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6ÂœÂ?°Ê888]ĂŠ ՓLiÀÊ{äÊUĂŠĂ•Â?ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊN 50¢ AN ALMANAC, MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE AND PALO ALTO WEEKLY PUBLICATION

HOME+GARDEN

Inside this issue

Summer Home & Garden Design

SUMMER 2012

INTERIOR MOTIVES IN MENLO PARK|PAGE 10 A

A NOD TO HISTORY IN PALO ALTO | PAGE 4 DESIGN IN A DAY IN MOUNTAIN VIEW | PAGE 18 FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION IN PALO ALTO | PAGE 24

page 3

Deadline to vote this Sunday 2012

Transitions 10

Shop Talk 18

Movies 19

Puzzles 37

NArts Live theater meets the real world

Page 14

NSports Bank of the West tourney opens at Stanford

Page 21

NHome A passion for clay, glass and the environment

Page 25


For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/healtheducation.

July 2012

Ready, Set, Go: Preparing for Kindergarten Tuesday, July 10, 7 – 8:30 p.m. Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View

Presented by Stephanie Agnew, B.A. ParentsPlace 650-934-7373

Learn what to expect from kindergarten programs and what makes a child ready for the experience. Discussion includes suggestions on how you can help your child prepare socially, emotionally and academically for this transition.

REMEMBER STROLLING IN A LUSH GARDEN?

Tapped – Healthy Screenings Film Friday, July 27, ďŹ lm starts at 7 p.m. Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View

Presented by Edward Yu, M.D. PAMF Family Medicine 650-934-7000

An in-depth examination of the big business of bottled water.

memory

care

Upcoming Lectures and Workshops in August s -EDICARE5PDATESAND #HANGES (Mountain View)

s #AN9OU(EAR-E.OW (Sunnyvale)

s &ORKS/VER+NIVESn (EALTHY3CREENINGS&ILM (Mountain View)

facebook.com/paloaltomedicalfoundation twitter.com/paloaltomedical pamf.org/blog

Remember what a breath of fresh mountain air smells like? The Gardens Memory Care is located on a beautiful 42-acre campus in the peaceful environs of Portola Valley. Memory Care is just one of the beneďŹ ts of calling the Sequoias Portola Valley home. Learn more at sequoias-pv.org or call marketing at 650.851.1501.

(650) 851-1501 | sequoias-pv.org | 501 Portola Rd, Portola Valley, CA Scan this code with your smartphone for more health education information. Get the free mobile scanner app at http://gettag.mobi.

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This not-for-proďŹ t community is part of Northern California Presbyterian Homes and Services. License# 410500567. COA# 075


Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

Legislature to vote on high-speed rail funding 0ALO!LTOOFFICIALSREMAINOPPOSED TOCONTROVERSIALPROJECT by Gennady Sheyner NTHEEVEOFHOLIDAYCELEBRA TIONS 4UESDAY NIGHT *ULY  LAWMAKERS IN 3ACRAMENTO RELEASEDAMUCH ANTICIPATEDBILLFOR FUNDING THE LARGEST TRANSPORTATION PROJECTIN#ALIFORNIASHISTORY 4HEBUDGET TRAILERBILL WHICHTHE ,EGISLATUREWASSCHEDULEDTOHOLDA

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PUBLIC HEARING ON 4HURSDAY AFTER NOONANDVOTEONASEARLYAS&RIDAY IS NOW THE SUBJECT OF INTENSE BACK DOOR NEGOTIATIONS IN 3ACRAMENTO WITH 'OV *ERRY "ROWNS ADMINIS TRATION SCRAMBLING TO GET THE VOTES HENEEDSTOGETINITIALFUNDINGFORTHE BILLIONHIGH SPEEDRAILSYSTEM

4HEPROJECTHASBECOMEINTENSELY UNPOPULARIN0ALO!LTO WITHTHE#ITY #OUNCILVOTINGIN$ECEMBERTOADOPT ASTHECITYSOFFICIALSTANCEACALLFOR THEPROJECTSTERMINATION*OHN'ARA MENDI*R THECITYSHIGH SPEED RAIL LOBBYISTIN3ACRAMENTO SAID4HURS DAYMORNINGTHAT"ROWNDIDNOTAP PEARTOHAVETHEVOTESHENEEDEDIN THE,EGISLATUREON4UESDAYTOGETTHE BILL PASSED 4HE BEHIND THE SCENES DIALOGUES IN 3ACRAMENTO HAVE BE COMEPARTICULARLYTENSEGIVENANEW

LY RELEASED &IELD 0OLL SHOWING THAT THEPROJECTCOULDJEOPARDIZE"ROWNS PROPOSALTOBRINGAQUARTER CENTTAX INITIATIVETOTHEVOTERSIN.OVEMBER 4HE POLL SHOWED  PERCENT OF THE VOTERS SUPPORTING "ROWNS TAX "UT ITNOTESTHATTHEINITIATIVEWOULDBE hADVERSELY AFFECTEDv IF THE LEGISLA TUREWERETOPROCEEDWITHRELEASING FUNDINGFORTHESTATESCONTROVERSIAL HIGH SPEED RAILPROJECT/NEINTHREE VOTERS THEPOLLFOUND SAIDTHEYDBE LESSLIKELYTOVOTEh9ESvON"ROWNS

TAX IF THE ,EGISLATURE WERE TO FUND HIGH SPEEDRAIL h4HE UNPOPULARITY OF THE MULTI BILLION DOLLAR PROJECT APPEARS TO BE NEGATIVELYAFFECTINGCHANCESOFVOTERS ENDORSINGTHE'OVERNORSTAX INCREASE PROPOSAL vTHE&IELD0OLLSTATES 4HOUGH 0ALO !LTO OFFICIALS LIKE THEIR COUNTERPARTS ELSEWHERE IN THE STATE ARE STILL PORING THROUGH THE BUDGET TRAILER BILL ON 4HURS (continued on page 8)

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City to overhaul waste plan 0ALO!LTOLOOKSTOREPLACE AGEDWASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT DECIDEONTHEFUTURE OFCOMPOSTING by Gennady Sheyner S 0ALO !LTO PREPARES TO DRA MATICALLYCHANGEHOWITHAN DLES ITS WASTE CITY OFFICIALS AND RESIDENTS REMAIN AT ODDS OVER THEFUTUREOFLOCALCOMPOSTINGAND PROCESSINGOFFOODSCRAPSANDSEW AGESLUDGE "UT MOST PEOPLE INCLUDING THE #ITY#OUNCIL AGREED-ONDAYNIGHT *ULY THECITYNEEDSTOHAVEMUCH MOREINFORMATIONBEFOREITCANMAKE SUCHCOMPLEXDECISIONSANDSUPPORT EDANAMBITIOUSACTIONPLANAIMEDAT ARRIVINGATTHECRUCIALANSWERS 4HE PLAN WHICH THE COUNCIL AP PROVED BY AN   VOTE WITH 'AIL 0RICE ABSENT CENTERS ON TWO MAJOR WASTEOPERATIONSAT"YXBEE0ARKˆ THE OUTDATED WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT AND A WASTE TO ENERGY FACILITY THE CITY IS CONSIDERING BUILDING TO PROCESSYARDTRIMMINGS FOODWASTE AND POSSIBLY SEWAGE SLUDGE 4HE CITYSGOALISTODECIDEBYEARLY WHETHERTOBUILDTHELATTER KNOWNAS ANANAEROBICDIGESTER 4HE COUNCIL ACKNOWLEDGED -ON DAYTHATTHECITYHASMOUNDSOFHOME WORKTODOBEFOREITWOULDBEABLETO DECIDEONTHEFUTUREOFTHE2EGIONAL 7ATER 1UALITY #ONTROL 0LANT WHICH SERVES0ALO!LTO 3TANFORD5NIVERSITY -OUNTAIN6IEW ,OS!LTOS ,OS!LTOS (ILLSANDTHE%AST0ALO!LTO3ANITARY $ISTRICT4HEFACILITYUSESINCINERATORS TO BURN SEWAGE FORCING THE CITY TO THENSHIPHAZARDOUSASHTOALANDFILL 4HEAGEDPLANTISALSOSHOWINGhSIGNS OFEXTREMEWEAR vACCORDINGTO0HIL "OBEL ASSISTANTDIRECTOROFTHE0UBLIC 7ORKS$EPARTMENT 4HEPROCESSOFRETIRINGTHEINCIN

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Veronica Weber

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ACCESS vSTATE!SSEMBLYMAN2ICH 'ORDON$ -ENLO0ARK SAIDTHIS WEEK'ORDONSITSONTHE!SSEM BLYS#OMMITTEEON(EALTH WHICH IS HELPING SHAPE HOW THE FEDERAL ACTISEXECUTEDIN#ALIFORNIA h7EVE GOT A CERTAIN NUMBER OF CLINICS DOCTORS AND HOSPITALS 7EARENOTINCREASINGTHOSE AND WEAREINCREASINGTHENUMBEROF PEOPLE COMING TO RECEIVE CARE v HESAID ,EGISLATORS ARE WORKING ON DI RECTINGFEDERALGRANTSTOCOMMU NITYCLINICSTOADDRESSTHEGROWING DEMAND 4HE STATE HAS RECEIVED MILLIONTOCREATECOMMUNI TYHEALTHCENTERSITESINMEDICALLY UNDERSERVED AREAS ACCORDING TO 'ORDONSOFFICE !DDITIONALFEDERALGRANTSCOULD

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(continued on page 7)

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Upfront

A free event for seniors

PUBLISHER William S. Johnson

A fresh approach!

Saturday, July 28 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Palo Alto Medical Foundation 795 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Hearst Conference Center & Courtyard Come enjoy: ‡ Educational Seminars* ‡ Music & Art by Seniors ‡ Gardening Demos ‡ Vendor Booths ‡ Food Tastings ‡ Raffle Prizes

*Special movie screening

from 2:30 - 4:15 p.m. of “How to Live Forever� sponsored by LYFE Kitchen

*Limited seating! To guarantee a seat at an educational seminar and/or the movie, RSVP to pamf.org/successfulaging or call (650) 853-4873.

Partnering together for better health!

EDITORIAL Jocelyn Dong, Editor Carol Blitzer, Associate Editor Keith Peters, Sports Editor Tyler Hanley, Express™ and Online Editor Rebecca Wallace, Arts & Entertainment Editor Rick Eymer, Assistant Sports Editor Tom Gibboney, Spectrum Editor Sue Dremann, Chris Kenrick, Gennady Sheyner, Staff Writers Eric Van Susteren, Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Veronica Weber, Staff Photographer Dale F. Bentson, Colin Becht, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti, Contributors Helen Carefoot, Junesung Lee, Maytal Mark, Bryce Druzin, Lauren-Marie Sliter, Dean McArdle Editorial Interns DESIGN Shannon Corey, Design Director Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn, Senior Designers Lili Cao, Designer

avenidasvillage.org

pamf.org

pamf.org/successfulaging (650) 853-4873

Windrider brings award-winning, independent films along with the stars and filmmakers who create them.

This year, we are pleased to welcome actor Josh Lucas to the forum. Thursday, July 12 - Rising From Ashes “Work in Progress� screening Friday, July 13 - The Hammer Saturday, July 14 - Red Dog At the M-A Performing Arts Center Visit windriderbayarea.org for info

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC £™nxĂŠÂœĂ•ÂˆĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`]ĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠUĂŠÂ­ĂˆxäŽÊnxĂˆÂ‡ĂˆĂˆĂˆĂ“ĂŠUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°vVVÂŤ>Â°ÂœĂ€}ĂŠ -Ă•Â˜`>ÞÊ7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤĂŠ>ĂŒĂŠÂŁĂ¤\ääÊ>°“°ÊUĂŠ Â…Ă•Ă€VÂ…ĂŠ-V…œœÂ?ĂŠ>ĂŒĂŠÂŁĂ¤\ääÊ>°“°

10:00 a.m. This Sunday A Day at the Beach Rev. David Howell preaching

An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

PRODUCTION Jennifer Lindberg, Production Manager Dorothy Hassett, Samantha Mejia, Blanca Yoc, Sales & Production Coordinators ADVERTISING Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Adam Carter, Elaine Clark, Janice Hoogner, Brent Triantos, Display Advertising Sales Neal Fine, Carolyn Oliver, Rosemary Lewkowitz, Real Estate Advertising Sales David Cirner, Irene Schwartz, Inside Advertising Sales Diane Martin, Real Estate Advertising Asst. Alicia Santillan, Classified Administrative Asst. Wendy Suzuki, Advertising Sales Intern EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Rachel Palmer, Online Operations Coordinator Rachel Hatch, Multimedia Product Manager BUSINESS Susie Ochoa, Payroll & Benefits Elena Dineva, Mary McDonald, Claire McGibeny, Cathy Stringari, Business Associates ADMINISTRATION Janice Covolo, Doris Taylor, Receptionists Ruben Espinoza, Courier EMBARCADERO MEDIA William S. Johnson, President Michael I. Naar, Vice President & CFO Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Frank A. Bravo, Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Connie Jo Cotton, Major Accounts Sales Manager Bob Lampkin, Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Alicia Santillan, Circulation Assistant Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo, Computer System Associates The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Copyright Š2012 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com. Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 326-8210, or email circulation@paweekly. com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE!

Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: _______________________________ City/Zip: _______________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610. Palo Alto CA 94302

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

‘‘

‘‘

450 CAMBRIDGE AVE, PALO ALTO, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

4HISISARIDICULOUS UNDEMOCRATIC PROCESS

— Larry Klein,0ALO!LTO#ITY#OUNCILMAN REGARD INGTHESTATEHIGH SPEEDRAILFUNDINGBILLTHATWAS RELEASED4UESDAYNIGHT WITHAPOTENTIALVOTEON &RIDAY3EESTORYONPAGE

Around Town EICHLERS OR iCHLERS? ... With their minimalist design, for-the-people sensibility and cultlike following, Joseph Eichler-developed homes have more than a glancing similarity to Apple products, Palo Alto architect Mark Marcinik has noted. “Eichlers are the iPods and iPhones of the day,� he observed in an interview with Monique Lombardelli. Lombardelli, a Burlingame Realtor, is producing a documentary film about the wildly popular, midcentury modern homes, which she said owners consider “an art form.� “People in Glass Houses: The legacy of Joseph Eichler� features interviews with blissfully happy homeowners, including residents in Palo Alto’s Greenmeadow neighborhood, where hundreds of Eichler’s 11,000 homes are located. The 45-minute film is costing $30,000 and will be posted on Lombardelli’s website. Lombardelli, who studied film in college, also said that communities of Eichler homeowners are planning special screenings. A trailer can be viewed at http://tinyurl.com/6wa6rdx. IN WITH THE NEW ... A flood of fresh faces will soon be making their debuts on some of Palo Alto’s most influential citizen commissions — though in one case, the appointment process was too close to call Monday night. The City Council this week made a series of commission appointments to fill vacancies on the city’s Planning and Transportation Commission, Architectural Review Board and Utilities Advisory Commission. As a result, the sevenmember Architectural Review Board will soon get two new members — architects Naseem Alizadeh and Randy Popp. The influential board also will retain veteran member Alexander Lew. The Utilities Advisory Commission will welcome as its newest member Audrey Chang, executive director of California Energy Industry Council and co-founder of the group Students for a Sustainable Stanford as an undergraduate. Two current members, Jonathan Foster and Steve Eglash were also reappointed to new terms. Meanwhile, Commissioner Marilyn Keller announced that she would not be seeking another term, noting that she is “quite confident that there are other qualified candidates.� The council saved the suspense for its most important commission — the Planning and Transportation Com-

mission. The council reappointed Commissioner Greg Tanaka and appointed Alex Panelli, a former Parks and Recreation Commission member. But the race for the third spot on the seven-member commission went through several ballots and still resulted in dead heat between Vice Chair Susan Fineberg and aspiring newcomer Michael Alcheck. With Councilwoman Gail Price absent, each candidate received four council votes. Given the stalemate, the council elected to interview one more candidate, Henry Wong (who couldn’t attend the interview that was initially scheduled), and to settle the matter when the full council is present. SURVEY SAYS ... Palo Alto has grand plans for improving one of its oldest and most prominent parks and, in the coming months, residents will have a chance to chime in with their own ideas. The city is pursuing a long-term master plan for Rinconada Park, a fixture on Embarcadero Road since 1922 (only El Camino Park is older). To solicit community feedback, the city has released a detailed survey asking residents what they’d like to see at the park, with options including an amphitheater, a skate park, horseshoes and bocceball courts. Residents interested in taking the survey can access it at cityofpaloalto.org/rinconadaplan. TURNING TIDE ... If the Santa Clara Valley Water District passes a tax this fall, most county residents probably won’t notice. That’s because the new tax, which the district’s board of directors looks to bring to the voters in November, would extend the tax that voters had already passed in 2000 to fund the district’s Clean, Safe Creeks and Natural Flood Protection Plan. While Palo Alto doesn’t get its water from the water district, it has much to gain from the tax extension. The district’s plan includes two major projects that would impact the city — $35.5 million to boost flood protection from the volatile San Francisquito Creek between the Bay and Middlefield Road and another $20 million for a plan to boost tidal-flood protection. The tax measure, which requires a two-thirds majority, would authorize a special tax for 15 years to support the plan. Not surprisingly, the City Council voted 8-0 (with Gail Price absent) to endorse the water district’s drive. N


Upfront 42!.30/24!4)/.

Antiquated Newell bridge could be replaced by 2014 HE NARROW HAZARDOUS .EW ELL2OADBRIDGETHATCONNECTS 0ALO!LTOAND%AST0ALO!LTO COULD BE REPLACED IN  WITH A BROADER TWO LANE SPAN ACCORDING TO #ITY OF 0ALO !LTO 3ENIOR %NGI NEER*OE4ERESI 4HE FOOT LONGBRIDGE BUILTIN ACROSS3AN&RANCISQUITO#REEK AT 7OODLAND !VENUE AND .EWELL ISCONSIDEREDFUNCTIONALLYOBSOLETE $RIVERSFACEABLINDTURNWHENTRAV ELING EAST TO WEST AND BUMP AWK WARDLYOVERTHERAISEDPAVEMENT HE TOLD ABOUT  RESIDENTS FROM BOTH CITIESLASTWEEK4HEGATHERINGWAS THE FIRST PUBLIC MEETING ABOUT THE REPLACEMENTPLAN 4HE FOOT WIDEROADWAYBARELY LETSTWOVEHICLESINOPPOSITEDIREC TIONSPASS 4ERESISAID 4HEBRIDGEREPLACEMENTISPARTOF ABIGGER3AN&RANCISQUITO*OINT0OW ERS !UTHORITY FLOOD MANAGEMENT PLAN WHICH WOULD IMPROVE CREEK FLOWFROM%L#AMINO2EALTO53 (IGHWAY 4HEEXISTINGBRIDGEABUTMENTSARE LOCATED WITHIN THE CREEK BED CON STRICTING THE CREEK AND CAUSING THE POTENTIALTOOVERFLOWINA YEAR FLOOD HESAID 4HEFUTUREUPSTREAMWORKWOULD CAUSEhMOREWATERTHANTHATBRIDGE

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by Sue Dremann HASEVERSEENvTORUSHDOWNTOWARD RESIDENCES ON BOTH SIDES OF THE CREEK 4ERESISAID !  FOOT LONG BRIDGE WITH A  FOOT WIDE ROADBED AND TWO  FOOT WIDE SIDEWALKS IS PLANNED .EW FLOODWALLS WOULD BE ADDED ALONGTHECREEK ANDNEWRETAINING WALLSWOULDBEADDEDATTHE.EWELL AND7OODLANDINTERSECTION 4WODESIGNOPTIONSAREUNDERCON SIDERATION4HEFIRSTWOULDKEEPTHE SAME BRIDGE ALIGNMENT ACROSS THE CREEK THE SECOND WOULD SHIFT THE BRIDGE TO ALIGN WITH THE %AST 0ALO !LTOCONTINUATIONOF.EWELL WHICH CURRENTLY JOGS TO THE WEST ! NEW ALIGNMENT WOULD MAKE A STRAIGHT FOUR WAYINTERSECTIONWITHFOUR WAY STOPSIGNS "OTHDESIGNSWOULDRAISETHEBRIDGE HEIGHTANDNECESSITATEARAISEDROAD WAYGRADUALLYSLOPINGTOWARD.EWELL ONTHE0ALO!LTOSIDEAND7OODLAND ONTHE%AST0ALO!LTOSIDE 2ETAININGWALLSCOULDRISEASHIGH ASFEETANDWOULDEXTENDFORABOUT  FEET ON THE 7OODLAND SIDE WHICH COULD AFFECT SOME APART MENTS HESAID !RETAININGWALLWOULDALSOABUT SOME0ALO!LTOPROPERTIES!DRIVE WAY TO ONE 0ALO !LTO HOME TO THE SOUTHCOULDBEAFFECTED BUTRECON

STRUCTIONWOULDBEPAIDFORTHROUGH PUBLICFUNDS HESAID.ORESIDENTS WOULDNEEDTOMOVE !BOUT CARSUTILIZETHEBRIDGE EACHDAY 4ERESISAID 2ESIDENTS DESCRIBED THE CURRENT BRIDGEAShSCARY vBUTOTHERSVOICED CONCERNTHATREALIGNINGTHEBRIDGETO MATCHWITH.EWELLIN%AST0ALO!LTO COULDCAUSEACCIDENTS h4HIS BRIDGE DOES ONE THING VERY WELL)TSLOWSEVERYBODYDOWN/NE CONCERNISTHATPEOPLEAREGOINGTOGO ROCKETINGACROSSTHATBRIDGE vAMAN SAIDATLAST7EDNESDAYSMEETING 3PEEDISONETHING BUTVISIBILITYIS ALSOIMPORTANT RESIDENTSSAID4HEY ASKEDENGINEERSTOBEMINDFULOFTHE BLIND CORNERHAZARDSWHENTHEYDE SIGNTHENEWBRIDGE !NOTHER RESIDENT SUGGESTED THAT ENGINEERSCOLLECTACCIDENTDATANOW TO ESTABLISH A BENCHMARK FOR AFTER THE BRIDGE IS CONSTRUCTED 4HEN THEY WOULD KNOW IF ACCIDENTS HAD INCREASEDANDCOULDIDENTIFYANDFIX ANYCAUSES %NGINEERS SAID THAT THE IDEA OF RESTRICTINGTHEBRIDGETOPEDESTRIANS ANDBICYCLESONLYHASBEENDISCUSSED ANDRULEDOUTFOLLOWINGPUBLICDIS CUSSION !#ALTRANSGRANTISPAYINGFOR PERCENT OF THE DESIGN AND ENVIRON

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7/7 Poncho Sa nchez

Photo: Devin

Upfront

’T DONS MIS IT!

News Digest

Dehavin

City’s cell-tower plan meets cool reception

“The Dean of Latin jazz.” —New York Times

7/6

Chet Baker Tribute

7/8

7/14

Songs of Sinatra

Roy Haynes

Photo: Carol Friedman

Jazz shows all summer including: 7/15

Wayne Wallace

7/16

Victor Wooten/ Geoffrey Keezer

7/28 7/31

Wycliffe Gordon’s

More shows, details & tickets at

Hello Pops!

stanfordjazz.org

Kenny Barron

650-725-2787

! PROPOSAL BY 0ALO !LTO OFFICIALS TO CREATE A CITYWIDE PLAN FOR CELL TOWERSISUNLIKELYTOPREVENT!44FROMINSTALLINGDOZENSOFANTENNAS ATLOCALNEIGHBORHOODSINTHECOMINGMONTHS THECOMPANYINFORMEDTHE CITYINALETTER-ONDAY *ULY 4HE#ITY#OUNCILON-ONDAYDIRECTEDSTAFFTOSOLICITPROPOSALSFROM COMMUNICATION COMPANIES THAT WOULD HELP THE CITY COME UP WITH THE WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONPLAN4HEPLANWILLLIKELYRELYLARGELYONLARGE hMACROvCELLTOWERSPLACEDONTHECITYSUTILITIESSUBSTATIONSTOBOOST0ALO !LTOSCELLRECEPTIONANDDATACAPACITYANDCOULDPROMPTREVISIONSTOTHE ZONINGORDINANCETOMAKETHESETOWERSLEGAL 4HE PLAN IS 0ALO !LTOS RESPONSE TO A PROPOSAL BY !44 TO INSTALL ABOUTSMALLANTENNASONEXISTINGUTILITYPOLESTHROUGHOUTTHECITY4HE COUNCILAPPROVEDTHEFIRSTANTENNASIN!44ShDISTRIBUTEDANTENNA SYSTEM$!3 vWHICHDREWHEAVYCRITICISMFROMSOMERESIDENTSINTHE AFFECTED NEIGHBORHOODS )N RECENT DISCUSSIONS COUNCIL MEMBERS HAVE BEENLEANINGTOWARDALLOWINGFEWERTOWERSOFLARGERSIZESRATHERTHAN THESCATTERINGOFANTENNAS 4HECOUNCILLASTWEEKLEARNEDTHATTHREEMACROTOWERSCOULDBLANKET THEENTIRECITYWITHCELLCOVERAGE ACCORDINGTO#ROWN#ASTLE ACOMMU NICATIONS EQUIPMENTVENDOR4HESETOWERSWOULDHAVETOBEBETWEEN ANDFEETINHEIGHT HOWEVERTHECITYCOULDALSOOPTFORSIXSMALLER TOWERSABOUTFEETHIGH ANDDISTRIBUTEDANTENNAS A#ROWN#ASTLE REPRESENTATIVESAID 4HECOUNCILVOTED -ONDAYNIGHT WITH'AIL0RICEABSENT TOSUPPORT ASTAFFSUGGESTIONTOSOLICITPROPOSALSFROMCOMMUNICATIONCOMPANIES ANDEXPLOREZONINGCHANGES"UTTHEPLANISUNLIKELYTODETER!44FROM PURSUINGITSCONTROVERSIALDISTRIBUTED ANTENNASTRATEGY 4HECOMPANYSATTORNEY *OHNDI"ENE SUBMITTEDALETTERTOTHECITY -ONDAYARGUINGTHATTHEPROPOSALTOINSTALLTHEMACROTOWERSWOULDNOT hOBVIATETHENEEDFORTHEPENDING$!3NODESANDADDITIONALMACROSITES TOADDRESSCOVERAGEANDCAPACITYNEEDSWITHINTHECITYv h/NCE AGAIN WHILE !44 APPRECIATES STAFFS PROACTIVE APPROACH TO THESEISSUES THECITYCANNOTCONSIDERMACROFACILITIESATCITY OWNEDSUB STATIONSTOBEATIMELYALTERNATIVEFOREXISTINGNETWORKEXPANSIONPLANS v WROTE!TTORNEY0AUL!LBRITTON WHOHASBEENREPRESENTING!44ATRE CENTPUBLICHEARINGSIN0ALO!LTON ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER

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Upfront

Waste

(continued from page 3)

