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City considers merging safety services Page 3 w w w.PaloA ltoOnline.com

Looking for art in all the public places page 13

Spectrum 10

Obituaries 12

Movies 19

ShopTalk 24

NArts

Puzzles 40

A tree ‘grows’ in Palo Alto NSports Stanford football hires head coach NHome Elegant, edible gardening

Page 16 Page 26 Page 29

A SEASON FOR THE AGES

2011 DISCOVER ORANGE BOWL CHAMPIONS FIRST-EVER ORANGE BOWL VICTORY

FIRST-EVER 12-1 SEASON

FIRST-EVER TOP 5 BCS FINISH

Our sincere thanks to Stanford Football fans everywhere. Your passion, pride and exuberance inspired the 2010 Cardinal to new heights. Your support, along with this very special season, will be remembered forever. 2011 HOME SCHEDULE

Don’t have Season Tickets? Make your 2011 Season Tickets deposit now by calling 1-800-STANFORD or online at GOSTANFORD.COM Page 2ĂŠUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊ£{]ÊÓ䣣ÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?Ăž

Upfront

GOAL $275,000

See who’s contributed to the Holiday Fund on page 20

As of Jan. 13 422 donors $245,430 with matching funds

Donate online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Local news, information and analysis

Fearful residents press city for emergency alerts Recent armed robberies prompt call for greater use of Palo Alto’s notification system by Sue Dremann

H

ow often is too often to be notified of crime happening in one’s neighborhood? In the wake of a string of armed robberies in Palo Alto, residents are saying there’s no such thing as too much information.

The city’s emergency-alert system, AlertSCC, issues a recorded phone message, e-mail or text message regarding crises such as power outages and impending floods. Palo Alto police say they want to reserve the alert system for signifi-

cant events so that people won’t become complacent by receiving too many calls. But residents of neighborhoods hit by the recent armed robberies argue the system was designed for notifications about dangerous suspects who could be lurking in the neighborhood after a violent crime. The system is already used for non-emergencies. It alerted residents on Jan. 7 to street closures

before the following day’s parade downtown for Palo Alto High School athletes. Around midnight following the parade, a robber pointed a gun at a woman and stole her purse in the driveway of her Duveneck/St. Francis neighborhood home near Oregon Expressway. “Neighbors seem not to have received any emergency notification that this was occurring or had occurred — and that an armed as-

sailant was at large. And this, after years of work to institute an emergency alerting system in the first place,� Karen White, president of the Duveneck/St. Francis Neighborhood Association, said. But Police Chief Dennis Burns said the robber fled the area immediately after committing the crime. “I think the community would (continued on page 7)

CITY HALL

Palo Alto explores merging services Three other city managers want to study consolidating public-safety functions by Gennady Sheyner

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(continued on page 8)

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Veronica Weber

fewer lanes could hurt business and force small shops to close. The plan does not consider the negative impact of construction and lane reductions on their livelihoods, they said. California Avenue could lose anchor store Mollie Stone’s Market, one of its owners, David Bennett, warned in a petition opposing the proposed lane reductions and signed by 30 residents and businesses. The reduction to one lane each direction “would put the market in a difficult position with reduced access. Fortunately for Mollie

alo Alto, Mountain View, Los Altos and Sunnyvale city managers are considering merging their emergency-dispatch centers, record-management facilities and fireprevention services to save money during lean times. But possible consolidations would involve specific services, not a wholesale merger of fire, police or other departments. The Palo Alto City Council Tuesday night will consider a resolution instructing City Manager James Keene to explore sharing equipment and emergency services with Palo Alto’s Peninsula neighbors. The other three cities are expected to consider similar resolutions, Keene said Wednesday in an interview with the Weekly. The push toward consolidation of some services gathered steam last year as Palo Alto, Mountain View and Los Altos all began to upgrade their respective dispatch operations, Keene said. He said the city managers agreed to purchase the same communication systems, use the same kind of software and broadcast in the same megahertz cycle. Once the upgrades are completed, a communication center from each city will have the ability to coordinate dispatch across city lines. Keene said the effort could also reduce overtime costs by enabling cities to help each other cope with particularly busy periods. “We’ll have the opportunity to po-

Home-grown brilliance Gunn High School produced four Intel Science semifinalists this year, including (from left) Audrey Ho, Andrew Liu, Brian Zhang and Youyang Gu. Grace Davis (far left), Intel’s California state manager of corporate affairs, presented each student with a check for $1,000. Intel will next narrow the pool of 300 semifinalists to 40 finalists, who will present their projects in March. Read the full story online at PaloAltoOnline.com.

LAND USE

Businesses worried over California Avenue plan Commission recommends reducing number of lanes from four to two in Palo Alto retail district by Sue Dremann

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controversial street plan that’s prompted one California Avenue anchor-store owner to warn he might close up shop was endorsed Wednesday night by the

city’s Planning and Transportation Commission. T he Ca l ifor n ia Avenue Streetscape Project would narrow the business district’s main street

from four to two lanes. The commission unanimously recommended approval of an environmental “negative declaration,� required under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The declaration allows the city to move the project forward without a cumbersome and expensive environmental review. If the City Council agrees with the commission, the project would receive a $1,175,200 Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority grant for transit-corridor improvements, including pedestrian and bicycle access. Palo Alto would add $550,000 in matching funds. But some business owners fear

*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊ£{]ÊÓ䣣ÊU Page 3

Upfront

PUBLISHER William S. Johnson EDITORIAL Jay Thorwaldson, Editor Jocelyn Dong, Managing Editor Carol Blitzer, Associate Editor Keith Peters, Sports Editor Tyler Hanley, Express™ and Online Editor Rebecca Wallace, Arts & Entertainment Editor Rick Eymer, Assistant Sports Editor Chris Kenrick, Gennady Sheyner, Staff Writers Sue Dremann, Staff Writer, Special Sections Editor Karla Kane, Editorial Assistant Veronica Weber, Staff Photographer Dale Bentson, Colin Becht, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti, Robert Taylor, Contributors Sarah Trauben, Zohra Ashpari Editorial Interns Vivian Wong, Photo Intern DESIGN Shannon Corey, Design Director Raul Perez, Assistant Design Director Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn, Senior Designers Gary Vennarucci, Designer PRODUCTION Jennifer Lindberg, Production Manager Dorothy Hassett, Samantha Mejia, Blanca Yoc, Sales & Production Coordinators ADVERTISING Walter Kupiec, Vice President, Sales & Marketing Judie Block, Esmeralda Flores, Janice Hoogner, Gary Whitman, Display Advertising Sales Neil Fine, Rosemary Lewkowitz, Real Estate Advertising Sales David Cirner, Irene Schwartz, Inside Advertising Sales Cathy Norfleet, Display Advertising Sales Asst. Diane Martin, Real Estate Advertising Assistants Alicia Santillan, Classified Administrative Asst. EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Rachel Palmer, Online Operations Coordinator Rachel Hatch, Multimedia Product Manager BUSINESS Penelope Ng, Payroll & Benefits Manager Elena Dineva, Mary McDonald, Susie Ochoa, Doris Taylor, Business Associates ADMINISTRATION Amy Renalds, Assistant to the Publisher & Promotions Director Janice Covolo, Receptionist Ruben Espinoza, Courier EMBARCADERO MEDIA William S. Johnson, President Michael I. Naar, Vice President & CFO Walter Kupiec, Vice President, Sales & Marketing Frank A. Bravo, Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Connie Jo Cotton, Major Accounts Sales Manager Bob Lampkin, Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Alicia Santillan, Circulation Assistants Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo, Computer System Associates

Great homes are as different as the people who live in them. Whether you’re building a new home or remodeling, expect excellence from De Mattei.

The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 3268210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Copyright Š2010 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed by SFOP, Redwood City. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our e-mail addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com. Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 326-8210, or e-mail circulation@paweekly. com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

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450 CAMBRIDGE AVE, PALO ALTO, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

If it can make people talk, then it’s good.

—Terry Acebo Davis, chair of the Palo Alto Public Art Commission, on what makes art in public places worthwhile. See story on page 13.

Around Town LESSONS LEARNED ... It’s been more than a year since Palo Alto officials hastily axed 63 holly oaks on California Avenue, but the fallen trees continue to cast a long shadow over the city’s planning process. So when city officials began planning for a removal of 10 ailing eucalyptus trees at Eleanor Pardee Park, they held countless public hearings, received input from at least three different arborists and had a stack of reports on hand when they brought their proposal to the City Council this week. But some members of the City Council felt staff may have learned the lessons from the California Avenue fiasco a little too well. The council praised staff’s massive outreach campaign but rejected its recommendations to remove the trees in two phases, choosing instead to fell them in one swoop. Several council members also said they were concerned that after California Avenue, staff has become a bit too reticent in its proposals. “I believe the California Avenue situation has caused our staff to be more adverse to taking clear but controversial positions in their recommendations,� Councilman Pat Burt said. Councilman Larry Klein agreed and said the Pardee Park operation had been “overly influenced� by California Avenue. “California Avenue was a failure of the city’s own process,� Klein said. “This is a triumph of process.� FOOD FOR THOUGHT ... Palo Alto residents haven’t always been on the same page when it comes to library improvements. Though the city’s massive library-reconstruction program remains on track, some residents have criticized recent proposals to reduce shelf space at the new libraries and to make more room for e-books, possibly at the expense of traditional books. This week, the council extended a program that should give every bookworm a reason to smile. The council agreed to sign up for two more years of LINK+, a program that allows the library system to share its collection with academic and public libraries throughout California and Nevada. Users can request books from other libraries through the

library system’s catalogue and have the books delivered to a local branch within days. According to report prepared by Assistant Library Director Cornelia Van Aken, LINK+ gives users access to more than 18 million volumes. The cost of the twoyear program will be $200,000, with up to $100,000 contributed by the nonprofit group Friends of the Palo Alto Library. The city joined the program in 2008. PLANT A TREE ... A Palo Alto nonprofit dedicated to promoting and protecting trees on city streets will team up with Mayor Sid Espinosa this Thursday plant a large Cedar of Lebanon tree at the entrance of the Cultural Arts Hall at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center. The event, sponsored by Canopy, combines the “Jewish Festival of Trees� with the group’s annual Mayoral Tree Planting. The free event will take place at 5:15 p.m. on Jan. 20 near East Charleston Road and San Antonio Road. It will be followed by a reception from 5:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Those planning to attend are asked to call 650-964-6110 to RSVP. DIRTY BUSINESS ... Note to dog owners who let their pooches do their dirty business at Duveneck Elementary School: The neighborhood is watching you. Duveneck Principal John Lents, sent a letter to the neighborhood last week seeking to enlist support and raise awareness about an “issue important to our children.� Lents wrote in his letter that the school has been relying on dog owners to pick up their dogs’ deposits. “Unfortunately, we’ve recently been subject to multiple piles of dog waste left on the field ... only to learn of them after they’ve been stepped in, and/or requiring us to put the field off-limits until we can do a thorough search for additional waste.� He also wrote that leaving dog waste on school property is both disrespectful and illegal. “So, as you utilize our school grounds for your own pleasure, please make sure you leave them clean and pleasurable for the next community member(s).� N

Upfront CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Intense text messages dominate Zumot trial Cell-phone records reveal turbulent relationship between Bulos Zumot and his slain girlfriend, Jennifer Schipsi by Gennady Sheyner

D

uring their turbulent two-year relationship, Bulos Zumot and Jennifer Schipsi exchanged hundreds of text messages, including ones containing threats, insults and lengthy diatribes. This week, the jury in Zumot’s arson-and-murder trial saw a large sample of the messages, including ones the couple exchanged on Oct. 15, 2009, the day a Palo Alto firefighter discovered Schipsi’s body in the Addison Avenue cottage the two shared. The messages dominated the second week of Zumot’s trial. These included the hysterical, insulting messages Schipsi sent Zumot as she was walking home alone from Zumot’s birthday party the night before the fire. They also included a message Zumot sent Schipsi about a week before her death, telling her he had just missed several calls from the San Jose Police Department — calls that phone records show were actually made by Schipsi, pretending to be the police. Prosecution and defense attorneys also sparred this week over which text messages should be shown to the jury. Santa Clara County Deputy District Attorney Charles Gillingham requested Tuesday morning that about 20 messages found on Zumot’s phone be excised from evidence. These include ones Zumot exchanged with Schipsi’s mother, Jamie Schipsi, and with his friend, Joseph Martinez, a deputy sheriff at Monterey County Sheriff’s Office. The messages between Zumot and Jamie Schipsi were exchanged on Oct. 14 — Zumot’s 36th birthday. She wished him a happy birthday, told him to “smile all day� and signed off as “mom.� Zumot wrote in his response that Jennifer had made it his best birthday ever and told Jamie Schipsi of plans to propose to Jennifer the following weekend. Gillingham requested that about 20 messages be excised as “hearsay� — which means they cannot be introduced into evidence unless Zumot testifies in his own defense. But Zumot’s attorney, Mark Geragos, said he was previously led to believe that all messages would be admitted into evidence and criticized what he called the “dilatory tactics� of the prosecution. He argued that showing only certain messages will give the jury a “skewed view of what has transpired. “Surely, the jury should have all the messages, rather than the cherrypicked ones,� Geragos told Judge David Cena. Cena ultimately sided with the prosecution. Geragos also went on the offensive Monday afternoon, when Jaber Al Suwaidi, a friend of the couple, testified that he detected Zumot’s writing style in a message he received from Schipsi’s phone on the afternoon of the fire. Mark Geragos

heatedly disputed Al Suwaidi’s professed ability to recognize the authors by the grammar in the texts, at one point derisively referring to Al Suwaidi’s “magical powers.� The disputed message stated that Zumot wasn’t mad at Al Suwaidi for missing his birthday the previous night (he was “just drunk�). Al Suwaidi immediately suspected it was Zumot, not Schipsi, who wrote it. “It’s not her writing,� Al Suwaidi testified. He said Schipsi’s messages tend to be less formal than Zumot’s and that she frequently uses popular abbreviations such as “LOL� (for “laughing out loud�). Al Suwaidi acknowledged that the person sending the Oct. 15 message from Schipsi’s phone could have been anyone but said that in his opinion it was Zumot. “If you have them as friends, you know,� Al Suwaidi said. Al Suwaidi also testified that Schipsi called him on the night of Oct. 14, 2009. Schipsi was breathing heavily and crying as she walked home alone from the Zumot’s downtown business, Da Hookah Spot. She also told Al Suwaidi that Zumot had “humiliated her� so she left. “She said she’s done and that she can’t handle it anymore,� Al Suwaidi testified. The jury saw dozens of other text messages on Tuesday and Wednesday, when Palo Alto Sgt. Cornelius Maloney painstakingly read out the texts that Zumot and Schipsi had exchanged in the days leading up to Schipsi’s death. These included one on Oct. 14 in which Schipsi, walking home from Da Hookah Spot, wrote to Zumot, “Stay the f--- away so I can regain my happiness and satisfaction.� The messages portray Schipsi becoming increasingly furious at Zumot. A little after 1 a.m., she sent him a series of messages demanding that he pay her money that she said he owed her for damaging her car and other belongings. She also told him not ever to threaten her again or she “will seek ultimate justice.� She also wrote that she would go to the police if he didn’t pay her back by 11 a.m. the following day. This jury also learned Wednesday about the five “spoof calls� that Schipsi allegedly made to Zumot on Oct. 8, in which she masked her phone number and made it seem like the calls were coming from the Palo Alto and San Jose police departments. The trial will be in recess the week of Jan. 17 and will resume on Jan. 24. N Editor’s note: Follow the trial on Twitter. Go to twitter.com/#!/ paw_court. Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be e-mailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

