyed the Stanford Sierra Camp and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland. Peggy and Henry traveled widely in Europe, as well as to South America, Asia, and Australia, and celebrated their 50th anniversary (2001) with family and grandchildren in Hawaii. Peggy is survived by brother Ralph Crusius of Andover, Mass.; daughter Virginia Jones of Castro Valley; son Henry Jones of Eugene, Ore.; son Keasley Jones, daughter-in-law Autumn Stephens, and grandchildren Emerson Jones and Elliott Jones, all of Berkeley; niece Carolyn Bower of Portland, Maine; and nephew Richard Crusius of Long Island, N.Y. A memorial service for friends and family will take place on Sunday, April 21, at 2 p.m. on the Stanford campus. To RSVP, please contact Keasley Jones (keasley@me.com). In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to any of the organizations listed above, or other progressive charity. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

Transitions Births, marriages and deaths

John “Jack” Schutz John “Jack” Schutz died at home surrounded by family on March 2 after a battle with cancer. He was born in Hebron, Neb. When he was 5, his family moved to Canby, Ore. He lived there until he enlisted in the Navy, reporting for duty on his 18th birthday. Following his military service, he graduated from the University of Portland. Soon after, he traveled to California, stopping in a little town called Woodside — the town he never left. He became the restaurateur of The Village Pub. He was a charter member of Sharon Heights Golf and Country Club, where he played golf and dominoes with his buddies. He enjoyed spending time with family, friends and traveling. He was preceded in death by his parents, Howard and Lottie Schutz, and his four sisters. He was a husband for 40 years to the late Norma Oswald. He was a father to Carolyn Schutz, Janet Schutz and Julie Luttringer, son-in-law, Collin, and grandfather to Katie and Jack. He was a partner to Linda “Sam” O’Sullivan, who he shared time with in his final years. A “Celebration of Life” memorial Mass will be held Thursday, March 14, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. at St. Pius Church, 1100 Woodside Road, Redwood City. In lieu of flowers, please honor his memory by sending donations to a charity of your choice.

William H. Mauel William H. Mauel, born Dec. 21, 1914, in Redding, Calif. died on Feb. 28 in Menlo Park, Calif. He spent his early years in Redding and moved with his family to Palo Alto during the Great Depression. He graduated from Palo Alto High School in 1931. He attended the College of San Mateo

and began his 43-year banking career in 1934 in the mailroom of the American Trust Company (which later merged with Wells Fargo Bank in the 1950s). He also volunteered for the Merchant Marine Service and served as a Purser and Pharmacist’s Mate aboard three separate Liberty ships from 1942 to 1945. He was awarded the Pacific War Zone Medal and the Merchant Marine Combat Bar as a crewmember aboard ships that went in harm’s way in the South Pacific war zone. Always an advocate for education, he continued in a wide variety of banking courses throughout his career. The majority of his work assignments were spread along the Peninsula, from San Francisco to San Jose, with the notable exception of a two-year tour in Pago Pago, American Samoa as the manager of the Bank of American Samoa. That assignment offered him the opportunity to travel throughout the South Pacific on banking business, quite often via a World War II PBY aircraft, taking numerous photographs of all the islands he visited or flew over. His final assignment began in 1968 when he accepted the position of vice president and manager of the Wells Fargo Bank office in downtown Menlo Park. A longtime Rotary International member, he transferred to the Menlo Park Rotary Club in that year. Retiring in 1977, he soon opened a financial consulting office, assisting many former bank clients with their financial affairs, planning and estates. Continuing his lifelong interest in education, he joined a small group of Rotary members and established the Rotary Club of Menlo Park Foundation with the goal of providing financial assistance to help deserving students continue their formal education. In honor of his devotion to raising funds for the foundation, the Bill Mauel Fellowship was established to honor those persons who have donated $1,000 or more to the foundation. Today

Enjoy the ride.

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there are more than 200 Bill Mauel Fellows. He enjoyed gardening, photography and was an avid golfer, walking the course and carrying his clubs at every opportunity, well into his 80s. He is survived by his wife of 70 years, Lillian Mauel of Menlo Park, sons William H. Mauel Jr. of Auburn, Calif. and D. Clark Mauel of Los Altos, four grandchildren and five great grandchildren. In accordance with his wishes, there will be no formal services. Anyone wishing to acknowledge his life and accomplishments is asked to make a donation in his name to the Menlo Park Rotary Club Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 876, Menlo Park, CA 94026.

Barbara Thomas Hammond Barbara Thomas Hammond, 90, of La Mesa, Calif., and wife of Sutton Hammond for 50 years, died surrounded by family on Feb. 14 at Sunrise Senior Living Community in Bonita, Calif. After graduating from Carleton College, she became a lifelong advocate for the environment and a teacher at Woodside Elementary School, from 19761981. She also did environmental consulting work for the Woodside Planning Commission. Born in Billings, Mont. in 1922, she loved the mountains, fly fishing, horseback riding and birds. She was married for 50 years and had four children. The family lived in Billings; Seattle, Wash.; Woodside and finally La Mesa, Calif. until Sutton’s death at the age of 80 in 1997. The couple is survived by four granddaughters, two grandsons and their four children, including Susan Hammond of Chula Vista, Calif.; Sally Hammond-Penland of Riverside, Calif.; Connie Ham-

mond Weinsoff of Goleta, Calif. and Thomas Sutton Hammond of Portland, Conn.

Dina Dejong Dina Dejong, a longtime Palo Alto resident, died on Feb. 25. Born in Zaandam, Holland to parents Maas and Elizabeth Zeeman, she grew up in the first war over Holland. In her younger years, she worked as a seamstress. She later moved to Australia and married Cornelius Dejong. In Australia she would have her first two children, daughters Patty and Jennifer. Later, Dejong and her husband moved to Palo Alto and had two more children, sons Frank and Michael. She enjoyed cooking and baking and loved flowers. She also had many grandchildren — grandsons Kees, Aaron and Adam and granddaughter Cindy — and also great grandchildren — great granddaughters Tais and Jiah and great grandsons Bret and Garret. She was surrounded by her children, family, friends and “adopted� family members, Sarah and Elizabeth in her later years. She also leaves behind her cat, named “Kee Kee.�

Ronald Ferrando Ronald Rio Ferrando, born May 30, 1953 to Ezzio and Rita Ferrando, died in Menlo Park on Feb. 18. He grew up in Menlo Park and remained in the area. He spent much of his retirement playing the drums and restoring muscle cars. He was a school bus driver for Las Lomitas School District for 30 years. He is survived by his son, Mark; brothers, Bob (Grace) and Randy (Mary), and was uncle to Andrew, Mary and Alex. Private services will be held. Re-

membrances can be mailed to PO Box 831 Menlo Park, CA 94026. Donations can be made in his name to the American Cancer Society

Katoko Sax Katoko Sax died on Feb. 23 surrounded by her family after a long battle with cancer. Born and raised in Japan, she went to Central Michigan University in 1958 to study economics. It was there that she first met her husband, Ron, and then spent the next 50 years as a wife, mother, grandmother, friend and steward of the environment. More than 40 of those years she lived in Palo Alto. She was an active member of the Palo Alto Friends Meeting, the Funeral Education Foundation and the Peace Alliance, which is dedicated to the establishment of a federal Department of Peace. She also learned to speak Chinese and Italian, to play soroban and to tap-dance. She also drew, painted and played the piano. She had two children, Kenji (Cindy Lamerson) and Naomi (Neil Simmons), and four grandsons, Nathan, Joel, Nicky and Scott.

Births Nathan and Katharine Schrenk, Atherton, a girl. Shawun Warren and Chelsea Roache, Menlo Park, a boy. Kent and Caroline Keirsey, Menlo Park, a boy.

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Franz K. Baumgratz Franz Karl Baumgratz, a longtime resident of the Bay Area passed away on March 8, 2013 at his home in Mountain View. Franz immigrated from Germany to the United States in 1956. He worked at a nursery in South San Francisco after his arrival. He quickly learned enough English to start his own business as a landscape contractor until his retirement in 1990. He loved to travel all over the world and took many trips to Germany to visit family and friends. Franz enjoyed nature and loved many outdoor activities like skiing at Tahoe and hiking at Yosemite up waterfalls and Half Dome. He also loved windsurďŹ ng around the Bay and Mauii. Classical music was one of his

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/obituaries

Mary J. Rafferty Mary J. Rafferty died peacefully on March 11 in Portola Valley, CA at the age of 98. She was born Mary Josephine Guerin, the daughter of James Guerin and Blanche Warren Guerin, on January 15, 1915 in Chicago, IL. There, she attended The Sacred Heart Convent and earned a Bachelor’s degree from Barat College. Before moving to California, she met and married her beloved husband, James Francis Rafferty, with whom she had six children and spent 49 years before his death in 1986. Mary J. was a volunteer and supporter of many charities, including The Children’s Health Council, The Allied Arts Guild and Catholic organizations. In 1967 she opened Mary J. Rafferty Antiques with shops in Menlo Park, San Francisco and Atherton, CA. She proudly owned and operated her lovely stores for 30 years. She loved to travel, both for business and for pleasure, and had friends in many countries but there was no place she would rather have been than sitting on her porch looking at the view from her home in Woodside, where she was a 48 year resident. She is survived by her two sisters, Martha Egan (Mrs. William Q. Egan) of Glenview, IL and Blanche Rockwell (Mrs. John E. Rockwell) of Grangeville, ID. Mary J. was preceded in death by her eldest daughter, Joanna Malvino of Los Altos, CA and by her brothers, Dr. John W. Guerin, Rev. Mark E. Guerin and James Warren Guerin. She leaves behind her children Gael Efron of Palo Alto, CA, Mimi Halstead of Pasadena, CA, James F. Rafferty Jr. of Astoria, OR, Rosemary Rafferty of Mountain View, CA and Jeannie Magee of Las Vegas, NV. She also leaves ten grandchildren, ďŹ ve great grandchildren, one great, great grandchild and many nieces and nephews. Mary J. was a character and an artist and she lived her life joyously. She will be remembered for her strength, her sense of humor and her positive outlook on life. The Rafferty family would like to thank the staff at The Sequoias in Portola Valley and Hana Zilker for the beautiful care Mary J. received from them. A funeral mass will be held at Our Lady of the Wayside Church in Portola Valley on Friday, March 15, at 11:00 am. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Catholic Relief Services, 228 W. Lexington St. Baltimore, MD 21201 or at www.crs.org. Our Lady of the Wayside Church 930 Portola Rd. Portola Valley, CA 94028 PA I D O B I T UA RY

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biggest passions, he planned several trips to San Francisco with friends to enjoy the opera, symphony and sunsets on the beach. Franz will be sorely missed by many cousins and uncles in Germany, as well as his many close friends in California. Services will be held at Alta Mesa Funeral Home in Palo Alto, CA. PA I D

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Money Matters: Taking Charge of Your Finances Please join us on Saturday, March 16, 2013 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. :HZLOOGLVFXVVVXFKWRSLFVDV Ă&#x201D;7KH3V\FKRORJ\RI0RQH\ Ă&#x201D;3HUVRQDO2UJDQL]DWLRQDQG%XGJHWLQJ7LSV Ă&#x201D;7KH)LVFDO&OLIIDQG+RZ,W$IIHFWV<RX Ă&#x201D;)LQDQFLDO0\WKVDQGWKH5ROHRI,QYHVWLQJ Ă&#x201D;3ODQQLQJIRU5HWLUHPHQWDQG%H\RQG /\WWRQ$YHQXH3DOR$OWR__deborahspalm.org 7KLVHYHQWLVIUHHDQGRSHQWRWKHSXEOLF:HKRSH\RXFDQMRLQXV

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Editorial

So far, all take, no give on Cubberley site As lucrative lease nears renewal date, school district hopes it can persuade the city to keep the money flowing

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e had high hopes in November 2011 when the Palo Alto City Council adopted an ambitious work plan aimed at determining a thoughtful path forward for the use and related financing for the 35-acre former Cubberley High School site. The idea was to form several committees, including a large community advisory committee, and work jointly with the school district to create a vision of how the city and schools might use and finance this valuable acreage to serve their respective future needs. The effort was prompted by the upcoming expiration, at the end of 2014, of a 25-year lease between the school district and the city that has helped keep the schools financially stable during some very tough times. Currently, the city pays the school district more than $7 million a year for the aging facility, assumes all the costs of maintenance and must manage a rental program that generates barely enough revenue to just cover the maintenance expenses. The loss of Foothill College as a major tenant now creates new risks and challenges. At a time of financial crisis for the schools, it was a generous and appropriate offering by the city, and was unofficially funded by voter approval of a utility users tax. But financial conditions have now changed dramatically, and this deal no longer makes much sense, except to the school district, which would love to avoid having to wean itself from this gift of $7 million a year. Unfortunately, the ambitions for what could have been accomplished over the last nine months have slowly and quietly diminished, to the point where the just-released report of the hard-working and well-meaning citizens group leaves us virtually in the same place as when the process began. The report proposes that the city and the district renew the current lease at unspecified terms, write a joint-use plan over the next seven years that could encompass community uses as well as make room for a third public high school for Palo Alto that might not be needed for 20 or more years. The committee was split on whether the two parties should sign a five-year or 10-year agreement, with those favoring five years believing the shorter term would signal to the district that it should not depend on this subsidy continuing forever. In essence, the school district’s consistent position has been that because it thinks that some day it may need the Cubberley site for a school, it wants the city to continue renting and managing the property at a substantial loss. And if the city decides that this is no longer a viable use of $7 million a year, given the school district’s current budget surpluses and healthy financial outlook? Some have threatened to put a repeal of the utility-users tax on the ballot if the city doesn’t choose to continue the Cubberley lease. Such talk is insulting to Palo Alto residents, who have generously supported the schools through repeated bond measures, donations and ongoing volunteer activities. It was due to this generosity that the school district has received well over a hundred million dollars over the last 25 years from city funds to supplement its regular revenues. With the citizens committee’s report, which contains very helpful background and data, particularly on how joint-use sites can be successful, now complete, the City Council will begin sorting out how to proceed with the potential renewal and renegotiation of the lease. With a good starting point, city and school-district staff and their elected leaders need to begin serious discussions about how to begin winding down this long outdated lease arrangement. No one wants to impose a sudden financial hardship or management burden on the school district, but it is time to plan a steady reduction in the cost of this lease. If a complete renegotiation of the lease isn’t possible between now and the end of the year, city officials should consider offering only annual extensions. One option is for the school district to manage some or all of the property itself, as it does other surplus sites, and find appropriate tenants. The city has spared them this responsibility for 25 years, but we question why the city should continue to be managing the school district’s property in today’s fiscal environment. The city now has its own severe financial pressures and many important alternative uses for the money that has been flowing to the school district. The Cubberley advisory committee has done good and valuable work, even while failing to reach recommendations on the details of a new lease arrangement between the city and school district. “Kicking the can down the road (by renewing the lease with no long-term plan) is clearly not a solution,” the committee said.