ERATORSANDREVAMPINGTHEOLDWASTE WATERPLANTISEXPECTEDTOCOSTABOUT  MILLION OVER A PERIOD OF  YEARS "OBELSAID-AKINGTHENECES SARYUPGRADESTOMEETSTATEANDFED ERAL REGULATIONS COULD ADD ANOTHER MILLIONTOTHEPRICETAG "UT WHILE THIS OPERATION IS COM PLEXENOUGHINITSELF ITISMADEEVEN MORESOBYTHEPROPOSALTOBUILDAN ANAEROBIC DIGESTER AT A  ACRE SITE NEARTHESEWAGEPLANT4HECITYSVOT ERSPASSED-EASURE%LAST.OVEMBER hUNDEDICATINGvTHESITEANDMAKING ITAVAILABLEFORAWASTE TO ENERGYFA CILITYTHATCONVERTSYARDSCRAPSAND FOODWASTEINTOENERGY4HEHIGHLY DIVISIVE DISCUSSION OVER THE COM POSTINGPLANTWASPROMPTEDBYLAST YEARSCLOSUREOF0ALO!LTOSLANDFILL ALSOLOCATEDAT"YXBEE0ARK WHICH INCLUDED THE CITYS COMPOSTING OP ERATION 3INCE THEN MANYRESIDENTS HAVE ARGUED THAT THE CITY SHOULD BUILDANEWCOMPOSTINGPLANT WHILE OPPONENTSHAVEARGUEDTHATAPUBLIC PARKISTHEWORSTPOSSIBLEPLACEFORA NEW LONG TERMWASTEOPERATION 4HE ACTION PLAN AIMS TO COORDI NATE THE TWO AMBITIOUS AND HIGHLY COMPLEXPROJECTS "OBELSAID h7E NEED A ROADMAP v HE SAID h7ITHOUT THAT WE COULD CONSTRUCT ONE PROJECT IN ONE LOCATION WHICH COULDBENEGATIVETOANOTHERNEEDED PROJECTTHATWEDSUBSEQUENTLYREAL IZE4OAVOIDTHISIMPROPERSEQUENC ING WENEEDAPLANv 4HEACTIONPLANCALLSFORTHECITY TO SPEND MUCH OF  EVALUATING PROPOSALSFROMTECHNOLOGYCOMPA NIES CONDUCTINGTHESTATE MANDATED ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS CRUNCHING NUMBERSANDCONSIDERINGITSOPTIONS FOR EXPORTING THE WASTE SHOULD A NEWPLANTPROVEINFEASIBLE4HEGOAL ISTOHAVETHEANALYSISCOMPLETEDBY *ANUARY  AND TO MAKE A DECI SIONONANEWWASTE TO ENERGYPLANT THE FOLLOWING MONTH THOUGH CITY OFFICIALSACKNOWLEDGEDTHATWITHSO MANY MOVING PIECES THE TIMELINE COULDEASILYSLIP h4HECOMPLEXITYISTHATWEHAVE TO ATSOMEPOINT MOVEFORWARDON ABIOSOLIDSWASTEWATER FACILITYBE CAUSETHEINCINERATORSDONEEDTOBE REPLACED v"OBELSAID )F EVERYTHING WERE TO GO AS PLANNEDANDTHECITYWERETOPURSUE THE WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT ITS CON STRUCTIONCOULDBEGININANDBE COMPLETEDBY4HENEWWASTE WATERFACILITY MEANWHILE COULDBE COMPLETEDAROUND "OTHCAMPSINTHECOMPOSTDEBATE WEREREPRESENTEDAT-ONDAYSMEET ING0ROPONENTSOFTHEPLANTENCOUR AGED THE COUNCIL TO ACCEPT THE STAFF PROPOSAL WHICH ALSO INCLUDES CREAT INGANh/RGANICS2ESOURCE2ECOVERY 3TRATEGYvTHATWOULDANALYZETHECITYS ORGANIC WASTENEEDS/PPONENTS WHO HAVEFILEDALAWSUITCHALLENGINGTHELE GALITYOF-EASURE% MAINTAINEDTHAT THECITYISWASTINGMONEYONAPROJECT THATWOULDDESTROYPARKLAND "OB7ENZLAU WHOCO WROTE-EA SURE% URGEDTHECOUNCILTOPROCEED WITHABALANCEDSTUDYANDTOhMOVE TO THE NEXT CHAPTER IN THIS BOOKv &ORMER -AYOR 0ETER $REKMEIER A LEADING PROPONENT OF THE COMPOST INGPLANT COMPAREDTHECURRENTDE BATETOTHECITYSDECISIONTOBUILDITS

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Upfront

Care

(continued from page 3)

ILY(EALTH#ENTERIN%AST0ALO!LTO ANOTHERPERCENTWEREUNINSURED IN  SAID +ATHLEEN !LEXANDER THE CLINICS COMMUNICATIONS DIREC TOR-ANYOFTHEUNINSUREDARENEW IMMIGRANTS WHOARENOTYETELIGIBLE FOR-EDICAID SHEADDED 7AYNE9OST 2AVENSWOODSCHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER SAID THE STAFF IS STILL TRYING TO FIGURE OUT THE MAJOR IMPACTS OF THE FEDERAL LEGISLATION INCLUDINGHOWTHENEWHEALTH INSUR ANCEEXCHANGEWILLAFFECTTHECLINIC h7ESEETHEWAVECOMINGTOWARD US vHESAID "UT THE CENTER IS ALREADY GEAR ING UP FOR MORE PATIENTS )T HAS RECEIVEDAMILLIONGRANTUNDER THE!FFORDABLE#ARE!CTTOBUILDA PERMANENTFACILITYIN 4HE NEWBUILDINGISEXPECTEDTODOUBLE PATIENT CAPACITY FROM   TO  ANNUALLY h7ERE OUT OF SPACE 7ERE DILI GENTLYTRYINGTOBUILDANEWBUILD INGANDAREREWORKINGOUREXISTING SPACE FOR ADDITIONAL CLINIC ROOMS v 9OST SAID 4WO EXAM ROOMS ARE TO BEBUILTTHISSUMMER -OREDOCTORSAREBEINGHIRED AND THECENTERISACTIVELYRECRUITINGMORE DENTISTSANDHYGIENISTS HEADDED 2AVENSWOODALSORECEIVEDA MILLION GRANT ON -AY  TO HELP  PATIENTSMANAGETHEIRCHRONIC CONDITIONS4HEHEALTH MANAGEMENT PROGRAM WILL SAVE AN ESTIMATED  MILLION IN HEALTH CARE COSTS THE CENTER ESTIMATES SINCE PEOPLE WHO DONT GET ROUTINELY TREATED FOR ILLNESSESCANENDUPREQUIRINGMORE COSTLYCARELATER 3HAMINA(ASAN EXECUTIVEDIREC TOR OF THE -AY6IEW #OMMUNITY #LINIC IN 0ALO !LTO AND -OUNTAIN 6IEW SAIDWHILESHEISPLEASEDTHE FEDERALLAWHASPASSEDCONSTITUTIONAL MUSTER SHETOOISCONCERNEDABOUT HERCLINICHAVINGTHEINFRASTRUCTURE TOCAREFORTHENEWPATIENTS h/URFACILITIESCANTEXPAND7EARE TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO ADDRESS THEINCREASINGNUMBERS vSHESAID 4HE CLINIC CURRENTLY SEES   PATIENTS ANDAPPROXIMATELYPER

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com Join the discussion on the implications of the Affordable Care Act on Town Square, the online discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.

High-speed rail (continued from page 3)

DAY MORNING THEY CRIED FOUL OVER THE PROCESS THAT LED TO THE BILLS RELEASE #OUNCILMAN ,ARRY +LEIN WHOCHAIRSTHECITYS2AIL#OMMIT TEE SAIDSUCHAPROCESSFORPUSHING THROUGH MAJOR LEGISLATION WOULD NEVERFLYATTHELOCALLEVEL h4HISISARIDICULOUS UNDEMOCRAT ICPROCESSTHATWEREGOINGTHROUGH v +LEINSAIDh)TSINTERESTINGTONOTE THAT CITIES CANNOT DO THIS 7ED BE PROHIBITED BY THE "ROWN !CT FROM RELEASINGSOMETHINGATMIDNIGHTON *ULYANDHAVINGAHEARINGON*ULY ANDVOTINGONITON*ULYv

CENT ARE UNINSURED !LREADY ABOUT  NEW PATIENTS HAVE ENROLLED IN THE PAST TWO YEARS FOLLOWING THE IMPLEMENTATIONOFSOMEPARTSOFTHE FEDERALACT SHESAID $R ,ISA #HAMBERLAIN MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF THE 0EDIATRIC !DVO CACY 0ROGRAM AT 3TANFORD 3CHOOL OF -EDICINE AND ,UCILE 0ACKARD #HILDRENS(OSPITAL SAIDTHEINFLUX OFMILLIONUNINSUREDADULTSNA TIONWIDE COULD INITIALLY STRAIN THE MEDICALSYSTEM 4HE53(EALTHAND(UMAN3ER VICESFUNDINGFORFACILITIESANDTRAIN INGOFMOREPHYSICIANSANDMEDICAL SUPPORTPERSONNELISTRYINGTOCLOSE THATGAP SHEADDED h'ETTING A PIPELINE ESTABLISHED TAKES TIME )T MAY BE A MISMATCH FORAWHILE vSHESAID "UT SHE DOESNT ANTICIPATE THE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM THAT HELPS CHIL DRENWILLSUFFERTHESAMECONSTRAINTS ASPROGRAMSAREALREADYINPLACETO ENSURETHEIRTREATMENT SHESAID 4HE !FFORDABLE #ARE !CT GUAR ANTEED INSURANCE ELIGIBILITY FOR CHILDREN WITH PRE EXISTING CONDI TIONS ENDED LIFETIME CAPS FOR IN SURANCE AND EXTENDED COVERAGE TO  TO  YEAR OLDS -ANY PATIENTS AT0ACKARDFALLINTOONEORMOREOF THESE CATEGORIES !ND MANY CHIL DRENAGESTOLEAVE0ACKARDFOR CONTINUEDCAREASADULTSAT3TANFORD (OSPITAL SHESAID h)TSAVERYFRAGILETIMEFORAKIDˆ ITSREALLYDEVASTATINGFORTHOSEKIDSv WHENTHEYARENOLONGERCOVEREDBY PARENTSINSURANCE SHESAID /VER THE PAST TWO YEARS 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY HAS ALREADY IMPLE MENTED SOME OF THE !FFORDABLE #ARE!CTBYEXPANDINGITSCOVERAGE THROUGHITS,OW)NCOME(EALTH0RO GRAM 6ALLEY#ARE !ND STATEWIDE #ALIFORNIA HAS RECEIVED  MILLION FOR PREVEN TATIVEANDPUBLICHEALTHPROGRAMS THROUGHTHEACT ACCORDINGTO2ICH 'ORDONSOFFICE $R -ARTY &ENSTERSHEIB 3ANTA #LARA#OUNTYPUBLICHEALTHOFFICER SAID PREVENTIVE AND PUBLIC HEALTH CARE IS A LARGE PIECE OF THE HEALTH REFORMACTTHATISALREADYBENEFITING THECOUNTY 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY HAS APPLIED FEDERAL FUNDING TO PREVENTION AND EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAMS THAT INCLUDE TOBACCO AND SECONDHAND SMOKEPOLICY OBESITYANDNUTRITION ANDHEALTH EDUCATIONPROGRAMS 0REVENTIVE SERVICES AND SCREEN INGSFORDISEASESSUCHASCOLONCAN CER BREASTCANCER HEARTDISEASEAND

DIABETES WOULD ULTIMATELY LOWER COSTS TO THE STATE AND COUNTY BY MANY MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 0EOPLE WITHOUT INSURANCE OFTEN DELAY CARE ANDDIAGNOSIS HESAID RESULTINGIN COSTLIERURGENTOREMERGENCYCARE 4O HELP MORE PEOPLE OBTAIN AF FORDABLEINSURANCE 'ORDONHASIN TRODUCEDABILL !" TOESTAB LISH#ONSUMER/WNEDAND/PERATED 0LANS#/ /PS ˆNONPROFITHEALTH INSURERS THAT WOULD BE DIRECTED BY CUSTOMERS AND USE THE PROFITS FOR CUSTOMERSBENEFIT

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Upfront

Finding of the 2000 Measure A Citizens Watchdog Committee

CityView A round-up of

Fiscal Year 2011 Measure A, approved by Santa Clara County voters in 2000, is a 30-year half cent sales tax that generates revenue to enhance the county’s public transit system. Many of its projects, including the highly anticipated BART extension to Silicon Valley and electrification of the Caltrain system, require years of planning, engineering, and environmental work before they are operational. Although Measure A was passed in 2000, revenue collection did not begin until April 2006 when a previous tax expired. Significant accomplishments and milestones during the first six years of the Measure A Program are set forth for public review on VTA’s website, www.vta.org.

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (July 2)

Cell towers: The council approved a staff recommendation to solicit proposals for formulation of a citywide plan for wireless facilities. Yes: Burt, Espinosa, Holman, Klein, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd, Yeh Absent: Price Waste management: The council approved an action plan for upgrading the city’s Regional Water Quality Control Plan and analyzing the feasibility of a proposed anaerobic-digestion plant at Byxbee Park. Yes: Burt, Espinosa, Holman, Klein, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd Absent: Price

The Citizens Watchdog Committee (CWC) is responsible for review of 2000 Measure A expenditures to ensure funds are being spent in accordance with the intent of the ballot. The CWC has recently completed its review of FY 2011 expenditures, evaluated the results of an independent audit it commissioned of Measure A financial records, and conducted a public hearing on May 9, 2012 to receive input from the community. After thorough and careful consideration of all information and input received:

Council Finance Committee (July 3)

Cost study: The committee discussed the methodology used in the ongoing cost-ofservice study that the city is performing. Action: None

Council Rail Committee (July 5)

Rail: The committee discussed the budget appropriation bill for high-speed rail and directed staff to draft a letter expressing the city’s opposition to the process used in drafting this bill. Yes: Unanimous

It is the conclusion of the Citizens Watchdog Committee that, for the period of FY 2011 2000 Measure A tax dollars were spent in accordance with the intent of the measure.

Public Agenda

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CWC members and VTA staff are available to meet with community and civic groups to provide information on Measure A, the CWC’s responsibilities, findings and Annual Report, and to receive input on Measure A. To arrange, contact VTA’s Speakers Bureau at (408) 321-5965.

A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to hold a closed session to discuss the status of labor negotiations. The council also plans to incorporate the new Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation Plan into the city’s Comprehensive Plan and approve the Housing Element. The closed session will begin at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, July 9. Regular meeting will follow in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in closed session to review the performance of City Manager James Keene. The meeting will begin at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, July 11, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the California Avenue streetscape project, including the status of the design work, opportunities for sidewalk widening and plaza design. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, July 11, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). UTILITIES ADVISORY COMMISSION ... The commission plans to elect officers, designate a spokesperson for City Council meetings and consider a resolution approving a pilot program for time-of-use electric rates for residential customers with electric vehicles. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 11, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

1206-8390

COUNCIL POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss the City Council’s priority-setting process and review the proposed work plan for the Office of the City Auditor. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, July 10, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

(The complete CWC Annual Report and related information is available at VTA’s website www.vta.org. Printed copies of the CWC Annual Report are available at libraries and other public buildings throughout the county, and at the Valley Transportation Authority offices at 3331 North First Street, San Jose, CA, in the Building B Lobby.)