656 Lytton Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650) 617-7384 INDEPENDENT SUBSIDIZED SENIOR HOUSING WAITING LIST TO OPEN MONDAY, JANUARY 24TH, 2011 THROUGH FRIDAY, JANUARY 28TH, 2011. Lytton Gardens is pleased to announce the opening of our Single & Couple Waiting Lists for our Lytton I and Lytton II Facilities. Lytton Gardens offers subsidized housing for extremely low and very low-income seniors and mobility impaired applicants. TO BE ELIGIBLE: Single and couple applicants one must be 62 years of age or older, or 18 years of age or older and mobility impaired. Maximum annual income for single applicant must be less than $36,250.00 Maximum annual income for couple applicants must be less than $41,400.00 Rent will be 30% of your adjusted monthly income. Assets (Real Estate, CDs, Stocks, and Bonds, etc.) will be converted to income at 2% or actual % of income. You or a close family member *must live, or work, in the designated area of Palo Alto, Redwood City, East Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Stanford, Portola Valley, Woodside, Atherton, Mountain View, Los Altos or Los Altos Hills. TO APPLY: Applications will be distributed at Lytton Gardens Senior Communities, 656 Lytton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301, on January 24th, 26th, and 28th, 2011 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., and on January 25th, and 27th, 2011 from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Applications must be returned by mail to Lytton Gardens, P.O. Box 51907, Palo Alto, CA 94303, no later than February 18th, 2011. Applications postmarked after February 18th, 2011 cannot be considered and will be returned to sender. Selection will be made by a lottery process to determine applicants’ order on the waiting list. Names will be chosen between March 14th, 2011 and March 18th, 2011. Copy of your Social Security card must be attached to your application. APPLICANTS’ AUTHORIZATION AND CONSENT FOR RELEASE OF INFORMATION, SECTION 214, AND HUD FORMS 9887 & 9887A, MUST BE FILLED-OUT, SIGNED AND ATTACHED TO YOUR APPLICATION, OR WE WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ACCEPT YOUR APPLICATION. *Family Member includes: Grandparent, Parent, Children & Siblings. Grandparent in Law, Parent in Law, Children in Law & Siblings in Law. Lytton Gardens Senior Communities does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, handicap, ancestry, medical condition, veteran status, sexual orientation, AIDS, AIDS related condition (ARC), in the admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its federally assisted programs and activities. Gery Yearout, Executive Director and HUD Housing Administrator, 656 Lytton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650) 617-7372 has been designated to coordinate compliance with nondiscrimination requirements contained in the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s regulations implementing Section 504 (24 CFR Part 8 dated June 2, 1988). TDD/TYY 1-800-735-2922

S TANFORD PRESCHOOL BILINGUAL MONTESSORI IS NOW REGISTERING STUDENTS

• Mandarin Chinese and English for children 2-6 years of age • Fees include nutritious hot lunch and professionally-taught art and dance classes • Brand new facility and learning center

4232 El Camino Real, Palo Alto • 650-739-3545 www.stanfordpreschool.com Please Join Us At Our Open House Saturday and Sunday • January 29th & 30th • 3-5 pm *>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ>Â˜Ă•>ÀÞÊ£{]ÊÓ䣣ÊU Page 5

Upfront

Inspiring children to achieve since

News Digest ‘King’s Dream’ to be celebrated Sunday, Monday The life and message of civil-rights visionary Martin Luther King, Jr., will be celebrated Sunday, Jan. 16, at the Annual Community and Interfaith Celebration, followed by a community day of service on Monday, Jan. 17 sponsored by the City of Palo Alto, the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center and other nonprofit organizations. The Sunday event will be held from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, 625 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto. The community is invited to sing along with the Interfaith Choir and a rehearsal will be held from 1:45-2:45 p.m. Former City Councilwoman LaDoris Cordell will serve as master of ceremonies for the event, which will also feature a discussion led by journalist Belva Davis; performances by Eastside College Preparatory High School’s choir and the Volunteer Community Interfaith Choir; poetry recitation by Stanford University student Victoria S. Asbury; and youth awards to Costano Elementary School students. On Monday, the city and the group Youth Community Service will accept donations of food and coats at Lytton Plaza on University Avenue Monday from noon to 3 p.m. The Kiwanis Club of Palo Alto plans to be at the plaza signing up volunteers for future service projects. The Oshman Family Jewish Community Center will offer more than 25 volunteer opportunities Monday as part of its “Mitzvah Day.� Projects range from habitat restoration, making cat toys and dog biscuits for homeless pets, visiting seniors, serving meals at a shelter and working on crafts for hospitalized children to helping with the creation of a library in Botswana. Sign ups and information about the volunteer projects are available at www.paloaltojcc.org. “This is going to be an exciting day for Palo Alto and the broader community. We’re encouraging everyone to get out there and do a service project during the holiday weekend,� Palo Alto Mayor Sid Espinosa said in a press release about Monday’s day of service. “There’s something for everyone, so I hope to see a great mix of individuals, families, students, teachers, seniors, nonprofits, service organizations, faith-based groups, and members of the business community join me in volunteering on this day of service.� Jan. 17, 2011, marks the 25th anniversary of the Martin Luther King, Jr., federal holiday. More information about the Palo Alto MLK Day of Service is available at www.CityofPaloAlto.org. — Palo Alto Weekly staff

Two armed robberies hit Palo Alto An armed robber stole a Palo Alto woman’s purse shortly after midnight Saturday, Jan. 8, just after she had parked her car in her driveway in the 2300 block of St. Francis Drive, near Oregon Expressway, police reported. Just two days later, a pizza deliverer was robbed at gunpoint on Ben Lomond Drive in the Greenmeadow neighborhood of south Palo Alto Monday night, Palo Alto police said. No one was injured in either instance, police reported. In each incident, the gunman was described as a black male in his 20s, wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt and jeans. “The Palo Alto Police Department would like to remind community members to be aware of their surroundings at all times, especially during the evening hours. Please report any suspicious activity to the Police Department as soon as possible,� police said in a press release. Anyone with information can call the Palo Alto Police Department at 650-329-2413. Anonymous tips can be emailed to paloalto@tipnow.org or anonymous voice mails and text messages can be sent to 650-383-8984. N — Palo Alto Weekly staff

Join Us for an Open House! Friday, January 7 Wednesday, January 12 Wednesday, January 19 Wednesday, January 26

9 9 9 9

a.m.–2 a.m.–6 a.m.–2 a.m.–6

p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m.

Š 2011, Barbara B. Baker

Budget cuts could mean big drop at Foothill-DeAnza Almaden (408) 927-5771 19950 McKean Rd., San Jose Shawnee (408) 365-9298 500 Shawnee Ln., San Jose Harwood (408) 723-0111 4949 Harwood Rd., San Jose Strawberry Park (408) 213-0083 730 Camina Escuela, San Jose Berryessa (408) 998-2860 711 East Gish Rd., San Jose

Saratoga (408) 378-0444 18811 Cox Ave., Saratoga Sunnyvale (408) 245-7170 1185 Hollenbeck Ave., Sunnyvale MiddleďŹ eld (650) 213-8245 3880 MiddleďŹ eld Rd., Palo Alto Newark (510) 770-1771 39600 Cedar Blvd., Newark Ardenwood (510) 739-0300 35487 Dumbarton Ct., Newark

Because You Know the Value of Education An independent private school offering preschool through eighth g rade ChallengerSchool.com Licenses: 434400459, 434408058, 434408059, 434404888, 434400467, 430700130, 430710539, 434403575, 010212301, 013412399

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The Foothill-De Anza Community College District could be forced to serve 9 percent fewer students under the state budget proposed Monday (Jan. 10) by Gov. Jerry Brown. Chancellor Linda Thor said it is too early to draw firm conclusions but that the governor’s proposed cuts to community colleges was estimated to translate to a $10.9 million hit to her district’s $182 million operating budget, atop $20 million in cuts sustained over the past two years. Under formulas used by the Community College League of California, the proposal translates to an enrollment loss of 4,000 of the district’s current 45,000 students. That would mean fewer course sections offered, Thor said. The proposed cuts to Foothill-De Anza come at a time when Thor anticipates growing demand stemming from Brown’s proposed $500 million cuts each to the University of California and the California State University systems. The preliminary figures bandied about Monday also depend upon voter approval this spring of tax extensions sought by Brown. “If those are not approved, there will be additional cuts of $500 million to the community colleges, so it’s pretty devastating,� Thor said. N — Chris Kenrick LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Upfront

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Stanford applications set another record The number of applications for this fall’s freshman class at Stanford University — at 34,200 — have set another record, the university said today. (Posted Jan. 13 at 12:33 p.m.)

California Ave. fountain voting ‘through the roof’ The second California Avenue controversy — what kind of fountain should replace the old, damaged one at the end of the business district — has generated a huge amount of community interest, according to the city. Voting deadline is Tuesday noon. (Posted Jan. 13 at 12:29 p.m.)

Five-car pile-up in underpass stalls Oregon Five vehicles were involved in an apparent rear-end chain-reaction crash Wednesday afternoon (Jan. 12), resulting in traffic backups westbound. No one was injured, fire officials reported. (Posted Jan. 12 at 10:54 p.m.)

Tour bus catches fire, ties up San Antonio Road A large tour bus filled with Japanese tourists caught fire late Wednesday afternoon (Jan. 12), blocking westbound lanes of San Antonio Road near Charleston Road and emitting dense clouds of smoke and flames from its engine compartment. No one was injured, Palo Alto fire and police officials reported. (Posted Jan. 12 at 6:54 p.m.)

Simitian calls Brown’s budget a ‘grown-up’ plan For years, state Sen. Joe Simitian has been repeating a budget mantra: “Spend less; collect more; do it now.� Gov. Jerry Brown’s proposed budget finally does that, he says. (Posted Jan. 12 at 6:45 p.m.)

Board backs Duveneck plan, even-year voting In two rare split votes Tuesday night (Jan. 11), the Board of Education approved “conceptual designs� for major renovations to Duveneck School and agreed to align itself with the Palo Alto City Council by moving its elections to even-numbered years. (Posted Jan. 12 at 12:36 a.m.)

Double — no, make that quadruple — trouble? A Redwood City woman performed a rare feat recently when she gave birth to naturally conceived quadruplets at Stanford University’s Lucile Packard Children’s Hostpital, a hospital spokesman said Tuesday (Jan. 11). (Posted Jan. 11 at 3:41 p.m.)

Roberts blasts media accounts of his departure Public Works Director Glenn Roberts, who retired from Palo Alto after reaching a legal settlement with the city in October, took a bow Monday night (Jan. 10), as well as a parting shot at newspaper accounts that he said grossly mischaracterized his departure. (Posted Jan. 10 at 9:55 a.m.)

Brown says slash spending, keep tax hikes Gov. Jerry Brown said Monday (Jan. 10) that he is proposing to close the state’s $25.4 billion budget gap by cutting spending by $12.5 billion and extending temporary tax increases that were enacted under the Schwarzenegger administration. There will be huge impacts from the cuts. (Posted Jan. 10 at 2:34 p.m.)

Eshoo to keep contact with constituents Meeting face to face with the public is “the one of the most basic functions relative to democracy,� U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, said by phone on Monday (Jan. 10). And although she will remain cautious, the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona on Jan. 8 won’t stop her from meeting with her constituents, she said. (Posted Jan. 10 at 9:56 a.m.)

Paly’s state championship teams honored It was a parade unlike any seen before in the City of Palo Alto’s history as thousands turned out Saturday (Jan. 8) to honor the only school in the state of California to produce two state championship teams this past fall. Video posted on Palo Alto Online. (Posted Jan. 8 at 8:41 p.m.)

Palo Alto street-robbery suspect could face life A 21-year-old man suspected of at least two armed street robberies in Palo Alto could face a “three strikes� sentence that could put him behind bars for 25 years life if convicted, a Santa Clara County prosecutor said Friday (Jan. 7). (Posted Jan. 7 at 9:33 p.m.)

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Emergency

(continued from page 3)

have been upset with us if we had sent out a CANS Alert (now AlertSCC) given the hour of the incident. Also, since the suspect was no longer in the area there was no urgency to unnecessarily wake folks up,� Burns wrote in an e-mail to the Weekly. Police also issued a press release regarding the robbery before the end of the midnight shift, and the Weekly posted it on its PaloAltoOnline website at 7:34 a.m. on Saturday morning, he said. “We want to inform the public about what is going on in their neighborhood; however, the AlertSCC is something that we want to use for significant issues where there is an immediate lifesafety issue or there is a significant disruption to an area. We are concerned that if we use the system too often we can desensitize the community members,� he said. He added that there is no addi-

tional cost to the city when sending a notification. Police spokeswoman Lt. Sandra Brown on Thursday echoed Burns’ sentiments that the system should not be over used. “I want to wake you up at 3 in the morning if your neighborhood is on fire, not at 2:30 if a robbery occurs several blocks away,� she said. Brown has sent out 14 press releases related to the robberies, she said. Heather Galanis, a longtime resident of Triple El, an enclave of 58 Eichler-style homes north of Oregon Expressway where a robbery occurred in December, said the number of incidents that rise to the level of an alert have been few over the years. “In all of the years that I’ve lived here, we’ve only had something like that happen twice. I remember a couple of decades ago when a young man broke into a home, helicopters got up there with loud speakers. People came out of their homes. (Some residents) ran down the street and found him behind a bush,� she said.

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Galanis said she thinks the city should interview residents before saying they will become complacent. “I’d like to see to see some proof of that,� she said. The Midtown neighborhood where Annette Glanckopf lives has also been hit by violent crime. She said she has met twice with police about using AlertSCC for incidents and this week called for more discussion. Glanckopf is chair of the Palo Alto Neighborhoods (PAN) emergency-preparedness committee. She said Burns makes a good argument for not using the system to wake people in the middle of the night, but she doubts alerts about robberies would desensitize people. “That type of incident is exactly what we want� the system to be activated for, she said. Burns and Brown said the department is working on outreach and some technology tools and is exploring various social media. A community meeting is planned for Thursday, Jan. 20. N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be e-mailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

Check out the Weekly’s Community Calendar for the Midpeninsula.

TALK ABOUT IT

Instantly ďŹ nd out what events are going on in your city!

Under what circumstances would you like to receive an alert from the City of Palo Alto? Share your opinion on Town Square, the community discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.

Go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/calendar

www.PaloAltoOnline.com

1 Planning the Perfect Remodel For homeowners interested in learning more about how to approach a successful remodel, these interactive workshops, taught by our Sr. Designers, promise to be informative and fun! Upfront planning will ensure a successful project and the transformation of your house into the home you’ve always wanted. n Get the answers you need about budgets, design and space planning/guidelines, cabinet and countertop choices, color palettes, lighting, new trends and ideas for ooring. n Learn about accessible/timeless design and why you should integrate it into your remodel now. Beautiful, luxurious and functional – you can have it all. n Get excited about your home remodel as our Designers take you through a journey of ideas, photos, materials and product options available to transform your home today!

