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Philippine Association of Institutions For Research (PAIR) Member Institutions and Universities

Agusan del Sur School of Arts and Trade Aklan State University Asian College of Science and Technology Bataan Peninsula State University Bohol Island State University Brokenshire College Bukidnon State University Capitol University Carlos Hilado Memorial State College Cebu Normal University Central Mindanao University Cor Jesu College Davao Central College Davao Doctors College Father Saturnino Urios University Holy Cross of Davao College Holy Name University Iligan Medical Center College John B. Lacson Colleges Foundation – Bacolod John B. Lacson Colleges Foundation –Arevalo John B. Lacson Foundation Maritime University Jose Rizal Memorial State University La Consolacion College – Bacolod La Salle University Liceo de Cagayan University Lyceum of the Philippines University Maritime Academy of Asia and the Pacific Mindanao Sanitarium and Hospital College of Medical Arts Foundation, Inc. Mindanao University of Science and Technology Misamis University Mountain View College Notre Dame of Dadiangas University Notre Dame of Kidapawan College Notre Dame of Marbel University Our Lady of Fatima University Pampanga Agricultural College Romblon State University Saint Joseph Institute of Technology San Pedro College Southern Christian College Surigao del Sur State University Surigao Education Center Surigao State College of Technology Universidad de Zamboanga University of Bohol University of Mindanao University of Northern Philippines University of San Jose Recoletos University of the Cordilleras University of the Immaculate Conception Wesleyan University Xavier University – Ateneo de Cagayan University of Cebu

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


Table of Contents

PAIR Member Institutions and Universities 2 PAIR Officers 2011-2015

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MESSAGES

Dr. Mariano M. Lerin

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Dr. Genaro V. Japos 6 Dr. Zenaida G. Gersana 7 PROGRAMME 8 KEYNOTE SPEECH

Dr. Roberto N. Padua

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Outstanding Filipino Researchers 2012

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Plenary Session Papers 19 Best Practices Paper 27

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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PAIR OFFICERS 2011-2015

PRESIDENT DR. GENARO V. JAPOS LICEO DE CAGAYAN UNIVERSITY VICE-PRESIDENT PETRONILA E. FLORENDO UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN PHILIPPINES SECRETARY DR. ROLANDO A. ALIMEN JOHN B. LACSON FOUNDATION MARITIME UNIVERSITYMOLO TREASURER DR. JES B. TIROL UNIVERSITY OF BOHOL AUDITOR DR. JOY B. MIRASOL BUKIDNON STATE UNIVERSITY PIO DR. MERIAN CATAJAY-MANI ROMBLON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


Office of the University President Liceo de Cagayan University

MESSAGE Liceo de Cagayan University prides itself in continually pushing its research performance evidenced by the institutionalization of its four Asian Journals, one of which, the Asian Journal of Biodiversity, is Thomson Reuter indexed and JAS accredited (Category A), while the other journals – Liceo Journal of Higher Education and Asian Journals of Governance and Management and Health - are likewise refereed and published for international distribution. Evidencing further the university’s commitment to advancing excellence in research is its application for ISO certification for its research and publication office to institutionalize international standards in its operations. And Liceo de Cagayan University is proud to earn the distinction as the first and only academic research office in the country to obtain ISO certification. The accreditation processes, such as that of the PACOCOA, CHED’s IQUAME and ISO, serve as drivers for Liceo de Cagayan University to achieve such milestones in research. The introduction of CHED’s typology in higher education is likewise viewed as new driver that will further bolster the university’s resolve to stay on course toward research excellence. In spite of our accomplishments in research, this development in higher education has prompted us to reassess the extent of our research performance. In the context of CHED’s typology, will we measure up in the area of research vis-à-vis faculty engagement in research? This has now become a pressing question that all HEIs across the country should ponder on. This development in higher education necessitates reassessment of our research capabilities and recalibration of our enabling mechanisms to ensure compliance with the new requirements of CHED. It cannot be denied that this latest development in higher education has drawn mixed reactions from and has brought worries to many HEIs across the country. This new typology may put much pressure on us; however, on a positive note, it is a welcome development that may serve as impetus for HEIs to step up efforts to strengthen their research capability. Much can and has to be done to raise another notch the quality of higher education particularly in the field of research. Thus, this conference is convened to give HEI’s a venue for intellectual exchanges of best practices in research and publication hoped to help us reengineer our efforts for us not just to parallel the requirements of the Commission but even to exceed them, thereby bringing us to a height that puts us on a par with the rated universities of the neighbouring regions. For convening this very timely conference, credit goes to the Philippine Association of Institutions for Research especially to its founding president, Dr. Genaro V. Japos.