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

A downtown parking idea Editor, Mayor Greg Scharff mentioned the need for downtown parking in his State of the City address and indicated an estimated cost of $60,000 per parking space. There is an alternative that comes without any cost to the city. If anyone is in doubt about that, you have only to look at an example that has been there for many years. The Abitare condominium project was developed on what was then a small city parking lot located between High Street and Alma. The developer (Chuck Kinney, who later became mayor of Menlo Park) bought the air rights from the city. A multi-level underground parking garage was built. On top of the garage, a four-story building was constructed that included one retail level at the ground floor and three floors of for-sale residential condominiums above that. The city got a parking garage for free. The downtown area got some new retail space and, more importantly, some new housing that contributes both property tax revenue and puts consumers who live in the condominiums within walking distance of all the stores in downtown Palo Alto. This could be replicated on any city parking lot. While considering this, the council might also want to reconsider the sacred cow (the 50-foot height limit). Garages do not have to be blocky, blah buildings. Downtown Chicago has buildings that include parking and residences that are architecturally stunning. The Abitare project was developed using a vertical subdivision map with a condominium plan overlay. Perhaps the council should ask the staff to revisit this concept. John Paul Hanna University Avenue Palo Alto

One region idea: bad Editor, It seems the Silicon Valley Community Foundation proposes to turn the whole Bay Area into a single region. Hmmm. Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg recently donated $500 million to this group, and suddenly the foundation apparently wants to take over the entire Bay Area. The last time I checked, we were living in a Constitutional Republic where individual rights are “unalienable,” and cities have the freedom and sovereignty to chart their own courses. This “One-Silicon-Valley-andBay-Area-Plan,” to coin a phrase, brainchild of the Joint Venture Silicon Valley Network and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, should be very worrying to residents. It would mean losing our representational form of democratic government. Exactly who would be deciding what’s best for all Bay

Area counties? And why are businesses and government so eager to partner? Have we already forgotten that the classic definition of totalitarian Fascism is partnership between government and big business? Nor is government by “region” — through unelected, nonrepresentational bodies — unknown in Communist countries. Consider this quote by technology forecaster Paul Saffo: “Powerful regions are the new basic unit of governments in the 21st century.” Not so new however: They were the basic unit of government in the Soviet Union in the 20th century! All that regional government accomplishes is to take away the rights of our cities, towns and counties along with those of the residents within them. This “new” idea has long since been proven a disastrous failure and needs to be nipped in the $500 million bud. Cherie Zaslawsky Oak Lane Menlo Park

Whose fault is it? Editor, I would like to share my story of

today with your readers: I was parked in a parking lot of a large electronics store in Palo Alto. Next to me is a motorcycle. I park slightly angled touching the white line with my rear left wheel. When I come back from the store, I find my driver’s door kicked in with a large motorcycle boot imprint. So I call the police who take 45 minutes to appear. While waiting an old lady tries to park next to me and rams into my trunk. Police arrive and says: “Oh, that’s easy, it’s your (my) fault because you are touching the white line. You will have to pay for your own damage and that of the old lady who ran into you. We will file a report for the old lady.” Apparently in the U.S., if you touch the white line in a parking spot, other folks have the right to destroy your property. I thought that is worth knowing for your readers because it could have far-reaching consequences on parking lots throughout California. Christian Busch Greenways Drive Redwood City

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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What do you think should be done with the Cubberley property?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.


Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

Guest Opinion

Hidden bruises, safe schools

by Marc Vincenti s my students streamed out of the classroom after the bell, I caught her eye. Let’s call her “Nicole” — a rangy Gunn sophomore with big brown eyes and long hair. “Got a sec?” I said quietly, with my best it’s-nothing-to-worry-about smile. As a teacher, you don’t want to seem urgent to a kid, with her classmates around; you’d just draw attention and embarrass her. “Only a sec,” I said. “Don’t want to take up your brunch.” Nicole shifted her book-bag on her tall shoulder and we stepped to a quiet corner as the last kids left my English class. With sympathy, I told her I’d noticed she looked sad during the hour, or tired — I couldn’t tell for sure. “Oh, Mr. V., I’m sorry!” She hung her head. Her instinct was to apologize for being an inattentive student, though I hadn’t meant that. This was a girl who’d written me a disconsolate note after she’d missed her first vocab word of the semester, sure she was headed for a “B” in the course at best. She was a soccer player, a reporter for the school paper. She went on to tell me: On her way to my class she’d read a long email on her phone, from her boyfriend’s former girlfriend, telling her what a slut she was, calling her names. Nicole had read it all, several screens. She’d been upset for the whole period, unable to concentrate. I told her how very sorry I was for her pain, and that when such things hap-

A

pen my students may step outside for a bit, and need not suffer “for all to see.” I thanked her for confiding in me, and encouraged her to go join the people who really matter to her — her buddies — at brunch. And out the door she went. Most such incidents at school, such disruptions, go undetected. With Nicole I was lucky. I’d taught her the previous year as a freshman, so she had reason to trust me. I’d spotted her feelings because the class had only 22 kids (a vanishing phenomenon now). And with brunch coming up, she hadn’t had to rush off to biology or sports, PSAT-study or volunteering. And for all of us, now, who want a healthy life in our schools, I’ll make the point in extreme terms, maybe too strongly: in letting our teenagers use their phones during the school-day, we — the adults — are enabling bullying on campus. Yes, OK, it has ever been thus. Stock an environment with pencils and paper, and there’s a kid who’ll write a nasty note, pass it across the classroom, zip it into a book-bag, or tape it to a locker. Schools have always had walls, and kids have had spray-paint. But now it’s different. Today’s electronic insults are posted instantly, ubiquitously, and sometimes permanently. They are endlessly, easily copied and sent on to others, to do more mischief. The power to hurt with words has grown from the potency of sticks and stones to the capacity of a howitzer. In the Atlantic Magazine this month, Emily Bazelon — a Yale researcher who’s just published a book on bullying — reports on a Connecticut middle-schooler who, styling herself on Facebook as the “Drama Queen,” set up a page called “Let’s Start Drama” that

soon pulled hundreds of her classmates to a site that traded in tantalizing rumors, gossip about breakups, reports on who had lost their virginity or sent nude photos, and ranking of girls by looks. The site got under the radar of Facebook’s policies against anonymity and rudeness. Bazelon doesn’t say if the middle school permits phone-use on campus, but if so, it’s easy to imagine the effects.

The power to hurt with words has grown from the potency of sticks and stones to the capacity of a howitzer.

We need to end this kind of thing, especially as it reaches into our schools. Our kids’ resilience need not be tested to such an extreme. There is no reason a young person in one of our high schools, already stressed about grades and college, perhaps sleep-deprived, perhaps upset by a failed romance or friendship, in classes as large as 35, impulsive and self-conscious as all teenagers are, should be exposed to electronic communications that make it ever more impossible for her to enjoy what she’s there for: Harper Lee and Jhumpa Lahiri, Freud and Shakespeare and Moliere. Face-to-face interaction with friends. Time, in “real” time, to form ties with teachers and counselors and coaches — ties so vital to the

“safety net” we all want to weave. Among the distracting communications are not only bullying, of course — but back-andforth with hovering parents about the day’s chem test and how it went, work left at home (I had a student, once, who spent all day in an electronic frenzy with her parents, at their workplaces, cobbling together a nick-of-time delivery of a left-behind item), and afterschool plans. There will always be a need for emergency calls to and from school. We handled them in the “old days” just fine, and we can handle them now: Gunn has classroom phones; teachers have cell-phones; the Main Office has lots of phones and good secretaries; the entire campus has a P.A. system. And homework left at home, a chem test, a text from Starbucks to ask about a coffee preference (yes, I had a student who monitored her phone during class for this), recent messages and texts, the good, the bad, the ugly — these are not emergencies. Unfortunately, as long as we don’t have stop-and-frisks or metal detectors (and we shouldn’t), a student will always be able to say, “May I go to the bathroom?” and leave class just to sneak in a phone-call or look at Facebook. But with a shift in culture and some sensible regulations — no phones visible or audible from the first bell to the last, confiscation otherwise, parental pick-up required — we can, without detriment to real emergency needs, rescue our kids from one particular, hidden, insidious form of schoolyard bullying. The Nicoles of this world need the grownups to help them. N Marc Vincenti has taught English for 15 years at Gunn High School.

Streetwise

What do you think of a high-speed rail line along Caltrain? Asked at Palo Alto Caltrain Station on Alma Street. Interviews and photographs by Rebecca Duran.

Adrian Moravcsik

Wealth manager Stanford Avenue, Stanford “Anything that can make transit convenient for commuters and the elderly would be favorable.”

Mike Parkhill

Retired Fayette Drive, Palo Alto “Anything they can do to make it faster is great.”

Marion Pauck

Retired Del Medio Avenue, Mountain View “I’m all for it. Cars are great, but we’re poisoning the air. Trains are wonderful.”

Lorin Krogh

Retired Encina Avenue, Palo Alto “I think it’s a good idea.”

Juan Sanchez

Temp agency work Alma Street, Palo Alto “I think it’s a benefit for people who work. Everything in the world is going faster, so they need to as well.”

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Book Talk AN EVENING WITH AMY TAN ... Best-selling author Amy Tan of “The Joy Luck Club,” “The Kitchen God’s Wife” and others (including “The Bonesetter’s Daughter,” for which she also wrote the opera libretto), will speak at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center at 3921 Fabian Way in Palo Alto on April 11. Tan will be in conversation with author Louann Brizendine at the event, which runs from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Tickets are $30 general, $25 for students and JCC members, and $22 for residents of the Moldaw complex at the center. Go to paloaltojcc.org or call 650-223-8699.

BOOKS INC. ... Future author talks at Books Inc. at Palo Alto’s Town & Country Village include: Cara Black, “Murder Below Montparnasse” (March 16, 6 p.m.); Jennifer Nielsen and Lisa McMann, “The False Prince” and “The Trap Door,” respectively (March 20, 6:30 p.m.); Michael Lavigne, “The Wanting” (March 28, 7 p.m.); emeritus Stanford University professor of psychiatry and human biology Herant Katchadourian, “The Way it Turned Out” (April 3, 7 p.m.); Harry Brod, “Superman is Jewish?” (April 10, 7 p.m.); and Caroline M. Grant and Lisa Catherine Harper, “The Cassoulet Saved Our Marriage” (April 11, 7 p.m.). Info: booksinc.net N

Items for Book Talk may be sent to Associate Editor Carol Blitzer, Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 93202 or emailed to cblitzer@paweekly.com by the last Friday of the month.

A monthly section on local books and authors

“Not Less Than Everything: Catholic Writers on Heroes of Conscience, from Joan of Arc to Oscar Romero,” edited by Catherine Wolff; HarperOne; 352 pages; $16.99 hatever else you might think about “Not Less Than Everything,” a new book of essays by Catholic writers edited by Catherine Wolff, you have to admit this much: It is spectacularly well timed. The book was released by Harper One, the spiritual wing of Harper Collins, in mid-February, sandwiched between the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI, ostensibly for health reasons, and the resignation of Britain’s highest-ranking Catholic leader amid accusations of sexual misconduct. Subsequent weeks have brought stories of infighting, financial malfeasance and a secret gay cabal within the Roman Curia (the Vatican bureaucracy that oversees the central governance of the church). The fact that many of these stories lack credible sources has not lessened the public perception that the church is in a state of crisis. All of these events occurred after Wolff, a lifelong Catholic, composed her introduction to “Not Less Than Everything,” in which she laments the church’s “lack of transparency and accountability,” its “increasingly isolated” hierarchy, its refusal “to welcome women into full membership and leadership,” its “retrograde ... teachings on human sexuality,” and its failure to respond to “the legitimate demands of the society in which we live.” Like many modern Catholics who have come to question the moral authority of those who — at least nominally — lead the church, Wolff began to look elsewhere for spiritual leadership and inspiration, for historical role models who had possessed the courage to find their own solutions to the age-old conflict between conscience and authority. Ultimately, she solicited essays from a number of notable Catholic writers (some, professional theologians who happen to write; others, established novelist or essayists who happen to be Catholic), asking each to submit a portrait of his or her own “hero of conscience.” The resulting collection presents 26 such portraits, personal meditations on the lives of exceptional men and women of faith, from such well-known historical figures as Mary Magdalene and Ignatius of Loyola to such 20th-century champions of social justice as Simone Weil, Charles Strobel and Father Horace McKenna. Along the way, we meet Bartolomé de las Casas, perhaps the first Spaniard to decry the systematic slaughter of the West Indian native peoples by conquistadors hungry for land and gold; Mother

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Mary MacKillop, Australia’s first saint, excommunicated in 1871 after exposing child sexual abuse by local clergy; and Sister Corita Kent, an irrepressible teacher and painter who turned the pop art of the 1960s into something holy. With so many essays on a single theme, it’s not surprising to find a certain uniformity creeping into the offerings. Many of the essayists have limited themselves to writing straightforward biographical sketches, and many of these sketches have the same basic shape: A young man/woman converts to Catholicism, becomes a priest/ nun/Jesuit brother/etc., offends the church hierarchy by advocating a position that is too modern/socialist/American/etc., is summoned to Rome and ordered to renounce said position, refuses to conform and is subsequently censured/excommunicated/moved to an unappealing parish/ etc. (Alternatively, one could blame this monotony not so much on the contributing writers as on the Vatican’s woefully predictable response to principled dissent.) The most memorable essays in the bunch, though, are

TIMELY

MUSINGS In a new collection of essays, Catholic writers look at heroes of conscience, present and past by Kevin Kirby

Courtesy of Catherine Wolff

MEET THE AUTHORS ... Upcoming authors and programs at Keplers, 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park, include: Alan Rinzler, “Top Ten Problems in Submitting Your Work and How to Fix Them” (March 16, 1 p.m.); Jonathan and Margaret Kathrein with Wallace “J” Nichols, “Surviving the Shark: How a Brutal Great White Attack Turned a Surfer into a Dedicated Defender of Sharks” (March 21, 7:30 p.m.); Ellen Sussman, “The Paradise Guest House” (March 26, 7:30 p.m.); Palo Alto resident Navi Radjou, “Jugaad Innovation: Think Frugal, Be Flexible, Generate Breakthrough Growth” (March 27, 7:30 p.m.); Natalie Goldberg, “The True Secret of Writing: Connecting Life with Language” (March 28, 7:30 p.m.); Robin LaFevers, “Dark Triumph” (April 2, 7:30 p.m.); Anita Hughes, “Market Street” (April 3, 7:30 p.m.); Peter Spiers, “Master Class: Living Longer, Stronger and Happier” (April 4, 6:30 p.m.); Amanda Coplin, “The Orchardist” (April 9, 7:30 p.m.); and Caroline Paul and Wendy McNaughton, “Lost Cat: A True Story of Love, Desperation and GPS” (April 11, 7:30 p.m.). In addition, Cassandra Clare will speak on her teen book “Clockwork Princess” at the Menlo-Atherton High School Performing Arts Center at 555 Middlefield Road in Atherton at 7 p.m. March 23. Info: keplers.com

Title Pages Editor Catherine Wolff. those that move beyond mere biography to explore the writer’s own relationship to his or her subject, as when Tobias Wolff (Stanford professor and husband of editor Catherine) compares his own experience as a U.S. serviceman during the Vietnam War to the life of Franz Jägerstätter, an Austrian conscientious objector during WWII. Jägerstätter chose execution in a Nazi prison rather than serve in Hitler’s army. In contrast, Wolff gives an admirably candid account of his own reasons for participating in a conflict about which he harbored serious doubts: “It did not meet the test of a just and necessary war, or even one we were likely to win. But I stifled my doubts, because I was going, and doubt would do me no good there. ... And, frankly, I was curious. What would it be like? War is interesting to young men — even to those who oppose it.” Another striking entry is Kathryn Harrison’s portrait of Joan of Arc, in which she contrasts Joan’s famous visions with her own shattering moment of epiphany while walking the labyrinth at San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral. As Tobias Wolff does, Harrison goes beyond the factual details of her subject’s life to ask the thornier and potentially more enlightening questions: What is it that allows a hero to be a hero? How was this person different from everyone else? What are we to do when confronted with stories such as these? Saint Joan and the beatified J‰gerst‰tter notwithstanding, this is not a “lives of the saints” book. Fewer than a third of the individuals profiled herein have been canonized. One of them, the formidable Hildegard von Bingen, was finally raised to sainthood last year by Benedict XVI, more than eight centuries after her death. Some, like Dorothy Day or Oscar Romero, may someday be similarly elevated. Others, though, had precious little


