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ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

A Collection of Art + Architecture


Education

Honors

Professional Experience

College, Transferred Fall ’09 to Present North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC Major: Architecture Minor: Landscape Architecture Current Class Standing: Senior GPA: 3.3

Projects on pgs. 8 + 18 used in the ‘12 NCSU, School of Architecture Re-Accreditation pin-up • Accepted to travel in Barcelona, Spain with Clemson University, Fall ‘13 • NCAIA Scholarship Finalist ‘11 • 2nd Place, NCMCA Brick-Masonry Competition ‘11 • Dean’s List Fall ‘08, Fall ’09, Spring’10, NCSU • NSCS College Honors Society

Valet May ’11 – December ‘11 Royal Parking Inc, Charleston, SC + Raleigh, NC

Leadership

Senior SA + Server August ’09 – May ’10; The Mint - Fine Dining August – December ‘10 Raleigh, NC • Dining room support • Train new assistants

College, Attended Fall ’08 to Spring ‘09 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC Major: Engineering GPA: 3.0

High School, Graduated May ‘08 Home School, Charleston, SC GPA: 4.3

• Successfully organized study-abroad to Barcelona, Spain for four NCSU students. • Trained and supervised employees in landscaping and fine dining.

Skills

Contact

Palmer Fox 843.708.4809 pkfox@ncsu.edu

Portfolio - Online Location

http://issuu.com/palmerfox/docs/archportfolio

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

SketchUp Pro 8 V-Ray AutoCAD Revit Rhino Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Multi-Frame GIS Laser-Cutter Operation Hand Modeling Drawing Sketching

Self-Employed May ’10 – August ‘10 Charleston, SC • Landscaping • Pressure Washing

Crew Manager May – August 2008; Down to Earth Landscaping May – August 2009 Charleston, SC • Supervise the landscaping crew • Train new employees Inventory Manager July 2007 – May 2008 Fossil Watch Co Charleston, SC • Sales representative + cashier • General store maintenance Sales Associate July 2006 – May 2008 Factory Brand Shoes Charleston, SC • Sales representative + cashier • Teamwork + customer satisfaction

Nolli Map - Raleigh, NC ARC202 - Spring 2011


1. Daylighting Study

Parabolic Arc

ARC331 Professor:

Wayne Place

PAGE

6

2. Margaret Angel

NCAIA Scholarship Nomination

Foundation

3. Facade Design

2nd Place NCMCA Brick-Masonry Competition

4. Design Expansion

ARC301

ARC432

ARC302

Epifanio Pazienza

Pat Rand

Dana Gulling

Studio Mentor:

PAGE

8

Professor:

PAGE

11

Studio Mentor:

PAGE

12


6. Stair Design 5. Charleston Museum of the City

Spring 2012 Fall

2011

Spring 2011

City Scale Studies Pricinct Scale Studies

Museum Proposal

Studio Mentor:

Studio Mentor:

ARC202

Jessica Johnson Moore

PAGE

16

ARC202

ARC302

Jessica Johnson Moore

Dana Gulling

PAGE

18

Studio Mentor:

PAGE

22


Daylighting Study Group Project: Kenan PAGE

6

Frase + Jay Holt

ARC331 - Fall 2011 Studio Mentor: Wayne

Place

This building combines contemporary building construction with the principles of suspension bridge structure as a museum to house an extensive photo collection of historical building types. The arc is a parabolic curve, or a cone section, that stretches up from its deep footing. The arc then becomes the spine of our tectonic concept as it suspends the roof. Cables in tension and rigid beams centered about torsion members allow our building a heavy though lofted feeling. The orientation of our building is South facing. It captures light primarily through the glazing on the faรงade. A clearstory is present on the North facade to emphasize the fact that walls are not structurally dominant. The roof splits around the halfway point and peels up to allow light into the deeper portion of the building. The illumination quality is nearly even throughout the structure.


Margaret Angel Foundation NCAIA Scholarship Finalist 2011

University Club Prairie Site - Raleigh, NC PAGE

8

ARC301 - Fall 2011 Studio Mentor: Epifanio Pazienza

This project is about internal and external spatial relationships of the architecture as well as the psychological connection to nature as one approaches the end of their biological process. The idea is that bringing these individuals into a harmonic composition of built-form and natural environment will produce a sense of peace within the terminally ill patient. The composition overall conveys a thought about the roundness of life. It begins with the control state, or life, represented by idealized nature and contained by the private support wing, which bisects the axis and anchors the building. The geometry then breaks down over the course of the long-axis as it approaches the forest, which represents the chaos state, or death. The poetic message within this composition emulates the idea that nature, as well as life, cannot truly be controlled, but only ordered temporarily.


The Margaret Angel Foundation: Japanese Principles Reinterpreted LAR444 - History of Landscape Architecture - Fall 2011 - Prof. Fernando Magallanes

The Margaret Angel Foundation is a non-profit organization devoted to honoring and promoting care and comfort to individuals diagnosed with terminal illness. The Foundation wants to build a facility on a gently rolling pastoral site that is just outside a busy urban environment. The site contains over fifty acres of which the designer is expected to choose a small portion for the constructed implementation. It is highly accessible by public and private transportation. The net heated area is 11,720 sq. ft. and the gross heated square feet total, which includes 12% circulation, is 13,126 sq. ft. The project is theoretical and became a study of reinterpreting principles of Japanese architecture to take meaning along side a contemporary support center with an integrated relationship to site.