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ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board plans to discuss the proposed expansion of Ronald McDonald House at 50 El Camino Real and landscape improvements to Cogswell Plaza at 264 Lytton Ave. The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. on Thursday, July 12, in the Downtown Library (270 Forest Ave.). REGIONAL HOUSING MANDATE COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to review the Draft Housing element, which would be integrated into the city’s Comprehensive Plan. The meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, July 12, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in closed session to review the performance of City Attorney Molly Stump. The meeting will begin at 5 p.m. on Thursday, July 12, at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the Magical Bridge playground project and consider the next steps for the Human Services Needs Assessment Report. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 12, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Corrections The June 29 article “Only one Palo Alto church offers parking to car campers� incorrectly identified Aram James as a former deputy district attorney. He was a deputy public defender. To request a correction, contact Editor Jocelyn Dong at 650-223-6514, jdong@paweekly.com or P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302.

You’re not alone. 40-70% of family caregivers experience clinically signiďŹ cant symptoms of depression. The emotional toll of caring for an aging parent can be detrimental to your health and wellbeing. Fortunately, you don’t have to choose between placing your parent in a facility and becoming a caregiver yourself. Home Care Assistance is the preferred home care provider for hundreds of local families seeking professional in-home care. Call us today to get the help you need and deserve.

Call us for a FREE consultation:

855-202-7674. www.HomeCareAssistance.com 148 Hawthorne Ave, Palo Alto, CA ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂ•Â?ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 9


Transitions Deaths

Kathleen Prior Kathleen Prior (born Kathleen Wineman) of Palo Alto, wife of Christopher Prior, mother of Matthew, Mark, Andrew and Christine, and teacher of many preschoolers, died at home June 14. She was 55. She fought a long battle with cancer, living to see her two youngest children graduate from high school in early June. She was born Nov. 12, 1956, in Harvey, Ill. She moved to Menlo Park and attended local schools including Woodside High School. She

graduated from Stanford University in 1978 with a bachelor’s degree in history and honors in humanities. She earned her MBA degree at Cornell University in 1984. She then worked for several years as a financial analyst for two aerospace companies before stopping to raise her young children. She returned to work the past eight years as a teacher at Parents Nursery School in Palo Alto. She was an avid reader, swimmer and backpacker. She enjoyed many family vacations to Hawaii and Carmel and was a longtime member of Foothills Tennis and Swimming Club. She is survived by her husband of 30 years, Christopher; her four children; her father, Paul Wineman of Palo Alto, Calif.; brothers, Bruce Wineman of New York City, N.Y., and Scott Wineman of Mountain View, Calif.; uncles, John Abel of

Betty Hedges

Malibu, Calif., and Neil Wineman of Sisters, Ore.; and many cousins. Private services will be held.

Mildred Karabatas Mildred Karabatas of Palo Alto died June 25. She was born in Boston, Mass., in 1916, the daughter of Ernest and Mildred Knight. She met her future husband, Chris, at a mutual friend’s party and their relationship took them across the country three times between Lexington, Mass., and Palo Alto/San Jose, Calif., while he was working at Varian Associates. She and her husband enjoyed traveling, touring the west coast and visiting their son Chris and his wife, Natalie, in Las Vegas and Europe. She was an avid bridge player and spent hours playing bridge with the girls at The Villages Golf and Country Club for more than 25 years.

She was preceded in death by her husband of 66 years, Chris, her son, Bill, and her grandson, Chris. She is survived by her sons, Art (Janis), Stan, Chris (Natalie) and Larry (Stephanie); her daughter, Valerie (Craig); seven grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren.

Births David Stein and Monica Torgesen of Mountain View, a daughter, June 19. Esequiel and Maira Aguayo of Menlo Park, a daughter, June 26. Eitan and Dahlia Sharon of Palo Alto, a daughter, June 26.

Visit

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to:

PaloAltoOnline.com/ obituaries

William Paul Blake

Betty Jo Hedges of Palo Alto lived a full and happy life. It was ďŹ lled with the “aloha spiritâ€? from many years of living in Hawaii. She was born in New Albany, Indiana and died in Palo Alto on June 26, 2012. Her husband Rev. Jack Hedges preceded her. She is survived her children Jill (Chuck) Ramsey, North Las Vegas, Nevada; Jack (Anne) Hedges, Kekaha, Kauai, Hawaii; Joe (Cathy) Hedges, Portola Valley, California; eight grandchildren and one greatgranddaughter. Service will be private. Donations may be made in her memory to First United Methodist Church Palo Alto. PA I D

March 11, 1942-June 22, 2012

William P Blake, 70, a 40-year resident of Palo Alto, CA, passed away Friday, June 22, 2012. He was born in Utica, New York on March 11, 1942. Bill graduated from Syracuse University and worked as an Electrical Engineer for 40 years, retiring in 2004. During the 1960s he worked for NASA on the Apollo program. He holds numerous patents for electrical circuit design. He loved hiking, folk dancing, sailing, growing vegetables and roses. Bill was the son of the late Paul and Ruth Blake, father of Brian Blake of Portland, OR; former husband of Vicky Blake, Mountain View, CA; brother of Nancy (Anthony) Lanni of Leander, TX, Elizabeth

(Richard) Eiseman of Wexford, PA, and Mary (Leigh) Rundell of Honeoye Falls, NY; uncle of Grace Lanni, Richard Eiseman, Jr., Erica Sicilia, Lindsey Rundell and Trevor Rundell; great-uncle of Connor, Shannon, Max and Sophia. A memorial will be held in Fayetteville, New York in the fall. Memorials may be made to VITAS Hospice at: vitascommunityconnecton.org.

O B I T UA RY

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB) 8:30 A.M., Thursday, July 19, 2012 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review ďŹ led documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. 1213 Newell Road [11PLN-00379]: Request by City of Palo Alto Public Works Engineering Division for Historic and Architectural Review of 4,132 sf of additions to the existing 25,836 sf Main Library, and site and landscape improvements. Zone: PF. Environmental Assessment: An Environmental Impact Report was prepared and certiďŹ ed by City Council 2002 for the Newell/Embarcadero Facilities Expansion Program 3445 Alma Street [12PLN-00249]: Request by Aaron Gilliand, on behalf of Trestle Alma LLC, for a master sign program and a sign exception to allow two projecting signs. Zone District PC-4956. Environmental Assessment: Exempt from the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) per CEQA Guidelines Section 15301. Amy French Manager of Current Planning Page 10ĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â?ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

PA I D

OBITUARY

Beth Sage Pattie June 5, 1956 – May 11, 2012 Beth Sage (Lenhart) Pattie, resident of Pleasanton, Calif., died May 11, 2012, from complications of cancer treatment. She was born in Palo Alto and was a graduate of Palo Alto High School. She was a member of the ďŹ rst girl Sea Scout troop in the area whose activities centered around the Palo Alto yacht harbor and Sea Scout House, now an interpretive center. She graduated with a B.S. degree in nutrition from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and later an M.A. in Psychology from Fuller Graduate School of Psychology in Pasadena. She was a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in private practice in Pleasanton. In addition to her gentle humor and practical therapy techniques, she was planning to add the unique skills developed in recent studies with Cathryn Clerc at Hippocrene Springs — integrating horses as partners in the therapeutic process. Sage is survived by her husband of 32 years, Steven Pattie of Pleasanton; and sons, Nathan Norris Pattie of Honolulu and Lucas Ohio Pattie of Martinez; her mother, Gracella (Gee-Gee) Anderson Lenhart of Palo Alto, who is the granddaughter of Melville Best Anderson, a member of

the original faculty brought to Stanford by David Starr Jordan. Survivors also include siblings, Bill Lenhart of Riggins, Idaho, Laurie Engelhardt of Boise, Idaho, and Russ Lenhart of Railroad Flat, Calif.; parents-in-law, Frank and Mary Jane Pattie of Gilroy and sister-in-law, Linda Pattie of Columbia, Mo. Her father, James Lenhart preceded her in death. She was blessed to have many friends, aunts, uncles, cousins and professional colleagues, all of whom will miss her deeply. A memorial celebration of her life is planned on Saturday, July 21, at 4 p.m. at the senior Pattie’s farm in Gilroy. Please contact stevenpattie@ hotmail.com for more information. In lieu of owers, friends and others who shared her vision and supported her mission in life will be invited to contribute to the Sage Pattie Foundation, which the family is planning to establish. PA I D

OBITUARY


City of Palo Alto Presents the 28th annual

5K walk, 5K & 10K run — Great for kids and families A benefit event for local non-profits supporting kids and families

Register online: PaloAltoOnline.com/moonlight_run TIME & PLACE 5K walk 7:00pm, 10K run 8:15pm, 5K run 8:45pm. Race-night registration 6 to 8pm at City of Palo Alto Baylands Athletic Center, Embarcadero & Geng Roads (just east of the Embarcadero Exit off Highway 101). Parking — go to PaloAltoOnline.com to check for specific parking locations.

Corporate Sponsors

COURSE 5K and 10K loop courses over Palo Alto Baylands levee, through the marshlands by the light of the Harvest Moon! Course is flat, USAT&F certified (10k run only) on levee and paved roads. Water at all stops. Course map available at www.PaloAltoOnline.com.

REGISTRATIONS & ENTRY FEE

In-Kind Sponsors

Adult Registration (13 +) registration fee is $30 per entrant by 9/14/12. Includes a long-sleeved t-shirt. Youth Registration (6 - 12) registration is $20 per entrant by 9/14/12. Includes a long-sleeved t-shirt. Youth (5 and under) run free with an adult, but must be registered through Evenbrite with signed parental guardian waiver, or may bring/fill out a signed waiver to race-night registration. Late Registration fee is $35 for adults, $25 for youth from 9/15 - 9/26. Race night registration fee is $40 for adult; $30 for youth from 6 to 8pm. T-shirts available only while supplies last. Refunds will not be issued for no-show registrations and t-shirts will not be held. MINORS: If not pre-registered, minors under 18 MUST bring signed parental/waiver form on race night.

SPORTS TEAM/CLUBS:

Community Sponsors

Online pre-registration opportunity for organizations of 10 or more runners; e-mail MoonlightRun@paweekly.com.

DIVISIONS Age divisions: 9 & under; 10 - 12; 13 - 15; 16 - 19; 20 - 24; 25 - 29; 30 - 34; 35 - 39; 40 - 44; 45 - 49; 50 - 54; 55 - 59; 60 - 64; 65 - 69; 70 & over with separate divisions for male and female runners in each age group. Race timing provided for 5K and 10K runs only.

COMPUTERIZED RESULTS BY A Change of Pace Chip timing results will be posted on PaloAltoOnline.com by 11pm race night. Race organizers are not responsible for incorrect results caused by incomplete/incorrect registration forms.

AWARDS/PRIZES/ENTERTAINMENT Top three finishers in each division. Prize giveaways and refreshments. Pre-race warmups by Noxcuses Fitness, Palo Alto

PALO ALTO GRAND PRIX Road Race Series — Moonlight Run, 9/28; Marsh Madness, 10/27; Home Run, 9/11, for more information go to www.paloaltogp.org.

BENEFICIARY Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund. A holiday-giving fund to benefit Palo Alto area non-profits and charitable organizations. In April 2012, 55 organizations received a total of $353,000 (from the 2011-2012 Holiday Fund.)

MORE INFORMATION Call (650) 463-4920, (650) 326-8210, email MoonlightRun@paweekly.com or go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com. For safety reasons, no dogs allowed on course for the 5K and 10K runs. They are welcome on the 5K walk only. No retractable leashes. Bring your own clean-up bag. Jogging strollers welcome in the 5K walk or at the back of either run.

Friday

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Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

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SFBMXPSME California real estate is a hot topic at Stanford Summer Theater

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L

ive theater has the ability to combine the great themes of life with real-world scenarios. Stanford Summer Theater’s production of “Curse of the Starving Class� may be very authentic for some in the audience. The play focuses on the issues of real-estate speculation, financial loss and the family drama that ensues: topics that many Californians know all too well. “It’s the question of what is real estate,� said Rush Rehm, the play’s director and co-founder of the Stanford Summer Theater program. “How real is it? In some sense real estate is really dream estate. The dream of all you’re going to be able to do with

it, and that it is always going to go up in value.� Sam Shepard, a California native, wrote the piece in 1976, but its critical view of real estate and the corporate world strike a modern chord. “Curse of the Starving Class,� which runs July 19 through Aug. 12, follows a dysfunctional family as they try to sell their home. The characters vie against each other to cash in on the property and escape their way of life. “Aspects of this play seem to be written not today, but tomorrow,� Rehm said. “There is a little bit of the Occupy movement in the play, recognition that the people at the bottom are always the ones who get gobbled up.�

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Top: From left, director Rush Rehm talks with actors Max Sosna-Spear, Keith Marshall and Courtney Walsh during a rehearsal for “Curse of the Starving Class.� Above: Walsh and Sosna-Spear in character.


Arts & Entertainment

In a rehearsal for “Curse of the Starving Class,� Ella (Courtney Walsh) talks with son Wesley (Max Sosna-Spear) about selling the family house. The Sam Shepard play about real estate may feel all too real to California audiences.