Title Pages saintliness about them. In one of the book’s most engaging essays, Paul Elie considers the Baroque painter Caravaggio, known for such devotional works as “The Calling of Saint Matthew” and “The Entombment of Christ.” Caravaggio led a decidedly carnal existence that would be scandalous even today. But Elie finds, in the visceral passion of Caravaggio’s compositions, a kind of fidelity: to scripture, to his own artistic vision, and to the encompassing divinity that illuminates the human world in all its beauty and horror. Colm Toibin makes a less compelling case for poet Gerard Manley Hopkins. His Hopkins comes across as a mistaken convert, unwilling to renounce the Jesuit vows that led him to a life of sublimated artistic impulses, repressed homosexuality and abject misery in an Irish city that hated him for his Englishness. The term “hero of conscience” seems to apply only if one assumes that being a Jesuit is, ipso facto, a heroic act that justifies the complete crushing of the self — a premise that many non-Catholic readers may be unwilling to grant. It’s worth noting that, while a few of the figures profiled in “Not Less Than Everything” (the post1520 Martin Luther, for example, or Henry Bartel, founder of the first Mennonite mission in China) are non-Catholics, this is no interfaith volume. You will find no Dalai Lama here, no Aung San Suu Kyi, no Ghaffar Khan. The closest we get to a non-Christian view is in Paula Huston’s sketch of Bede Griffiths, the Benedictine monk who, during nearly four decades in India, adopted elements of Hindu dress, meditation and scripture into his daily sacrament. Of course, Catherine Wolff never intended to create an interfaith book. She set out to create a book for people like herself: socially progressive Catholics, concerned that the church is actively running away from the promises of the Second Vatican Council (more than half the authors in this collection mention Vatican II in some fashion), and seeking examples of faith, courage and integrity that resonate in the modern world. And yet the finished product transcends that narrow goal, because conscience transcends the proprietary claims of any single religion. It is easy to imagine this volume finding a place in non-Catholic homes and in church libraries of all denominations, its stories providing inspiration to clergy and laypersons alike. It would also be nice (though perhaps more of a stretch) to imagine this book finding its way into the Vatican library, or even onto the bedside table of the new pope. As the new pontiff and his advisers wrestle with a host of perennial problems — none of the “modern” issues facing Benedict’s successor is less than a century old, and many have been debated since early in the first millennium A.D. — they could do worse than to seek inspiration from this volume of essays: a catalog of Christian men and woman who knew, above all else, how to follow the dictates of their conscience. N

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Page 20ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…Ê£x]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“


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Cover Story

the future is not yet now Local robotics companies are pushing the boundaries, but the Jetsons’ Rosie is still years away Story by Bryce Druzin Photographs by Veronica Weber

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ith a rotating head and two strong arms, the Personal Robot 2 from Menlo Park-based Willow Garage can navigate by itself and pick items up off the floor, open a refrigerator, fetch a beer and fold towels. But before anyone gets too excited about the prospect of a personal robot maid — think Rosie from the ‘60s cartoon show “The Jetsons” — a few things: It costs $400,000, weighs almost 500 pounds and can’t move up stairs. And the towel it can fold? That’ll take a couple minutes. “One of the issues we have in robotics is that people’s expectations of robots are really, really high because of what they see in Hollywood,” Willow Garage CEO Steve Cousins said during a January presentation of the robot at the Avenidas senior center in Palo Alto. An affordable robot with human capabilities isn’t a reality yet. But from the humanoid, general purpose PR2 to simpler robots that perform single tasks, researchers and companies in and around Palo Alto are working to make robots ever more useful and practical. “Fifteen years is all the time we’ve had cell phones, but yet we take them for granted,” Cousins said. “So the world is changing fast, and I think the same thing’s going to happen with robotics.” Willow Garage was founded in late 2006 by Scott Hassan, founder of eGroups, a group email-messaging company that would become Yahoo Groups. Hassan founded Willow Garage to “accelerate the development of non-military robotics and advance open-source robotics software,” according to the company’s website. The first PR2 was rolled out in 2008. Today there are nearly 50 of the robots, nearly all of them at academic institutions, including 11 loaned, free of charge, to research institutes in the United States, Eu-

rope and Japan. The robotics lab at University of California, Berkeley, under the direction of Pieter Abbeel, was one of these recipients. It generated a bit of a stir when the robot successfully folded 50 towels in succession, at a rate of about 24 minutes per towel. Since the PR2’s first towel fold in 2010, the lab has been able to get the time down to two minutes. More recently, in 2012, a Berkeley research team collaborated with Google to program the PR2 to de-clutter a room. Using the Google Goggles image recognition application, the robot was able to identify objects such as a mustard bottle and bar of soap, grasp those objects, and move them to appropriate areas. Professor Ken Goldberg, a member of the research team, believes a commercially viable robot that picks up around the house could be a reality in the not-too-distant future. He thinks the object recognition and grasping programming needed to make such a robot practical can be developed within five years. He said the key would be creating a physical robot that’s reliable and affordable. “For under $5,000, people are going to start wanting it,” he said. Like Cousins, Goldberg also thinks robotics are close to a “tipping point.” “When you get capability it drives acceptance, which drives down the price, and drives further acceptance,” he said. “So you get this positive spiral.” In this experiment, the PR2 used the concept of “cloud robotics.” Instead of storing data for image recognition and grasping motions on hard drives located on the PR2, this information was stored on a remote network that the robot accessed wirelessly. By outsourcing data storage and computing power to external networks, robots can take advantage of increased computing power, re-

Page 22ÊUÊÊ>ÀV…Ê£x]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Students from Crittenden Middle School in Mountain View take a closer look at the PR2 robot during a presentation on robotics at Avenidas, a Palo Alto nonprofit senior center, on Jan. 15. duce the amount of physical storage they have on them, and share information with each other.

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oth the PR2 and the Robot Operating System software it uses have their roots at Stanford University. The PR2 is named after the PR1, which was developed at Salisbury BioRobotics Lab at Stanford. Doctoral students Keenan Wyrobek

and Eric Berger, in collaboration with professor Kenneth Salisbury, designed and built the robot in a span of 18 months. The PR1 was able to tidy up a room, unload a dishwasher and fetch a beer from the fridge and open it, though there was a catch: The tasks were performed while the robot was being controlled by a person. Still, Salisbury said, he had long

been interested in building a robot that was more than “just a hand on an arm.” Salisbury said he favors wheeled robots over legged robots because the challenge of balancing on legs still presents a difficult problem. “I’d like to do something today that involves the perception and manipulation of objects, without having to worry about ‘Am I going to fall over?’” he said.

A woman gets a hug from a robot at robotic hardware and software developer Willow Garage’s presentation at Avenidas in January.


Cover Story

Stanford robotics professor Ken Salisbury picks up a few robot-arm prototypes at Salisbury Robotics Lab on Feb. 26. At the same time the PR1 was being developed, Stanford’s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, under the direction of Andrew Ng, was developing an operating system for robots to use. Salisbury said the PR1 served not only as a platform to study robotic capabilities but also as a tool to raise funds for the next generation of personal robotics. “The founder of Willow Garage saw what we were doing, saw what Andrew Ng was doing, looking at both the hardware and the software capabilities that we were developing, and became quite excited about it,” he said. Wyrobek and Berger were hired by Willow Garage to head up its personal robot project, which produced the PR2. And the software originally developed at Stanford’s AI Lab would be developed further by Willow Garage and become known as the Robot Operating System, or ROS. ROS is now the most widely used open-source robotics software platform. Because it’s opensource, the code can be freely viewed by anyone.

During his January talk in Palo Alto, Cousins said the open nature of ROS was bringing robotics closer to “exponential growth.” “Suddenly other people can look at what you did, learn from it, build on it, and then do something else and contribute back,” he said. Stanford was also one of the 11 institutions to be loaned a PR2 by Willow Garage in 2010. Salisbury said one of his many dreams in robotics was to have a robot fetch him a cup of coffee. A simple task for a human being but not so easy for an autonomous robot. “That’s a pretty hard problem if you think about it,” he said. “How do I get from here through the doors, through the elevator, somehow communicate with the person serving coffee, take the coffee (and) bring it back down?” Last summer, student Tony Pratkanis was able to program the robot to perform an approximation of the task. The PR2 used laser sensors to detect obstacles, and it used accelerometers and its vision to determine how many floors it traveled.

Communication with the barista was aided by a handwritten note, and an enclosed container of juice was used in lieu of coffee to avoid spillage. All in all, the PR2’s journey took 40 minutes for something that would take a human around 10. “The coffee-fetching robot is a pretty sophisticated example of full autonomy,” Salisbury said. “Yet that is a laboratory demonstration. That robot’s not going to be serving coffee for (a few) years.”

w

hile Willow Garage and academicians work on creating a general purpose robot that can be programmed to perform multiple tasks, other people are working on simpler, single-task robots. But if a robot can only perform one task, what’s the difference between it and an appliance, like a toaster? FoldiMate CEO Gal Rozov is developing a laundry-folding robot. He said a robot is characterized by how it responds to changes in its environment.

A detail of an arm extension of the Avatar II, built by RoboteX in Palo Alto, shows the robot’s camera and claw attachments, which are primarily used for missions of the U.S. military and police departments. “If you are aware and do not do anything, you are a sensor,” he said. “If you are aware and you react, then you can start to be considered a robot.” Though Rozov said he was inspired by watching “The Jetsons” on TV as a kid, he’s setting his sights on something a little less ambitious than a humanoid robot like Rosie. “You want to find a robot or a solution that will solve a specific pain point,” he said, “And if we look at it like that, the time to market will be a lot faster.” Rozov identified folding clothes as a pain point. “It’s a tedious task,” he said. He started work on the concept in 2010 and founded FoldiMate, based in San Mateo, in 2012. A

few months later, he was joined by Robert Ford as well as Ted Selker, who designed IBM’s in-keyboard pointing device Trackpoint. Rozov, who has a software background and is writing code for the FoldiMate, said he’s working to have a functional prototype ready by April. Users will place an article of clothing on top of a rectangular box about 2-feet wide and 2.5-feet long. A platform will lower down into the machine, where the folding will take place. Users will indicate whether the garment is a shirt, towel or pair of pants. FoldiMate will sense its size, thickness of fabric and whether it is long-sleeve or shortsleeve and adjust accordingly. (continued on next page)

Left, Steve Cousins, president and CEO of Willow Garage, gives a presentation about the PR2 and robotics at Avenidas in January. Above, he shows a video of the PR2 successfully fetching a beer for programmers. ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊ>ÀV…Ê£x]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 23


Cover Story

A sign hangs in the RoboteX assembly center on Page Mill Road in Palo Alto, marking how many units have been shipped out.

Gal Rozov, CEO of FoldiMate, works on the company’s laundry-folding “smart machine” at his lab in Berkeley on March 11. (continued from previous page)

The company decided in early March to start referring to FoldiMate as a “smart appliance,” as opposed to a “robot,” in order to make it more relatable to customers. “If you say ‘robot,’ it’s the future,” he said. “When you say ‘smart appliance,’ it’s right now.” Rozov said he’s first targeting laundromats and wants to sell them a coin-operated model for their customers to use. He hopes to eventually sell a home model that would cost under $800. A robot that is a bit more autonomous than the FoldiMate is made by Neato Robotics, based in Newark and founded by Stanford Graduate School of Business students. The company makes robotic vacuum cleaners, the first of which were sold in 2010. Nancy Nunziati, vice president of marketing, said the company was founded in 2004 and benefited from coming out after the Roomba, which was first

sold in 2002 by Massachusettsbased iRobot. “When (Neato) was founded, there was a lot more fear about calling things ‘robots,’” she said. “There was a concern that people would react negatively or not be ready for robots in the home. And I think that was true at the time, but I think it has changed quickly.” David Ivers, general manager of RoboteX in Palo Alto, said he’s also noticed a change in how the public reacts to robots. His company makes security robots for law enforcement and other emergency responders that can be outfitted with cameras, manipulator arms and gas and radiation detectors. He said that when he used to drive the robot around Palo Alto streets, people would stop and ask questions. But about a year ago that changed. “It was just sort of ‘Yeah, there goes another robot,’” he said. RoboteX’s robots are controlled (continued on page 26)

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Eric Ivers, general manager of the Palo Alto-based robotics start-up RoboteX, stands among the fleet of prototypes of the Avatar, a security-based robot primarily used by the U.S. military and police departments, on March 7.

At Neato Robotics in Newark, Bill Beach, SQA manager, left, and Mike Perkins, vice president of engineering, talk in the lab, which is used to test the robotic vacuum cleaners as they move around various home environments, on March 11.


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ndra Keay is bullish on the future of robotics but thinks that its very success could make the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;robotâ&#x20AC;? obsolete. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Within 10 years, there will not be any such thing as a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;robotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; because everything we have will be robotic,â&#x20AC;? said Keay, the managing director of Silicon Valley Robotics, a membership organization whose mission is to promote innovation and commercialization of the robotics industry. The group organizes events, such as meetings between investors and startups, and has cohosted the Robot Block Party at Stanford University. Keay, whose background is in researching human-robot interaction, said one challenge facing the industry is a talent shortage, caused by roboticists being in high demand by other industries, such as software, mobile and aeronautics.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;They can have skillsets that can go across platforms: electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and computer science,â&#x20AC;? Keay said. She also said high levels of student debt could contribute to a slower pace of innovation, providing a motivation for recent grads to choose a stable, wellpaying job over the uncertain prospect of a startup. But Keay said as the costs of launching a startup decrease, she expects the availability and affordability of useful robots at the consumer level to increase. Concerns of the broader technology sector â&#x20AC;&#x201D; such as patents and work visas â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are also shared by the robotics industry, Keay said. The three-year-old organization is currently conducting an industry survey to help it set a policy agenda. N â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bryce Druzin

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by a person using a remote and watching a screen that shows what the robot’s cameras see. SWAT teams are some of the company’s biggest customers, and they’ve used the machines to check out houses where they suspect an armed person might be present. Ivers said that while some definitions of robots include autonomy as a necessary feature, in the security industry “if it can be operated non-line-of-sight, it’s pretty much considered a robot.” RoboteX is planning on releasing a model for home use in June that Ivers described as a “very stripped down version of our basic robot.” Users will attach a device such as an iPad or iPhone that would act as the eyes and ears for the user, who would control the robot remotely from the Internet. The home robots look much tamer than the security model, which Ivers said was a deliberate choice. They’re also blue. “We didn’t make a big, black, scary-looking robot for home use,” he said. Professor Salisbury echoed the sentiment that if a robot is in a domestic setting, it should look pleasant. He also said it’s important that domestic robots act in a way to reassure people that they are friendly and have predictable behaviors. For example, if a robot is passing through a room with a human in it, it should look at that person so that they know the robot knows they are there. “If it’s just (seemingly) moving blindly around, I might become afraid of it, rather than realize that ‘OK, it’s perceiving that I exist and ... it’s going to behave safely,’” he said. The issue of safety is something Willow Garage’s Cousins called vital to the future of homeuse robots. “Robots in human spaces ... have to be safe around people,” he said, “and if you can’t hit that bar, there’s no way they’re going to be acceptable.” In line with that, the PR2’s 100-pound arms are held up by springs that allow them to “float,” as opposed to powerful motors that would not only weigh a lot but also be capable of inflicting damage if the robot’s programming were to malfunction. “I’m a software guy and ... I don’t trust software,” he said. “So I want to make sure there’s a backup plan in case the software goes crazy.”

a

s robot-human interaction becomes more commonplace, questions about liability in the case of accidents have arisen in tandem. Ryan Calo, an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Law and an affiliate scholar at Stanford, has written about legal issues relat-

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ing to robotics. He said current product liability law is adequate to cover single-use, “closed” robots that perform one task. “They’re supposed to do one thing, and they’re supposed to do one thing safely ... (But) if you take a Roomba and you put a chainsaw on it, they can claim product misuse,” he said. “You’re not using it for the intended purpose.” But the legal issues get tricky with general-purpose robots that can be programmed by anybody, such as the PR2. “People are going to do all kinds of wacky things with this technology, like they do with any technology,” he said. Calo said right now it’s not clear how courts would rule if a general-purpose robot were to injure someone. But he said at the very least, the manufacturer would be a defendant and have to spend resources defending itself. In a 2011 article for the Maryland Law Review, Calo wrote that open-robotics systems hold the most promise for innovation but that the legal uncertainty is a deterrent for companies to invest in the field. “The law is basically stuck in this mode of product liability that’s strict,” he said. “So maybe we should immunize platforms for what users do with these so that (companies) have incentive to build the platforms because that will spur the robotics industry.” Building up the robotics industry was Willow Garage’s primary goal, Cousin said, adding that the company expected to profit from this foundational work in the long term. In line with this philosophy, PR2 customers who agree to share their programming code with the open-source community can receive a 30 percent discount off the robot’s hefty price tag. Cousins said the open-source nature of ROS jibed with Willow Garage’s plan to build a robotics industry first and profit from it later. In February, however, the need for profit apparently became a starker reality for Willow Garage, and Cousins announced that the company was changing its funding model and would “enter the world of commercial opportunities with an eye to becoming a self-sustaining company.” The statement said the company would continue to provide support for the PR2. A representative of Willow Garage declined to comment further on the company’s decision. N Freelance writer Bryce Druzin can be emailed at bdruzin.writer@gmail.com. About the cover: Illustration by Shannon Corey.

