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Cover Story

No ordinary T summer

Justin Lim, left, and Celia Morell prepare to sail their 14-foot dinghy into dock during an intermediate lesson at Stanford Sailing Summer Camp.

oday’s Bay Area campers are learning more than just how to make friendship bracelets. In Redwood City, aspiring sailors ages 8 to 15 can learn to maneuver sailboats or enhance their seamanship skills. North of Los Altos Hills, curious city-dwellers can milk a cow, shear a sheep and sleep under the stars. Even right here in Palo Alto, wannabe rockers can jam in a band and perform in a rock concert, all in one week.

Campers learn sailing, farm life and how to rock ‘n’ roll Photographs by Veronica Weber Story by Jeff Carr and Casey Moore

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ir pushes through the sails, sheets and shrouds of the docked dinghies like they’re 20-foot-high wind chimes. It’s unusually gusty on the bay, which means it’s extra noisy. And cold. “Lay down,� suggests an instructor partially in jest, and many Stanford Sailing Summer Campers heed her advice. They huddle on the dock in board shorts, longsleeved shirts and life jackets with first

names duct-taped on backs. They may be cold, but they’re beaming. When one of the boats approaches, they each clamber up for a spot on the next educational voyage. Michael Liebsch, from Woodside, had never sailed before attending the camp for six straight weeks last summer. “On the very first day, you go out into the bay,� he says. “It’s just fun.�

Profile for Palo Alto Weekly

Palo Alto Weekly 07.22.2011 - Section 1  

Section 1 of the July 22, 2011 editiion of the Palo Alto Weekly

Palo Alto Weekly 07.22.2011 - Section 1  

Section 1 of the July 22, 2011 editiion of the Palo Alto Weekly

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