While comedy appears throughout the play, Rehm stressed that ultimately the piece is not a comedy but a tragedy. He praised Shepard’s ability to weave so many themes and characters into a soundly structured script. Shepard’s work has seen a revival in the Bay Area over the last year; many of his plays have been brought to life this season. “Curse of the Starving Class,� however, is less commonly performed. Rehm said he believes the piece to be Shepard’s masterpiece. He points to its unusual combination of loveable characters, scurrilous humor and relevance to the contemporary economic and social problems in the United States. “I think 10 years ago it would have been a little hard for people, but now people get it,� Rehm said. The director also described the play as an actor’s dream, allowing performers to approach the characters from many angles. Stanford Summer Theater veteran Courtney Walsh plays the mother, Ella, whom she described as a woman who is seldom right but never in doubt. “Everything in the culture tells her that she should be able to get out of this rut and decay that she lives in,� Walsh said. “Every time she tries to get a toe-hold out, it’s as if the world is conspiring against her.� Walsh said that behind the onstage action of the play there is a great real-estate game going on in the subtext. The family, she said, tries to break into that game, but is not savvy enough and ends up being played by the large, unfeeling corporate entities. Walsh, an attorney, is in her fourth season with Stanford Summer Theater. She said the professionalism and keen audience keep her coming back to the company, which she calls a secret treasure of the Bay Area. “We have this audience that is unbelievable,� Walsh said. “Normally it’s nice if you can get people to come, and if you can get them to come and they have read the play that’s good. But these people have not only read the play, they have studied the play.� Audiences will have many chances to study the work of Sam Shepard this year, as Stanford Summer Theater is also featuring a film series and a symposium. The film series will run July 9 through Aug. 6, with free screenings every Monday at 7 p.m. and discussions with Stanford faculty members follow-

ing. Rehm designed the series to examine Shepard’s work as an actor and a screenwriter. Shepard has appeared in more than 47 movies and written screenplays for another seven. He earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his role in the 1983 film “The Right Stuff.� Stanford Summer Theater will also host an allday symposium called “Shepard and the Eclectic American West,� scheduled to take place the day of the July 28 performance of “Curse of the Starving Class.� The event will include selections from a number of Shepard plays and speeches from Stanford faculty members. There will also be a discussion led by faculty members and Stanford Summer Theater actors. Meanwhile, Rehm, a Stanford drama and classics professor, has also been teaching a continuing-studies course since June called “Shepard and American Realism.� “I’m trying to draw out, ‘What is realism?’� Rehm said. “When we say something is real we are accepting the world as it is supposed to be. Realism is a battle between what is on the surface and what is underneath it.� N

What: Stanford Summer Theater presents Sam Shepard’s play “Curse of the Starving Class,� along with free film screenings and a symposium on Shepard’s work as a playwright, screenwriter and actor. Where and when: All events are at Stanford University. Play performances are July 19Aug. 12, Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m., in Pigott Theater. The symposium is July 28 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., in Pigott Theater, and film screenings are 7 p.m. Mondays, July 9-Aug. 6 in Annenberg Auditorium.

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ********************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp (TENTATIVE) AGENDA–SPECIAL MEETING-COUNCIL CHAMBERS July 9, 2012 - 5:30 PM CLOSED SESSION 1. Labor CONSENT 2. Approval of Utilities Enterprise Fund Contract with Precision Engineering Inc. in the Amount of $3,987,034 for Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation Capital Improvement Program Project WC-09001/WC-10002, (Wastewater Rehabilitation and Augmentation Project 22/23 – Crescent Park and Baylands) 3. Resolution Approving the City of Palo Alto Annex to the Santa Clara County Annex to the 2010 Association of Bay Area Governments Local Hazard Mitigation Plan “Taming Natural Disasters� 4. Energy Risk Management Policy 5. Approval of Contract with Green Earth Engineering & Construction Inc. in the Amount of $388,000 for Demolition and Construction Work for the Cowper/Webster (Lot J) Parking Garage Structure Repair Project (CIP PF-10002) (PW) ACTION 6. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING: Adoption of a Resolution Amending the Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan Incorporating the Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation Plan and Approval of a Negative Declaration (continued from 5/21/12) 7. PUBLIC HEARING: Approval of the Housing Element. 8. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING: Palo Alto Rail Corridor Study: Adoption of a Resolution Amending the Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan To Incorporate Certain Findings of the Palo Alto Rail Corridor Study and Approval of a Negative Declaration (continued from 6/25/12)

1. Cost: Play tickets are $25 general and $15 for students and seniors, with group discounts available. The symposium is $90, including lunch, and the film series is free. Info: For more information, go to summertheater.stanford.edu or call 650-798-4072.

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA–SPECIAL MEETINGCOUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM July 11, 2012 - 5:00 PM CLOSED SESSION: City Manager Annual Review

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA–SPECIAL MEETING-COUNCIL CHAMBERS July 12, 2012 - 5:00 PM 2. CLOSED SESSION: City Attorney Annual Review STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Policy and Services Committee meeting will be held on July 10, 2012 at 6:00 PM to discuss: 1) Consideration of Approaches to Human Habitation of Vehicles, 2) Council Priority Setting Process, and 3) City Auditor’s OfďŹ ce Fiscal Year 2013 Proposed Workplan and Risk Assessment. The Regional Housing Mandate Committee meeting will be held on Thursday, July 12, 2012 At 10:30 AM.

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ON YOUR MARK ‌ GET SET ‌ VOTE! DEADLINE TO VOTE IS THIS SUNDAY! LANE 1 RESTAURANTS Best Ambiance Best Bar/Lounge Best California Cuisine Best Chinese Restaurant Best Coffee House Best Dining With Kids Best French Restaurant Best Fusion Restaurant Best Indian Restaurant Best Italian Restaurant Best Latin American Cuisine Best Meal Under $20 Best Mediterranean Restaurant Best Mexican Restaurant Best New Restaurant Best Outdoor Dining Best Restaurant To Splurge Best Romantic Restaurant Best Solo Dining Best Sports Bar Best Sunday Brunch Best Sushi/Japanese Restaurant Best Thai ReStaurant Best Vegetarian/Vegan Cuisine Best Wine Bar

LANE 4

LANE 3 LANE 2

FOOD & DRINK Best Bagels Best Bakery/Desserts Best Breakfast Best Burgers Best Burrito Best Deli/Sandwiches Best Grocery Store Best Happy Hour Best Ice Cream/Gelato Best Milkshake Best New Food/Drink Establishment Best Pizza Best Produce Best Salads Best Seafood Best Steak Best Takeout Best Yogurt

SERVICE Best Auto Care Best Chiropractor Best Day Spa Best Dentist Best Dry Cleaner Best Fitness Classes Best Frame Shop Best Gym Best Hair Salon Best Hotel Best Manicure/Pedicure Best Massage Best Men’s Haircut Best New Service Business Best Orthodontist Best Personal Trainer Best Plumber Best Shoe Repair Best Skin Care Best Travel Agency Best Value Hotel/Motel Best Veterinarian Best Yoga

RETAIL Best Beauty Supply Best Bike Shop Best Bookstore Best Boutique Best Eyewear Best Flower Shop Best Furniture Store Best Gift Shop Best Green Business Best Hardware Store Best Home Furnishings Best Jewelry Store Best Lingerie Wear Best Men’s Apparel Best New Retail Business Best Nursery/Garden Supply Best Pet Store Best Pharmacy Best Shoe Store Best Sporting Goods and Apparel Best Stationery Store Best Toy Store Best Women’s Apparel

2012 LANE 5

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Best Art Gallery Best Live Entertainment Best Nightlife Place Best Wifi Hot Spot Best Palo Alto Park Best Place To Go For A Run Best Place For A Kid’s Playdate

In this year's Best Of we cheer the Olympian businesses that champion the Palo Alto area -- the Peninsula's gold-medal restaurants, retailers and services. HALL OF FAME:

Businesses who win their categories five years in a row are inducted into the Hall of Fame for three years. This year’s Hall of Fame Super Stars are:

1ST YEAR

Burgers - The Counter Sports Bar - The Old Pro Men’s Haircut - Hair International Skin Care - Skin Spirit Green Business - Palo Alto Hardware Men’s Apparel - Nordstrom Pharmacy - Walgreens

BEST OF

2ND YEAR

Ambiance - Evvia Estiatorio Mediterranean Restaurant Evvia Estiatorio Milkshake - Palo Alto Creamery Fountain & Grill Steak - Sundance the Steakhouse Thai Restaurant - Thaiphoon Yoga - Darshana Yoga

3RD YEAR

Bagels - Izzy’s Brooklyn Bagels Dining with Kids - Palo Alto Creamery Fountain & Grill Dry Cleaners - Charleston Cleaners

Flower Shop - Michaela’s Flower Shop Ice Cream - Rick’s Ice Cream Massage - Watercourse Way Mexican Restaurant - Palo Alto Sol Pizza - Applewood Pizza Restaurant to Splurge - Evvia Estiatorio Romantic Restaurant - St. Michael’s Alley Solo Dining - Cafe Borrone Sporting Goods/Apparel - REI Veterinarian - Adobe Animal Hospital

RETURNING TO THE BALLOT

Home Furnishings - IKEA Manicure/Pedicure - La Belle Day Spa

Go to PaloAltoOnline.com and Vote!

Deadline to vote is this Sunday!

Vote online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/best_of — OR — Scan the QR Code and vote with your mobile phone!

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Vote by July 8


Eating Out FOOD FEATURE

A culinary guide to Mountain View by Bryce Druzin ountain View resident Max Hauser has spent much of his life designing microelectronics. But the entrepreneurs he most admires aren’t techies, but restaurateurs. “These people are risking a lot; restaurants quite often fail,� he said. “When they succeed, they often barely succeed.� And while risk is inherent in any small business, Hauser said restaurants add something unusual to a community. “You can bring opportunities and flavors and experiences that people wouldn’t have access to otherwise,� he said. Over lunch at Napoletano Pizza in Mountain View, Hauser pulled out his own copy of the restaurant’s menu with notes from previous visits. Besides collecting information on local restaurants, he said he has more than 100 regional files from national and international food scenes. Hauser writes restaurant profiles and updates for the Old Mountain View Neighbor-

al Photo Co u n An

t ntes

21 st

M

hood Association’s newsletter and keeps an up-to-date listing of the more than 90 restaurants in downtown Mountain View. Hauser began spending time downtown in 1980, when he said the area was in decline because retail businesses were hurt by shopping malls. In 1990 the city refashioned Castro Street, cutting lanes of traffic from four to two and widening sidewalks, which allowed for outdoor seating. Hauser said that since then, the number of restaurants has gone up from around 40, and that Mountain View has become a destination for foodies. Hauser grew up in the 1960s in the East Bay and traces his love of food back to his parents. Homemade food like yogurts, breads and pickles often filled the kitchen. His parents kept livestock, brewed beer and roasted coffee beans to make espresso. Hauser said his father’s army service in Korea in the ‘40s helped broaden his culinary horizons. And Hauser became passionate about food while traveling through Europe in high school. “I noticed the incredible range

Michelle Le

Max Hauser devotes himself to the ups and downs of the local restaurant scene

Max Hauser, right, keeps a close eye on Mountain View’s fast-changing restaurant scene for his neighborhood newsletter. of food, which I had no idea about from the U.S. perspective.� Using older cultures as a measuring stick, Hauser is enthusiastic about the development of Mountain View and the larger Peninsula

food scene. “That is what is so exciting,� he said, “to be in a region that has been evolving the (continued on next page)

Call for Entries

21st Annual Palo Alto Weekly Photo Contest Cash and gift certificate prizes will be awarded to 1st - 3rd place winners in the following Adult and Youth categories: Portraits, Bay Area Images, Views Beyond the Bay For complete rules and submissions details go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/photo_contest Age: â?‘ Adult â?‘ Youth (17 yrs. or younger as of 7/6/12) Category: â?‘ Bay Area Images â?‘ Views Beyond the Bay Area â?‘ Portraits Photo Title: __________________________________________________________________________________ Photo Location: ______________________________________________________________________________ Your Name: ________________________________________________________________________________ If non-resident, work location or school you attend: _______________________________________________ Email: ______________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ___________________________________________________________________________________ City/Zip: _____________________ Day Phone: ___________________________ Entry submission implies agreement of statement below. This photograph is my original work and was taken in the past 5 years. I understand that the Palo Alto Weekly reserves ďŹ rst publishing and online rights to winning entries and those chosen for exhibition. Judges will use their discretion as to whether an image needs to be recatagorized. Judges decisions are ďŹ nal.

Photographer’s Signature _____________________________________________________________________

ENTRY DEADLINE EXTENDED July 27, 2012 Entry fees: Adult $25 per image Youth $15 per image One entry per category You may use this form to mail payment for entries submitted by email and/or to mail your images on a CD. No print submissions. Matted prints for winning entries will be requested of the photographer for exhibition.

For questions call 650.223.6588 or e-mail photocontest@paweekly.com

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Eating Out (continued from previous page)

HELP YOUTH THRIVE PALO ALTO FAMILY YMCA

Asset of the Month: Community Values Youth Youth who feel valued enjoy better mental health, greater personal control and optimism, less substance abuse and higher academic performance.

DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS are the positive relationships, opportunities, values and skills that young people need to grow and thrive.