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www.PaloAltoOnline.com A video about the robotics work being done locally has been posted on Palo Alto Online.


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A Palo Alto restaurant pianist as a teen, keyboardist Loren Gold now tours the world with The Who

S

by Nick Veronin

ome parents might have reservations upon hearing that their son, fresh out of high school, had decided to pursue his dream of being a professional musician, but not Loren Gold’s folks. “My parents have always been supportive,” says the pianist, who’s now been in music for more than 20 years. “I would never have made it here without their support.” The here Gold is referencing is actually more like everywhere, and could just as easily be a major city in Europe or Japan or Madison Square Garden — where Gold recently helped British classicrock gods The Who wrap up the final set of their “Quadrophenia” tour. “This is the biggest tour I’ve ever been a part of,” Gold says. “It was definitely special.” These days, Gold lives in Los Angeles, where he moved to be closer to the music industry. But before he was rocking sold-out stadiums, he was just another Peninsula kid. Gold was born and raised in Palo Alto. It was here that he learned to play piano — in music classes at his alma mater, Gunn High School, and from a local tutor who still gives lessons. According to Gold’s former tutor, Paul Fink, it was quite clear from the outset that Gold would become a professional musician. “He was very talented,” Fink says. “Very quick to learn pieces. He had a real affinity for the keyboard. It just seemed like a natural extension of

himself.” But it was more than that. “He just sort of had the aura of someone who was already settling in to being a musician.” Indeed, Gold started his career as a professional musician when he was still in high school, in both ordinary and extraordinary ways. Like many young musicians, Gold played in a series of local bands, playing Top 40 covers at house parties and gigging around the Bay Area. While Fink encourages his students to explore pop music, Gold’s high school band wasn’t what impressed him. Fink was wowed when Gold, while still attending Gunn, landed a gig playing piano at a fancy restaurant in downtown Palo Alto. (The restaurant was called La Tour and is long since gone.) “It was quite an impressive thing,” Fink says, adding that such a job is often filled by someone much older. “It was quite a feather in his cap at the time.” Still, looking back at his musical career, Gold says nothing ever really made him feel as if he had “made it” like sharing the stage with Who lead singer Roger Daltrey and guitarist Pete Townshend — whom he will join this summer for The Who’s tour of Europe. “It definitely makes me feel like all that hard work paid off — and is continuing to pay off,” he says. And it’s a good thing that it has paid off. Gold (continued from previous page)

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Arts & Entertainment (continued on next page)

says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never considered working in any kind of conventional job. Though Gold says that The Who gig is by far his largest and most prestigious, he has worked as a keyboardist for a variety of artists, including Hilary Duff, Melissa Etheridge and Kenny Loggins â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the last artist he played with before landing the gig that would ultimately secure him a spot on The Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tour bus. A friend of Goldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knew the man who was helping Roger Daltrey put a band together for a recent solo tour. Gold got a call and auditioned for the part. He said he was a bit ner-

vous upon walking into the studio, but the feeling soon melted away as he and Daltrey played some songs off â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tommy,â&#x20AC;? The Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classic concept album about a deaf, mute and blind pinball master. The two clicked, and so Gold toured the world with Daltrey starting in 2010. When it came time to pick a keyboardist for The Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quadropheniaâ&#x20AC;? tour, Gold was tapped again. For someone who has toured with some of musicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest acts, Gold is incredibly unassuming â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a trait he seems to have possessed for all of his life, according to Fink. When Gold came through the Bay Area on Daltreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solo tour, he invit-

ed Fink to the show. The two have kept in touch over the years, and Fink, who still teaches in Palo Alto, canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say enough about his former student and his family. Fink says he is doubly impressed now with the ability of Goldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who has taken after his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love of the piano. N Info: For more about Loren Gold, go to lorengold.com.

Palo Alto native Loren Gold has now been a professional musician for more than 20 years.

A&E DIGEST

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ***************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp

Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs Cranio Sacral Therapy Cupping, Ear Seeds, Tuina

SPECIALIZING IN:

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SPECIAL MEETING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM March 18, 2013 - 6:00 PM STUDY SESSION 1. Study Session: Joint Meeting with UAC CONSENT CALENDAR 2. Approval of Amendment No. One to Southgate Design Agreement 3. Finance Committee Recommendation that the City Council Appoint an Electric Undergrounding Advisory Body 4. Recommendation to Adopt a Resolution Amending Utilities Rate Schedule C-1 Utility Service Calls 5. Recommendation to Adopt a Resolution Authorizing the City Manager to Negotiate and Execute Electric Master Agreements and Delegating the Authority to Transact Under the Master Agreements 6. Finance Committee Recommendation to Approve Five-year Contract Extension for the Palo Alto Golf Course Management Services Agreement with Brad Lozares (Lozares) and Amendment to the Lease Agreement for the Golf Course Pro Shop with Lozares to Reduce the Term of the Lease From Ten Years to Five Years; and Five-Year Contract Extension for the Golf Course Maintenance Contract with Valley Crest Landscaping 7. Adoption of a Budget Amendment Ordinance in the Amount of $2.2 Million to Utilize the Additional Funds Added to the Infrastructure Reserve in FY 2013 for Infrastructure "Keep-up" to address street and sidewalk problems and to accelerate street and sidewalk improvements 8. Second Reading: Adoption of Ordinance Reducing the Size of the Library Advisory Commission from Seven to Five Commissioners and Amending the Frequency of Regular Meetings to Bi-Monthly 9. Recommendation from the Council Appointed OfďŹ cers Committee to Exercise an Option to Extend for One Year for a Total Cost Not to Exceed $49,350 for 1) Consulting Services related to the 2012-2013 Annual Performance Reviews for Four Council Appointed OfďŹ cers for a Total Cost Not to Exceed $32,300, 2) Solicitation of Staff Feedback Related to Performance Evaluations for a Total Cost Not to Exceed $9,500, and 3) Mid-year Performance Review Updates for a Total Cost Not to Exceed $7,550 10. Policy & Services Committee Recommendation to Approve Revisions to Section 2.4 of the City Council Protocols Setting Forth the Conduct of Council Liaisons to Palo Alto Boards and Commissions ACTION ITEMS 11. Consideration of Direction Regarding Near-Term Downtown Parking Improvements 12. Infrastructure Projects Change Report STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Finance Committee will meet on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 7:00 P.M. to discuss: 1) ModiďŹ cations to Street Sweeping Program, 2) Cost of Services Study Follow-up, 3) Utilities Advisory Commission Recommendation that City Council Adopt a Resolution to Increase Water Fund Revenues by $2.4 Million per Year Effective July 1, 2013 and Amend Water Utility Rate Schedules W-1, W-2, W-3, W-4, and W-7, and 4) Long Range Financial Forecast. The Policy and Services Committee will meet on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 at 7:00 P.M. to discuss: 1) Discussion of Ordinance Prohibiting Smoking in Three Parks , 2) Setting Core Values, and 3) Referral From City Council - Colleagues Memo on Annual Council Reorganization Meeting Date.

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SCHOOL SEEKS DIRECTOR ... Moy Eng, executive director of the Community School of Music and Arts in Mountain View, is stepping down at the end of March, leaving the school looking for a new head. Eng said she wanted to spend more time with her two daughters. She has been in the job for two years and plans to serve in an advisory role to the board of directors for another half-year after stepping down, said John Williams, marketing and communications director for CSMA.

Yaping Chen, L.Ac.

Sports Injuries Chronic Pain Stress and Mood Swings Insomia and Fatigue Depression and Anxiety Weight Management Menopause Symptoms

Call Today for Appointment 650.853.8889

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Transforming lives, one dance at a time. One of the most popular ballrooms in Northern California, this Mountain View studio is open seven days a week Dance Parties on four nights, Thursday - Sunday.

Celebrating four years of great dancing in Silicon Valley! Studio Anniversary - Two Nights! Thursday, March 28

8-9pm: Night Club Two Step Class Dancing until 11pm

Saturday, March 30

8-9pm: American Rumba Class Dancing until 1am

$15 in advance on each night. $20 at the door. Buy tickets @ 650.864.9150 or visit www.cherylburkedance.com and click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Special Eventsâ&#x20AC;? to pay by PayPal. Guest Instructor Steve Rebello will teach classes for all levels, beginning to advanced dancers. Cheryl Burke Dance Mountain View 1400 North Shoreline Blvd. #A-1, Mtn View Š 2010-2013 Cheryl Burke Dance.


Arts & Entertainment

The King as ordinary man Though its script is flawed, ‘The Mountaintop’ is an intriguing demystification of an icon he Martin Luther King Jr. we meet in Katori Hall’s “The Mountaintop” isn’t orating magnificently on a theme of civil rights for all. Rather, he’s hollering after someone about a pack of Pall Mall cigarettes. Once alone in his Lorraine Motel room in Memphis, Hall’s King is further deconstructed as just an ordinary man. He takes his shoes off and his feet stink — he calls it “marching feet.” Then we hear him going to the bathroom just off stage (he washes his hands after). Thus begins the demystification process of Hall’s play, an awardwinner in London three years ago and a 2011 New York star vehicle for Samuel L. Jackson (making his Broadway debut) and Angela Bassett. Now Hall’s piece of re-imagined history is spreading out across the land. In its local premiere at the Lucie Stern Theatre courtesy of TheatreWorks, “The Mountaintop” appears to be part of a campaign to pull the Rev. King off his pedestal. The play roots around in his humanity a bit, then returns him to the pantheon of great Americans with a renewed sense of appreciation and respect for what this man, who was mortal after all, was able to accomplish. Hall takes her title from what has come to be known as King’s “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech delivered April 3, 1968, in a Memphis church the night before he was assassinated on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel. It’s in that speech that King said, prophetically: “We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life — longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will.” Hall catches up with King in Room 306 just after that speech, on a stormy night. The great man is trying to write another speech, “Why America Is Going to Hell.” He’s exhausted — only 39 but with the weariness of a much older man. So it’s no surprise he’s so easily distracted by Camae, a spirited maid who brings him a cup of coffee and happily shares her pack of Pall Malls and a whole

lot of excited conversation. “I cuss worser than a sailor with the clap,” Camae says after a string of expletives has spilled out of her star-struck babble. She plays the backwoods innocent, but she knows what she’s doing. She’s thrilled to be in the presence of a man whom she knows from watching on TV down at Woolworth’s, but she’s no dummy. She’s certainly smart enough to know when King is coming on to her. Adrian Roberts as King and Simone Missick as Camae have striking stage chemistry, which is vital to this 90-minute two-hander. Roberts has the burden of portraying one of the most revered men in 20th-century history while allowing the flawed portrait Hall paints to render him in human rather than mythic terms. He does so admirably, and when we do see Hall’s King unleash the magic, it’s a convincing and welcome moment. Lovely and charming, Missick is a delight as Camae, even when she’s asked to do sometimes ridiculous things like putting on King’s suit jacket and shoes and delivering a speech she wishes he’d give. When Hall’s play takes a narrative turn, whether or not the audience turns with it is almost entirely up to Missick. She has to be a believable guide into hyper-theatrical territory. The good news is that Missick is more than up to the task. She and Roberts, under the astute direction of Anthony J. Haney, are excellent, even when the play isn’t. Hall takes some imaginative leaps, and that in itself is an admirable thing. She takes a reasonably realistic play in a rundown motel room (set by Eric Sinkkonen) and sends it into some wild places to underscore King’s importance, even with all his flaws. But Hall’s writing isn’t strong enough to sustain the theatrical structure she has created. Like the lightning and thunder in the lighting and sound design, there are flashes of humor and poetry and nobility, but there’s also filler and silliness and the least convincing phone conversations you’re likely to hear on a professional stage. Hall has the ambition and imagination of a Tony Kushner but the dialogue writing skills of a decent sitcom scribe. She doesn’t build dramatic tension so much as let the

Mark Kitaoka

T

by Chad Jones

Playing Martin Luther King Jr., Adrian Roberts laughs with Simone Missick, who plays the hotel maid Camae. weight of history do it for her. When the TheatreWorks matinee crowd shouts an enthusiastic “amen” when Dr. King calls for one, it’s not really because of the play. When Dr. King — who happens to be standing on a pedestal at this point — asks you to testify, you testify. It’s too bad “The Mountaintop” doesn’t do more with that power than play theatrical games. N

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Cost: Tickets are $23-$73 general; discounts for students, seniors and educators.

Where: Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto

Info: Go to theatreworks.org or call 650-463-1960.

When: Through April 7 with 7:30 p.m. shows Tuesday and Wednesday; 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday; and 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday (schedule varies April 1-7)

Sign up today at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Attention Bay Area Seniors

Living Well The Palo Alto Weekly’s first ever monthly special section focusing on the needs and interests of local seniors.