Controversy and Physical Issues of Development The greatest physical issue involved with the development of this project came from the gently rolling slope of the site. It created a situation where the design terraced down three major levels. This integrated the floor changes into the grade and caused a largely fixed ceiling height. Sectional value was difficult to deal with because of this complication. However, the restriction of vertical space, in the end, added to the richness of the project by promoting a staggered composition of spaces, allowing more flexible heights at the uppermost floor, which lent to the sprawling organic orientation of the self-help side of the foundation. It is important to understand that while I was looking at Japanese principles during the development process, I was not attempting to create Japanese architecture. My study of these principles influenced the conceptual basis for the project. They did not set the grounds for architectural style. What came to be was a project with similarities to Japanese site relationships and some formal symbolism. What critics should look for is an attempt at repurposing formal guidelines to support the conceptual basis for a contemporary wellness center and its relationship, as well as psychological message, of built form to natural environment. Theoretical and Conceptual Development of Ideas Expressing an Idea about Nature

In order to express a particular idea about nature and human creation, that concept must also clearly distinguish itself from nature. “If there is to be an ideal relationship with nature, nature too must be experienced in an idealized state.�4 This creates a clear concept of nature itself and the ideal relationship of the built and natural worlds: control state and chaos. It was this concept that became much of the basis for the Margaret Angel Foundation. I attempted to set up throughout the scheme an idea of a controlled state, or garden, at one end of a long axis and a chaos state, or forest, at the opposite.

[Excerpt...]


Facade Design

2nd Place - NCMCA Brick-Masonry Competition PAGE

11

ARC432 - Spring 2011 Group Project: Worth Professor: Pat Rand

Younts + Jenn Lenn

Our elevation proposal consists of masonry units used in non-structural situations. They relinquish function for aesthetic and become suspended by a steel skeletal system left open to the public eye. The theoretical concept is the creation of a series of layers, each ranging in depth and transparencies, which give an experience of multiple thresholds. These thresholds exist as interior and exterior, mass and void, beam light to diffuse light, and scale that zooms in from monumental and solid to delicate and transparent. This delicate layer punches through to the interior, passing underneath a third semi-transparent layer which exhibits masonry units suspended within an exposed steel frame. From a technical aspect, we bind two common construction systems to show an a-typical marriage of techniques. Visible steel acts to frame the masonry screen without contacting the suspended arm. Inversely, this monumental piece is covered with non-structural masonry which appears to defy physics but contains reinforced concrete.


NC State University Campus - Raleigh, NC

This project was about creating a presence on campus for the college of design. However, it was simultaneously crucial to embrace the internalization of the design family. Additionally, we thought it important to contain space to contribute to the design campus while offering chance opportunities for the rest of campus to be involved.

Group Design: Cameron Lasater Studio Mentor: Dana Gulling

The scheme uses two buildings. The front stands as an object to create an image of design to the rest of campus. It invites students to peer into voyeuristic review rooms or ascend down an exterior stair that cuts through the building to a lower courtyard. Passing through this transition you find the rear building. This part of the composition is a courtyard scheme meant to be functional studio spaces.

College of Design Expansion PAGE

12

ARC202 - Spring 2012


E

CHAS AHU ER

CHILL

AHU


Museum of the City Charleston, SC

City-Scale + Precinct Scale Studies PAGE

16

ARC202 - Spring 2011 Studio Mentor: Jessica

Johnson Moore

During my City-Scale study of Charleston, SC, I focused on the grids of downtown streets, the delineation of development that happened up the peninsula and along the surrounding plantations, as well as the chaotic, ever-changing marshland that buffers the two rivers.


At the Precinct-Scale I looked at building footprint, property lines, street corridors, and trees. I found it interesting that the square blocks had fostered a layering effect. Buildings were crammed against the street edge to pronounce themselves, these dense outer edges made the center of the block often the most open, natural space. I found these cores to be private and hold many of the largest white oaks in Charleston. In this model I depicted the trees as supporting the urban fabric of downtown Charleston.


Museum of the City Charleston, SC

Final Proposal PAGE

18

ARC202 - Spring 2011 Studio Mentor: Jessica

Johnson Moore

The site for this final proposal was at the corner of Meeting St and Queen St in downtown Charleston. The concept for this project was designed about the conditions set forth in the Precinct-Scale study. This museum is occupied in the center by a garden. This garden mimicks those at the core of many downtown blocks. Specifically those in plain visiblility that remain locked to the public. Moving through the composition, from entering on Meeting to exiting into the plaza on Queen, the viewer is delivered select views of the garden which is ultimately unoccupiable.


Stair Design

NC State University Campus - Raleigh, NC PAGE

22

ARC202 - Spring 2012 Group Design: Brandon Venable Studio Mentor: Dana Gulling

This stair design was about internalizing the experience of the courtyard. Our design offered a source of off-axis circulation through the terraced courtyard space. This would slow the transition from elevated courtyard space to the parking lot. The tectonic screen followed the datum of a pre-existing brickwall. This screen presents an external experience by withholding an internalized transition between spaces. This stair is meant to be a quiet, private “backdoor� of sorts to the NCSU, School of Architecture.


Nolli Section - Raleigh, NC ARC202 - Spring 2011


ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

Contact:

843.708.4809 | pkfox@ncsu.edu


ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


Palmer Fox | Architecture Portfolio