What you can do: ‡ 7DNH\RXQJSHRSOH¾VLGHDVVHULRXVO\ ‡ +HOSFKLOGUHQSDUWLFLSDWHLQFLYLFOLIH ‡ 0DNHVXUH\RXUEXVLQHVVKDV\RXWKIULHQGO\SROLFLHV Learn more: projectcornerstone.org

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

Chef Chu’s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

Cheese Steak Shop

Ming’s

326-1628 2305-B El Camino Real, Palo Alto

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

854-0291 3535 Alameda, Menlo Park www.luttickens.com

The Old Pro 326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com STEAKHOUSE

Sundance the Steakhouse 321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

New Tung Kee Noodle House 947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luvnoodlemv INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant 462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

powered by

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Info: For restaurant updates, go to omvna.org and click on “Restaurant.�

ShopTalk

PENINSULA

Lutticken’s

kind of ... interesting, inexpensive, neighborhood dining that is so characteristic of New York or Europe or Hong Kong.� Hauser said Mountain View’s defining characteristic is its diversity. He said a misconception that the area is dominated by Asian restaurants is rooted partly in history. “Twenty years ago, the surviving restaurants that had been around for a long time, a larger proportion of them were particularly Chinese, but East Asian in general,� he said. Hauser has a special admiration for restaurateurs with an unwillingness to compromise, even if it means disappointing a customer. One such person is Costas Eleftheriadis, owner of Napoletano Pizza, whom Hauser congratulated for refusing a substitution request from a friend during a previous visit. “It has to be how it has to be,� Eleftheriadis said. Hauser respects stubbornness even when it comes at his own expense. He recalls asking the late Mountain

View restaurateur Sue Sista if she could make a vindaloo dish more mild. “She got them to up the spices from the usual version, and I was ... almost in tears from the pain,� he said. “And she comes back with this gleam in her eye and says, ‘Is the vindaloo mild enough for you?’� For diners trying to know restaurants on a deeper level, Hauser says: visit multiple times; if you’re on a budget go for lunch; and talk to the owners, cooks and servers. He said they appreciate customers who show interest. “They are trying to make people happy; they are not just trying to make a living.� Instead of ordering off the menu, Hauser will sometimes ask the cooks to choose dishes for him. “By and large they just love that, because it means someone is there to appreciate their craft,� he said. “It’s not just somebody who’s going to have a conversation and ignore their food.� N

FURNITURE DUO ... Two new furniture stores are opening in downtown Palo Alto within two blocks of each other. The first, West Elm, is taking over the corner location at 180 University Ave. After nearly three years of temporary tenants at the site, West Elm grabbed the 11,000-square-foot space and is doing a major renovation. Owned by Williams-Sonoma, West Elm sells contemporary pieces and housewares, with a sustainablefurniture division. Developer John McNellis said: “We are absolutely delighted to be bringing West Elm to University Avenue. It ... will perfectly complement the other home-oriented uses, like Restoration Hardware, already on the Avenue.� The store is expected to open around Thanksgiving. A second furniture store, also renovating its corner location, is called Inhabiture. At 248 Hamilton Ave., it will sell “eco-friendly� furniture. Inhabiture grew out of Vox Design Group, a 9-year-old Mountain View company that creates green residential and commercial buildings and renovations. Ken Arends, vice president of sustainability for Vox, said the retail portion will be in the front of the building and the Vox Design offices will be in back. “We’ll be buying materials from local vendors. We don’t want our cabinetry coming from sweatshops in China,� he said. A Sept. 1 opening is planned. THAI CITY OUT, HONG KONG IN ... Thai City, a family-owned and -run Palo Alto restaurant, closed its doors in late April, enabling another family restaurant to move in. Hong Kong Restaurant opened last month at 3691 El Camino Real after painting and removing a wall in the 1,900square-foot space. It had to leave its previous location (inside the San Antonio Inn at 2650 W. El Camino Real in Mountain View) after a 12-year run. “Our lease was up and the entire

property was sold,� owner Jimmy Chow said. He said the restaurant’s loyal clientele followed him and his restaurant to Palo Alto. “Business has been pretty great here and we’ve only been open a few weeks. It’s a good location; it’s bigger than our old place; and we’re still using the same menu and prices,� he said. Lunch items are in the $6 range. “We may eventually change the menu, but not yet,� he added. 24-KARAT-GOLD SHOES AT STANFORD ... The high-end shoe store Stuart Weitzman is stepping into Stanford Shopping Center. The company bills its shoes as “equal parts spectacle and sculpture,� using unusual materials such as 24-karat gold, gemstones or crystals, and reports that it sells 2 million pairs of shoes annually. The shop is set to open July 11 in a 1,300-square-foot space between the Microsoft Store and the Apple Store. “When the opportunity arose to expand the business within the city, I jumped at the chance,� Stuart Weitzman spokesperson Karen Ferko said, calling Palo Alto a place of “fashionable charm.� The store will also sell handbags and baby shoes. A SHOUT-OUT FOR MOLLIE STONE’S ... Mollie Stone’s Markets was named Outstanding Specialty Retailer last month by the National Association for the Specialty Food Trade, recognized for its excellence in areas including customer service. There are nine Mollie Stone’s markets in the Bay Area, including the Palo Alto store at 164 S. California Ave. The chain is featured in the May/June issue of Specialty Food Magazine.

Heard a rumor about your favorite store or business? Daryl Savage will check it out. Email shoptalk@ paweekly.com.


Movies

there for the taking by those willing to play along. The menage à trois at the heart of the film emblematizes American life: Naive consumer O is in bed with both damaged-goods muscle Chon and Buddhist businessman Ben, but they’ll never want her as much as they want, need and envy each other. There’s something beautiful and sad about their co dependency. The middle-aged set is much more literal in depicting, in ways that can be funny or scary, the rot on both sides of the border. Stone revels in the power plays, stokes suspense repeatedly and with ease, and casts a knowing eye toward the savagery swept under all of our rugs.

OPENINGS

Savages ---1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) Oliver Stone, bless ‘im, still believes in red-meat cinema. The proof is in “Savages,� a hard-R crime drama that never treats the audience as juvenile. One of the points Stone goes after with his countercultural summer movie is the fatuity of big-screen hero myths. One character — a veteran of foreign wars named Chon (Taylor Kitsch) — implicitly represents a darker and more authentic version of the characters played by John Wayne. Chon is referred to in Don Winslow’s novel as “a draftdodging movie war hero cowboy.� Stone’s film version hopes that we’re ready to smell the bull in many of Wayne’s war movies and “cowboys and Indians� pictures, which are too often simplistic usversus-them narratives of “Americans� fending off “savages.� (Stone and Winslow share screenplay credit with Shane Salerno.) As for Chon’s business partner and best friend Ben (Aaron Johnson of “Kick Ass�), he brings to mind the American entrepreneurship of Ben and Jerry. The boutique product they export from Laguna Beach isn’t gourmet ice cream but gourmet pot, with an unprecedented THC content of 33 percent. Ben and Chon face a hostile takeover by a Mexican cartel coveting the young men’s product

Rated R for strong violence, graphic sexuality, nudity, drug use and language. Two hours, 10 minutes. — Peter Canavese

The Amazing Spider-Man ---

The latest cinematic incarnation of Spider-Man. and expertise. When the duo makes other plans, the cartel takes their surfer girl “O� (Blake Lively) hostage, setting off a war of wills. The standard-issue plot mechanics function just fine, but the characterizations say “Elmore Leonard, eat your heart out.� The equilateral (or is it?) love triangle — everyone’s cool that O sleeps with both men in turns — offers a dramatic relational novelty, and the young performers are well cast. But it’s the supporting cast that makes the movie. Salma Hayek’s Elena, the cruel mistress of the cartel, doesn’t suffer fools, but she’s also a devoted, frustrated mother. Benicio Del Toro plays her top goon, Lado,

          

both psychotic and unexpectedly sensitive. John Travolta is the slick, corrupt DEA agent ever looking out for number one. All three could be Oscar front-runners: They’re that good, and even more delicious when they mix it up in duets. “Savages� dares to depict sex and drugs as pleasurable pursuits, and unleashes profanity and violence not as cheap thrills but facts of life. Vietnam veteran Stone doesn’t cheapen violence, but rather considers its roles in American life and our international relations. How dare he: No wonder the guy’s always getting in trouble with the establishment. Though it’s not requisite for enjoyment of the movie, the satire is

(Century 16, Century 20) It doesn’t take “Spidey sense� to recognize that superhero films are a cash cow. Studios are spinning out comic-book adaptations faster than the Flash runs track, from reboots (“The Amazing Spider-Man�) to sequels (“The Dark Knight Rises�) to fresh endeavors (“The Avengers�). So while producing another Spider-Man origin film a mere decade after director Sam Raimi’s 2002 flick is unnecessary, the web of box-office revenue was apparently too tantalizing a prospect. “The Amazing Spider-Man� borrows much of its tone and story material from the pages of the “Ultimate Spider-Man� comic series. Andrew Garfield (“The Social Network�) is high-school outcast Peter Parker, and Peter’s love interest this time around is Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone). Peter’s parents left him in the care of his uncle Ben (Martin

Sheen) and aunt May (Sally Field) when he was a boy, and he still puzzles over their sudden departure. Peter discovers his father had been working with one-armed scientist Dr. Curt Connors (Rhys Ifans), and visits Connors at research-anddevelopment company OsCorp. A genetically altered spider bites Peter, who starts exhibiting enhanced strength and heightened reflexes. He soon develops a pair of hightech “web shooters,� dons a redand-blue costume (which looks like it was designed by UnderArmour), dubs himself Spider-Man, and takes to swinging over the city. Connors, meanwhile, tests an experimental serum on himself in hopes of re-growing his lost limb. But the solution transforms him into a massive, lizard-like beast that can rip through metal and concrete. The relationship between Peter and Gwen develops even as Gwen’s gruff cop dad (Denis Leary) is determined to arrest Spider-Man. It all leads up to a big showdown between Spider-Man and “The Lizard,� with Gwen and her dad caught in the crossfire. Viewers will inevitably compare this version to Raimi’s 2002 effort, and it could be argued that the two are on equal footing. The visual effects in “Amazing� are superior (including some breathtaking scenes from Spider-Man’s P.O.V.) and the Lizard is one of the genre’s most frightening villains. The battle scenes between Spider-Man and the Lizard are exceptional. Garfield is a terrific actor — better than Maguire — but his Peter Parker isn’t as sympathetic. This Peter rides a skateboard and wears the kind of clothing you would see en masse at a Pearl Jam concert. Stone is a welcome upgrade over the dour Kirsten Dunst, and both Field and Leary are brilliantly cast. The scenes of Peter discovering his pow(continued on next page)

WOODY ALEC ROBERTO PENÉLOPE JUDY JESSE GRETA ELLEN ALLEN BALDWIN BENIGNI DAVIS EISENBERG GERWIG PAGE CRUZ

“One of the most delightful things about ‘To Rome With Love’ is how casually it blends the plausible and the surreal, and how unabashedly it revels in pure silliness.� -A.O. Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES

“‘To Rome With Love’ has pleasures galore.� -Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

“It’s hard not to fall under the movie’s spell and indulge in some picturesque escapism.�

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square Fri & Sat 7/6-7/7 Sun 7/8 Mon 7/9 Tues & Wed 7/10-7/11 Thurs 7/12

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:00 To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25, 10:05 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - 4:15, 7:15 To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - 1:15 To Rome with Love - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - 4:15 To Rome with Love - 1:30, 7:25

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

-Claudia Puig, USA TODAY

TO ROME WITH LOVE WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY WOODY ALLEN

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM  

    

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

IN THEATERS IN

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STARTS FRIDAY, JULY 6 NOW PLAYING CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN CENTURY 12 DOWNTOWN

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www.restorationstudio.com

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Movies (continued from previous page)

ers are highly entertaining, from fending off a violent gang on the subway to hitting the snooze button with a tad too much emphasis. One of Marvel Comics’ popular titles in the 1980s was “The Spectacular Spider-Man,� and that adjective describes this film. Both familiar and fresh, it’s a spectacle with enough thrills and humor to satisfy most fans. Rated PG-13 for action and violence. Two hours, 16 minutes.

— Tyler Hanley

Take This Waltz --1/2

(Aquarius) Films concerned with adultery, or the potential for it, teeter over the pitfall of unlikeableness. A character even asking the loaded question “Should I cheat?� risks the abandonment of audience sympathy, but writer-director Sarah Polley goes there with her sophomore feature. Polley’s fearlessness is one of many reasons I take no pleasure

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         Check Local Listings For Theatre Locations And Showtimes

Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District Strong Schools Bond – Citizens’ Oversight Committee Senior Citizen Member The Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District Board of Education seeks an applicant for appointment to the independent, volunteer Strong Schools Bond Citizens’ Oversight Committee. The Committee reviews and report to the public on the District’s bond expenditures. The applicant must be active in a senior citizen organization and must reside within the Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District. An applicant may not be an employee, contractor, consultant, or vendor of the District. The successful applicants will serve a two-year term that will extend from the date of appointment to August 22, 2014. The purpose of the Citizens’ Oversight Committee (COC) is to inform the public concerning the expenditure of bond revenues. The COC is required by state law to actively review and report on the proper expenditure of taxpayers’ money for school construction. Application forms can be obtained by writing to: Dr. Kevin Skelly, Superintendent, Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District, 25 Churchill Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94306, or by emailing:Ibaranoff@pausd.org. You can obtain information by phone by calling 650-329-3737. Completed applications must be sent to: Dr. Kevin Skelly, Superintendent, Palo Alto UniďŹ ed School District, 25 Churchill Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94306, or emailed to: Ibaranoff@pausd.org. All applications must be received by Friday, July 20, 2012 at 4:30 pm.

Page 20ĂŠUĂŠĂ•Â?ĂžĂŠĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

in saying that “Take This Waltz� stumbles. Better known as an actor, Polley made a brilliant directing debut with 2006’s “Away from Her,� so high expectations accompany her latest. And then there’s the cast Polley has enlisted, including three-time Oscar nominee Michelle Williams and Seth Rogen as a married couple. The film begins with Williams’ Margot awkwardly meeting an attractive hipster named Daniel (Luke Kirby). Their chance encounter at the Fortress of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia marks the first in a series of unnecessarily overwritten signifiers. In this place of contention, the two banter over a historical reenactment of a “public humiliation,� the lashing of an adulterer. When they meet again on an airplane heading home to Toronto, she explains, “I’m afraid of connections,� then adds, by way of clarification, “In airports.� Right. Margot has reason to be afraid, of course, because she’s heading home to her husband Lou (Rogen), a sweet but clueless man struggling to figure out what his obviously dissatisfied wife would like him to do, short of being someone else. Also the universe seems to hate him, for guess where Margot’s tempter Daniel lives? Across the street. And so the slow dance continues, with neither Margot and Daniel nor Margot and Lou able to avoid bumping into each other. The first pair share stolen moments that typically come to abrupt ends, while the latter one curdles into passive-aggression, the couple’s defining playfulness becoming palpably strained. Plus pesky life goes on, meaning Margot and Lou also have to contend with the family problems of his sister Geraldine (nicely played by the great Sarah Silverman). Polley knows well enough that nothing is permanent, stuff happens and, as the Bard wrote, “Affection is not rated from the heart.� But the maturity of these understandings does not, in and of itself, a movie make, and the devil of “Take This Waltz� is in its tonal missteps and unconvincing details. One must, for example, ignore the utter fantasy of the main characters’ living arrangements in well-appointed homes, given that Lou writes chicken cookbooks, Margot writes as well (“just not what I want to write�), and Daniel is a rickshaw driver and painter by hobby. Margot’s maddening indecision, on the other hand, is probably entirely realistic, but the way she prolongs the process of making three people miserable quickly alienates the viewer. (To Williams’ credit, she goes where the character takes her, without vanity or the slightest hesitation.) There’s a movie about this subject that finds the humor in it and allows us to sympathize with the characters, but unfortunately these two hours of discomfort don’t quite add up to it. Rated R for language, sexual content and nudity. One hour, 57 minutes. — Peter Canavese

MOVIE TIMES Times for the Century 16 movie theater are for Friday through Monday only unless otherwise specified.