Find… s,IFESTYLESOFTODAYS seniors s$EVELOPMENTSIN senior housing s.OTABLELOCALSENIORS s#ALENDAROFSENIOR FOCUSEDLOCALEVENTS s!NDLOTSMORE

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What: “The Mountaintop” by Katori Hall, presented by TheatreWorks

Living Well publishes in the Palo Alto Weekly the first week of every month. Next issue is April 5. For more information, contact your advertising rep at 650.326.8210

450 Cambridge Avenue, Palo Alto | 650.326.8210 | www.PaloAltoOnline.com ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊ>ÀV…Ê£x]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 29


Serving Fine Chinese Cuisine in Palo Alto since 1956 A Great Place for Get-togethers Happy Hour s Catering s Gift Certificates Private Dining s Meeting s Banquet Rooms

Arts & Entertainment

Worth a Look

Art

‘Classic California’ Ming’s Delivery Service Has Come Back! Available for Lunch and Afternoon Order Over $100 (Previous Day Pre-Order Required!) Dinner Delivery Welcome For Order over $30.00, (No Pre-Order Needed!) On-line Order At MINGS.COM Phone Order at 856-7700 (9am to 9:30pm)

Ming’s Chinese Cuisine and Bar 1700 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto tel 650.856.7700 / fax 650.855.9479 / www.mings.com

The daughter of two classical musicians and the granddaughter of a painter, Kristen Olson has the arts in her bones. She paints on Belgian linen and Baltic birch panels. And you just may see her out in nature locally with her easel, capturing the light and emotion of the landscape. This month, the Palo Alto painter has an exhibit of landscapes called “Classic California” at the Portola Art Gallery at Menlo Park’s Allied Arts Guild. She finds her inspiration in sunsets and seasons, hills and ocean waves and, occasionally, Starbucks. (One of her “Zinfandel Sunset,” a 2013 oil painting on linen, is among the landscapes by paintings depicts a lazy cafe Kristen Olson now on exhibit in Menlo Park. scene in front of a Starbucks in Walnut Creek.) She calls herself an “American Impressionist.” In addition to the show, Olson is also teaching a daylong workshop on plein-air garden painting, Impres- ‘Homegrown’ sionist-style. Open to painters of all levels working in Combining historical documentary styles and hip-hop oil, acrylic, gouache and watercolor, the workshop goes music flavors, three films tell three stories that have from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. this Saturday, March 16, at Allied come out of East Palo Alto in recent years. They will all Arts. The $125 price includes lunch at the Blue Garden be screened at a public event called “Homegrown: CulCafe at Allied Arts. tivating Dreams through Action” scheduled for March The exhibit runs through March 31 at the gallery at 18 at East Palo Alto City Hall. 75 Arbor Road. Admission is free; gallery hours are The movies are the fruits of a 10-week joint effort of Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Go to East Palo Alto youth lyricists and students from Stanportolaartgallery.com or call 650-321-0220. For more ford’s urban-studies program. The young writers and on the workshop, go to kristenolson.net. students teamed up as part of a class on environmental issues in the city, according to a press release. The films focus on: the Youth United for Community Action campaign to shut down the local Romic waste recycling program; efforts to farm and grow local food He’s performed in East Palo Alto; and the Weeks Neighborhood Plan at Carnegie Hall, and East Palo Alto Historical and Agricultural Society’s the Metropolitan work to increase self-sufficiency through local food. Museum, the 92nd After the screenings, environmental and sustainability Street Y. And activists Carl Anthony and Paloma Pavel will speak. now: the Oshman The event is free and scheduled from 6:30 to 8:30 Family Jewish p.m. at 2415 University Ave. in East Palo Alto. For more Community Cen- information, call 650-724-7575. ter. Pianist Inon Barnatan brings his big-city classical-music stylings to Palo Alto on March 24 for a Family theater Two family-friendly shows open on Peninsula stages concert. next weekend: Palo Alto Children’s Theatre opening the Born in Tel Aviv classical musical “Oliver” on March 21, with Peninsula in 1979, Barnatan Youth Theatre presenting the new “The Wishing Chair made his orchesand Other Irish Tales” starting on March 22. tral debut at age The “Oliver” adaptation, with script and score by 11. He studied at Lionel Bart, includes the songs “Consider Yourself,” the Royal AcadeInon Barnatan. “As Long as He Needs Me” and “You’ve Got to Pick a my of Music in LonPocket or Two.” It will be performed at the Children’s don before moving to Theatre at 1305 Middlefield Road in Palo Alto, with 7 New York City, where he lives in a converted warehouse p.m. shows on March 21, 22, 23, 29 and 30; 2 p.m. shows in Harlem, according to his bio. He’s a fan of both classion March 23, 24 and 30; and 4:30 shows on March 27 cal and contemporary composers; besides paying tribute and 28. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for children. to the greats of the past, he also plays works by alternaGo to cityofpaloalto.org or call 650-463-4970. tive composer George Crumb, Britain’s Judith Weir and Meanwhile, “The Wishing Chair,” a new production Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho, who has a taste for of Irish stories presented in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, electronic music. will be performed at the Mountain View Center for the On March 24, he’ll play Beethoven’s “32 Variations”; Performing Arts at 500 Castro St. It’s part of PYT’s Schubert’s Sonata in C minor, D. 958; Chopin’s Ballade Stories on Stage series, which has 45-minute shows inNo. 4 in F minor; and Schumann’s “Carnival.” tended to get younger audiences interested in reading. His March 24 concert is scheduled from 7 to 9 p.m., at Shows are at 9:30 and 11 a.m. March 22 and 11:30 a.m. the Schultz Cultural Arts Hall at the JCC. Admission is and 1:30 p.m. March 23. Admission is $8 on Friday $25-$45 general and $20-$36 for JCC members. Go to and $10 on Saturday. Go to mvcpa.com or call 650paloaltojcc.org or call 408-286-2600, extension 23. 903-6000.

Film

Music

Kids

Marco Borggreve

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Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEW

Yakitori shines at Sumika Los Altos restaurant serves up tasty grilled treats, Japanese-style UDDENLY ITSEEMS DOWNTOWN ,OS!LTOSBECAMEAMINI *A PANTOWN OF RESTAURANTS WITH 3UMIKAATTHEHEADOFTHECLASS 3LIGHTLYBELOWSTREETLEVEL THE SEAT RESTAURANT IS ENTERED THROUGH THE #ENTRAL 0LAZA PARKING LOT BE TWEEN3ECONDAND4HIRDSTREETS! MODESTSIGNMARKSTHESPOT ASIFOFF ANALLEYIN4OKYO 3INCEOPENINGSIXYEARSAGO THE LITTLEYAKITORIPLACEHASDONESOWELL THATOWNER+UIKO/SAWAOPENEDA SECOND RESTAURANT /RENCHI 2AMEN IN3ANTA#LARA4HATONEISALLABOUT NOODLES 3UMIKA DOESNT RUN THE GRILL AT LUNCH BUT MOST OF THE REST OF THE MENU IS AVAILABLE ! GREAT MEAL COULDBEMADEOFSOUPANDSALADOR THEFABULOUSFRIEDTOFU ORONEOFTHE

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RICEANDEGGDISHES !T NIGHT FRIENDS AND FAMILIES COLLEAGUESANDCOUPLESNESTLEINTWO COZYDININGAREAS ALLSCRUFFYWOOD ANDTANTALIZINGAROMAS!HUGEVENT DRAWSSMOKEFROMTHEVERYHOTCEN TRAL GRILL WHERE CHEFS DEFTLY TURN SMALLBAMBOOSKEWERSOFMEATSAND VEGETABLES)TSFUNTOWATCHÂ&#x2C6;FROM THEOTHERSIDEOFAGLASSENCLOSURE )FYOURENEWTOYAKITORI ASKFORDI RECTIONS/THERWISEYOUCANENDUP WITHAPILEOFSKEWERSANDASLEEPY FEELINGOFMEATOVERLOAD 4HE NIGHT WE VISITED SERVICE COULDNOTHAVEBEENBETTER)TWAS CROWDED WE DIDNT HAVE A RES ERVATION AND WERENT AMONG THE CLEARLY RECOGNIZED REGULARS 4HE SERVERCAMEBYIMMEDIATELYWITH (continued on next page)

Michelle Le

by Sheila Himmel

Sumika chef Yuri Okamura grills meats and seafood.

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Cucina Venti

ons ervati s e r g in accept

able l i a v a ng cateri Now

It is in this spirit that we will continue sharing our classic recipes with you each week.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sorrento Watermelonâ&#x20AC;? Salad Cocomero con ďŹ chi e rucola Ingredients:

Ripe watermelon Feta cheese (full block in brine) Fresh Arugula Fresh ďŹ gs Sicilian olives

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.cucinaventi.com

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

Slice watermelon into a 5â&#x20AC;?L x 3â&#x20AC;?W x 1â&#x20AC;? H rectangle. Cut a 4â&#x20AC;? x 2â&#x20AC;? piece of feta cheese into 1â&#x20AC;? square pieces and place evenly over watermelon slice. Top with a large pinch of arugula and 1/2 sliced whole ďŹ g. Pour ribbons of Vidalia onion dressing over salad. Place 4 Sicilian olives around the plate and lightly drizzle olives with extra virgin olive oil to ďŹ nish dish.

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Michelle Le

Eating Out

Above: Ebi and hotate get grilled. Below: Chicken thighs, chicken hearts and scallops ready to eat. (continued from previous page)

HOT TOWELS AND ADVICE FOUR OR FIVE SMALL PLATES PER PERSON (E DESCRIBEDACOUPLEOFTHESPECIALS LISTED ON A CHALKBOARD AND SAID h9OUCANORDERTHISFORNOW ANDIF YOURESTILLHUNGRY ORDERANOTHER DISHv (OW REFRESHING IN A WORLD OFOVERSELLING &IRSTCAMETHEBEER COLD3APPORO  OR +IRIN  ON DRAFT !ND THEN HAPPILY ACOUPLEOFDISHESAT ATIME ! CUP OF RED MISO SOUP  WITH TWO JUICY CLAMS WAS FULL FLA VORED ALMOSTSWEET)LIKEDITMY COMPANION DIDNT )F YOU PREFER A MOREASSERTIVEMISO SKIPIT /N THE OTHER HAND THE 3UMIKA SALAD  IS A MUST PRETTY TO LOOK AT AND A SATISFYING COMBINA TIONOFALLTHEFOODGROUPS4ENDER STRIPSOFCHICKENANDCRUNCHYWONT ONSTRIPSDRAPEAMOUNTAINOFTANGY MIZUNALETTUCE CABBAGE CHERRYTO MATOESANDCUTELITTLEDISCSOFBABY CORN0EANUT SESAMEDRESSINGBRINGS ITALLTOGETHER 3UMIKAS KARAAGE FRIED CHICKEN  DESERVES ITS RENOWN WITH A CRUNCHY CRUST HUGGING EACH PIECE OFJUICYWHITEMEATANDLEAVINGNO GREASYFINGERS &ROMTHEGRILL WESAMPLEDOTHER PARTS OF 0ETALUMAS FINEST STARTING WITH FIVE CHICKEN HEARTS HATSU  OFSURPRISINGLYDIFFERENTSIZ ES*USTLIGHTLYSALTED THEYPOPOPEN INYOURMOUTH!SWITHMOSTOFTHE GRILL ITEMS THEY ARE GONE IN TWO BITES "ONELESS CHUNKS OF CHICKEN THIGHS MOMO  WERE JUICY ALMOSTLIKEPORKBELLY 4WOGRILLEDSCALLOPSHOTATE  HAD THE SAME ENTRANCING TEXTURE CRUNCHYONTHEOUTSIDE MOISTINTHE

PENINSULA

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Chef Chuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Mingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

STEAKHOUSE

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Sundance the Steakhouse

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

INDIAN

MIDDLE BUTAFTERTHEFRIEDCHICKEN LESSFLAVOR ) PREFERRED THE MEATY SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS  /NE OF THE SPECIALS MOZZARELLA MISO  SOUNDED SO UNUSUAL THATWEHADTOTRYITTHREEKINDSOF MISO FRESH MOZZARELLA AGED TWO WEEKS)NTHEEND ITWASDENSEAND PIQUANT LIKEANAGED!SIAGO SOTHAT DESSERTWOULDHAVEBEENOVERKILL $ESSERTISWHERETHECHEFSBREAK INTOFANCIFULFUSION2ECENTCHOICES INCLUDEDBLACKSESAMEPANNACOTTA ROASTEDTEACRĂĄMEBRÂ&#x153;LÂŁEANDPURPLE YAMPUDDINGEACH ANDYUZU CHEESECAKE .EXTTIMEN Sumika Grill, 236 Central Plaza, Los Altos; 650-917-1822; sumikagrill.com Hours: Lunch Tue.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Dinner Tue.-Thur. 6-10 p.m., Fri. 5:30-11 p.m., Sat. 5:3010 p.m., Sunday, 5-9 p.m.

Janta Indian Restaurant 462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

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Sumikaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fried chicken has a crunchy crust and juicy white meat. Page 32Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;ÂŁx]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;


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Matthew Goode, Nicole Kidman and Mia Wasikowska in “Stoker.”

Stoker --1/2

(Palo Alto Square) A key line in the sleek new psychological thriller “Stoker” avers, “Sometimes you need to do something bad to stop you from doing something worse.” “Stoker” isn’t exactly bad — in fact, it’s worth seeing — but one could imagine director Park Chan-wook (“Oldboy”) comforting himself with the same advice, as he muddles through the American system and resists selling out. Park doesn’t take a writing credit on “Stoker” (it’s scripted by Wentworth Miller, who’s better known as an actor), but the film screams “Park Chan-wook!” in its sight-and-sound trappings. The man is a stylist, and “Stoker” can be bracing simply for being so out of step with most domestic films that we see. And yet there’s a whiff of desperation in the film’s aesthetic inventions, suggesting Park’s efforts to distract from a script that doesn’t quite make it. Mia Wasikowska (“Alice in Wonderland”) plays India Stoker, an 18-year-old who narrates, “To become adult is to become free.” She’s itching to play in the behavioral big leagues, though emotionally stunted by the recent death of her father in a car accident. All is not well at home, where India’s mother (Nicole Kidman) allows a new houseguest and begins cozying up to him even as he cozies up to India. It’s her Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode), who fulfills a wolfish archetype dating back beyond the Uncle Charlie of Alfred Hitchcock’s “Shadow of a Doubt.” Where “Shadow of a Doubt” provides a jumping-off point, and Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” a thematic touchstone (in the perniciousness of bloodlines), it’s the craftwork of David Lynch that seems to be on Park’s mind as he strikes ground in America. An insect motif evokes “Blue Velvet”; a violent nature doc on a motel TV nods to “Wild at Heart”; and much of the rest pays homage to “Twin Peaks.” There are comical high-school toughs (including a biker teen at a roadhouse), the threat of incest, crossing train tracks to a dan-

gerous woodsy rendezvous, dreamy ceiling-tofloor drapes, and frequent close-ups of saddle shoes, as a signifier of innocence on the cusp of sexual awakening. Park’s skills for surreal subjectivity and the mischievously weird certainly don’t hurt, but they can’t quite banish the film’s narrative speed bumps and drafts of cold air as the film bluntly denotes the compulsive correspondence of orgasm and murder, and nastiness by inheritance (evoking “The Bad Seed”). The women’s waywardness of thought and feeling comes off as unfortunately regressive, though the stoking of India’s inner life will lead her either to her dead father’s “openness, honesty and integrity” or his brother’s eagerness to sin. Despite its deficiencies, this moody symbolist thriller is not for a second less than engaging. Credit delicate work by Wasikowska and Goode, and Park’s strategy to design every composition, camera move and edit to keep the audience off-balance (plus: newly composed Philip Glass piano duets). Who knows: Maybe this movie that asks “What kind of family is family you can’t take home?” can be a rally point for dysfunctional broods needing to let off a little “at least we’re not as bad as all that” steam. Rated R for disturbing violent and sexual content. One hour, 38 minutes. — Peter Canavese