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Upfront

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L U C I L E PA C K A R D

California Ave. (continued from page 3)

Stone’s, we are the owners of the property and are not subject to any third-party lease if our business goes below the point of necessity. Our plans would be to develop the property to a different use than a supermarket,� he wrote. Earlier on Wednesday, before the commission hearing, Tony Montooth, owner of Antonio’s Nut House, said his biggest concern is parking. Parking is already at capacity during lunch hour and many businesses don’t have rear entranc-

C H I L D R E N ’ S H O S P I TA L

es for deliveries, he said. “Traffic will stop in the middle of the street. It’s going to stop dead,� he said. But Jaime Rodriguez, the city’s chief transportation official, said loading zones have been figured into the plan, and alleys off California are also to be used for deliveries. The traffic study determined that street could be used by 560 vehicles per hour — down from the current maximum 1,360 — with traffic slowing by about two to three seconds per vehicle if the number of lanes is reduced. But Rodriguez said even with that reduction, the amount of traffic that would use

California Avenue would still be well below the capacity the street could handle without congestion. Montooth and others said construction is another major concern. “I have mixed emotions. I’d love to beautify California Avenue, but at what expense? During construction, it would really hurt, especially in this economy.� Jessica Roth, whose family has owned the European Cobblery for four generations, is worried. “When they were redoing the sewer lines it was really hard on our business. It’s been episode after episode (of construction). “Six months of construction is going to just kill my business —

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Jan. 10)

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Board of Education (Jan. 11)

Duveneck construction: The board approved â&#x20AC;&#x153;conceptual designsâ&#x20AC;? for a $10.56 million plan to build new classroom buildings and make other renovations at Duveneck. Yes: Caswell, Tom, Townsend No: Klausner, Mitchell Election timing: The board voted to align itself with city, state and federal balloting by moving its elections to even-numbered years. Yes: Klausner, Mitchell, Tom, Townsend No: Caswell

Planning and Transportation Commission (Jan. 12)

California Avenue: The commission recommended approving the proposed streetscape improvements for California Avenue, including a proposal to change the road from four lanes to two. Yes: Unanimous

Utilities Advisory Commission (Jan. 12)

Water plan: The commission discussed and approved the Water Shortage Implementation Plan. Yes: Unanimous Gas efficiency: The commission recommended approving the proposed Ten-Year Gas Efficiency Goals, which include reduction of gas usage by 5.5 percent by 2020. Yes: Berry, Cook, Eglash, Foster, Keller, Waldfogel No: Melton

LETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

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ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TIME TO TALK ABOUT EATING DISORDERS AND THE ATHLETE: DISPELLING THE MYTHS AND FINDING THE FACTS



Pardee Park: The council voted to remove all the eucalyptus trees at Eleanor Pardee Park at the same time, rather than in phases as staff had proposed. Yes: Burt, Espinosa, Holman, Klein, Price, Scharff, Schmid, Yeh No: Shepherd Roberts: The council passed a resolution of appreciation for retired Public Works Director Glenn Roberts. Yes: Unanimous

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LU C I L E PA C K A R D

C H I L D R E Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S H O S P I T A L V I S I T W W W. L P C H . O R G TO S I G N U P F O R C L A S S E S Page 8Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;䣣Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The City Council plans to hold a closed session to discuss labor negotiations. The council also scheduled to discuss the annual Service Efforts and Accomplishments survey, adopt the Energy Risk Management Policy, and consider a resolution to share services with Sunnyvale, Mountain View and Los Altos. The closed session is scheduled for 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 18. Regular meeting will follow at 7:30 p.m. or as soon as possible thereafter in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). HISTORIC RESOURCES BOARD ... The board is tentatively scheduled to meet at 8 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 19, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board plans to review 524 Hamilton Ave., a request by Steve Reller of R&M Properties for a review of a proposed 10,818-square-foot, mixed-use, three-story building with commercial office on the first and second floors and a residential unit on the third floor. The meeting is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 20, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PUBLIC ART COMMISSION ... The commission plans to select the design for the California Avenue fountain project. The commission also plans to discuss a temporary installation by artist Patrick Dougherty, the recent installation of a memorial sculpture to Bill Bliss and an update on the status of the Mitchell Park public art projects. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 20, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Upfront just kill my business,â&#x20AC;? she said. Curtis Williams, director of planning and community environment, said staff would work out a plan to limit construction impacts on businesses, such as phasing the work and making sure entrances remain clear. Roth said she worries that lane reductions would cause backups and that would turn off people traveling up El Camino who might intend to shop on California. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People going by will have a bad thought in their heads: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;That street is a mess.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I want people to come to my street. It just does not make sense to me,â&#x20AC;? she said. But a few business owners said they just want the street to look better. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see why changing from two lanes to one will make a traffic problem, especially if there is more parking. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see that many cars,â&#x20AC;? Josephine Montoya, owner of Montoya Jewelers, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re saying is fine with me â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to make the street more attractive.â&#x20AC;? Despite businessesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fears, Commissioner Samir Tuma said he â&#x20AC;&#x153;did not see any data that supports traffic congestion or hazards to bicycles.â&#x20AC;? Vice Chair Lee Lippert said street improvements in Menlo Park enticed several Stanford Shopping Center businesses to move to Santa Cruz Avenue. He also did not agree that narrowing the lanes would clog California with traffic from cars looking for parking spots, buses or delivery trucks. A traffic study found that California has about one third or less the traffic volume of other area retail districts. (5,280 vehicles per day compared to 18,700 for University Avenue and 15,445 for Santa Cruz). Tommy Fehrenbach, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic development manager, said the plan would add parking and create a sense of place, making the area more attractive and improving business. Seventeen additional diagonal parking spaces would be added and 75 or more bicycle parking spaces would be added, according to Rodriguez. Residents on Wednesday night said they support the changes and dismissed the four-lane road as a throwback to the 1950s. Roger Carpenter and Ted Black, residents of the adjacent Evergreen Park neighborhood, pointed to retail districts where lane reductions have taken place, such as Castro Street in Mountain View and Santa Cruz Avenue. They are â&#x20AC;&#x153;great places and highly trafficked. It will be great for business,â&#x20AC;? Black said. The commissioners are concurrently reviewing the broader California Avenue Area Plan, and they wanted to know if the traffic study included any impacts of those eventual developments, which could include high-density housing. Julie Caporgno, chief planning and transportation official, said staff doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t anticipate that any future development would have a significant impact on traffic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any residences that go in there would be transit-oriented,â&#x20AC;? she said. N Staff Writer SueDremann can be e-mailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

Merger

(continued from page 3)

tentially back each other up,â&#x20AC;? Keene said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all on the same system, even if not on the same space.â&#x20AC;? Then the city managers decided to take collaboration one step further. Keene said he began to have regular conversations with Kevin Duggan and Doug Schmitz, the city managers of Mountain View and Los Altos, respectively. Sunnyvale City Manager Gary Luebbers later joined the discussions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once we had that, what I thought and what the other city managers thought was that in these times weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to be exploring any opportunities we have for shared services,â&#x20AC;? Keene said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Should we take it to the next level and at least potentially start to look

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com Should the City of Palo Alto consolidate services with neighboring municipalities? Share your thoughts on the topic on Town Square, the community discussion forum on Palo Alto Online.

at bricks-and-mortar consolidation?â&#x20AC;? Talk of merged emergency operations isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t new to Palo Alto. In the last two years, as the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax revenues plunged, Keene and the council have occasionally talked about regionalization as a possible way to cut costs.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Should we take it to the next level and at least potentially start to look at bricks-andmortar consolidation?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D;James Keene, Palo Alto city manager

The proposed resolution, Keene said, is a way to â&#x20AC;&#x153;publicly announceâ&#x20AC;? that consolidation of services is an option that is now being seriously explored. The resolution states that each of the four cities currently has its own public-safety communications center and that the cities â&#x20AC;&#x153;wish to further explore the possibility and feasibil-

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agenda/council.asp (TENTATIVE) AGENDA â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; COUNCIL CHAMBERS DUE TO THE MARTIN LUTHER KING Jr. BIRTHDAY HOLIDAY THE REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING OF MONDAY, JANUARY 17, 2011 HAS BEEN CANCELLED (TENTATIVE) SPECIAL COUNCIL AGENDACOUNCIL CHAMBERS JANUARY 18, 2011 - 6:00 PM 1.

Closed Session: Labor 7:30 PM or as soon as possible thereafter 2. Study Session: Service Efforts and Accomplishments (SEA) Report CONSENT CALENDAR 3. Budget Amendment Ordinance for Replanting of Trees at Eleanor Pardee Park 4. Approval of an Exchange Agreement and Quit Claim Deed to Secure and Maintain a Public Access Road to the Former Mayfield Mall Site at 200 San Antonio Road 5. Recommendation to Refer the Percent for Art Policy and Procedure to the Policy and Services Committee 6. Approval of a Resolution Shared Services 7. Approval of a Contract to Provide Community Shuttle Service for the Crosstown Shuttle Route and Amendment to the Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board Agreement ACTION ITEM 8. Adoption of the Energy Risk Management Policy (TENTATIVE) SPECIAL COUNCIL AGENDA-BAYLANDS INTERPRETIVE CENTER JANUARY 22, 2011 - 9:00 AM 1. Council Retreat

Introducing

Good for Business. Good for You. Good for the Community.

ityâ&#x20AC;? of consolidating these centers. The resolution also states that the city managers have discussed consolidating centralized records management, evidence facilities, office or field equipment, emergency planning, arson investigation and fire prevention. The council resolution would endorse this exploration of coordination opportunities. The resolution also directs Keene to include in next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget, which starts July 1, funds for an â&#x20AC;&#x153;independent study of a joint publicsafety communications center.â&#x20AC;? The cities already cooperate on a variety of services, including SWAT teams, solid-waste facilities and animal services, Keeneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report notes. He said the managersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; decision to pursue more consolidation came â&#x20AC;&#x153;partly because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the same geographical area and partly because we have experience sharing different services.â&#x20AC;? He also emphasized that the proposed resolution is not binding on the cities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just wanted to start the conversation,â&#x20AC;? Keene said. N

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your

story?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stories about Palo Alto, as told by local residents as part of the Palo Alto Story Project, are now posted on the Internet.

Watch them at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

NOTICE OF VACANCIES ON THE HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION FOR TWO TERMS ENDING MARCH 31, 2014 (Terms of Ezran and Savage)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council is seeking applications for the Human Relations Commission from persons interested in serving in one of two terms ending March 31, 2014. Eligibility Requirements: Composed of seven members who are not Council Members, ofďŹ cers or employees of the City, who are residents of the City, and who shall be appointed by the Council. Regular meetings are held at 7:00 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month. Duties: The Human Relations Commission has the discretion to act with respect to any human relations matter when the Commission ďŹ nds that any person or group does not beneďŹ t fully from public or private opportunities or resources in the community, or is unfairly or differently treated due to factors of concern to the Commission: a) public or private opportunities or resources in the community include, but are not limited to, those associated with ownership and rental of housing, employment, education and governmental services and beneďŹ ts; and b) factors of concern to the Commission include, but are not limited to, socioeconomic class or status, physical condition or handicap, married or unmarried state, emotional condition, intellectual ability, age, sex, sexual preference, race, cultural characteristics, ethnic background, ancestry, citizenship, and religious, conscientious or philosophical belief. The Commission shall conduct such studies and undertake such responsibilities as the Council may direct. Application forms and appointment information are available in the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s OfďŹ ce, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto (650) 329-2571 or may be obtained on the website at http:// www.cityofpaloalto.org. Deadline for receipt of applications in the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s OfďŹ ce is 5:00 p.m., January 28, 2011. If one of the incumbents does not apply, the deadline will be extended until 5:30 p.m. on February 2, 2011. DONNA J. GRIDER City Clerk MEMBERS MUST BE PALO ALTO RESIDENTS. *>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;䣣Ă&#x160;U Page 9

Editorial

New state budget: a hard dose of reality At last, a governor tackles the core issue of our time: balancing cuts with extended tax revenues to get state out of a deep hole

C

aliforniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beleaguered social network and system of higher education â&#x20AC;&#x201D; beset by years of slashed budgets â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are about to get whacked again by Gov. Jerry Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed budget, released this week. It is a dose of hard, necessary reality.

Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal is to cut $12.5 billion from programs and raise $12 billion in new revenues by continuing taxes due to expire. It is a Draconian budget made necessary by years of overspending in the dot-com boom of the late 1990s, and before, and the Great Recession that started in 2001. There will be much pain in the implementation of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $84.6 billion general fund budget, with jobs lost and full programs cut that provide all types of social and other services. State workers not covered by collective-bargaining contracts will face up to 10 percent cuts in take-home salaries. Those individual hardships will be vastly overshadowed by cuts of $1.7 billion to Medi-Cal, $1.5 billion to welfare-to-work, and $750 million to developmental services. Yet the hardest-to-bear impacts in the long term are in the field of education, which comprises roughly half the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general-fund budget. The state colleges and university systems will get hit with $500 million each in cuts, further undermining Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already slashed educational system. Lower grades will be spared for now, funded at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s levels â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but that is contingent on voter approval of higher taxes in a special election this spring. But in between are the two-year community colleges scattered throughout the state, serving students of all types, from recent high-school graduates â&#x20AC;&#x201D; some aiming for jobs and some for higher education â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to adults seeking career retraining during desperate economic times. As a kind of microcosm for higher-education statewide, the magnitude of the cuts has begun to hit home at the Foothill-De Anza Community College District. Chancellor Linda Thor reports that of the $400 million cut faced by community colleges, FoothillDe Anzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share appears to be about $10.5 million on an annual budget of $180 million. That is on top of $20 million in cuts made in the past two years, and translates to being able to serve about 4,400 fewer students, nearly 10 percent of the current 45,000. Fees would rise from $780 to $1,080. It could get worse, she said. If voters fail to approve tax extensions this spring community colleges could face a â&#x20AC;&#x153;devastatingâ&#x20AC;? additional $500 million in cuts State Sen. Joe Simitian says Brown at last has presented â&#x20AC;&#x153;a serious grown-up budget proposal of the kind we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen for seven yearsâ&#x20AC;? under former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Simitian has long had a mantra about what to do about the state budget deficit: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spend less; collect more; do it now.â&#x20AC;? Good advice. Both Democrats and Republicans now must do some growing up to solve our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial mess.

Holiday Fund tops $4 million â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in home stretch

T

he Palo Alto Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Holiday Fund this year has topped the $4 million mark of grants to local organizations providing services to our greatest community resource: children and their families.

The fund, now in its 17th year, combines direct donations, matching grants from local foundations and revenues from the annual Moonlight Run to raise up to a quarter million dollars. Virtually all funds go to local programs benefiting children and their families, with some college scholarships. The grants are selected by Weekly staff, who share in the pride of the fund. We are also proud of our longstanding relationships with the Packard and Hewlett foundations, which last year gave $32,000 and $25,000 respectively, and to the Peery and Arrillaga family foundations, which gave $10,000 each. Donations are handled through the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. The Weekly absorbs all fundraising costs, so 100 percent of every donation goes back into the community. Seldom has there been a time in recent history when such community-based, communitybuilding support is needed more. The campaign continues through January: Please join us by checking out our website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Page 10Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;䣣Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;

Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Fountain finalists Editor, Elise DeMarzo, Manager of the Palo Alto Public Art Commission (PA PAC), has finally disclosed the costs of the artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; proposals for the California Avenue fountain. The commission had originally refused to reveal the price of the fountain proposals because they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to sway the public vote. Why shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fountain costs be part of the voting equation? The two modern fountain proposals by Szabo and Oldland were quoted at $49,198 and $46,050, respectively. The Madden/Reed fountain proposal, which offers a green choice by recycling and revitalizing the original Cal Ave fountain, will cost $35,000, about 30 percent less than the other two proposals. The commission, along with the California Avenue Area Development Association (CAADA), tried to replace the original fountain with the very modern Bruce Beasley sculpture. Public outcry kept that from happening. The commission said they will â&#x20AC;&#x153;considerâ&#x20AC;? the pubic vote when they make their final decision on which of the three fountains will reside on California Avenue. Which one do you think they will pick? Jan St. Peter High Street Palo Alto

Watching the coop Editor, Palo Alto has a first-class new mayor in Sid Espinosa which raises hopes for some real infrastructure changes in our city in the new year. Both Sid and Vice Mayor Yiaway Yeh have the ability to move the city in a positive direction. There are a couple clouds over this leadership change that we will have to watch with an open mind: 1.) Both Sid and Yiaway received significant campaigns funds from the South Bay Labor Council, and so their independence on union issues needs to be watched carefully. 2.) On an important union vote, Sid was a no-show at the council meeting, leaving Yiaway to cast the lone vote in support of the union position. This was contrary to Mayor Pat Burtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s noble efforts to restore some rationale to the city-employee benefits structure. Residents, while we stand in support of our new leaders, please keep your eyes open. We might expect to see proposals such as limiting city vendors to â&#x20AC;&#x153;prevailing wageâ&#x20AC;? contractors as early indicators of union paybacks. (Prevailing Wage law has nothing to do with â&#x20AC;&#x153;fair wagesâ&#x20AC;? but feeds into a statutory formula that creates an upward spiral on the cost of municipal projects.) Just remember, the entire city operations are smaller than most of the companies that residents work for.