A Clockwork Orange (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m. Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 10 a.m.; Sun. & Mon. also at 10:30 p.m.; In 3D at 2:40 p.m. Century 20: Fri.-Tue. at 6:20 p.m.; In 3D Fri.-Tue. at 9 p.m. The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 10 a.m.; 4:30 & 11:15 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 11:30 a.m.; 3:10, 7 & 10:30 p.m.; In 3D Fri.-Mon. at 10:40 a.m.; 12:10, 1:10, 2:10, 3:50, 5:30, 7:30, 8:10, 9:10 & 10:50 p.m. Century 20: 10:40 a.m.; 1:50, 5 & 8:15 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 3:30 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 7:15 p.m.; Fri. & Thu. also at 9:50 p.m.; In 3D at 11:30 a.m.; 12:20, 1:10, 2:40, 4:20, 5:50, 6:40, 7:30, 9:05 & 10:40 p.m.; In 3D Fri.-Sun. also at 10:05 a.m. Bernie (PG-13) ((( Guild Theatre: 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1 p.m. The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13) ((1/2 Palo Alto Square: Fri.-Mon. at 4:15 & 7:15 p.m.; Tue. & Wed. at 1:15 p.m.; Thu. at 4:15 p.m.; Fri.-Mon. also at 1:15 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 10 p.m. Brave (PG) (((1/2 Century 16: 10 a.m.; 12:50, 3:40, 6:20 & 9:10 p.m.; In 3D at 10:40 a.m.; 1:30, 4:30, 7:20 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 10:30 & 11:15 a.m.; 1:55, 4:25, 7 & 9:35 p.m.; Fri.Wed. also at 1:05 & 3:40 p.m.; In 3D at 12:05, 2:35, 5:15, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m. Gigi (1958) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Tue. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 3:05 p.m. Headhunters (R) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 3:30 & 8:45 p.m. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Thu. at 12:02 a.m.; In 3D Thu. at 12:01 a.m. Katy Perry: Part of Me (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 10 a.m.; In 3D at 12:20, 2:40, 5:10, 8 & 10:30 p.m.; In 3D Tue. at 8 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:35 a.m.; In 3D at 12:55, 3:15, 5:40, 8:10 & 10:35 p.m. The Ladykillers (1955) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 7:30 p.m. Love in the Afternoon (1957) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Tue. at 5:10 & 9:35 p.m. Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:20 & 3:10 p.m.; Fri. also at 5:30 p.m.; In 3D at 10 a.m.; In 3D Sun. & Mon. also at 6:10 & 8:50 p.m. Century 20: 10:20 a.m. & 3 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 10:10 p.m.; Sun.-Thu. also at 10 p.m.; In 3D at 12:40, 5:20 & 7:40 p.m. Magic Mike (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:50, 4:30, 7:40 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:20 & 11:50 a.m.; 1:10, 2:25, 3:50, 5, 6:30, 7:45, 9:10 & 10:30 p.m. Marvel’s The Avengers (PG-13) (((( Century 20: In 3D at 9:50 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Les Contes d’Hoffman (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Century 20: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Moonrise Kingdom (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 1:50, 4:40, 7:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 12:25, 2:45, 5:10, 7:45 & 10:10 p.m. Our Man in Havana (1959) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 5:30 & 9:10 p.m. People Like Us (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 12:30 & 7:50 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m. & 1:40 p.m.; Fri. also at 4:30 p.m.; Sat. also at 4:35 p.m.; Sun., Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 4:35, 7:15 & 10:05 p.m.; Tue. also at 4:25 p.m. Prometheus (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 10:35 p.m.; Sat.-Mon. also at 7:20 p.m.; In 3D at 11:40 a.m. & 3 p.m. Century 20: Fri., Sat. & Mon.-Thu. at 10:55 a.m.; In 3D Fri.-Thu. at 4:40 p.m.; In 3D Sun.-Thu. also at 10:35 p.m. Rock of Ages (PG-13) (( Century 20: Fri. & Sat. at 1:45 p.m.; Sun. at 7:35 p.m.; Mon.-Thu. at 1:45 & 7:35 p.m. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: Sat. at midnight. Romeo and Juliet: Royal Ballet (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Sun. at noon; Tue. at 7 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Sun at noon; Tue. at 7 p.m. Savages (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 10 a.m.; 1:10, 4:10, 7:40 & 10:50 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 8:40 p.m.; Fri. also at 7 & 10:10 p.m.; Sat. also at 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 10:25 a.m.; 1:20, 4:15, 7:20 & 10:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 8:25 p.m. Singin’ in the Rain (1952) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Thu. at 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Thu. at 2 & 7 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Thu. at 2 & 7 p.m. Snow White and the Huntsman (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 20: 10:40 a.m. & 10:20 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 1:30, 4:20 & 7:25 p.m. Take This Waltz (R) ((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 4:15, 7 & 9:45 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1:30 p.m. Ted (R) ( Century 16: 10 & 11 a.m.; 12:40, 1:40, 3:30, 4:30, 6:30, 7:30, 9:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:50 a.m.; 12:10, 1:30, 2:45, 4:05, 5:20, 6:50, 8, 9:25 & 10:40 p.m. To Rome With Love (R) (( Century 20: 10:55 a.m.; 1:40, 4:30, 7:10 & 9:55 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1:30 & 7:25 p.m.; Fri.-Wed. also at 4:30 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 10:05 p.m. Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 10:30 a.m.; 1:20, 4:20, 7:40 & 10:40 p.m. Century 20: 12:15, 2:50, 5:25, 8:05 & 10:45 p.m. Your Sister’s Sister (R) ((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 6:15 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, theater addresses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies


Sports Shorts

WATER POLO

Hoping for good ending

LIN TO CASH IN . . . Whether he’s playing for the NBA’s Houston Rockets or New York Knicks next season, Palo Alto’s Jeremy Lin is going to be a rich man. Linsanity, indeed. According to a report in the New York Post, the Rockets are planning to offer Lin a backloaded deal worth nearly $30 million. The 2006 Palo Alto High grad could make as much as $10 million per year in his third and fourth seasons. According to ESPN, the Knicks can offer Lin a four-year deal worth $24.5 million. Lin averaged 14.6 points and 6.2 assists per game for New York last season in 35 games, including 25 starts, before being sidelined with torn knee cartilage. He is now a restricted free agent, which means New York can match any offers for him. Deals, however, can’t be signed until July 11. The Rockets waived Lin last December and he was claimed by the Knicks, who were saddled with injuries. Lin turned into a breakout star when he landed the starting point guard job. Now, Goran Dragic is not expected to return to the Rockets and thus the push for Lin. The Associated Press was told on Tuesday that the Rockets were planning to offer Lin a multiyear contract. The Knicks have said they intend to keep him. New York reportedly had plans to go after the Sun’s Steve Nash, who on Wednesday signed a three-year, $27 million deal with the Lakers. Lin, an undrafted 6-foot-3 guard out of Harvard and the NBA’s first Americanborn player of Chinese or Taiwanese decent, evidently would fit nicely in Houston as the Rockets remain popular in Asia even after former center Yao Ming’s retirement. In addition to Lin, the Knicks may have to match another offer to eep their starting backcourt intact. Former Stanford standout Landry Fields has an offer sheet from the Toronto Raptors for a reported $20 million over three years.

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

Stanford’s Melissa Seidemann scored three goals for the U.S. Olympic Women’s Water Polo Team in a 17-8 exhibition win over Hungary on Monday, this one cheered on by team captain and former Stanford All-American Brenda Villa.

(continued on next page)

WOMEN’S PRO TENNIS

Plenty going on at Bank of West before Williams takes the court Qualifying tournament begins Saturday; main draw ceremony set for Stanford Shopping Center by Rick Eymer ven before Serena Williams takes the court at Stanford’s Taube Family Tennis Center next week, there will be a lot of interesting tennis being played at the Bank of the West Classic. The tournament’s main draw begins Monday with first-round matches divided between the 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. sessions. The qualifying tournament will be interesting and it’s open, free of charge, to the public beginning Saturday at 11 a.m. Stanford junior Nicole Gibbs, who won both the NCAA singles and doubles titles in the spring,was given a wild card into the main draw. Her doubles partner, Cardinal senior Mallory Burdette, is entered in the qualifying tournament along with Kristie Ahn, who is recovering from injury and missed most of Stanford’s season. Incoming Stanford freshman Krista

E

Hardebeck is also in the qualifying draw. Hardebeck, who will turn 18 in September, has a WTA ranking of 361 and was in Denver this week playing in the $50,000 Colorado Classic. She took a 17-7 record this year into her July 4 match against Venezuela’s Gabriela Paz, but dropped her opener, 6-3, 5-7, 7-6 (10-8). Gibbs is also playing in Denver and posted a 7-6 (7-4), 6-0 victory over Canada’s Sarah Fichman, the tournament’s No. 5 seed, in her first-round match. Gibbs won three matches, including a victory over former Bank of the West participant Alexandra Stevenson, during qualifying to reach the main draw. Gibbs, who is expected to play doubles with Burdette at the Bank of the West, is playing with Florida’s Lauren Embree in (continued on page 23)

Harjanto Sumali

READ MORE ONLINE

by Rick Eymer elissa Seidemann wasn’t quite sure what to make of all the down time she experienced since she decided to take a year off from Stanford and train with the United States Women’s National Water Polo Team in preparation for the 2012 London Olympics. Seidemann, who was back at Stanford Monday night as part of the U.S. Olympic team that downed Hungary, 17-8, in an exhibition match, discovered reading in her spare time. With the Americans in the final stretch of their preparation for the Olympic Games, there has been precious little time to hit the books. Team USA and Hungary also played Wednesday night in Los Alamitos, with the Americans posting a 14-8 victory. The teams meet again Friday night in San Diego and Sunday in Newport Beach in the final competition before the Olympics begin on July 27. “I wasn’t much of a reader before,� Seidemann said. “At first I was excited that I wouldn’t have to do any homework and all I had to do was think about water polo. But in the middle of it, I was wondering what to do with myself. At school I learned to segment my time. When I was at water polo, that’s all I thought about. After that, there was homework and that’s all I thought about.�

M

Keith Peters

GOLF CHAMP . . . Stanford-bound Lauren Kim of Los Altos struggled to a 4-over-par 76, but nonetheless came away the winner of the girls’ division at the 83rd annual NCGA Junior Championship at Spyglass Hill Golf Course in Pebble Beach on Tuesday. Kim, who was runner-up in last week’s 63rd California Junior Girls State Championship at Monterey Peninsula Country Club, looked like she might let another title slip through her hands after suffering a double-bogey six on the 349-yard ninth hole on Tuesday. That wrapped up a 3-overpar 39 on her second nine (she started on No. 10) after shooting a 1-over on her first nine. Kim, however, wasn’t the only one who struggled. Nancy Xu of Sunnyvale, who was tied with Kim after the first day, ballooned to a 77 on Day 2 and finished a stroke back at 150. Menlo-Atherton High senior Xin Fang of Menlo Park shot rounds of 78-79 and finished at 157 and in a tie for ninth. Castilleja sophomore Chloe Sales of Palo Alto shot 85-87-172 and tied for 28th.

USA women have a gold-medal story for the Olympics

Bank of the West defending champ Serena Williams will play for the women’s singles title at Wimbledon.

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Sports OLYMPIC ROUNDUP

Stanford puts two on women’s volleyball team Cardinal grad Camarena-Williams makes team in track and field

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did not travel to the Final Round. She averaged 2.50 points, 2.95 digs and 1.65 points to help Team USA qualify for the Final Round and eventually win its third straight title. Tom, who earned Best Scorer at the 2008 Olympic Games, becomes just the third four-time Olympian for the U.S. in women’s volleyball. Akinradewo started five matches in the first two legs of the FIVB World Grand Prix preliminary round, averaged 3.06 points and 0.71 blocks per set. She was named the MVP of the 2010 FIVB World Grand Prix after helping the U.S. to the gold medal and 11 consecutive victories to end the tournament. “I can’t believe my Olympic dream is finally coming true,â€? Akinradewo said. “I’m so excited to represent the USA in London. I’d like to thank my family, coaches of the past and present, and friends who have supported my journey.â€? Scott-Arruda becomes the first U.S. volleyball player, male or female, to compete in five Olympic Games and just the third female worldwide, matching Brazilian setter Hèlia Rogèrio de Souza and Russia’s Yevgeniya Artamonova-Estes. The 12-team Olympic tournament will take place on alternating days at Earls Court beginning July 28. The preliminary round consists of two pools of six teams playing a round-robin format with the top four teams in each pool advancing to the quarterfinal round. The U.S. is part of Pool B with No. 2 Brazil, No. 5 China, No. 6 Serbia, No. 11 Turkey and No. 15 Korea. The top pool finisher crosses over to play the fourth place team in the

Swimming For the first time since 1956, Stanford will not have a single swimmer on the U.S. Olympic team. The closest the Cardinal came was a pair of third-place finishes at the recent U.S. Team trials in Omaha, Neb. Stanford’s last hope came Monday when recent graduate Chad La Tourette finished third in the men’s 1,500-meter freestyle in the final event of the meet. La Tourette, who was sixth in the Sunday prelims, finished with a time of 14:57.53, five seconds short of Andrew Gemmell (14:52.19) and Connor Jaeger (14:52.51). Gemmell and Jaeger both caught and passed La Tourette over the final 250 meters. Stanford’s other close finish came in the men’s 200 fly, where recent grad Bobby Bollier also finished third. Stanford junior Maya DiRado twice finished fourth (200 and 400 IM) and graduate Eugene Godsoe reached finals in the 100 back and 100 fly. (continued on next page)

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tanford grads Logan Tom and Foluke Akinradewo will bring varying degrees of experience to the U.S Olympic women’s volleyball team after the two were the 12 athletes named to the squad for the 2012 Summer Games. Tom will make her fourth appearance in the Olympic Games when the Americans arrive in London later this month. Akinradewo was named to her first Olympic team. Danielle Scott-Arruda, at age 39, was named to her fifth Olympic team. Stanford grads Kristin Richards and Cynthia Barboza were named as replacement players as the U.S. carried 25 players on its training roster. The Americans were the silver medalists at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, after placing fifth in Athens in 2004 and fourth at the 2000 Sydney Games. Also named to the 12-player roster were Lindsey Berg, Courtney Thompson, Christa Harmotto, Megan Hodge, Jordan Larson, Tayyiba Haneef-Park, Destinee Hooker, Nicole Davis and Tamari Miyashiro. “We’ve developed a lot of depth in this program over the course of the Olympic quadrennial and, as you would expect, it was very difficult to determine the final composition of this team,� Team USA coach Hugh McCutcheon said. “However, after a lot of time and deliberation, we all believe that the group we’ve selected gives our program the best possible chance of being successful in London.� Tom started the first six matches of the FIVB World Grand Prix and

quarterfinals, while a drawing of lot decides the crossover matches for second- and third-place finishers. Semifinals are on Aug. 9 with the medal-round matches on Aug. 11. The U.S., ranked No. 1 in the world by the International Volleyball Federation (FIVB) since November 2011, qualified for the 2012 Olympic Games in the first qualification tournament by claiming silver at the 2011 FIVB World Cup held in November. Team USA beat host China, 2624, 25-21, 27-25, in Sunday’s finale to finish the FIVB Grand Prix final round unbeaten in five matches (14-0 overall in Grand Prix competition) and win the $200,000 prize money in Ningbo. The U.S. won its third straight Grand Prix title and fifth overall. Only Brazil, which finished second, has won as many in a row.