The Incredible Burt Wonderstone --

(Century 16, Century 20) The film-going public was introduced to funnyman Steve Carell as a supporting player to Jim Carrey’s lead in the God-complex comedy “Bruce Almighty” (2003). Ten years later, Carrey is playing backup to Carell’s protagonist in “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone.” And while the roles have reversed, the outcome is similar — a middling chuckler with lackluster writing

that fails to leave a lasting impression. Magic serves as an entertaining backdrop for this otherwise mediocre undertaking, with Carell playing the part of applauded Las Vegas magician Burt Wonderstone. The audience meets Burt at his most vulnerable, as a youngster perpetually bullied and left to his own devices by his absentee mother. A birthday gift in the form of a magic kit sets Burt on his future path, a direction further cemented when Burt meets fellow outcast Anton. As adults, Burt and Anton (Steve Buscemi) have the hottest act in Sin City, but their traditional theatrics are growing stale. Burt’s overblown ego has become a liability and edgy newcomer Steve Gray (Carrey, in an obvious caricature of street magician Criss Angel) is starting to transform how Vegas views magic. The lifelong friendship between Burt and Anton is torn asunder as casino mogul Doug Munny (James Gandolfini) seeks new ways to attract an audience. “Wonderstone” is an enticing concept but lacks the laughs to back up its potential. The film’s first half is almost arduous viewing, as Burt is so narcissistic and tactless that he is utterly unlikable, which all but dissolves any empathy built for the character in the film’s opening scenes when Burt is a child. Fortunately, the picture picks up quite a bit in the second half, both in the story and humor departments. But there are only a handful of laugh-out-loud moments, such as when Carrey is trying to sleep on hot coals or Carell and Buscemi pass out after inhaling a faint-inducing vapor. The casting is mostly solid — especially Olivia Wilde as an aspiring magician and the always reliable Alan Arkin as an aging one. Buscemi and Gandolfini, however, are odd fits (although, to be fair, both seem fully invested in their parts). Director Don Scardino has a resume made up mostly of television gigs, and unfortunately it shows. The movie itself feels almost dated, with a soundtrack that boasts predictable and long-forgotten tunes. (“Magic,” anyone?) Part of the reason “Wonderstone” misses the mark is that magic itself is meant much more for the stage than the big screen. In person, magic can be hypnotic, but on film it is little more than adequate visual effects. And while the reunion of Carell and Carrey is something of a treat, the dynamic duo can’t quite pull a rabbit out of this cinematic hat. Rated PG-13 for sexual content, dangerous stunts, a drug-related incident and language. 1 hour, 40 minutes. — Tyler Hanley

The following is a sampling of movies recently reviewed in the Weekly: Emperor -1/2 (Aquarius, Century 20) Though they’re better than nothing, movies have never been a good place to learn history. There are exceptions: well-researched films, honest ones that convey the essence of truth even in conflation and remove. “Emperor” is not one of those. It purports to tell the story of what happened in Japan in the fall of 1945, as occupying Americans investigated Emperor Hirohito’s culpability in war crimes. Would he stand trial? Or would he remain in place in a rebuilt Japan? On the face of it, this post-war twilight zone could be a fascinating place, in the company of men like Hirohito and General Douglas MacArthur, the latter played by Tommy Lee Jones. But this “inspired by a true story” story gets told from the point of view of “Brigadier General Bonner Fellers” (Matthew Fox), whose name I put in quotation marks because the character resembles his historical counterpart pretty much in name only. Yes, Fellers was a right-hand man to MacArthur and investigated war crimes and the role of Hirohito. But “Emperor” (based on Shiro Okamoto’s book “His Majesty’s Salvation”) ignores prevailing opinion about how the investigation went down and, worse, invents an obsessive romance with a Japanese woman (Eriko Hatsune). The true story of post-war back-room meetings, or at least a truer one, might have worked for “Emperor,” but the mealy half-truth that director Peter Webber (“Girl with a Pearl Earring”) and screenwriters Vera Blasi and David Klass settle for just winds up a waste of everyone’s time. Rated PG-13 for violent content, brief strong language and smoking. One hour, 38 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed March 8, 2013) The Gatekeepers ---1/2 (Palo Alto Square) Dror Moreh’s documentary “The Gatekeepers” proves more intellectually engaging than Hollywood’s “Zero Dark Thirty,” and at least as unsettling. Moreh pursued the participation of former heads of the Shin Bet, Israel’s secret service. Six of these men agreed for the first time to explain their actions, discuss their successes and air their regrets. Obviously men who have run the Shin Bet will be both canny enough and skilled enough to say just what they want, no more or less. Essentially the sole criticism of Moreh’s film is that it gives the men a venue to couch their past actions in the best possible light and to polish their legacies by explaining how they have, in hindsight, turned certain political corners. The sometimes-slick visual approach, incorporating recreations of satellite surveillance and an animated photographer’s-eye view of the 1984 debacle, can at times feel like overkill, but they also help to put what’s otherwise a series of talking heads in the game with other eye-catching top docs. Rated PG-13 for violent content including disturbing images. One hour, 41 minutes. — P.C. (Reviewed Feb. 22, 2013) Jack the Giant Slayer --(Century 16, Century 20) The classic folk tale has become a fascination for Hollywood lately, and the evolution of visual effects has made such stories easier to translate to the big screen. Director Bryan Singer’s take on the “Jack and the Beanstalk” fable may be the best film adaptation of a time-honored yarn yet. Singer, of “The Usual Suspects” and “X-Men” fame, infuses the film with just the right balance of action, romance and goofy fun. The picture moves at a brisk pace, the effects are spot-on and the script is refreshingly sharp. Up-andcomer Nicholas Hoult (“X-Men: First Class”)

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ACADEMY AWA RD® NOMINEE BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM “Weirdly funny and rousing, both intellectually and emotionally.” -Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

WINNER CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

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Gael García Bernal A film by Pablo Larraín

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Movies (continued from previous page) plays Jack, a humble farmhand who lives in relative squalor with his uncle. Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uncle tasks him with taking a horse to town to sell, and Jack reluctantly parts with the animal for â&#x20AC;&#x201D; you guessed it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a handful of unusual beans. But the beansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bearer issues an ominous warning: Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get them

wet. Houltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jack is an admirable blend of heroics and aww-shucks humility, but the usually spectacular Stanley Tucci is miscast as a less-than-honorable royal advisor. Rated PG-13 for intense scenes of fantasy action violence, some frightening images and brief language. One hour, 55 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; T.H. (Reviewed March 1, 2013)

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No ---1/2 (Aquarius) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Disappearedâ&#x20AC;? detainees. Political executions. Torture. Rigged elections. Put these up for a vote by the people, and one wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect a nailbiter election. Yet thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the story of â&#x20AC;&#x153;No,â&#x20AC;? Pablo Larrainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drama about 1988â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up-or-down vote on Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, and the advertising war waged to sway the populace. The third film in Larrainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loose trilogy set in the Pinochet era, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Noâ&#x20AC;? casts Mexican star Gael Garcia Bernal as ad man Rene Saavedra (a composite character representing Jose Manuel Salcedo and Enrique Garcia), who â&#x20AC;&#x201D; despite the risks to career, self and family â&#x20AC;&#x201D; joins the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Noâ&#x20AC;? campaign as the key creative force behind 27 nights of videos to run adjacent to videos by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yesâ&#x20AC;? campaign. A plebiscite will then determine whether Pinochet gets another term, unopposed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Noâ&#x20AC;? ably captures the cultural moment, clarifying how fear and a protectiveness of economic growth bolster the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yesâ&#x20AC;? side, and how perhaps only the successful campaigner for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Free Colaâ&#x20AC;? could harness music, rebelliousness and romance to make the sale for â&#x20AC;&#x153;No.â&#x20AC;? Rated R for language. One hour, 58 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; P.C. (Reviewed March 8, 2013) Oz the Great and Powerful --1/2 (Century 16, Century 20) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;sound-alikeâ&#x20AC;? has long been a practice of those looking to borrow the cachet of a piece of music with

a knock-off. Well, Disney has a shiny new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ozâ&#x20AC;? movie thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a â&#x20AC;&#x153;look-alikeâ&#x20AC;? of Warner property â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wizard of Oz.â&#x20AC;? This prequel tells how the Wizard installed himself in the Emerald City. James Franco plays roguish carnival magician Oscar Diggs (aka â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ozâ&#x20AC;?), whose balloon gets whipped by a tornado into the magical land of Oz. There he meets a fetching witch named Theodora (Mila Kunis), who informs him that he must be the wizard foretold in prophecy to inherit the Emerald City throne. Theodora takes Oz to meet her sister Evanora (Rachel Weisz), who regards him with suspicion but sends him on a mission to kill witch Glinda (Michelle Williams) and earn his position. In story terms, this sort of connect-the-dots prequel is basically a dead end, warned not to stray from its yellow-brick road and doomed to a foregone conclusion. The script by Mitchell Kapner and Pulitzer Prize winner David Lindsay-Abaire (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rabbit Holeâ&#x20AC;?) mostly settles for revisiting every trope of the original story rather than trying to break ground. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ozâ&#x20AC;? gets saved from the junk heap by Franco and especially by director Sam Raimi, who happily treats the enterprise as a sandbox. Like Ang Lee and Martin Scorsese before him, Raimi finds his first foray into 3D creatively invigorating, at least in visual terms. Rated PG for sequences of action and scary images, and brief mild language. Two hours, 10 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; P.C. (Reviewed March 8, 2013)

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w w w. j a n t a i n d i a n r e s t a u r a n t . c o m

Snitch --1/2 Century 16, Century 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snitchâ&#x20AC;? fictionalizes the case of 18-year-old Joey Settembrino, a first-time offender who landed a 10year prison sentence after being entrapped by a friend in a drug sting, adding spoonfuls of action sugar to make the social message go down. Dwayne Johnson plays the father, John Matthews, whose son Jason makes one bad call and winds up in the Big House. As the owner of a big-rig freightshipping outfit, Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;goodâ&#x20AC;? position to offer drug traffickers an enticing proposition. Entrapping one of his employees, John gets a meet with dealer Malik, who in turn connects John with Mexican drug cartel head Juan Carlos. Stunt coordinatorturned-director Ric Roman Waugh shows his sure hand with the impressive if overblown, driving stunts, which constitute most of the limited action in whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s otherwise an indie-flavored thriller. The cast helps. For a man of not unlimited acting talent, Johnson shows he has a good understanding of his range and a firm handle on his career, this role being just the sort he ought to be playing. That said, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be nowhere without his supporting cast. In its modern way, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snitchâ&#x20AC;? is almost Dickensian in its intent, missing no opportunity for melodramatic confrontation. Rated PG-13 for drug content and sequences of violence. One hour, 52 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; P.C. (Reviewed Feb. 22, 2013)

All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. 21 and Over (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:20 a.m. & 2, 4:50, 7:40 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m. & 2:10, 4:30, 6:55 & 9:20 p.m. Argo (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 12:20, 3:30, 7:10 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m. & 1:55, 4:45, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m.

AN ADRENALINE SHOTâ&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

TO THE CEREBRAL CORTEX! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Marshall Fine, HUFFINGTON POST

â&#x20AC;&#x153;ONE OF THE MOST ARTFUL CHILLERS IN AGES.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; John DeFore, THE HOLLY WOOD R EPORT ER

The Call (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m. & 2:20, 5, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m. & 12:35, 1:55, 3:10, 4:20, 5:35, 6:45, 8, 9:15 & 10:30 p.m. Dead Man Down (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 11:30 a.m. & 2:15, 5, 7:50 & 10:40 p.m. Sat no 11:30 a.m. Emperor (PG-13) (1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 & 10 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m. & 2, 4:35, 7:10 & 9:45 p.m. Escape from Planet Earth (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 11:35 a.m. & 4:40 & 9:30 p.m. In 3D 2:15 & 7:05 p.m. The Gatekeepers (PG-13) (((1/2 Palo Alto Square: Fri and Sat 2, 4:30, 7:15 & 9:45 p.m. Sun 2, 4:30 & 7:15 p.m. Identity Thief (R) ((1/2 Century 20: 11:40 a.m. & 2:30, 5:05, 7:55 & 10:40 p.m. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (PG-13) (( Century 16: Fri-Sat 11 a.m. & noon & 1:30, 2:30, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9:50 & 10:40 p.m. Sun at 10:30 p.m. instead of 10:40. Century 20: 11:15 a.m. & 12:30, 1:50, 3:05, 4:25, 5:35, 7, 8:05, 9:35 & 10:35 p.m. Jack the Giant Slayer (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m. & 4:20 & 10:05 p.m. In 3D 1:40 & 7:25 p.m. Century 20: Fri & Sun 11:30 a.m. & 5 & 10:30 p.m. In 3D 2:10 & 7:45 p.m. Sat no 11:30 a.m. show. Lawrence of Arabia (1962) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Wed 2 & 7 p.m. Les Miserables (2012) (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:10 a.m. & 2:40, 6:20 & 9:50 p.m. Life of Pi (PG) (((1/2 Century 16: 3:10 & 9:40 p.m. In 3D 11:40 a.m. & 6:40 p.m. Century 20: Fri and Sat 1:25 & 7:15 p.m. In 3D 4:20 & 10:10 p.m. Sun 1:25 & 7:15 p.m. In 3D 4:20 & 10:10 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 12:30 & 6:50 p.m. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri 7:30 p.m. Sat-Sun 3:25 & 7:30 p.m. Met Opera: Francesca da Rimini Century 20: Sat 9 a.m. Met Opera: Parsifal Century 16: Wed 6:30 p.m. Century 20: Wed 6:30 p.m. No (R) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 1, 4, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Oz the Great and Powerful (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m. & 12:40, 2:10, 3:40, 5:30, 7:10, 8:50 & 10:30 p.m. In 3D 11:50 a.m. & 1:30, 2:50, 4:40, 6:30, 8 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m. & 2:20, 3:05, 5:20, 8:25 & 9:15 p.m. In 3D noon & 12:40, 3:45, 6:10, 6:50 & 9:55 p.m. In XD 1:20, 4:25, 7:30 & 10:35 p.m. Quartet (PG-13) ((( Century 20: 11:55 a.m. & 2:35, 4:55, 7:25 & 9:50 p.m. Guild Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m. Safe Haven (PG-13) 1/2 Century 20: 11:10 a.m. & 1:50, 4:35, 7:20 & 10 p.m. Silver Linings Playbook (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m. & 1:45, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m. & 2, 4:50, 7:35 & 10:25 p.m.

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Snitch (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 16: 3:50 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: Fri and Sun 12:10, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m. Sat 2:45 & 5:15 p.m. DIRECTED BY

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Stoker (R) ((1/2 Palo Alto Square: Fri and Sat 2:15, 4:45, 7:25 & 10 p.m. Sun 2:15, 4:45 & 7:25 p.m. The Wrong Man (1956) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: 5:35 & 9:40 p.m. Zero Dark Thirty (R) ((1/2

Century 16: 12:10, 3:50 & 7:50 p.m.

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Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers, theater addresses and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies


Sports Shorts

SKIING

Keeping it all in the family

OAKS’ NOTES . . . California Pacific Conference Player of the Year Jolise Limcaco of Menlo College added another accolade to her resume on Wednesday as she was named to the NAIA All-American third team. Limcaco, a sophomore guard from Sacramento, was an integral part of Menlo women’s impressive season, which included a 26-4 record, Cal Pac regular season and conference championships, a 10-0 conference record, and a trip to the NAIA national championships. Limcaco averaged 16.7 points and 4.9 assists per game while shooting nearly 50 percent from the field. This is the first time Limcaco has cracked the All-American list. Limcaco is the first Menlo College women’s basketball player to be named to the NAIA All-American list since Kelci Fushikoshi earned an honorable mention in 2009 . . . Menlo junior Justine Roscoe was named Cal Pac Conference Softball Pitcher of the Week it was announced Wednesday. Roscoe pitched seven innings and allowed three hits and three unearned runs in helping the Oaks sweep a doubleheader from the University of Concordia of Nebraska.