We just need to watch the chicken coop to make sure there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a fox disguised as a rooster or hen. With hope that this caution is unwarranted. Let the hard work begin. We are watching. Timothy Gray Charleston Meadows Palo Alto

Get rid of rail? Editor, Editor, It is time for the political leaders and residents in the cities between Santa Clara and Brisbane to tell the California High Speed Rail Authority goodbye and good riddance. The high-speed rail-project will provide very limited benefits to the people of the Peninsula while at the same time causing a massive disruption during its construction. It was not too many years ago that the residents of San Francisco demanded the elevated Embarcadero freeway be torn down. It was torn down because the residents and politicians thought it was an eyesore, hurt property values and blocked their view of San Francisco Bay. The politicians of Sacramento, San Francisco, San Jose, Los Angles

and the High Speed Rail Authority think it is OK to build this massive eyesore in our neighborhood. A more reasonable route would be for high-speed rail to follow the Union Pacificâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rail lines in the East Bay, These rail lines run mostly through industrial areas. Downtown San Francisco can be served by an interchange with BART in Oakland. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let them destroy our neighborhoods to satisfy their egos. The high-speed rail system, with its massive construction costs, is almost certainly going to be a money pit. Government projects of this size, rarely if ever come in on budget. If this project had an even chance of making money, private venture capital and industry would be standing in line to get a piece of it. John S. McKenna Tramanto Drive San Carlos

Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s news, sports & hot picks

YOUR TURN The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

What do you think? Do you favor a â&#x20AC;&#x153;traditionalâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;sculpturalâ&#x20AC;? design for a new California Avenue fountain? Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. You can also participate in our popular interactive online forum, Town Square, at our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Read blogs, discuss issues, ask questions or express opinions with you neighbors any time, day or night. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Publishing Co. to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jay Thorwaldson or Online Editor Tyler Hanley at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Answers to this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s puzzles, which can be found on page 40

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A weekly compendium of vital statistics

Palo Alto Jan. 4-10

Martin A. Agueret Martin entered into rest on December 27th, 2010. A proud native San Franciscan, Martin was born on December 6, 1920. He was an alumnus of Lowell High School in S.F. Martin delivered the San Francisco News as a paperboy in the 1930â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Martin turned 21 on the eve of the attack on Pearl Harbor. He served in the Army during WWII and worked for the Marine Corps, retiring at Age 50. Martin was a lifelong Giants and 49ers fan. Martin was preceded in death by his father Martin Sr., and his mother Emelie. Martin was proud of his French-Basque heritage and traveled extensively including many trips to Europe and the Pyrenees where he still has a large extended family. Martin loved his Palo Alto community and volunteered for many years in the Library. He was most honored to have had the opportunity to assist the Palo Alto Police Department as a volunteer where he still holds a city record for his hours given. God bless you Martin, you were a gentleman and a sweet wonderful soul. Funeral services with military honors were held Saturday, January 8th, 2011 at Roller Hapgood & Tinney Funeral Home â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 980 MiddleďŹ eld Road â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Palo Alto. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

Violence related Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

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Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspended license . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/damage . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .1

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Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Menlo Park Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle related Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .3 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Suspended license . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .3 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Miscellaneous Coroner case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Ben Lomond Drive, 1/10, 21:18 p.m.; robbery.

Menlo Park Del Mundo Street, 1/5, 6:28 p.m.; battery. Hamilton Avenue, 1/10, 5:55 p.m.; battery.

Sherrie Wilkins Sharon Louise Fasola Wilkins was born on September 30, 1942 and peacefully passed away on December 25, 2010 surrounded by her loving family and pets. Sherrie was a wife, mother and medical professional who lived with breast cancer since 1992 and with itsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; metastases since 2003. Sherrie was a strong proponent of providing needed support to women with breast cancer through her afďŹ liations with societies and non-proďŹ t organizations. Sherrie obtained her RN degree from Queen of Angels Nursing School in Los Angeles, her BS in Nursing from Los Angeles State College, her MS in Nursing and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Education from UCSF and her Ph.D. in Microbiology from UCSF. After UCSF she received a medical fellowship to Stanford University to study genetic diseases in children. She then went to Genentech where she started in the laboratory but then found her calling in hiring and pulling together high caliber talent in the different research settings. Sherrie also held executive positions in numerous biotechnology, health care organizations, i.e. Stanford Medical Center, UCSF, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Los Angeles, Lucille Packard Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital. She also served in executive capacity in organizations such as Heartport, Cholostech, Cytokinetics and other biotechnology organizations. In 2003, Sherrie medically retired from corporate life and turned her attention to both the medical and spiritual sides of breast cancer, spending her time at Breast Cancer Connections in Palo Alto and her church, Companions on the Journey in Palo Alto. Sherrie could always be counted on to provide a sunny and cheerful attitude towards her medical situation and was a comfort to everyone around her. In addition to taking on numerous leadership roles at her church, Sherrie was nominated by Breast Cancer Connections to be honored as one of 16 Volunteers in Santa Clara County selected for the prestigious Glass Bowl Award in 2007. In 2009 she was awarded with the Distinguished Professional Award for her work with the Association of Women in Science, which she was the former President of for the Palo Alto Chapter. She will be missed by all who have come in contact with her and especially missed by her husband Sid and daughter Amy. Beyond all her achievements, she was kind, compassionate, and loving to all those she encountered. In lieu of ďŹ&#x201A;owers, donations can be made to either Breast Cancer Connections, 390 Cambridge Ave. Palo Alto, Ca. 94306 or Companions on the Journey, P.O. Box 60195, Palo Alto, Ca. 94306 PA I D

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O B I T UA RY

Transitions FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC ÂŁÂ&#x2122;nxĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;>`]Ă&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;­Ă&#x2C6;xäŽĂ&#x160;nxĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°vVVÂŤ>°Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;}Ă&#x160; -Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;£ä\ääĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;°

This Sunday: Lighten Up Rev. Dr. Eileen Altman preaching An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

INSPIRATIONS

A resource for special events and ongoing religious services. To inquire about or make space reservations for Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

Deaths Norman Duvall Norman Duvall, 78, a resident of Menlo Park, died Dec. 24. He was born in Battle Creek, Mich., and graduated from Michigan State University as an ROTC member. He was honorably discharged from the United States Army with the rank of 1st Lieutenant. He spent his last 43 years in Menlo Park, where he and his wife Eileen raised their family. He had a long and successful career as an executive at Potlatch Corporation. He was an avid golfer, World War II film buff, and master of the daily crossword. He enjoyed fishing, watching football and baseball (especially when his sons were playing), loved dogs and a good belly laugh, loved ones said. Friends and family often described him as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the life of the party.â&#x20AC;? He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Eileen Ann Duvall; his sons, Farley Cash Duvall and Derek Norman Duvall; two grandchildren; Lili the Labrador; and many friends. A memorial lunch will be held Saturday, Jan. 29, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Harryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hofbrau in Redwood City.

Cover Story

A mural by John McQuarrie, depicting Leland Stanford in an Old West setting, resides in the waiting room of the Downtown Palo Alto Caltrain station.

A ceramic piece by Pablo Picasso is displayed in the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office on the seventh floor of the Palo Alto City Hall.

Sculptures, paintings are at home in the urban environment few Caltrain patrons filtered through the downtown Palo Alto station on a recent Monday, one ordering a coffee from CaffĂŠ del Doge, some checking their phones. No one seemed to be looking up at the John McQuarrie mural depicting scenes from California history gracing the wall above, but the painting has been there since the early 1940s, providing a touch of art to the mid-morning commute. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the many murals, sculptures and other artworks amongst the stores,

streets and offices around town. Sometimes theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in unexpected locations such as on a traffic median, storm-water pump station or parking-lot wall. Next door to the traditional train-station mural is a futuristic, color-changing LED installation at the bus depot. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even a genuine Picasso piece on the seventh floor of City Hall. Love it or hate it, in Palo Alto, art is all around. Encountering art out in the urban landscape, such as on the wall of a CVS drugstore in Midtown, â&#x20AC;&#x153;keeps you smiling. If

you see it with a child or with a visitor to your town then theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll remember that as an extra attraction,â&#x20AC;? Terry Acebo Davis, a local artist and the current chair of the Palo Alto Public Art Commission, said. In many cases, art pieces seen around town are part of Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Art in Public Places program. The program, which currently boasts 326 works, started in 1975 and consists of pieces displayed on the exteriors of city-owned buildings, within city buildings, in open public areas or purchased with city funds. Approximately 70

pieces in the current collection are installed outdoors. The program is overseen by the Public Art Commission, a group appointed by the City Council. The process of selecting and installing public art varies from piece to piece. In many cases, a business with room for and interest in art approaches the city and its art commission for assistance, and the city and business share the costs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For a business with a big, blank wall, a (continued on next page)

Left, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Streaming,â&#x20AC;? by local artist Ceevah Sobel, adorns the San Francisquito Creek stormwater pump station on East Bayshore Road. Right, Palo Alto has numerous works by muralist Greg Brown, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ornidontistâ&#x20AC;? on Middlefield Road. *>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;䣣Ă&#x160;U Page 13

Cover Story

Left, Marta Thomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Light and Imaginationâ&#x20AC;? installation surrounds the Palo Alto Utilities Department on Alma Street. Right, Stanford Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Guinea sculpture garden contains such works as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kura,â&#x20AC;? by New Guinean Teddy Balangu.

(continued from previous page)

mural is really its best bet as an anti-graffiti measure,â&#x20AC;? as well as for sprucing up the look of a building, said Elise DeMarzo, staff liaison to the Public Art Commission. When a business decides it wants to create a joint venture with the city to house an artwork, or the city wants to place one in a park or plaza, the physical environment of the site is considered before the particular

art piece is selected. Because public art is often exposed to the elements and less protected than museum art, maintenance costs must be considered. The commission currently has a budget of $25,000 annually, which in part covers maintenance costs. Sometimes the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Architectural Review Board is also involved in the planning and approval process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With anything that has a big visual impact on the area itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wise to go through city channels,â&#x20AC;? DeMarzo said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone has a definition of what they

think art is. The challenge for us is that the art commission has to be the voice for the whole city,â&#x20AC;? Acebo Davis said. Though some of the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choices have been controversial, she said public art is an essential part of municipal culture. The San Francisquito Creek Stormwater Pump Station, decorated in 2009 with the water-themed installation â&#x20AC;&#x153;Streamingâ&#x20AC;? by artist Ceevah Sobel, is an example of how art can spring up in surprising spots. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone could get on their bike and go from art piece to art piece; what a great tour that would be,â&#x20AC;? she said.

Acebo Davis, who said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d eventually like to see public art installed in every city park, said aesthetic tastes change from one generation to the next and that future projects could consist of digital installations and projections rather than the more traditional murals and sculptures. Interactivity will be an important quality in public art of the future, too.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Everyone has a definition of what they think art is. The challenge for us is that the art commission has to be the voice for the whole city.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Terry Acebo Davis, local artist and current chair of the Palo Alto Public Art Commission â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the public has something to say there are ways to make their voices heard. We listen; the news gets back to us,â&#x20AC;? she said, adding that the commission is currently soliciting public input on the three finalists for the California Avenue fountain project. The commissioners hear their share of criticism from members of the public who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care for their artistic choices. One such critic is resident Alexis Hamilton, who considered the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection while visiting the Papua New Guinea sculpture garden at Stanford University.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Inner Lives of Teenagers,â&#x20AC;? by Elizabeth Lada, can be seen on the wall of the CVS pharmacy on Middlefield Road.

TALK ABOUT IT

www.PaloAltoOnline.com What is your opinion of Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public art? Share your thoughts on Palo Alto Online

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Cover Story

INFUSING SPECTACULAR HANDCRAFTED EYEWEAR WITH WORLD CLASS OPTICS

TRUNK SHOW Saturday, January 22, 11am-6pm Featuring Zero G and David Yurman Eyewear Byxbee Park is home to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wind Wave Pieceâ&#x20AC;? by Peter Richards, along with other environmental-art installations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Palo Alto takes its public art too seriously. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so cerebral, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no fun to it, except for the sculpture outside of the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s museum. I really loved the sculpture â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Foreign Friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; from our sister city in LinkĂśping, Sweden, before it was vandalized and got rid of. It was so charming, wonderful and human, now all the art is so technological â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it lacks humanity,â&#x20AC;? she said. Acebo Davis said artists are aware that not every piece will please everyone and that what matters is that a piece spark interest and conversation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it can make people talk, then itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good,â&#x20AC;? she said. N

Open 7 Days A Week Joanne Hu, OD - VSP Provider - 650.321.3382 2750 Middlefield Road, Midtown Palo Alto www.ubereyes.com

Editorial Assistant Karla Kane can be e-mailed at kkane@paweekly.com. Staff Photographer Veronica Weber can be emailed at vweber@paweekly.com

On the cover: Herons and flowers face El Camino Real on the wall of the Stanford Terrace Inn. Artist Florence Goguely painted the nature-themed mural in 2009.

Above left, A witch doctor casts out devils on the walls of the former Palo Alto Medical Foundation and future home of the Palo Alto History Museum. The murals, by Victor Arnautoff, were controversial when they debuted in 1932. Below, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neededâ&#x20AC;? by Thai Bui marks the entryway to Adobe Creek at El Camino Real.

Join us at our beautiful Albert & Janet Schultz Cultural Arts Hall for our second scintillating season!

The False Friend, Capriccio Chamber Orchestra, Jeff Sanford Jazz

JANUARY HIGHLIGHTS

The Great Broadway Sing-Along Jewish Songwriters of Broadway

Saturday, January 22 at 8:00 PM Author Myla Goldberg The False Friend

Thursday, January 27 at 7:00 PM Capriccio Chamber Orchestra Sunday, January 30 at 3:00 PM COMING IN FEBRUARY

Jeff Sanford Jazz

Part of the Singles Arts CafĂŠ

Thursday, February 3 at 7:30 PM To purchase tickets, visit www.paloaltojcc.org/arts or call (650) 223-8699. Oshman Family JCC 3921 Fabian Way Palo Alto, CA | (650) 223-8699

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Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

SPIRALING SAPLINGS

Todd Mulvihill

SCULPTOR WEAVES TREES INTO FANCIFUL VISIONS

Veronica Weber

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Duncan Price

Patrick Dougherty has turned hundreds of artistic visions into tree sculptures, and now heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creating a new work at the Palo Alto Art Center (pictured above). Past works include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Uff Da Palaceâ&#x20AC;? at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum in Chaska, above right, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call of the Wildâ&#x20AC;? at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Wash., right.