Stanford’s Annika Dries (on defense) helped the U.S. Olympic women’s team beat Hungary twice this week in water polo.

Water polo

(continued from previous page)

Sure, the national team practices were longer, maybe a little more intensified and the meetings, game plans and conditioning were harder, but there was down time. “I had to rewind and let my mind relax,� Seidemann said. “So I got into reading books. Nothing special, stuff like the ‘Harry Potter’ books. For a while I was reading about a book a week.� Most of her summers have always been about water polo, whether it was age group or the national team. This summer is no different, except for that trip to London coming up at the end of July. Seidemann was named the game’s MVP after scoring three goals and holding down the rugged 2-meter position. Stanford grad Brenda Villa was also honored afterward. Incoming freshman Maggie Steffens added three goals and Cardinal junior Annika Dries also scored. Stanford grad Jessica Steffens, one of the top defensive players in the game, also played. “It’s been strange,� Seidemann said of her year off. “I had a hard time leaving and knew somehow I had to stay involved. I was able to be there for a lot of the matches and we even came up for the Stanford Invitational. It was great to stay involved. I even became friends with the freshmen.� Monday’s game drew a crowd of 3,042, the largest to ever witness a women’s water polo contest on American soil. “It was definitely cool coming back,� Seidemann said. “It felt normal. This is my happy place.� The U.S. returned from Changshu, China, where it won the FINA World League Super Final with a victory over Australia, early in June and things have gotten pretty intense ever since. “Now we’re down the last couple of weeks and all of a sudden there’s not much time left,� Seidemann said. Before the trip to China, there was the trip to San Diego to watch Stanford play at the NCAA Championships. Seidemann and Dries, who also

took the year from school, were interviewed by a television crew after Stanford won its semifinal match. “The cameraman asked me what I would do if Stanford won,� Seidemann said. “I say I would probably start crying, which I did. Then he asked me if we would jump in the pool and I didn’t know if that would be allowed. There was a lot of security when Annika and I raced down to the deck. The same cameraman was standing there and he kept shaking his head, like ‘go ahead, do it.’ So we just went for it and jumped in. I forgot to thank him.� For her part, Dries said she didn’t realize how nervous she would be watching from the stands. “I still felt connected to Stanford and there were a lot of mixed emotions,� Dries said. “We would talk to them once in a while during the season. They took it and ran with it. They didn’t need us. They knew they could do it.� Two of her soccer friends, Alina Garciamendez and Lindsay Dickerson, drove down to join her in the stands. Garciamendez and Dickerson, of course, helped the Cardinal win the NCAA women’s soccer title in the fall. “It all made me think about our ultimate goal of winning the championship at the Olympics,� Dries said. “The soccer team winning pumped up the water polo team and I realized how it all came down to the little details. You train and work to be the best and to be ready for anything.� NOTES: Maggie Steffens scored a pair of goals to help the U.S. defeat Hungary on Wednesday. With a 4th of July celebration looming, the Team USA did not disappoint the home crowd as fireworks after the game were prefaced by offensive fireworks in the pool. For the second straight exhibition game, the Americans scored in double figures and now have outscored Hungary 31-16. The United States put the match away in the fourth opening the period with three straight scores to take a 13-5 lead. Villa and Dries added goals to the victory. Team USA went 6-for-12 on power plays and made one of two penalty shots while Hungary was 5-for-10 on power plays and did not attempt a penalty. N


Sports BASEBALL ROUNDUP

Stanford draftees are getting pro careers under way Paly grad Pederson hits three homers in minor league game by Dean McArdle

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t has been almost a month since the Major League Baseball Draft, and Stanford’s crop of draftees are beginning their new careers in the minor leagues. Supplemental first round draft pick Stephen Piscotty has played four games with the St. Louis Cardinals’ Single-A affiliate, Quad Cities (IA) River Bandits, and is hitting .167. Piscotty has been reunited with his former Stanford teammate Colin Walsh, who is currently in the top three in the Midwest League in home runs (16-2nd), RBI (64-1st), and average (.317-3rd). Kenny Diekroeger, Stanford’s shortstop from this past season and Menlo School graduate, was sent to the Kansas City Royals’ Rookie League affiliate, Burlington (NC) Royals. Through nine games with the team, Diekroeger is hitting .244 with three home runs. Catcher Eric Smith has caught fire early in his professional career. Smith is currently hitting .391 through 11 games with the LA Dodgers’ Rookie League affiliate, Ogden (UT) Raptors. The Detroit Tigers sent their ninthround draft pick, Stanford’s Jake Stewart, to Class A Short-Season ball in the New York-Penn League. Stewart is hitting .118 through four games with the Connecticut Tigers. Brett Mooneyham, Stanford’s Sat-

Tennis

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doubles competition in Denver. Gibbs beat Burdette in three sets to win the national singles title. Embree reached the Round of 16 before falling to the No. 2 seed. The qualifying tournament, with a field of 16, will be held in the stadium. Matches continue Sunday at 11 a.m. The official draw ceremony will be held at the Center Pavilion at the Stanford Shopping Center on Saturday at 1 p.m. The ceremony, which is free to the public, also will feature an appearance and autograph signing by a top-ranked WTA player. The main draw features firstround sessions at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday. The second round gets underway Wednesday at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m., with an exhibition match featuring Pete Sampras and Michael Chang, who is married to Stanford grad Amber Liu. Thursday’s second-round matches are also at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m., with Sampras and Jim Courier playing an exhibition at 7 p.m. Quarterfinals on July 13 are at noon and 7 p.m., with the evening session featuring Courier and Chang. Semifinal matches on July 14 are Saturday at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m., with the finals slated for 1 p.m. Sunday, July 15.

urday starter this season, has yet to pitch in the Minor Leagues, but has been assigned to the Auburn (NY) Doubledays of the Class A ShortSeason New York-Penn League. Meanwhile, former Palo Alto High standout Joc Pederson made Minor League headlines recently by slugging three home runs in a single game for the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes. Pederson is hitting .286 for the Class A Advanced Dodgers affiliate. Pederson tied a franchise mark with his three homers, setting the pace for a 17-4 Quakes’ win over the High Desert Mavericks on Sunday afternoon. Pederson, who had two home runs in his first 51 games, homered in Saturday night’s loss at Lancaster, then swatted three round-trippers in his first three atbats on Sunday, giving him six on the year. B.J. Boyd, who just graduated from Paly, is playing for the Oakland A’s Arizona Rookie League team. He was batting .333 in eight games with nine hits, three RBI and eight stolen bases. He had three hits and two RBI in his debut on June 20. In other baseball news: Stanford left fielder and running back Tyler Gaffney signed a professional baseball contract with the Pittsburgh Pirates on Monday after announcing his intention to do so on Friday. N Williams, the Bank of the West defending champion, reached the finals at Wimbledon on Thursday with a 6-3, 7-6 (8-6) victory over No. 2 seed Victoria Azarenka. Williams will face No. 3 seed Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland in the championship match Saturday. Williams will be seeking her fifth Wimbledon title. Other Bank of the West entrants winning this week at Wimbledon included Sabine Lisicki, Angelique Kerber and Tamira Paszek. Kerber advanced into the semifinals before falling to Radwanska on Thursday. In addition, the Bank of the West Classic will be one of the final appearances for 16 players heading to the Olympics, including Kerber, Lisicki, Williams, fellow Americans Christina McHale and Varvara Lepchenko, world No. 16 Dominika Cibulkova from the Slovak Republic, former world No. 1 Jelena Jankovic from Serbia, Russia’s Nadia Petrova, Romanians Monica Niculescu, Simona Halep and Sorana Cirstea, Marina Erakovic from New Zealand, Croatia’s Petra Martic, China’s Peng Shuai, and Belgian Yanina Wickmayer. Tickets can be purchased by calling the box office at 866-WTATIXS (866-982-8497) or by logging on to www.BankoftheWestClassic. com. Individual session tickets to the tournament’s opening round start at $26. The Bank of the West Classic, a

Olympics

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Track and field Stanford graduate Jillian Camarena-Williams was a heavy favorite to win the women’s shot put at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials last week in Eugene, Ore. She didn’t disappoint. The 2004 graduate won the U.S. title in the shot put, tossing 62-10 1/2 to earn a spot on her second straight Olympic team. “I am so happy I made it through,� Camarena-Williams said. “I did it and I am so excited to get to go out to London. “Last year I injured a joint in my hand and occasionally it’ll still slip, but it is always a little tough on the first throw. But I can acclimate for the next five throws pretty well.� Camarena-Williams came into the competition as the favorite but, after a poor throw and a foul, unleashed a huge toss that blew away the competition. She will now set her sights on London where she is a definite medal contender off her personal best of 66-2 1/2, which she threw outdoors in 2011 to tie the American record. “Today was not a good example of my technicality,� she said. “Now I just need to calm down and get ready for London.� Men’s volleyball Two Stanford grads were named as replacement athletes for the U.S. Olympic team, coach Alan Knipe announced Thursday. Kevin Hansen and Gabe Gardner just missed making the 12-man roster for the reigning Olympic champions. Gardner played in the 2004 and ‘08 Olympics whereas Hansen competed in Beijing. N

THE ENTRANTS Bank of the West Classic Acceptance list as of June 25 Player Serena Williams Angelique Kerber Marion Bartoli Dominika Cibulkova Sabine Lisicki Nadia Petrova Jelena Jankovic Christina McHale Monica Niculescu Peng Shuai Yanina Wickmayer Tamira Paszek Simona Halep Chanelle Scheepers Petra Martic Marina Erakovic Sorana Cirstea Varvara Lepchenko Urszula Radwanska Sloane Stephens Vania King Jarmila Gajdosova Eleni Daniilidou Nicole Gibbs

Country Rank (USA) 6 (Germany) 8 (France) 8 (Slovakia) 13 (Germany) 15 (Russia) 20 (Serbia) 21 (USA) 32 (Romania) 33 (China) 34 (Belarus) 36 (Austria) 37 (Romania) 42 (S. Africa) 43 (Croatia) 45 (New Zealand) 49 (Romania) 52 (USA) 53 (Poland) 54 (USA) 59 (USA) 61 (Australia) 76 (Greece) 88 (USA) 765

premier WTA event, is now in its 42nd year and features a 28-player singles draw as well as a 16-team doubles draw. The event is owned and operated by IMG and serves as the opening women’s event of the Emirates Airline US Open Series. N

CITY OF PALO ALTO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to Government Code Sections 66016 and 66018, that the City Council of the City of Palo Alto will conduct a Public Hearing at a Meeting on July 23, 2012, at 6:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as possible, in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California, to consider changes to the Fiscal Year 2013 Municipal Fee Schedule concerning Animal Services, including new fees, and increases to existing fees. Copies of the fee schedule setting forth any proposed new fees, and increases to existing fees are available on the City’s website and in the Administrative Services Department, 4th Floor, City Hall, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. There is a $3.00 per copy charge for this publication. DONNA J. GRIDER, MMC City Clerk

COMMUNITY MEETING Review the proposed landscape renovations for Eleanor Pardee Park Tuesday July 10, 2012, 6:30 PM Lucie Stern Center Community Room 1305 MiddleďŹ eld Road, Palo Alto, CA 94301 The City of Palo Alto seeks the community’s input on this proposed landscape renovation project. Email pwecips@cityofpaloalto.org for more information.

Meeting hosted by City of Palo Alto Public Works, (650) 617-3183

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Historic Resources Board [HRB] 8:00 A.M., Wednesday, July 18, 2012 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review ďŹ led documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. 411 Lytton Avenue [12PLN-00223]: Application by Hayes Group Architects in behalf of Ehikian & Company, owner, for Historic Resources Board review and recommendation of a proposal to designate an example of the square cottage building type, constructed in 1901, to the City of Palo Alto’s Historic Inventory in Category 2. Zone District: CD-C (P). 1213 Newell Road [11PLN-00379]: Request by City of Palo Alto Public Works Engineering Division for Historic and Architectural Review of 4,132 sf of additions to the existing 25,836 sf Main Library, and site and landscape improvements. Zone: PF. Environmental Assessment: An Environmental Impact Report was prepared and certiďŹ ed by City Council 2002 for the Newell/Embarcadero Facilities Expansion Program. 1305 MiddleďŹ eld Road [12PLN-00222]: Request by Palo Alto Community Services Division for Study Session review by the Historic Resources Board of the proposed sign program for Rinconada Cultural Park that includes the Lucie Stern Community Center, a Category 1 Historic Resource. Zone: PF. 300 Homer [Roth Building]: Request by the Palo Alto History Museum for a study session review a possible future project that would add a Spanish-style fountain to the courtyard of the Roth Building, a Category 2 Historic Resource. Steven Turner, Advance Planning Manager

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Palo Alto Weekly 07.06.2012 - section 1