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

T

Gunn High grad Joanne Reid, a senior at the University of Colorado, celebrates her title in the women’s 15kilometer race last Saturday at the NCAA Championships in Ripton, Vt.

he past and present came together in a big bear hug this past weekend as Gunn High grad Joanne Reid celebrated with her mother as an NCAA champion in cross-country skiing. Reid, a senior at the University of Colorado, won the women’s 15kilometer race on Saturday at the NCAA Championships at Ripton, Vt. That matched her mother’s performance 30 years earlier whiling helping the Buffaloes rally from a 54-point deficit to win their 19th national championship in skiing — their seventh coed title to go with 11 men’s crowns and one women’s. Reid’s mother, Olympic speed skating medalist Beth Heiden, won the cross country title skiing for Vermont in 1983, the first year the NCAA sponsored women’s skiing after absorbing the old AIAW (Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women). “It feels amazing,” Joanne Reid said of her final collegiate race. “My mom’s got connections here; she can do what she wants, so I saw her at the finish line and it was great. It’s cool that we have both now won NCAA individual titles — especially because every time I go skiing with her, they just list all her awards so now I have one that she has. I just need a few more world championships in other sports now to catch up.” Before skiing to here NCAA title in 1983, Beth Heiden was the all(continued on page 38)

NORCAL BASKETBALL

NORCAL BASKETBALL

The Panthers will battle for berth in state finals

Gunn girls miss shot at making some history

by Andrew Preimesberger

by Tom Jacoubowsky

he Eastside Prep girls’ basketball team is looking to make history. The Pinewood girls, meanwhile, want to add to their history. Only one team, however, will achieve its goal this weekend. Put your money on the Panthers. The West Bay Athletic League rivals with identical mascots will meet for a fourth time this season in Saturday’s CIF Northern California Division V championship game at American Canyon High at 10 a.m. The winner will advance to the state title game the following Friday morning, at the same early time, at Sleep Train Arena in Sacramento. Thus, only one of these teams will reach their goal this weekend. Top-seeded Eastside Prep (23-8) has never

he Gunn High girls’ basketball team was hoping for a shot at making program history by reaching the NorCal championship game for the first time. Instead, that shot missed its mark as a very successful season by the Titans came to a disappointing end in a 54-46 loss to Berkeley on Tuesday in the CIF NorCal Division I semifinals in front of a large and appreciative crowd that cheered to the end in the final game to be played at Robert A. Bow Gymnasium — the Titans move into a new gym next season. It was a game that No. 8 seed Gunn (21-7) never led and, after the first period, could only get as close as six points. True to their character all year, the Titans never quit.

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Tim Aiken

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by Keith Peters

Beth Reid

CARDINAL CORNER . . . Stanford’s Eddie Penev was named the College Gymnastics Association Gymnast of the Week as the nation’s top collegiate gymnast for the second consecutive week, as announced by the organization Wednesday. Tt is Penev’s third honor this season and fifth in his career. Penev had a terrific weekend, leading Stanford to a season-high team score of 438.600 against No. 14 Army and Springfield in West Point, N.Y. Penev claimed individual victories in floor and the all-around with season-bests of 16.050 and 89.100. . . . Stanford redshirt freshman wrestler Evan Silver was one of 44 wrestlers to receive an at-large berth into the 2013 NCAA Championships, the NCAA announced Wednesday. Silver, who competes at 125 pounds, was the only wrestler from the Pac-12 Conference to receive an at-large berth to championships, set for March 21-23 in Des Moines, Iowa. Silver leads the Cardinal this season with a 25-13 overall record and a 16-6 mark in duals. Joining Silver in Des Moines next week are Stanford juniors Bret Baumbach and Dan Scherer . . . . Stanford is sending 11 competitors to the National Collegiate Men’s and Women’s Fencing Championships, which begin March 21 in San Antonio, Texas. The 10th-ranked men’s fencing team will send six representatives including Alexander Massialas and Turner Caldwell in foil, Daniel Wolfson and Cameron Lindsay in sabre and Jake Harbour and Paul Riviere in epee. Riviere earned an at-large bid based on his performance throughout the season. The women’s fencing team will be represented by Francesca Bassa and Vivian Kong in epee, Avery Youngblood and Atira Richards in sabre and Lily McElwee in foil.

Gunn High grad matches her mother’s 1983 NCAA title

Gunn senior Claire Klausner (11) scored all 15 of her points in the second half against Berkeley.

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Sports GIRLS’ PREP ROUNDUP

BOYS’ PREP ROUNDUP

Lacrosse injuries slow Menlo

Menlo looks to defend tennis title Plenty of goals still available for Knights’ standout senior class

Knights open season without leading scorer and starting goalie

by Keith Peters

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Keith Peters

Menlo senior starters Michaela Michael (right) and goalie Hannah Rubin (second from right) have started the season with injuries. time in more than a decade), were ranked in the state . . . that was important to me. There’s nothing that I’m upset about missing my senior year.” Michael already has accomplished everything in three years that most lacrosse players never do in four. She holds all the school records, which should remain untouched for years, and led the Knights to WBAL playoff titles three consecutive seasons. Menlo last year was ranked No. 10 in the state and No. 14 in the West Region by Laxpower.com. “With regards to Michaela, I don’t know what else she has to prove in high school,” said Lee. “She will make incredible contributions from the sideline for our team, and her records will stand for a long time.” Michael hopes to be fit to compete in two big tournaments this summer — the Under Armour All-American Senior Games in Baltimore, Md., and the U.S. Lacrosse Champion All-American Showcase in Florida. With Michael sidelined, Lee will turn to senior co-captains Ali Kim and Brooke Bullington for scoring support. Each had four goals plus an assist in Menlo’s 22-19 loss to visiting SI on Tuesday. Freshman Parvathi Narayan added four goals with junior Alyssa Sherman adding three goals. Michael will serve as a volunteer assistant coach and attempt to be a vocal leader from the sideline while helping the younger players. She had hoped to do that while playing this season. “It will be hard,” Michael said of the preseason schedule, “but by league, we’ll be good to go.” In other girls’ lacrosse action this

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week: Palo Alto improved to 3-0 in the SCVAL and 5-0 overall with a 15-1 romp over host Sequoia on Tuesday. Senior Charlotte Biffar scored five goals and added one assist while fellow senior Nina Kelty added three goals and two assists. The Vikings had 10 players either score or provide assists, with 13 of the goals being assisted. Castilleja, meanwhile, finally opened its season with a 20-9 victory over Notre Dame-San Jose. Sophomore Lou Biffar tallied six goals and added one assist for the Gators while senior captain Katherine Hobbs added five goals and two assists. Senior captains Charlotte Jones and Julia Vais each had two goals and one assist. Softball Less than 24 hours after scoring 15 points in a NorCal Division I basketball semifinal loss to Berkeley, Gunn senior Claire Klausner made her 2013 softball debut in a big way by pitching five innings to get the win and hitting a three-run homer in a 6-5 triumph in eight innings over visiting Cupertino in a SCVAL El Camino Division opener on Wednesday. The Pioneers scored two runs in the fourth to take the lead before Gunn responded with Klausner’s three-run homer in the fifth. Cupertino came right back with three more runs in the fifth, but Gunn (1-0, 2-5) added two more in the bottom of the inning to tie at 5. After a scoreless seventh, the Titans won the game with a two-out, bases-loaded hit by Laura Tao in the bottom of the eighth. N

he current seniors on the Menlo School boys’ tennis team have pretty much done it all. They’ve won three straight titles in West Bay Athletic League, three straight Central Coast Section and NorCal championships. The Knights, however, still have plenty of other goals yet to achieve this season and are on track to do just that. The Menlo seniors will take a three-year plus record of 91-1 into this weekend’s National Invitational Boys Team Tennis Tournament hosted by Corona del Mar High. No group of Menlo seniors has ever played 92 matches with just one loss. The Knights also will be seeking to defend their tournament title, something no Menlo team has ever achieved. Menlo won this tourney in 2010, finished second in 2011 and won last year. Reaching the finals on Saturday for a fourth straight season also will be a first for coach Bill Shine’s squad. And, speaking of Shine, he takes a record of 387-41 in 17 seasons into the weekend. He’s 13 victories shy of 400 wins with the Menlo boys. Should the Knights successfully defend their title and keep winning, No. 400 could arrive on April 19 with a home match against Clovis. All the streaks and records, however, hinge on this weekend. Despite being the defending champ, Menlo is seeded only No. 2 behind University (Irvine). “I don’t care,” Shine said of the seeding slight. “Now the boys are motivated.” Surprisingly, the No. 1 seed has never won this tournament, now in its 14th year. Menlo, seeded No. 2 last year, will begin its quest to repeat on Friday morning against Gilman School of Baltimore, Md. A victory will move the Knights into an afternoon match against either Potomac (Md.) or Brophy Prep (Ariz.). Both firstday matches are at Corona del Mar. Saturday could find Menlo matched against No. 3 Corona del Mar at The Tennis Club while the finals are set for the Palisades Tennis Club at 3 p.m. Joining Menlo from the Central Coast Section will be Bellarmine Prep, the No. 4 seed. The field features 16 teams, six from outside California. The winner thus becomes the unofficial national champion, since there are no other tournaments like this in the country. Menlo is led by seniors Andrew Ball, Daniel Morkovine and Richard Pham. All were named the the All-Tournament Team last year. Michael Hoffman, William Boyd and

Keith Peters

by Keith Peters espite losing nine seniors to graduation, the Menlo School girls’ lacrosse team had its best offensive player returning for 2013 along with its starting goalie. At least those two positions were covered as the Knights embarked on perhaps their most ambitious schedule ever. Along with bringing in St. John’s from Texas, Menlo coach Jen Lee lined up Radnor (Pa.) for a scrimmage, Cleveland Heights, NorCal rival St. Ignatius and preseason nationally No. 2-ranked St. Stephen’s St. Agnews — all among the first nine matches of the season. No problem. The Knights did have senior goalie Hannah Rubin and senior do-everything Michaela Michael to handle some of the nation’s best, or so Lee thought. Rubin suffered a knee injury during soccer season and Michael suffered a torn ACL in her left knee last fall during a club team workout. Both are currently sidelined and their return this season is questionable. Thus, the Knights are 0-2 heading into Friday’s nonleague match at California High in the East Bay before hosting Amador Valley — one of only four teams to beat Menlo last year — on Tuesday in the first of six straight home matches featuring the aforementioned national powers. While Lee is expecting Rubin to return at some point, she’s mentally preparing not to have Michael. Michael, who is headed to USC in the fall on a scholarship, finished her junior year with 131 goals and 31 assists for 162 points. She ranked No. 3 in the nation and No. 1 in the state for goals scored while her points total ranked No. 2 in the state and No. 6 in the country according to MaxPreps. Not too surprisingly, Michael was named one of the top 10 seniors in the nation by Inside Lacrosse magazine’s preseason preview. “She is a total gem,” Lee said of Michaela, regarded as the best player in the Western states. “It (the injury) is very unfortunate, but she will come out stronger on the other end for it. We are trying to keep perspective and also the bigger picture in mind.” Michael suffered her injury last September and quickly had arthroscopic surgery to repair the damage. She was never in a cast but continues to go to physical therapy at APEX in Foster City twice a week while keeping her stick skills in shape daily. “I’m bummed,” Michael said. “I’ve had three great seasons at Menlo. Last year we accomplished so much. We beat SI (for the first

Menlo senior Andrew Ball leads the Knights this weekend. Eric Miller also are seniors. “This particular group gets it,” Shine said. “We talked about their legacy and how they want to be remembered down the line.” Baseball Getting a bases-loaded walk in the bottom of the eighth inning, Sacred Heart Prep strolled away with a 3-2 nonleague victory over visiting Menlo-Atherton on Wednesday. The Bears (4-3) brought in reliever Erik Amundson with two on and one out in the eighth and he issued an intentional walk to the Gators’ No. 8 hitter, Hank Robson. SHP’s Brad Gritsch then worked a fourpitch walk to bring in the winning run as the Gators improved to 7-3 heading into Friday’s nonleague game at Burlingame at 7 p.m. In the SCVAL De Anza Division, host Palo Alto got three hits from Michael Strong in an 11-7 victory over Saratoga, which knocked the Falcons out of sole possession of first place. Strong also scored twice and drove in a pair as the Vikings improved to 2-1 in league (5-4 overall). Elsewhere, host Gunn fell to 0-3 in league (3-6 overall) following an 11-2 loss to Wilcox. The Chargers (2-1, 8-3) are deadlocked with Paly, Mountain View, Saratoga and Homestead for first place. In nonleague action Tuesday, Menlo School (5-2) combined seven hits with six walks and five hit batters for a 14-4 win at Hillsdale. Graham Stratford and Will King each had two-out, two-run hits in the third as Menlo grabbed an 8-2 lead. Golf Menlo School senior Andrew Buchanan fired a 2-over par 37 to pace the defending champion Knights to a 200-205 WBAL victory over Harker at Palo Alto Hills Country Club on Wednesday. In another WBAL match, Sacred Heart Prep kept pace with Menlo with a 187-221 victory over host King’s Academy at Sunnyvale Municipal. SHP junior Bradley Knox birdied the second and third holes before finishing with seven pars to record a 2-under 33 for his nine holes. N


Sports

34th A N N U A L

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Stanford’s NCAA shot likely a miss Cardinal men can only hope for an NIT berth after Pac-12 setback by Rick Eymer

A

Honoring Outstanding Citizen Ray Bacchetti Outstanding Professional Becky Beacom Outstanding Business Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Outstanding Nonprofit Breast Cancer Connections Global Impact Award John Hennessy Master of Ceremonies Hal M. Mickelson

April 10, 2013 Reception and Silent Auction: 5:30-7pm Dinner and Program: 7-9pm Crowne Plaza Cabaña Bob Drebin/stanfordphoto.com

nother game or two is in the cards for the Stanford men’s basketball team, despite its frustrating overtime loss to Arizona State in the first round of the Pac-12 tournament on Wednesday night in Las Vegas. The NIT likely will come calling moments after the NCAA fills its brackets. The Cardinal (18-14) expected more of itself than getting a chance to defend its NIT title, but there it is all the same. “It’s everybody’s goal before the season starts to make the tourney,” Stanford guard Aaron Bright said. “And whatever tournament that we get into and whatever opportunity that we have, we’re going to try to fulfill it.” For all of its achievements, Stanford can point to one team statistic as the root of all its troubles this season. The Cardinal ranked dead last in the Pac-12 with its .419 field-goal percentage. Everywhere else you look, there are respectable numbers, and in some cases, eye-popping numbers. Bright, who tied a school record with six 3-pointers and scored 27 points in the 89-88 setback to the Sun Devils, missed 13 consecutive 3-pointers at one point early in the season and missed four games with an ankle injury. Bright has played better of late, of course, and raised his scoring average to 9.4 along with a team-best 97 assists, good for seventh in the conference. He ranks second in the Pac-12 in assists-to-turnover ratio at 2.2. Bright and Chasson Randle seemed to share their shooting woes. Bright shoots .351 from the field and .313 from long range. Last year he shot .432 from the floor, .436 from 3-point range. Randle’s percentages are also down from last year, when he shot .439 overall, .438 from long range. This year he’s at .397 and .358 respectively. Randle has also raised his level toward the end of the regular season and ranks second (14.0) in scoring behind Dwight Powell. He also leads the team with 58 three-pointers. Powell is enjoying a banner year, averaging 15.7 points and 8.2 rebounds a game. He’s also third in assists behind Bright and Randle and has blocked 35 shots. “It’s every college player’s dream to play in the March Madness tournament,” Powell said. “It’s extremely frustrating to not get our seniors there. But we all learn from it.” John Gage leads the Pac-12 in three-point shooting percentage. He’s made 42 of 93 for a mark of .452. Andy Brown also has been a

Come Celebrate this Palo Alto Tradition

Stanford men’s coach Johnny Dawkins (right) has seen the shooting percentages of Aaron Bright (left) and Chasson Randle fall off this season. mild surprise and worked his way into the starting lineup, contributing solid efforts. Perhaps the loss of Anthony Brown for the season was more damaging than anticipated. He would have given the Cardinal another weapon on the perimeter. Brown started 21 games as a sophomore and 12 as a freshman, displaying a deft shooting touch and a reliable 3-point star. At 6-6, he was a match-up problem at the small forward spot. Several other players — Rosco Allen, Robbie Lemons, Gabe Harris (the lone senior), Christian Sanders and Stefan Nastic each made at least three starts — showed promise during the year. Freshman Grant Verhoeven appeared in 20 games. It all came down to the field-goal percentage disparity. Stanford suffered 12 losses by fewer than 10 points, four by two or less and are 2-5 in games decided by three or fewer. “We’ve been in a lot of close games,” Stanford coach Johnny Dawkins said. “That’s a good thing. We have to learn how to close those games. Some of that comes down to maturity. Some of that comes down to guys stepping up and making plays that are there to be made.” The Cardinal swept the season series from California, denying the Bears of a chance at the Pac-12 title, by an average of 11.5 points. That’s the same average margin by which Stanford lost its season series to Colorado, which handed the Cardinal its worst loss of the season. Stanford finished the conference season in a four-way tie with USC, Washington and Arizona State. The Cardinal went a combined 1-4 against those teams.