W

by Rebecca Wallace hatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the mysterious construction project taking shape on the grounds of the Palo Alto Art Center? Willow saplings, sticks and twigs are being planted and intertwined on the grass facing Newell Road. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fencing and scaffolding, and a white-haired man with a pleasant North Carolina accent directing it all. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s row houses,â&#x20AC;? Patrick Dougherty says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;in a zig-zag pattern.â&#x20AC;? In a way, yes. This fanciful framework will ultimately be a sculpture with architectural flair, dreamed up by a prominent environmental artist. Dougherty has created hundreds of site-specific installations that resemble palaces, playhouses, faces and other shapes. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worked in Ireland rain, thigh-high snow at Smith College, and desert heat. Row houses in Palo Alto must be easier on the constitution. Doughertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medium of choice is trees. Usually willows, like the tractor-trailer load that was brought to Palo Alto from a Pescadero farm. But sometimes maple, rose apple or even bamboo will do. The artist draws inspiration from each site, then plans out a sculpture with sketches and word associations. He and his helpers build a base of sticks that grows up into a sort of shell. Then that shape becomes a canvas for patterns of sticks, twigs and greenery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a line logic in play, some kind of rationale,â&#x20AC;? Dougherty says in an interview at the art center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like a beaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dam. The sticks bunch up like there are forces at play.â&#x20AC;? Some of his sculptures feel like theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been swirled by a storm, or simply windswept. Titles include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jug or Naught,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spinoffsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toad Hall.â&#x20AC;? This month, Dougherty will be creating at the Palo Alto Art Center through Jan. 28 during a three-week artist residency. All his sculptures, he says, take three weeks to build. His current site struck him for several reasons: the length of the grassy expanse, the intimate feel created by overhanging trees, and the nearness to houses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It seemed like we do have urbanization in some ways,â&#x20AC;? he says. Hence, he created a hybrid. The front of the long tree sculpture will have the whimsical, green row-house feel, with big circles like picture windows. The back will feel more natural and down-to-earth, he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll feel like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to an indigenous setting, where thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hunting and gathering going on.â&#x20AC;? Dougherty encourages people to get close to his sculptures; here, visitors will be able to stroll inside and peer out the front â&#x20AC;&#x153;windows.â&#x20AC;? While a fence has been up during the early part of construction, he plans to take it down soon so passers-by can get a good look at the process and ask questions. Even during this interview, Dougherty gets into several conversations with curious visitors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want a barrier with people,â&#x20AC;? he says. Dougherty has also clearly connected well with the art-center staff, several of whom are outside helping him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were so thrilled that someone of his stature came here,â&#x20AC;? curator Signe Mayfield says. The art center foundation commissioned the proj-

ect, which was co-sponsored by the Palo Alto Public Art Commission and also fueled by a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Besides being a fan of Doughertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work, Mayfield is also impressed by the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organization. Before the building started, Dougherty sent over pages and pages of text describing his scaffolding needs and other details. Jan. 11, the first day of Doughertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work on the art-center grounds, brought rain, but no one working in the damp grass seemed fazed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always something,â&#x20AC;? Dougherty says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You kind of have to be an all-weather person.â&#x20AC;? A sense of humor is also essential, and a driving creative force behind these storybook-like creations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sticks are so tied into our psyche,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids play with sticks. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a magic wand, a piece of a house.â&#x20AC;? Dougherty, a longtime lover of nature and carpentry, started building small sculptures in his backyard around 1980, and then grew from there. He seeks out local and renewable saplings to use, and is based in his handmade log house in North Carolina, where he lives with his family. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s come to California

many times; sites of past projects include the Djerassi Resident Artists Program in Woodside, the San Jose Museum of Art, a private home in Portola Valley and the San Diego Wild Animal Park. Several photos of Doughertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work are now on display inside the Palo Alto Art Center as part of a new exhibition called â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Nature of Entanglements.â&#x20AC;? The show also features contemporary basketry and other works inspired by intertwined forms of nature, by artists GyĂśngy Laky, Ruth Asawa, Timothy Berry, Dominic Di Mare and Kay Sekimachi. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a space for visitors to make their own contributions to a weaving and wrapping art project, and a small show of bottle-house sculptures by Berkeley artist Mildred Howard. Howard is also planning an Eichler-inspired sculpture at the art center in the spring. The shows are open through March 31. The art center will close April 1 for renovations. Outside, though, Doughertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new installation is set to stay up through Jan. 30, 2012. Most of his sapling works, he says, could last about two years, but â&#x20AC;&#x153;wear and tear might end their life sooner.â&#x20AC;? He adds with a smile, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You try to

Peace Corps Celebrating 50 Years of International Service www.peacecorps.gov 800.424.8580

Palo Alto Information Session: Tuesday, Jan. 25, 6:30PM Lucie Stern Center, Fireside Room 1305 MiddleďŹ eld Rd

77 Countries. No Cost. Great BeneďŹ ts!

Deborahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm, a Non-ProďŹ t Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community Center, located in downtown Palo Alto presents a forum entitled:

           

 

take them down while they still look good.â&#x20AC;? N What: Environmental sculptor Patrick Dougherty is creating a new Palo Alto work during an artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residency. Where: Palo Alto Art Center, 1313 Newell Road. When: Dougherty is working on the site from about 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Jan. 28, possibly with the weekend of

Jan. 22-23 off. Call the art center at 650-329-2366. Cost: Free Info: Go to cityofpaloalto.org/artcenter. Dougherty will also give a free talk at the art center from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Jan. 27. Winter exhibitions are up through March 31. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m., and Thursday evenings from 7 to 9 p.m.

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AUTHORS LUNCHEON

thank you for helping us raise over $214,000 for people with disabilities        

Please join us on Saturday, January 22, 2011 10:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

 

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We will be discussing topics such as: â&#x20AC;&#x201D; How body image develops as a young woman

    

Carrie Anderson Ellen & Tom Ehrlich Sandi & John Thompson Bill & Brenda Younger Anonymous Friends

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This event is free and open to the public. We hope you can join us!

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Arts & Entertainment

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ini

393 California Avenue | 650-328-4800

What: Rennie Harris Puremovement performs a family matinee and a full performance of hip-hop dance. Where: Memorial Auditorium, Stanford University When: Saturday, Jan. 22. The family matinee (an abridged program) is at 3 p.m. The full performance is at 8 p.m. Cost: Matinee tickets are $10-$30 for adults and $5-$15 for youths. The evening show is $20-$60 for adults. Stanford students get in for $10. Info: Go to livelyarts.stanford.edu or call 650-725-ARTS. Rennie Harris will also give a free talk after the 8 p.m. show, and will take part in a free discussion hosted by the Aurora Forumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mark Gonnerman at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pigott Theater.

M eng

s Arturo Fuente s Cohiba s Macanudo s Montecristo s PadrĂłn s Partagas s Romeo Y Julieta

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ing everything. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All ingredients had their own unique taste before being added to the blend,â&#x20AC;? he says. Along the way, Harris and Puremovement have picked up many honors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rome & Jewels,â&#x20AC;? for instance, has earned three New York Dance and Performance Awards (Bessies), among others. In 2007, Harris was named Artist of the Year by Pennsylvaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Lady. In the future, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like his company to travel more. He also aspires to open his own dance school. Harris says he thinks life is harder today for young dancers. While he remembers when MTV began, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on YouTube. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much competition.â&#x20AC;? The only way to make money, he adds, is to dance on a major tour, like Madonna or Fergie, and those gigs are tough to get. Also, Harris is leery of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;hype and glamourâ&#x20AC;? that young dancers are being sold on in dance reality shows and other passing fads. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those opportunities will fade. Then whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll you do?â&#x20AC;? he asks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stay in school. Do your research. Have a plan.â&#x20AC;? N

Brian

with this ad

by Rebecca Wallace ccording to Rennie Harris, there are three laws of hip-hop culture: innovation, creation and individuality. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most people in hip-hop donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be caught with the same clothes on,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They want something new.â&#x20AC;? While the veteran choreographer and artistic director of the Rennie Harris Puremovement dance company is steeped in the hip-hop culture he grew up in, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always trying something new. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rome & Jewels,â&#x20AC;? his long-touring, much-honored hip-hop opera based on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Romeo and Juliet.â&#x20AC;? Other works factor in elements of Rennie Harris Japanese butoh dance, chants from he described as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a quasi-African various spiritual traditions, and sound with drums.â&#x20AC;? Another early company work, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pmusic not typically associated with the popping, locking and acrobatic Funk,â&#x20AC;? is from 1992 and looks back moves of hip-hop dance. Jazz, for at Harrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; upbringing in Philadelphia instance, and Stravinskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rite of in a predominantly male family â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Spring.â&#x20AC;? During a recent interview, he has five brothers and a sister. The Harris ponders, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Imagine if you piece has a jazzy feel, with some of were doing hip-hop movement to the music by the contemporary jazz group Groove Collective. It also Phillip Glass ...â&#x20AC;? A writer from Dance Magazine seeks to capture â&#x20AC;&#x153;that feeling of cawrote in 2007: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harris has crafted maraderie and support the way men and transformed this street-smart, do it,â&#x20AC;? Harris says. He pantomimes the half-hug with urban dance form into a complex, concert-stage product that offers a back slaps that men often give inmix of messages to diverse audienc- stead of a full embrace. He grins. es â&#x20AC;&#x201D; young-old, black-brown-white, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It still means a lot, even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not working-and-middle class. This is no a bear hug.â&#x20AC;? Harris says that this male camamean achievement.â&#x20AC;? And when people question Harris, raderie is part of Puremovementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is this really hip-hop?â&#x20AC;? he has one strength: men dancing together in response. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of course it is. I just re- groups or cheering each other on. There are both men and women in mind them of the three laws.â&#x20AC;? This winter, the peripatetic Phila- the company now, but in the middelphia native will spend a lot of time â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s there was a time when all the at Stanford University. Although he dancers were male. Harris recalls no longer performs with Puremove- enthusiastic responses from audiencment, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a busy campus resi- es, and credits hip-hop for creating dency planned, including teaching opportunities for men in dance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and speaking. His company is set to OK for men to dance, and grown perform in Memorial Auditorium on men,â&#x20AC;? he says. Now nearing 50, Harris was far Jan. 22: a family matinee at 3 p.m. from grown when he started on his and a full performance at 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thrilled to have Rennie on career path. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know when I accampus for the entire winter quarter. tually started to dance,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken hip-hop to another level,â&#x20AC;? can tell you the first time I got paid. Samy Alim, director of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s I was 14.â&#x20AC;? In those early days, rap groups Institute for Diversity in the Arts, said in a press release. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fill coliseums. They interested not just in dance, but in played bars and lounges, thinking and theorizing about what and sometimes would movement means culturally and po- hire dancers. Harris had a busy career litically.â&#x20AC;? The performance pieces, all cho- from early on. He reographed by Harris, provide a also performed with taste of Puremovementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appeal to a Smithsonian Instidiverse audiences. While inspired by tution project docuindividuality, Harris also strives to menting hip-hop dance include â&#x20AC;&#x153;universal themesâ&#x20AC;? that cut as folklore. After high school, Harris went on across cultural divides. The program includes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Something the road, touring with to do with Love, Volume I,â&#x20AC;? a 2006 Run-DMC, Kurtis Blow collection set to music by Nina Si- and other acts. Harris founded Puremone, Marvin Gaye and other musicians. The pieces, Harris once wrote, movement in 1992. His goals â&#x20AC;&#x153;reflect the trials and tribulations of were to preserve and spread hipour relationships with our friends, hop culture through performance, families and lovers as a way of track- teaching, mentoring and artistic residencies. ing our spiritual growth.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long sought to cross cultural Also on the program is â&#x20AC;&#x153;March of the Antmen,â&#x20AC;? a 1992 work about so- boundaries in dance and music, but cietyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issues with war and violence. he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t describe his work as fuâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Students of the Asphalt Jungle,â&#x20AC;? sion. When he adds elements of other from 1995, is â&#x20AC;&#x153;an acknowledgment styles, he tries to keep them discrete of our African heritage,â&#x20AC;? Harris says â&#x20AC;&#x201D; perhaps a few eight-counts, clear in an interview. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set to music that and distinct â&#x20AC;&#x201D; rather than combin-

Veronica Weber

.3HORELINE"LVD -TN6IEWs- &AM PM3AT3UNAM PM

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Innovation in motion

Dancer Brian Newby.

OPENINGS

Rabbit Hole ---1/2

(Century 16) Five stages of grief, and 5,000 movies about them. For every â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ordinary Peopleâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Bedroom,â&#x20AC;? there are dime-a-dozen duds like last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Greatestâ&#x20AC;? and Peter Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lovely Bones.â&#x20AC;? But â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rabbit Holeâ&#x20AC;? may be the most therapeutic of them all, in its focus on learning to put one foot in front of another again. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just medicinal: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great drama. Certified with the Pulitzer Prize, David Lindsay-Abaireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2005 play won a Tony Award for Cynthia Nixon. Now â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rabbit Holeâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as adapted by Lindsay-Abaire and directed by John Cameron Mitchell â&#x20AC;&#x201D; gets the big-screen treatment, with Nicole Kidman and Aaron Eckhart in the leads. Becca and Howie Corbett are, of course, not as functional as they first appear. In their well-appointed suburban home, the pair seem a halfstep off in their banter, and perhaps their surroundings are a shade too dark and a bit too quiet. Eight months earlier, Becca and Howieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-year-old son, Danny, chased his dog into the street, and suburban bliss turned into a seemingly unyielding emotional claustrophobia. The odds are against the Corbetts salvaging their marriage; though they have thus far endured, the halt on their sex life is a bad sign, and tensions have begun to win out over tolerance. Their different grieving processes have yet to mesh. Howie finds day-to-day comfort in his memories and a support group, while the perpetually touchy Becca rejects painful keepsakes and those who claim to know what sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feeling. Howie puts it succinctly: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somethingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotta change.â&#x20AC;? Defiantly on her own, Becca tentatively wanders avenues of potential comfort, revisiting her former workplace (could vocation be the answer?) and following â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and eventually engaging â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a teenage boy (Miles Teller) who has become the object of her fascination. In stark contrast to her husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comfort in signs of their old life, Becca has banished the family dog that played a role in her sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death and suggests selling their house full of memories. Howie counters with the implicitly scary prospect of having another child, but Beccaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not there yet, and perhaps never will be. Only one thing is certain to Becca. God is not her answer, her spiritual faith having been permanently dashed by her misfortune, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prone to lashing out at those who find comfort in religion. An intriguing alternative comes from the teenager, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Rated PG-13 for mature thematic material, some drug use and language. One hour, 32 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese

Somewhere --1/2

(Century 16) We should all have such problems as movie star Johnny Marco. Whiling away his off-set days at West Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infamously dissolute Chateau Marmont Hotel, Marco has women flinging themselves at him. His agent, manager and personal assistant ensure he never has to think about his schedule. And though heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s divorced, he has a perfectly lovely 11year-old daughter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who cares?â&#x20AC;? one might ask. Writer-director Sofia Coppola, whose â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhereâ&#x20AC;? finds its central character peeking over the fence and wondering if the grass has turned a shade greener. Coppola has successfully trod similar territory, winning an Oscar nomination for her direction of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost in Translation.â&#x20AC;? That film was about a movie star living in an upscale hotel, whose friendship with a younger woman curiously revitalized

him. In broad strokes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhereâ&#x20AC;? tells the same story, reworked for father and daughter. Coppola has never been more minimalist. Naturalistic to a fault, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhereâ&#x20AC;? aims, with its longueurs, to instill us with Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ennui. Faded movie star Stephen Dorff easily slips into Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skin. He has an easy chemistry with Elle Fanning, who plays Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter, Cleo, with an unbearable lightness of being that reflects her Ferrari-driving fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existential distress when sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not around. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhereâ&#x20AC;? touches on sex farce when a friend with benefits invites herself into Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bed while Cleoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staying with him. And Francis Ford Coppolaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter revels in the absurdities of a life in the movies. Sitting in an inches-thick mask of plaster, Johnny finds the perfect externalization of his mummified blankness, and a promotional trip to Milan proves both that he has a woman in every port and that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to get ... lost in translation. The core of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhereâ&#x20AC;? lives in the space between Johnny and Cleo as they quietly regard each other with mutual affection. Though Cleoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s admiration curdles when one of her fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girlfriends intrudes on father-daughter time, she enjoys his movie-star milieu and his somewhat surprising attentiveness and supportiveness. For Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part, Cleo gives him pride and replaces numbness with calm, an outwardly subtle but inwardly profound shift. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhereâ&#x20AC;? has one other thought on its mind: menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perception of women, and how having a daughter forever changes it. One of the scenes of Johnny gazing at identical-twin pole dancers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who make house calls toting their own poles â&#x20AC;&#x201D; comes adjacent to a scene of Johnny watching Cleo ice skate. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take a background in Freudian analysis to connect these dots: Johnny is taken by the innocence of his daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beauty as she puts on her own show, and his love for her may make him think twice about his treatment of adult women. Aside from his ex-wife (Lala Sloatman), Johnny

has burned bridges with the costar (Michelle Monaghan) of his latest, presumably awful action thriller. Coppola finds a visual soul mate in Gus Van Santâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regular cinematographer Harris Savides, whose gentle, poetic observation is absolutely essential. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhereâ&#x20AC;? feels like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made by the grandchild of Antonioni (and, in an artistic sense, perhaps it is). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll drive at least half the audience crazy, while the rest will walk out with a

light buzz. Rated R for sexual content, nudity and language. One hour, 37 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese For a review of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Green Hornet,â&#x20AC;? which critic Peter Canavese gave 1.5 stars (sting!), go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies.

more than any film in HISTORY

12

WINNER!

CRITICSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CHOICE

AWARD NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

BEST PICTURE

4

WINNER!

GOLDEN

GLOBE

ÂŽ

N O M I N AT I O N S I N C L U D I N G

BEST PICTURE

(DRA M A)

Movies

reading, as â&#x20AC;&#x153;research,â&#x20AC;? Fred Alan Wolfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parallel Universes: The Search for Other Worldsâ&#x20AC;? and writing his own science-fiction comic book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Space is infinite, and everythingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible,â&#x20AC;? he offers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Assuming you believe in science.â&#x20AC;? Perhaps faith in science might be the comfort Becca so sorely needs. The filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impeccable emotional truth and delicate touches of black humor owe in equal part to screenwriter, director and stars. Kidman turns in one of her finest performances, and Eckhart shares more than one powerful duet with her. As Beccaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who herself lost a son â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dianne Wiest is quietly devastating, especially when mother and daughter finally talk straight about their grief. Though the death of a child and potentially a marriage are unspeakably horrible, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rabbit Holeâ&#x20AC;? turns out to be improbably hopeful. After all, even Alice made her way back across the thresholds of the rabbit hole and the looking glass.

"  ""   "   "" "" "" !  foxsearchlight.com

GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINEE ÂŽ

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS AN ORIGINAL FILM PRODUCTION A FILM BY MICHEL GONDRY â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE GREEN HORNETâ&#x20AC;? EDWARD JAMES OLMOS EXECUTIVE DAVID HARBOUR AND TOM WILKINSON MUSICBY JAMES NEWTON HOWARD PRODUCERS SETH ROGEN EVAN GOLDBERG MICHAEL GRILLO ORI MARMUR GEORGE W. TRENDLE, JR. BASED UPON â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE GREEN HORNETâ&#x20AC;? WRITTEN PRODUCED DIRECTED RADIO SERIES CREATED BY GEORGE W. TRENDLE BY SETH ROGEN & EVAN GOLDBERG BY NEAL H. MORITZ BY MICHEL GONDRY

The Kings Speech 1:30, 4:20, 7:15, 10:00 The Kings Speech 3:00, 5:55, 8:45 Sat ONLY 1/8 The Kings Speech 1:30, 4:20, 7:15, 10:00 The Kings Speech 5:55, 8:45 Sun ONLY 1/9 The Kings Speech 1:30, 4:20, 7:15 The Kings Speech 3:00, 5:55, 8:45 Mon thru Thurs The Kings Speech 1:30, 4:20, 7:15 1/10-1/13 The Kings Speech 3:00, 5:55 Fri ONLY 1/7

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

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CLICK AND GIVE

Thank you for your generous support of the Holiday Fund.

Last Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grant Recipients

O

nce again, our readers came through with their donations to support local non-profits serving children and families in our community. Thanks to you, almost $250,000 in grants will be awarded this Spring. For those who still wish to give, you may make your tax-deductible donation at www.siliconvalleycf.org/giving-paw.html.

Adolescent Counseling Services ..........$10,000 All Saintsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Episcopal Church, Palo Alto ....$7,500 California Family Foundation ....................$2,500 CASSY (Counseling and Support .............$5,000 Cleo Eulau Center.......................................$2,500 Collective Roots..........................................$5,000

Thank you to our 2010 Moonlight Run Corporate Sponsors: Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Foundation, Hewlett Packard, Palo Alto Medical Foundation and Borel Private Bank & Trust

Community Legal Services in EPA ..........$5,000

422 donors through 1/13/11 totalling $155,430 with match $245,430 has been raised for the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund

Downtown Streets Team ........................$15,000 DreamCatchers .........................................$5,000 East Palo Alto Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Committee ..................................................$5,000 East Palo Alto Kids Foundation ................$7,500 East Palo Alto Youth Court ........................$5,000 Environmental Volunteers ........................$3,000 EPA.net.........................................................$2,500 Foothill-De Anza Foundation ....................$5,000 Girls To Women .........................................$2,500 Gunn High School Green Team................$1,000 InnVision ......................................................$5,000 Jewish Family and Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Services ....$5,000 JLS Middle School PTA.............................$3,500 Jordan Middle School PTA.......................$3,500 Kara ..............................................................$5,000 Mayview Community Health Center .....$10,000 Music in the Schools Foundation ............$5,000 New Creation Home Ministries ...............$5,000 Northern California Urban Development ....$7,500 Nuestra Casa ..............................................$5,000 Opportunity Health Center .......................$7,500 Palo Alto Art Center Foundation ..............$5,000 Palo Alto YMCA ..........................................$5,000 Palo Alto Library Foundation .................$50,000 Palo Alto PTA Council Arts ......................$2,000 Quest Learning Center of the EPA Library ..................................................$5,000 Reading Partners .......................................$7,500 St. Elizabeth Seton School .......................$5,000 St. Vincent de Paul Society ......................$5,000 West Meadow Track Watch Patrols.......$5,000 Youth Community Service .........................$5,000 Youth United for Community Action (YUCA) .............................................$2,500 CHILD CARE CAPITAL GRANTS Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center .......................................$3,000 Palo Alto Community Child Care ..............$3,000 PreSchool Family .......................................$3,000 The Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pre-School Center ...........$3,000

Donate online at siliconvalleycf.org/giving-paw.html 47 Anonymous .................. $24,732 Richard & Nancy Alexander .... 500 Ed & Margaret Arnold ............... ** Tom Ashton .............................. 50 Annette Ashton ......................... 50 Bob & Corrine Aulgur ............... ** Greg & Anne Avis...................... ** David & Karen Backer ............. 250 Jim & Nancy Baer ...................... ** Larry Baer & Stephanie Klein ... ** Bob & Linda Balint................. 100 Gail Barklow ............................. 10 Rick & Lisa Barr ..................... 200 Bob Barrett & Linda Atkinson. 200 Dave Fischer & Sue Bartolo .... 250 Brigid Barton .......................... 100 Richard A. Baumgarter & Elizabeth M. Salzer .............. 350 Lovinda Beal ............................. ** Vic Befera ............................... 100 Bonnie M. Berg ........................ 300 Sherie L. Berger ....................... 100 Lucy Berman ......................... 1500 Al & Liz Bernal ........................ ** Gerry & Harriet Berner ............. ** Roy & Carol Blitzer .................. ** Dan Bloomberg & Irene Beardsley .................... 100 John & Olive Borgsteadt ........... ** Steven & Linda Boxer............... ** Faith Braff ............................... 250 Lawrence M. Breed .................. 100 Eileen Brennan ........................ 100 Dick & Carolyn Brennan .......... ** Rick & Eileen Brooks ............... **

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Allan & Marilyn Brown ............ ** Gloria Brown........................... 200 Chet & Marcie Brown ............... ** Gaynor & Tim Brown ................ ** Sallie I. Brown ........................... 30 Steve Brugler............................. ** Richard Cabrera ........................ ** Bruce F. Campbell.................. 1000 Robert & Mary Cardelli ............ ** Theresa Carey ......................... 200 Barbara Carlisle ....................... ** Brian & Marjorie Cassingham . 100 George Cator ........................... 100 Miriam Cespedes ...................... 25 George & Ruth Chippendale ..... 25 Gavin & Tricia Christensen ...... ** Ted & Ginny Chu ...................... ** Keith & Linda Clarke ................ ** Andy & Liz Coe ...................... 100 Marc & Margaret Cohen ......... 100 Jean Colby................................. ** Michael & Jean Couch ............ 150 Daniel Cox .............................. 100 Constance Crawford................ 500 Robyn Crumly........................... ** Isabella E. Davis .................... 1200 Ed & Linda DeMeo................. 100 John & Ruth DeVries ................ ** Paul & Carol Diamond............ 100 M.M. Dieckmann .................... 200 Tony & Jan DiJulio ................... ** Jean Doble................................. ** Ted & Cathy Dolton .................. ** Attorney Susan Dondershine ... 200 Eugene & Mabel Dong ........... 200

Jocelyn Dong ............................ ** Diane Doolittle .......................... ** Joe & Lynn Drake ................... 100 Darrell DufďŹ e & Denise Savoie . ** Marie Earl ............................... 100 Steve Eglash & Susan Elgee .... 500 Tom & Ellen Ehrlich ................. ** Jerry & Linda Elkind .............. 250 Leonard Ely Family ................. 100 Hoda S. Epstein.......................... ** David & Charlotte Epstein ........ ** Leif & Sharon Erickson ......... 250 Stanley Evans ........................... ** Russ & Alice Evarts ................ 300 David & Diane Feldman ......... 300 S. & D. Finkelstein.................. 100 Herb & Alice Fischgrund .......... 50 Jerry & Ruth Fisher................... ** Michael & Elizabeth Fleice/Yasek ...100 Debbie Ford-Scriba ................... ** Win & Barbara Foster ............. 100 Carolyn Frake............................ 50 Jan & Freddy Gabus.................. ** John & Florine Galen ............... ** Gregory & Penny Gallo .......... 500 Robert & Betsy Gamburd ......... ** Betty W. Gerard ....................... 100 David & Carol Gilbert............. 100 Gerry Gilchrist .......................... 25 Matt Glickman & Susie Hwang 250 Dena Goldberg ........................ 100 Wick & Mary Goodspeed ......... ** Catherine Gowen....................... ** Werner Graf............................. 800 Harry & Diane Greenberg ....... 500

Richard & Lynda Greene ........ 250 Eric & Elaine Hahn ................... ** Michael & Nancy Hall .......... 1000 Jack & Myllicent Hamilton...... ** Hamilton Fund ..................... 1000 Ben & Ruth Hammett ............... ** Phil Hanawalt & Graciela Spivak .................... 300 Margaret Hanks ....................... 150 Stuart & Carol hansen ............... ** Harry & Susan Hartzell............. ** The Havern Family ................ 3000 Walt & Kay Hays ...................... ** Bob & Jan Hermsen .................. ** Maie & Tracy Herrick ............... 50 Victor & Norma Hesterman ...... ** Richard & Imogene Hilbers .... 250 Jane Holland.............................. ** Roland Hsu & Julie Noblitt........ ** Mahlon & Carol Hubenthal ...... ** Joe & Nancy Huber ................. 100 Marc Igler & Jennifer Cray ........ 75 Susana Im .................................. 75 Robert & Joan Jack ................... ** Kingsley Jack .......................... 100 Ted & Frances Jenkins .............. 50 Jon & Julie Jerome .................... ** Zelda Jury.................................. ** JoAnn Kahn .............................. ** Ed & Masako Kanazawa ........... ** Michael & Marcia Katz .......... 200 Charles Katz& Gina Signorello 600 Eric Keller & Janice Bohman .. 250 Sue Kemp ................................ 250 Peter & Lynn Kidder ............... 250

Kieschnick Family ................. 1000 Ellen M. King........................... 500 Bob & Edie Kirkwood .......... 1000 Larry Klein .............................. 500 Larry Koran ............................... ** Hal & Iris Korol ........................ ** Tony & Judy Kramer................. ** Mark Krasnow & Patti Yanklowitz ................... 200 Jan Krawitz ............................... ** Mark & Virginia Kreutzer ......... ** Karen Krogh.............................. ** Frank & Deborah Kurland ...... 300 Sue Kurtz ................................ 100 Donald & Adele Langendorf .. 200 Samuel S. & Jean Monma Law ....100 Elgin Lee ................................. 250 Patricia Levin .......................... 100 Roy Levin & Jan Thomas ........ 250 Stephen & Nancy Levy ............ ** Dick & Sue Levy........................ ** Robert & Constance Loarie ....... ** Chris & Kris Loew .................. 100 Mandy Lowell ............................ ** Gwen Luce & Family................. ** Hal & Lori Luft ......................... ** Mark Lurie ................................ 50 Jonathan MacQuitty .............. 1000 Dick & Ellie MansďŹ eld ............ ** Mimi Marden ............................ ** John & Maureen Martin ............ ** Kevin Mayer & Barbara Zimmer .. ** Richard L. Mazze MD & Sheil E. Cohen MD .............. 200 Drew McCalley & Marilyn Green ...................... 100 W. J. McCroskey ...................... 500 Hugh O. McDevitt.................... 200 Patrick & Nancy McGaraghan ....250 Jack & Martha McLaughlin .... 100 Joe & Lynnie Melena ................ 50 John & Eve Melton ................. 500 Sara Michie ............................... ** Elizabeth Miller ........................ ** David & Lynn Mitchell ........... 300 Stephen Monismith & Lani Freeman ......................... ** Diane Moore ........................... 300 Morgan Family Fund ............. 5000 Les Morris ............................... 200 Richard A. Morris ...................... ** Nancy Moss .............................. ** Thomas & Isabel Mulcahy ...... 200 Merrill & Lee Newman ........... 200 Frederic & Kristin Nichols........ ** Craig & Sally Nordlund .......... 500 Joan B. Norton ......................... 100 Boyce & Peggy Nute................. ** Kim Orumchian ...................... 250 John & Barbara Pavkovich...... 200 Scott & Sandra Pearson .......... 500 Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Journey Fund ............. 200 Conney Pfeiffer ......................... 25 Jim & Alma Phillips................ 250 R. Phillips.................................. ** Helene Pier ................................ ** Lee Pierce................................ 200 Denise Pitsch........................... 500 Deborah Plumley ...................... ** David & Virginia Pollard ........ 200 Joe & Marlene Prendergast ....... **

Harry Press & Mildred Hamilton ................ 100 Don & Dee Price ....................... ** Nan Prince............................... 100 Bill Reller ............................. 1000 Don & Kay Remsem ................. ** Nancy Rhea ............................... ** Jerry H. Rice ............................ 100 John & Ally Richter .................. ** Thomas RindďŹ&#x201A;eisch .................. ** Teresa Roberts ......................... 250 Mitchell & Sandra Rosen .......... 50 Dick & Ruth Rosenbaum .......... ** Peter & Beth Rosenthal............. ** Steve & Karen Ross .................. ** Norman & Nancy Rossen ....... 100 Don & Ann Rothblatt ................ ** Roderick Rowell ..................... 100 Dan & Lynne Russell .............. 100 Al & JoAnne Russell .............. 200 Ferrell & Page Sanders ........... 100 George & Dorothy Saxe .......... ** John & Mary Schaefer ........... 100 Stan Schier & Barbara Klein.... 300 Ken Schroeder & Fran Codispoti...................... 500 Scott & Kathy Schroeder ........ 150 Irene Schwartz .......................... 50 A.Carlisle Scott ......................... ** Elisabeth Seaman ...................... ** Ed & Linda Selden .................... ** Rosalie Shepherd ...................... ** Martha Shirk ........................... 500 Richard & Bonnie Sibley .......... ** Jerry & Donna Silverberg ....... 100 Bob & Diane Simoni............... 200 Alice Schaffer Smith ............... 100 Andrea B. Smith....................... 100 Hershel & Helen Smith ........... 100 Roger Smith & Judy Kay ......... 200 Charles A. Smith & Ann D. Burrell ....................... ** Ann J. Sonneberg ....................... ** Art & Peggy Stauffer .............. 500 Charles & Barbara Stevens ....... ** Craig & Susie Thom ............... 100 John & Susan Thomas .............. ** Carl & Susan Thomas ............. 500 Jean Thompson ......................... ** Tony & Carolyn Tucher ............ ** Mike & Ellen Turbow ............. 200 Scout Voll .................................. ** Alan & Cathy Wachtel .............. ** Jerry & Bobbie Wagger............. ** Roger & Joan Warnke ............... ** Anna Wu Weakland ................ 100 David R. Wells ........................... ** Stephen Westfold .................... 200 Ralph R. Wheeler .................... 350 John & Lynn Wiese ................. 100 Douglas & Susan Woodman ..... ** Gil & Gail Woolley ................. 500 Lawrence Yang & Jennifer Kuan ..................... 1000 George & Betsy Young ............. ** In Honor Of Julia, Elissa & Will Chandler .....500 Mary Dawey ...............................250 Dedicated teachers in East Palo Alto .........................200 Joe Ehrlich ....................................** The teachers of El Carmelo ..........**

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Bertha Kalson ...............................** Dick & Ellie MansďŹ eld ................** The Maser Kids ............................** Nicholas ......................................500 PALA ............................................** Sandra Pearson .............................** Paul Resnick ...............................100 Kathy Schroeder, PiE Director ...100 Sandy Sloan ................................100 Marilyn Sutorius .........................100 Sallie Tasto..................................100 Darla Tupper .................................** Richard Van Dusen & Kaye H. Kelley .......................250 In Memory Of Clara & Seb Abel ....................... ** Adele .......................................... ** Carl W. Anderson ....................... ** Carol Berkowitz ......................... ** Jane â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jillâ&#x20AC;? Bloodgood Bigwood ... ** John Davies Black.................... 300 Willie Branch ............................. ** Leo Breidenbach ........................ ** A.L. & L.K. Brown .................... ** Edward & Elizabeth Buurma ..... ** Gerard Charboneau .................... ** Marge Collins........................... 500 Jack Davoren .............................. ** Patty Demetrios ...................... 1500 Bob Dolan ................................ 500 Bob Donald ................................ ** Fred Eyerly................................. ** Steve Fasani ............................. 100 Linda Ferzoko .......................... 100 Mary Floyd................................. ** Fred & Annabelle....................... ** Pam Grady ............................... 150 Marie Hardin ............................ 100

Florence Kan Ho ........................ ** Al Jacobs .................................. 100 Chet Johnson .............................. ** Al & Mae Kenrick.................... 500 August King ............................... ** Katharine Rogers King .............. ** Helene F. Klein .......................... ** Helene F. Klein .......................... 25 Richard Krasnow........................ ** Mr. Y.F. Lai ................................ ** Bill Land .................................... ** Mr. N.C. Lee .............................. ** Charles Bennett Leib................ 100 Dr. James Lester ......................... ** Harry Lewenstein ................... 1000 Robert C. Lobdell....................... ** Emmett Lorey ............................ ** Anna Luskin ............................... ** Igor Malik ................................ 100 Bob Markevitch.......................... ** Betty Meltzer ............................. ** Ernest J. Moore .......................... ** Fumi Murai ................................ 90 Jacques Naar & Wanda Root ..... ** Aaron Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill ............................ ** Joan Paulin ................................. ** Our dad Al Pellizzari ................. ** Thomas W. & Louise L. Phinney .. ** Sue Pulisci, Becky Schaefer & Sheila Hunter ......................... ** Sonya Raymakers....................... ** Nancy Ritchey ............................ ** Betty Rogaway ........................... 25 Nate Rosenberg ........................ 100 Ryan ........................................... ** Sally ........................................... ** Becky Schaefer .......................... ** Virginia Schulz........................... **

Mary Fran, Joe Scroggs, Kelly Flanagan, Katharine King, Jill Bigwood, Debbie Kirk Rihn & Stephen Scroggs..................... ** Maria Serpa ................................ 25 William Settle .......................... 500 Diane Simone ............................. ** Derek Smith ............................... ** Don & Marie Snow .................... ** George & Arline Sobel .............. ** Robert Spinrad ........................... ** John Plummer Steward ............ 100 Jack Sutorius ............................ 100 Tinney Family .......................... 500 Hattie E. Tokar ........................... ** Smokey Wallace ......................... ** John F. Warren ........................... ** Yen-Chen Yen .......................... 250 Dr. David Zlotnick ..................... ** Irma Zuanich ............................ 100 A Gift For Bailey & Riley Cassidy .............. 50 Jim & Ro Dinkey ...................... 75 Andrew & Cait Louchard........ 100 The Lund Family..................... 100 Paul & Barbara Madsen ............ 25 Joan Mullen............................. 100 Marjorie Smith .......................... 50 Dick & Sally Werling.............. 100 Business & Organizations Carl King-Absolute Mortgage ... ** Harrell Remodeling, Inc............. ** Juana Briones 2nd Graders ........ 75 No Limit Drag Racing ............... ** Palo Alto Weekly Moonlight Run ..................... 40000 Thoits Bros Inc......................... 500

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Movies MOVIE TIMES Black Swan (R) (((

Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:20, 5, 7:40 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 12:05, 2:45, 5:25, 8 & 10:35 p.m.

Blue Valentine (R) (((( Aquarius Theatre: 2, 3, 4:30, 5:30, 7, 8 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 2, 4:45, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m. Casino Jack (R) Century 16: 2:25 & 8:10 p.m. (Not Reviewed) The Chronicles of Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 4:45 & 9:35 p.m. Century 20: Narnia: The Voyage of 11:25 a.m.; 4:30 & 9:40 p.m. the Dawn Treader (PG) (Not Reviewed) Country Strong (PG-13) Century 16: 12:30, 4:10, 7:05 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: (Not Reviewed) 11:40 a.m.; 2:20, 5:10, 7:55 & 10:40 p.m. The Dilemma (PG-13) Century 16: 11:35 a.m.; 2:15, 4:55, 7:50 & 10:35 p.m. (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:10, 1:50, 2:50, 4:25, 5:25, 7:05, 8:05, 9:45 & 10:45 p.m. The Fighter (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 12:20, 3:30, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:30, 5:35 & 8:25 p.m. Gantz (Not Rated) Century 16: 8:30 p.m. Century 20: 8:30 p.m. (Not Reviewed) The Green Hornet Century 16: Noon, 3, 6:30 & 9:40 p.m. In 3D at 1, 4:15, (PG-13) (1/2 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 12:20, 3:10, 6 & 8:50 p.m. In 3D at 11:30 a.m.; 2:15, 5:05, 7:55 & 10:45 p.m. Gulliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Travels (PG) Century 20: 2 & 7:25 p.m. (Not Reviewed) Harry Potter and the Century 16: Fri.-Wed. at 9:25 p.m. Century 20: 6:45 & Deathly Hallows: Part 1 10:05 p.m. ((( (PG-13) 1/2 The Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speech Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 2:10, 4:55, 7:45 & 10:25 p.m. (R) (((1/2 Palo Alto Square: 1:30, 3, 4:20, 5:55 & 7:15 p.m. Fri.-Sat. also at 8:45 & 10 p.m. Little Fockers (PG-13) Century 16: 11:45 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m. Cen (Not Reviewed) tury 20: 11:35 a.m.; 2:10, 4:35, 7:10 & 9:35 p.m. Made in Dagenham Guild Theatre: 1 & 3:30 p.m. (R) ((1/2 Rabbit Hole (PG-13) Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2, 4:25, 7:10 & 9:30 p.m. (((1/2 The Rocky Horror Guild Theatre: Sat. at midnight. Picture Show (R) (Not Reviewed) Season of the Witch Century 16: 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:45 & 10:15 p.m. Century (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) 20: Noon, 1:25, 4, 5, 6:40 & 9:15 p.m. Fri.-Wed. also at 10:10 p.m. The Social Network Guild Theatre: 6 & 8:30 p.m. (PG-13) (((1/2 Somewhere (R) Century 16: 11:55 a.m.; 2:45, 5:10, 8 & 10:25 p.m. (Not Reviewed) Tangled (PG) ((( Century 16: 12:40, 3:40, 6:50 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 1:45 & 4:15 p.m. In 3D at 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:10 & 10:30 p.m. The Tourist (PG-13) (1/2 Century 20: 2:35 p.m. Fri.-Wed. also at 7:40 p.m.

Meadow Wing & Focused Care

Tron: Legacy (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 5:20 p.m. In 3D at 1:30, 4:30, 7:35, 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 6:55 & 9:55 p.m. In 3D at 11:45 a.m.; 2:40, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. True Grit (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 12:50, 2:30, 3:50, 5:05, 7:55 & 10:35 p.m. Fri.-Wed. also at 6:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:25, 1:55, 3:05, 4:40, 5:55, 7:20, 8:40 & 10 p.m. Yogi Bear (PG) Century 16: 2:35 & 7:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; (Not Reviewed) 1:20 & 3:25 p.m.

a tradition of caring

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com.

PALO ALTO COMMONS offers a comprehensive program for individuals with Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease and dementia in our Meadow Wing. Here, residents enjoy daily walks on beautiful garden paths and a full program of activities to engage mind, body

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Monday, January 17 is Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day!

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Shop Talk

On this 25th anniversary of the King Holiday what are you doing to honor his legacy ?                                    !  "!    "  #   "     "     " $     

"       ! "  

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by Daryl Savage PHILZ COFFEE TO OPEN SECOND PALO ALTO SHOP ... The little Midtown coffee shop that opened less than two years ago is set to expand. Philz Coffee at 3191 Middlefield Road is poised to open its second location in Palo Alto, at 101 Forest Ave. downtown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even lookingâ&#x20AC;? for another site, Philz owner Phil Jaber said. But when Palantir Technologies, which will move into the just-completed two-story, glass-enclosed structure at 101 Forest, invited Jaber to open another location in its new building, he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t refuse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It looks like we may be able to open in April, maybe May,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have 2,000 square feet of space, which means weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have seating for 40 to 60 people,â&#x20AC;? Jaber said. The Midtown location seats barely l2 indoors and a couple dozen outdoors. Jaber refers to the new Philz decor as funky, clean and classy. The Philz menu and prices will be identical to the Midtown shop. The second Philz will bring the total number of Jaberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Area coffee shops to eight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more to come,â&#x20AC;? he said. PAMPAS REPORTS ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S STAYING OPEN ...â&#x20AC;?Pampas is not closing and we look forward to providing the great food, service and ambience to the Palo Alto community for many years to come.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pampas owner Tim Reyndersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; e-mail response to recent news reports that Pampas Restaurant at 529 Alma St. in Palo Alto is closing after it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy last week. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;closingâ&#x20AC;? reports are wrong, Reynders said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true that we did file Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization, but that was to protect us from some litigation. It has absolutely no bearing on the daily operations of the restaurant,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re open and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business as usual.â&#x20AC;? ZITUNE CLOSES ... The 4-yearold Zitune, the Moroccan/Mediterranean restaurant at 325 Main St. in Los Altos, closed its doors last week. Despite consistently good reviews, including a recent recommendation from the Michelin Guide, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Timing was not on our side â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the economy slowed and the Los Altos downtown revitalization we had hoped for never materialized,â&#x20AC;? owner Kim Auerbachand and chef Chafik Larobi

wrote in an e-mail to customers, in which they also thanked patrons for their support. AND ZAOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOODLES, TOO ... Also recently closed is Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Zaoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Noodle Bar, the eclectic little restaurant at 261 University Ave. The tables, chairs, fixtures, glassware and silverware have remained untouched and in place as if it is business as usual since Zaoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mid-November closing. A bit spooky. TWO NEW SIDE-BY-SIDE RESTAURANTS TO OPEN ... Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a busy time for new businesses at University Avenue and Ramona Street. The historic red-brick building that formerly housed Mills the Florist is about to become a restaurant, with a particularly appropriate name. The Red Brick Cafe is planning to open at 235 University Ave. Directly next door will be a hamburger place called The Workshop, which is taking over the former location of Bella Luna Ristorante. (The Italian restaurant suddenly went dark last year after 11 years.) And wrapping around the corner is Hookah Nites Lounge, formerly called Da Hookah Shop, recently under new ownership.

Heard a rumor about your favorite store or business moving out, or in, down the block or across town? Daryl Savage will check it out. She can be e-mailed at shoptalk@paweekly.com.

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Please be advised the Planning and Transportation Commission (P&TC) shall conduct a meeting at 6:00 PM, Wednesday, January 26, 2011 in the Civic Center, Council Chambers, 1st Floor, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Any interested persons may appear and be heard on these items. Staff reports for agendized items are available via the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main website at www.cityofpaloalto.org. and also at the Planning Division Front Desk, 5th Floor, City Hall, after 2:00 PM on the Friday preceding the meeting date. Copies will be made available at the Development Center should City Hall be closed on the 9/80 Friday. NEW BUSINESS. Public Hearing: 1.

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4041 El Camino Way*: Request by Stephen Reller to amend the existing Palo Alto Commons Planned Community zone by expanding it to add a 44-unit, three-story, senior assisted housing facility on a 0.83 Âą acre site. Environmental Assessment: An Initial Study has been completed and a Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared in accordance with California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requirements.

SAVE

2.

ClariďŹ cation of Commission Priorities Discussed at January 8, 2011 Retreat.

3.

Change of Procedures and By-Laws Related to Start Time, Posting and Response to Commissioner Questions, and Rotation at preCommission Meetings and Related Issues.

Questions. Any questions regarding the above applications, please contact the Planning Department at (650) 329-2440. The ďŹ les relating to these items are available for inspection weekdays between the hours of 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. This public meeting is televised live on Government Access Channel 26.

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1ST PLACE

STANFORD FOOTBALL

BEST SPORTS COVERAGE

Being head coach is now his business

California Newspaper Publishers Association

Sports Shorts

SOCCER HONOR . . . Stanford forward Christen Press won college soccerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most prestigious award, the Hermann Trophy, last week. At a ceremony at the Missouri Athletic Club, Press became the second consecutive Stanford player to win the award, following Kelley Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara. Stanford became the first school since North Carolina from 1991-94 to have different individuals win in consecutive years.

ON THE AIR Friday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Stanford at Washington, 7 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Saturday Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Washington St. at Stanford, 5 p.m.;XTRA (860 AM); KZSU (90.1 FM)

Sunday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Stanford at Washington St., 1 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Thursday Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: UCLA at Stanford, 7 p.m.;KZSU (90.1 FM) Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball: Stanford at USC, 7:30 p.m.; XTRA (860 AM); KZSU (90.1 FM)

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

by Rick Eymer avid Shaw was set to join the business world after his graduation from Stanford in 1995. Coaching was the last thing on his mind. The business world is still waiting for him to make an appearance. Shaw, who served as offensive coordinator this season, was introduced Thursday as Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 34th head football coach and the first Cardinal grad to lead the team since Paul Wiggin left following the 1983 season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My father (former NFL and college coach Willie Shaw) was a big influence on me and even while I was still playing Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d help the other receivers. They started referring to me as coach Shaw,â&#x20AC;? Shaw said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always said I would never coach. I was going to get my Stanford degree and go to work. I had started a trajectory in the financial world and some opportunities.â&#x20AC;? Before he could take advantage of his business opportunities, then-Western Washington coach Rob Smith offered Shaw a job on his staff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought maybe I could stay in football just a little bit longer,â&#x20AC;? Shaw said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I could find a real job later. I still had this itch.â&#x20AC;? Sixteen years later, he earned his first head coaching position at exactly the place he wanted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mindset I want is for this to be my last job interview,â&#x20AC;? Shaw said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to be part of the 25-year club like Tara VanDerveer or Dick Gould. My focus

D

Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck (12) will have David Shaw at his side again next season after Shaw, the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offensive coordinator, was named the Cardinalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head coach on Thursday.