Against the three teams that tied for second — Oregon, California and Arizona — Stanford won three of five games. With the exception of Harris, everybody else is eligible to return, which would give the Cardinal another sense of high expectation. For this year, however, maybe even an appearance in the NIT seems somewhat shallow. Women’s basketball Fourth-ranked Stanford (31-2) heads into the NCAA tournament riding a 17-game winning streak, which includes its 51-49 victory over UCLA in the Pac-12 tournament championship tilt. The win over the Bruins, accomplished despite Chiney Ogwumike’s career-low three points, shows both Stanford’s strengths and weaknesses. On the positive side, Amber Orrange displayed a tenacity and leadership on the court she hasn’t showed much this season. On the negative side, the Cardinal showed just how vulnerable it is without Ogwumike in the lineup. She did manage 10 rebounds, two blocked shots and a steal but one of the nation’s top players has to score. Will UCLA’s defensive game plan be imitated by other teams? Well, most teams have already tried the double- and triple-team thing against her. The Bruins just made it work. “Our team had to grit it out and quite honestly we haven’t had to do that a lot during this year,” Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer said. “We learned a lot about ourselves. I think we’ll just be better because of this experience.” N

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Inspirations

a guide to the spiritual community

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ST. ANN ANGLICAN CHAPEL A TRADITIONAL E PISCOPAL CHURCH 541 Melville Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94301 650-838-0508 The Most Reverend Robert S. Morse, Vicar Reverend Matthew Weber, Assistant Child Care Provided

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

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Sports

Skiing

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Claire Klausner (L), Meghan Mahoney Gunn High Klausner, a senior, and Mahoney, a sophomore, combined for 15 points in a 14point win to open the NorCal Division I playoffs before the two combined for 21 points with Mahoney adding 10 rebounds in an upset of No. 1 Monte Vista.

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Ronak Baldua Palo Alto High The freshman won all three of his tennis matches, the only singles player to do so during the week, as the Vikings posted a pair of 4-3 victories in SCVAL De Anza Division action in addition to a 6-1 victory while improving to 6-3 this season.

Honorable mention Drew Edelman* Menlo basketball

Menlo-Atherton lacrosse

Pinewood basketball

Palo Alto lacrosse

K Huang & G Mechali

Menlo basketball

Palo Alto tennis doubles

Alexus Simon

Bradley Knox

Eastside Prep basketball

Brigid White

Sacred Heart Prep golf

Wes Miller

Sacred Heart Prep lacrosse Gunn basketball

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Jonny Glazier

Lauren Lete

Zoe Zwerling*

NorCal hoops

Chase Connell

Marissa Hing*

around world speed skating champion in 1979, the 1980 world road cycling champ and a bronze-medalist speed skater at the 1980 Olympics in Lake Placid, N.Y. Reid’s uncle, Eric Heiden, won five gold medals at the 1980 Olympics, and set four Olympic records and a world best there. He was the only athlete in the history of speed skating to sweep five events in a single Olympics. Both Beth and Eric were on the cover of Time Magazine in 1980 in a preview edition to the Winter Games. While Joanne has yet to match the performances of her mom and uncle, her NCAA title was nonetheless special. “I was really worried about falling, because I’m small, and I get knocked pretty easily,” said Reid. “So (senior teammate) Eliska (Hajkova) and I just decided to go out fast and get in front and go. I’m more comfortable leading. I have a weird style so it’s hard for me to follow. When I got passed, I just got really nervous that they would break away so I passed them right back. I didn’t realize I had a gap, when you get a game there’s a hush over the crowd, that’s when I realized I had a breakaway.”

Menlo basketball

Nico Robinson Sacred Heart Prep track & field * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

NOTICE OF TRANSPORTATION SURVEY Of the City of Palo Alto The City of Palo Alto is releasing its first ever Transportation Survey to help better understand the travel mode and patterns of the community. Residents and persons travelling into Palo Alto to work are encouraged to complete the survey. The survey is comprised of 12-15 questions and takes only a few minutes to complete. Please provide your input before May 5th, 2013 by taking the survey online. Data from the survey will be used to develop future transportation programs, projects and policies.

Survey is available at http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/ts2013.

For further information regarding the survey please contact: Ruchika Aggarwal – ruchika.aggarwal@cityofpaloalto.org or (650)617.3136.

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played for a state title. Third-seeded Pinewood (23-7) has played in six of them, winning five times. Eastside Prep last topped Pinewood, 54-30, in the WBAL playoff final on Feb. 16 and have won all three meetings by an average score of 50-34. The NorCal finals will be the first meeting of two Central Coast Section teams since 2006, when Pinewood beat Sacred Heart Prep. “Where we’re going Saturday, we’ve been there,” said Eastside Prep head coach Donovan Blythe. “We were there last year and this year we need to take it further.” The Panthers dropped a 55-38 decision to Brookside Christian in last year’s NorCal Division V final in addition to losing NorCal finals in 2008 and 2003. Brookside played in the new Open Division this season — losing in the first round of NorCals — opening the door for a possible Eastside Prep trip to the state finals. Senior forward Hashima Carothers helped the Panthers take a step closer to their dream by scoring 12 points and grabbing 16 rebounds in a 44-22 NorCal Division V semifinal victory over visiting International of San Francisco (30-5) on Tuesday evening. Sophomore Destiny Graham helped get Eastside going when she hit a turnaround shot as time expired in the first quarter to put the Panthers up, 8-4. She finished with eight points, seven rebounds and five blocks. Junior guard Charmaine Bradford maintained the momentum and got the crowd into it when she hit a corner jumper with 20 seconds left in the second quarter to put Eastside

The largest final day rally in NCAA championship history gave Colorado the school’s 25th overall national title, when combining three in men’s cross country, two in women’s cross country and one in football. It is CU’s second ski crown in three years, having won in 2011 in Stowe, and of the 19 total, nine have now been won in the East. The women’s 15-kilometer race was first up Saturday, and set the tone for the day. Reid took the lead at the beginning and dipped into second just once after the second split, eventually pulling away from the field in an impressive winning time of 38:17.8. At 20 years, eight months and nine days old, Reid became the third-youngest Nordic female national champion, second youngest at CU to Kristen Petty (20, 2, 24) who won in 1985; Vermont’s Laura Wilson was a two-time champ in classic and freestyle in 1990, three months younger than Reid. Hajkova was second in 38:44.6, giving the Buffs two first-team AllAmericans; it was the sixth honor for Reid and the fourth for Hajkova. The women’s finish gave Colorado a 16-point lead heading into the men’s race. Reid is the sixth CU woman be crowned an NCAA freestyle champion, joining Anette Skjolden (1992), Line Selnes (1998), Katka

Hanusova (2000), current CU assistant coach Jana Rehemaa (2006) and Maria Grevsgaard (2008). It was Reid’s ninth win this year, third-most in a single season behind Selnes and Grevsgard, who had 11 those same years. It was also Reid’s 11th career win, tying her for fifth all-time at Colorado, and the NCAAleading 86th all-time a CU skier. It was the sixth time at the NCAA Championships since 1983 that Colorado skiers produced a 1-2 finish, the first since 2008 when Grevsgaard and Lenka Palanova also did it in the freestyle, though that year it was a 5K. In 2006, it happened in the 15k classic, with Rehemaa winning with Grevsgaard second. Colorado also had 1-2 finishes in 1999 (women’s giant slalom), 1988 (men’s 20k classic) and in 1991 (men’s 10k freestyle). “I’m so proud of Eliska, she was right next to me for most of the race, we inspire each other,” Reid said. “That helped me. She’s an amazing sprinter, and amazing skier, that made my race complete when she won the sprint to get second.” At Gunn, Reid ran cross country and on the track and field team. She helped the Titans finish third in 2008 and 2007 at the Central Coast Section Championships in cross country, earning trips to the CIF State Meet. She graduated from Gunn in 2009. N

up 20-12 at the end of the first half. Bradford finished with 12 points, five assists and no turnovers from her point-guard position. The Panthers came out aggressively in the third quarter as they went on a 12-0 run, led by Bradford and junior Alexus Simon. The Jaguars couldn’t do anything against the sturdy Panthers’ defense, going 0-for-8 from the field while scoring only three points in the quarter. Eastside Prep forced 19 turnovers. “We turned our defense up a lot tonight,” said Carothers, who also had two blocks. “We were a little rusty the game before so we knew we had to step it up tonight. Defense got us the win.” Simon put the game out of reach for the Panthers when she scored on a put-back layup in the fourth quarter to put her team up, 37-17. She finished with 10 points and seven boards. Eastside Prep now turns its attention to Pinewood, which lost each of the three games to Eastside this season by an average of 16 points. “This is going to be our fourth time playing Pinewood,” said Blythe. “We just have to be ready to go.” You can bet Pinewood will be ready to go after slogging its way to a 37-30 semifinal victory over No. 2 and host Valley Christian-Dublin (31-3). Defense and rebounding won it for coach Doc Scheppler’s team while junior Leanna Bade led the offense with 11 points. The game was tied at 26 with about three minutes to play when Angelina Mapa, Pinewood’s only senior, banked in a three-pointer. Sophomore point guard Marissa Hing then wrapped things up with four free throws in the final minute. Hing finished with nine points while freshman Chloe Eackles had seven points and nine rebounds.

For Pinewood to have any chance against Eastside Prep, it needs to shoot better than the 20 percent (10 of 49) against VC-Dublin. That included a 4-of-27 effort from threepoint range. The Pinewood-Eastside Prep winner will face either No. 1 Horizon Christian (25-7) or No. 2 Sierra Canyon (22-9) for the state title. Division IV girls In the NorCal Division IV semifinals, Menlo School senior Drew Edelman scored 23 points and grabbed 12 rebounds but it wasn’t enough as the No. 5-seeded Knights (22-10) dropped a 61-54 decision to No. 1 Salesian of Richmond (28-6) at St. Mary’s College in Moraga. Kaelen Dunn added 14 points in her final game while fellow senior Lauren Lete bowed out with six points five assists, six rebounds and three steals. Junior Maddy Price added 11 points and seven rebounds as Menlo out-rebounded Salesian, 31-20. The difference in the game, however, was Salesian’s 5-foot-11 junior Mariya Moore, who scored 28 points with 10 rebounds, eight steals and four assists. The game was close throughout until Salesian went on a 9-0 run to take a 45-37 lead in the third quarter. Boys’ Division IV No. 6-seeded Menlo School wrapped up a 21-8 season following a 52-45 loss to No. 3 and host Marin Catholic (25-8) last Saturday night in the quarterfinals. The Knights wiped out a 14-point halftime deficit to take the lead in the fourth quarter, but Marin Catholic outscored Menlo 11-2 over the final 5:46 to secure the victory. Wes Miller led Menlo with 14 points while Bobby Roth and Ryan Young each tallied nine points. N


Sports

Gunn hoops

further but couldn’t convert and the Lady Jackets went on a 9-0 run keyed by a couple of big baskets by Howard to stretch the lead to 3520. After trading baskets and with the score 39-24, Gunn went on a 11-2 run that included a buzzer-beating 3-pointer by Zoe Zwerling to make it 39-28 going into the final period. Zwerling then added two free throws at the end of the run to cut the score to 41-35 with 5:20 remaining. However, every time Berkeley needed a basket it got one and two quick baskets pushed the lead back up to 10 to dampen the Gunn rally. With 2:59 to go, Olivia Tapia made two free throws to make it 4537 but Howard answered with her final trey to put Berkeley up by 11. Trailing 50-39 with two minutes left, Gunn went on a 7-2 run as Klausner hit a trey and then made a layup with 40 seconds to go to cut the score to 52-46. After a missed free throw by Berkeley, Gunn had one final chance but Tapia’s 3-pointer with 20 seconds left just missed the mark and Berkeley’s Jaimonie WelchColeman made two free throws for the final points of the game. Gunn was led by Klausner’s 15 points, followed by seven from Redfield. As the game ended the appreciative Gunn crowd applauded the efforts of the Titans, who went further than many thought they would. The game marked the end for Klausner, Shevick, Klem, Redfield, Karissa Ogawa and Isabel Juang.

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Tim Aiken

Gunn sophomore Olivia Tapia (10) had five points in a NorCal semifinal loss to Berkeley on Tuesday night.

“I couldn’t be more proud of this team for how they performed this year,” said Gunn head coach Sarah Stapp. “From where we were in the middle of the season to how we finished was an incredible ride. They battled throughout with a determination that I’ll always remember.” One Gunn player who embodied that spirit was senior Claire Klausner, who scored all 15 of her points in the second half. From the moment she stepped onto the court as a freshman to the final seconds of her final game, Klausner competed with desire and dedication and nearly willed Gunn back into a game that at times looked hopeless. Gunn came out jittery in the first period as No. 12 Berkeley (21-11) scored the first nine points of the game while the Titans could only muster two Meghan Mahoney free throws as the Yellow Jackets led 9-2 at the end of one. In the second period, the Yellow Jackets extended the lead to 18-7 on the hot shooting of Rachel Howard, who led all scorers with 27 points, including four 3-pointers. Gunn cut the lead to 20-14 on baskets by Nora Shevick and Emily Redfield, but Berkeley pushed it back up to 26-16 at half. The second half started out well for the Titans as a basket by Klausner and two free throws by Sarah Klem cut the lead to 26-20. Gunn had an opportunity to cut the lead

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They leave as the most-decorated seniors to ever play for Gunn as they earned three trips to the Central Coast Section finals, won two section championships, made three appearances in the NorCal playoffs and advanced to the NorCal semifinals twice. Gunn reached the semifinals with a big 45-41 upset of No. 1 seed Monte Vista in the quarterfinals last Saturday night in Danville. “I couldn’t be more proud of my girls,” said an ecstatic Stapp after the game. “This might be my best win ever. What really made it great was the fantastic turnout by our fans, they made a difference.” Gunn has played in many big games including last year’s Central Coast Section final win over Palo Alto, but no game has come close to comparing to this battle with an athletic Monte Vista team that has had a long history of playoff success and who many considered to be the odds on favorite to represent Northern California in the CIF Division I state finale. It was a game that the Titans led for more than 25 minutes and at one time had a 12-point lead over the stunned Mustangs and their faithful following. However, the Mustangs came back and took a lead with a little over a minute to go on a fourpoint play. Klausner then put the Titans up for good with a three-pointer with 47 seconds to go and then Klem iced the game when she scored on a breakaway layup with 11 seconds left after a Monte Vista turnover. N

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Palo Alto Weekly 03.15.2013 - Section 1