(continued on page 28)

PREP BASKETBALL

PREP SOCCER

SHP boys win first showdown with Pinewood

Defense doing it as SHP boys stay unbeaten

by Keith Peters t was supposed to be a battle of two high-scoring offenses and two pressing defenses. It was supposed to be close, befitting arguably the two best boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball teams in the West Bay Athletic League. The anticipated showdown between Sacred Heart Prep and Pinewood, however, was pretty much decided in the opening half when the Gators put up 51 points on their way to an 87-71 victory in Atherton on Tuesday night. SHP (3-0, 11-2) moved into a tied for first place with Harker (3-0, 11-2) while Pinewood (3-1, 11-3) fell to second. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That obviously is a surprise,â&#x20AC;? said SHP coach Tony Martinelli, in his seventh season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never scored that many points in a half since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here.â&#x20AC;? One big reason for the first-half outburst was the hot shooting of junior forward Cole McConnell, who hit four 3-pointers in the first quarter, was nine for nine on his way to a 24-point first half and wound up with seven treys and a career-high 27 points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cole shooting like that makes a lot of things weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing look really good,â&#x20AC;? Martinelli said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss many. It was nice we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to tell the guys

by Keith Peters tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s said that the best offense is a good defense. Armando del Rio wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t argue with that. His Sacred Heart Prep boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; soccer team has allowed only four goals in eight matches this season. Not too surprising, the Gators are 8-0. Their latest defensive gem came Wednesday in a 2-0 victory over host Priory in a key West Bay Athletic League showdown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did what we needed to do,â&#x20AC;? del Rio told his team after the important win, which moved the Gators to 3-0 in the WBAL heading into Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s match at rival Menlo School at 2:45 p.m. While the focus on this seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team may be on an offense that has scored 36 goals in eight matches, the Gatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense has been superb. Priory was expected to provide SHP with its toughest match to date, based on its 3-1 victory over Menlo last week. The Panthers had two standout offensive players in seniors Guillermo Talancon and Evan Filipczyk plus talented sophomore keeper Evan Finney. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We knew it was going to be a difficult game,â&#x20AC;? said del Rio, making his return to the school where he coached the Priory girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; team last season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We expected this

I

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I

Keith Peters

READ MORE ONLINE

Former Cardinal David Shaw takes over as Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 34th head football coach

Bob Drebin/stanfordphoto.com

WARSAW DRAFTED . . . Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bobby Warshaw was selected with the 17th pick of the first round by FC Dallas at the MLS SuperDraft on Thursday. Warshaw becomes the first Stanford player selected in the MLS Draft since James Twellman was selected by the San Jose Earthquakes in the fourth round of the 2005 draft. Warshaw was a three-time All-Pac-10 player while at Stanford and was an NSCAA first team All-American in 2009. He was twice named to the MAC Herman Trophy Watch List, including being selected as a semifinalist in 2009. In 2009, Warshaw led Stanford to the Round of 16 in the NCAA tournament with wins over Saint Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and UC Irvine in the first two rounds. He has scored 18 goals in his career at Stanford, despite being moved to defense for his final two seasons. Warshaw will join the FC Dallas squad that advanced to the MLS Cup in 2010, losing to Colorado. FC Dallas went 12-4-14 during the regular season and enjoyed a surprising run to the final. Warshaw will join four former Stanford players currently playing in MLS. These players include Todd Dunivant of the Los Angeles Galaxy, Chad Marshall of the Columbus Crew and Taylor Graham and Roger Levesque of the Sounders FC. Marshall was the last Stanford player to be selected in the first round, being taken in the 2004 first round by Columbus.

SHPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joseph Bolous (right) found a way to slow down Prioryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s John Jernick on Wednesday.

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Prep soccer

game to be the toughest of the year . . . We did a solid job after the first 20 minutes.â&#x20AC;? While neither team scored during that time, Prioryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dangerous transition offense forced SHP out of its game plan, which actually helped in the long run. By playing the Panthersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; game early on, the spacing created by that transition game allowed SHP to eventually take advantage. Sacred Heart finally cashed in early in the second half when freshman Isaac Polkinhorne took a cross from sophomore Joseph Bolous in the 44th minute and one- Isaac Polkinhorne touched it off Finneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hand and into the net for a 1-0 lead. It was Polkinhorneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10th goal of the season. In the 68th minute, Robert Ojeda began the second scoring play by dribbling around the Priory defense before passing to Bolous, who finished for a 2-0 lead. Talancon and Filipczyk both had good shots on goal in the second half, but SHP keeper Max Polkinhorne was able to deny both. He had eight saves alone in the first half. SHP defenders Andrew Liotta (junior), Christian Thaure (senior) and Nick Salzman (sophomore) helped finish off the shutout after sophomore Tommy Meaney was forced to leave after taking an elbow to the back of his head. Liotta blanked Talancon while Kyle Scherba and Jack Odell shadowed Filipczyk, with help from Ojeda in the second half. In another WBAL match, freshman Matt Myers scored two goals and assisted on another to pace the host Menlo School to a 4-0 victory over Crystal Springs on Wednesday. The Knights (2-1, 2-3-1) got the game-winner when Myers scored an unassisted goal in the fifth minute. Myers made it 2-0 off an assist from senior captain Sam Parker in the 38th minute. Ryan Karle finished off a ball from Myers in the 52nd minute while the fourth goal

Jim Shorin

Skyler Felt scored Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning goal on Wednesday.

IF ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOT IN THIS VAULT, ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOT SAFE.

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

(continued from previous page)

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Melissa Holland

Kalen Gans

Sacred Heart Prep

Palo Alto High

The sophomore forward scored 56 points and grabbed 32 rebounds with 11 assists -- including 13 points in a one-point win -- as the Gators went 3-1 during the week to close out their preseason hoop schedule with an 8-1 mark.

The junior wrestler went 5-0 during the week, registering a pin at 189 pounds in a dual-match victory before going 4-0 with two pins while capturing the 160pound title at the Apple Cider Classic, his third title this season.

SAFE FROM STATE & FEDERAL GOVERNMENT INTRUSION IT IS IMPOSSIBLE FOR HACKERS TO PENETRATE OUR COMPUTER SYSTEM. REASON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; WE HAVE NO COMPUTERS. WE DO BUSINESS THE OLD FASHIONED WAY.

121 First Stre et , Los Altos, CA 9 4 022 Tel : 6 5 0 - 9 49 - 58 91 w w w.losaltosvault .com

Honorable mention Hailie Eackles Pinewood basketball

Sydney Davis Palo Alto basketball

Drew Edelman Menlo basketball

Claire Klausner* Gunn basketball

Cat Perez Gunn basketball

Maddy Price Menlo basketball

Joseph Bolous Sacred Heart Prep soccer

Andre Delagnes Menlo-Atherton wrestling

Reed McConnell Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Max Schmarzo Palo Alto basketball

Marquis Tolson Menlo-Atherton basketball

Solomone Wolfgramm Pinewood basketball * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

was scored by keeper-turned-striker Tommy Costa, who finished off a nice cross from Parker. Central defenders Alec Drobac (junior) and Jack Redman (sophomore) joined with junior outside back Zach Chase for strong defensive efforts. Sophomore Nick Batchelder and senior Ethan Leibovich did a good job controlling the midfield. In the SCVAL De Anza Division, sophomore Skyler Felt broke a scoring drought with a goal off an assist from Zac Hummel with 13 minutes gone in the second half to propel Palo Alto to a 2-0 victory over host Santa Clara. Felt also assisted on Rick Minnoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal 10 minutes later to give the Vikings (2-0, 6-2-1) some breathing room. Paly had additional scoring threats in the first half Rick Minno against the Bruins, who decided to play more defensively with a counter-attacking offense. Palo Alto will host rival Gunn (0-1-1, 0-5-3) in the first of two meetings on Friday at 3:30 p.m.

Gunn battled Saratoga (1-1-1, 5-1-4) to a scoreless draw on Wednesday. Girls soccer Gunn got its first SCVAL De Anza Division victory following a 4-3 triumph over host Homestead on Wednesday. Sarah Robinson and Caroline Anderson (assist Robinson) gave the Titans (1-1-1, 6-2-2) a 2-1 lead. Homestead, however, battled back in the second half and took a 3-2 lead before Gunn regained the lead on goals by Bonnie Cardillo and Laura Hayward (assist Anna von Clemm) to secure the triumph. Host Palo Alto (1-1, 4-5) ran up against nemesis Monta Vista (1-1-1, 3-4-3) and dropped a 2-0 SCVAL De Anza Division match after holding the Matadors scoreless in the first half. In WBAL Skyline Division action, Danielle Man scored the gamewinning goal in the first half to pace Pinewood to a 3-0 victory over host Harker. Adrienne Whitlock also scored an unassisted goal before halftime, with Etelle Stephan making it 3-0 in the second half off an assist from Man as the Panthers improved to 1-2 in league (6-6 overall). In the PAL Bay Division, MenloAtherton (0-2-1, 5-2-2) played to a scoreless draw with host Aragon on Tuesday. N *>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;䣣Ă&#x160;U Page 27

Sports

Shaw

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is on how great we make this place. I love this place and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m eager to pick up where we left off. Two good years is not enough. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re aiming for consistency.â&#x20AC;? Shaw succeeds Jim Harbaugh, who left to become head coach of the San Francisco 49ers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the most logical step we can take,â&#x20AC;? said Bob Bowlsby, Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Athletic Director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;David has the experience, intellect, coaching skills and organizational abilities to be a tremendous head coach. He understands and embraces the combination of world class academics and world class athletics that is required at Stanford.â&#x20AC;? After Harbaugh took the 49ersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; job last week, Stanford contacted Boise State coach Chris Petersen and interviewed Yale coach Tom Williams, another former Stanford player. Stanford assistant head coach Greg Roman and defensive coordinator Vic Fangio were also candidates for the job.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a proven recruiter and has great NFL and college experience,â&#x20AC;? Bowlsby said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He has tremendous communication skills.â&#x20AC;? As the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offensive coordinator the past four seasons, Shaw played an instrumental role in the resurgence of the Stanford program that has established school scoring records each of the past two seasons. Stanford was the ninth-highest scoring team in the nation this season, averaging 40.31 points a game, scoring a school-record 524 points during its 12-1 season that culminated with a victory over Virginia Tech in the 2011 Orange Bowl. During Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tenure as offensive coordinator, the Cardinal scored 40 or more points in 11 games since the 2007 season, including 10 times over the past two campaigns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a guy I love to play for,â&#x20AC;? Stanford safety Michael Thomas said, one of several players who attended the announcement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No matter whom they chose from the staff it would be a good choice. Coach Shaw is a Stanford guy and knows what it takes. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cool and collected. Stanford is in good hands.â&#x20AC;?

Bowlsby said he had meetings with players to get their input into the process. He also said he spoke to four members of the current coaching staff and had three â&#x20AC;&#x153;long conversationsâ&#x20AC;? with outside coaches. Even though it was Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passing game that drew most of the attention this past season, the Cardinal running game flourished under Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tutelage. Despite the loss of consensus All-American and Heisman Trophy runner-up Toby Gerhart, Stanford averaged 213.77 yards on the ground, which ranked second in the Pac-10 and 17th nationally. The Cardinal amassed 2,779 yards on the ground this season, which was the second-highest rushing total in school history. A four-year letterwinner at Stanford from 1991-94 as a receiver, Shaw was a member of Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1991 Aloha Bowl team coached by Dennis Green that finished the season with an 8-4 mark and was the third-highest scoring team in school history. He was also on the Cardinalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1992 Blockbuster Bowl winning squad coached by Bill Walsh that had a 10-3 overall mark. N

Prep hoops

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that he was hot.â&#x20AC;? McConnell made his first three shots, all three-pointers, while his teammates took advantage of 10turnovers by Pinewood in the first quarter. The Panthers ended up with 16 miscues in the first half as SHP grabbed a 51-21 lead. The Gators made five treys in the first quarter and had nine in the first half, finishing with 13. Colin TerndrupĂ­s basket to open the fourth quarter gave the Gators their biggest lead (33 points) at 76-43. Pinewood made a wild charge in the final period with 28 points, but the outcome was decided in the opening half. Kyle Riches led Pinewood with 20 points while Solomone Wolfgramm added 18 plus 10 rebounds and teammate Kevin Sweat scored all 12 of his points in the final quarter while SHP rested its starters. Harker maintained its lead with Sacred Heart Prep following a 5943 victory over visiting Priory on Tuesday night. Gabor Somogyi had

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Stanford Dermatology Center offers a full range of medical and surgical dermatology services in a patient friendly environment. Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re suffering from a common condition or a difďŹ cult-to-manage disease, Stanford Dermatologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team has broad experience in treating all skin conditionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from the common to the complex.

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Make an appointment, call 650.723.6316 or visit: stanfordhospital.org/dermatology

450 Broadway Street, Redwood City, CA 94063 Page 28Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ{]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;䣣Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;

20 points and 10 rebounds, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough to prevent the Panthers (1-2, 7-4) from falling. Priory teammate Brandon Willhite added 15 points. In another WBAL game, Menlo School pulled away in the second quarter and registered a 43-21 victory over host Eastside Prep. The Knights (2-1, 6-6) were led by Jonny Halprin with 10 points while Richard Harris added nine points and six rebounds. Will Miller chipped in seven rebounds and Kyle Bowman added four blocked shots In the SCVAL De Anza Division, Palo Alto and Gunn are headed on a collision course after both remained tied for the lead with solid wins on Tuesday. Palo Alto came up with a solid defensive effort and balanced scoring to remain unbeaten in the division with a 65-45 romp over visiting Los Altos. Israel Hakim led Paly (3-0, 9-5) with 10 points, but the Vikings had nine others score. A 23-7 outburst in the second quarter was the difference in the game. At Gunn, senior Anthony Cannon poured in 22 points, knocking down six 3-pointers, as the Titans remained tied for first place with a 64-59 victory over visiting Homestead. Fellow senior Matt Redfield added 16 points for the Titans (3-0, 11-4). In the PAL Bay Division, up-anddown Menlo-Atherton was down for its division opener, dropping a 50-46 decision to host El Camino on Wednesday. The Bears (0-1, 7-8) fell into an 18-9 hole after one quarter and never could overtake the Colts. Girls basketball Sophomore Claire Klausner scored 22 points while junior Cat Perez added 17 points and grabbed 14 rebounds while making 86 percent of her field goals to spark Gunn to a 67-40 romp over host Mountain View in a SCVAL De Anza Division game on Wednesday night. The Titans (3-0, 11-2) made 46 percent of their two-goal baskets and 60 percent from the three-point (6 for 10) and out-rebounded the Spartans, 45-18. Klausner, a point guard, grabbed eight boards while Julia Maggioncalda pulled down nine to go with nine points. Freshman Zoe Zwerling had 14 points and six rebounds. Elsewhere in the De Anza Division: Getting a defensive effort that clamped down on visiting Monta Vista and allowed only 10 firsthalf points, Palo Alto cruised to a 68-42 victory. Sophomore center Josie Butler blocked three shots and altered numerous other attempts in the first half as the Vikings raced to a 36-10 lead. Lindsay Black and Katerina Peterson took turns defending Monta Vistaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading scorer, Alexandra Chiu, holding her to just two points by intermission. Chiu finished with 12, most coming after the game had been decided. Sophomore Stephanie Allen took advantage of numerous fastbreaks created off Monta Vista turnovers, leading Paly with 17 points. Senior Sydney Davis added 13 while freshman post Danielle Palmer scored all of her eight points in the second half. N


Palo Alto Weekly 01.14.2011 - Section 1