Mariano M. Lerin, PhD, CPA

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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Philippine Association of Institutions for Research (PAIR)

MESSAGE Welcome to Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines! The officers of the Philippine Association of Institutions for Research are happy you have chosen to attend the Conference and Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and Best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education at the Pearlmont Inn, Limketkai Drive, Cagayan de Oro City. PAIR leads in the promotion of quality research and publication that meet international standards. The judgment of the Philippines’ competitiveness in the world rankings is partly gauged by the strength of R and D measured in terms of publications in refereed journals, patents, copyrights and trademarks. We organized this conference and training workshop to capacitate research institutions and researchers in meeting the requirements of the typology evaluation. Due to poor performance in research and publications, a university can be downgraded to institute or college. Just how do our Universities meet the standards? The answers are provided in three days as we share best practices and learn new technologies to motivate teachers to do research and to give a sense of urgency to our top management to make research a centerpiece of their administration. This defines the legacy our University Presidents’ leave to us in the academe. We have invited AJA Registrars Inc., Mr Paul B. Bagatsing, General Manager and Mr. Kevin Castillon, Lead Auditor to assist us in preparing our schools to get ISO Certification. We cannot have higher standards of research and publication if we do not have international standards in doing work. The ISO Certification of PAIR is a good start for universities and research organizations to model their Quality Management System. PAIR is committed to assist schools and research centers to get ISO certification. In particular, we have invited Dr. Roberto N. Padua as our Keynote Speaker to utilize the richness of his experience and expertise in research to help our schools. Dr. Padua is a quintessential Filipino research leader who has dedicated a lifetime promoting research in this country. We have also invited representatives of the University of the PhilippinesCebu, Central Mindanao University, Mindanao University of Science and Technology, Liceo de Cagayan University and the University of Mindanao; to share their best practices in research to cross pollinate our research cultures. Dr. Mariano M. Lerin, CPA, President of the Liceo de Cagayan University has constantly nourished us with his exemplary leadership and effective research publications. The recent inclusion of the Asian Journal of Biodiversity to Thomson Reuters Journals Masterlist is a proof of his productive leadership. The paper presentations on best practices and multidisciplinary research complemented by the awards for Outstanding Filipino Researchers provide unique experiences and insights to make this event truly an event to remember that is worth our time, effort and money. We also invite you to experience the beautiful places in Cagayan de Oro. In particular, try visiting Centrio, an Ayala Mall which, opened just last November 9. The nature-decked interiors and the shops will give you unique green memories. Once again, welcome and enjoy your stay.

GENARO V. JAPOS President, PAIR

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


Republic of the Philippines Office of the President COMMISSION ON HIGHER EDUCATION Region X 9000 Cagayan de Oro City

MESSAGE At the outset , in behalf of the Commission on Higher Education family, we would like to congratulate PAIR under the visionary leadership of Dr. Genaro V. Japos, President, for another “feather in its cap” through the conduct of this “National Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and Best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s typology in Higher Education.” This is without mentioning the breakthrough PAIR made in holding the “International Conference on Social Sciences, Health and Environment 2012” last September 24-26, 2012 at JW Marriott Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand, a frist for the organization. This training workshop is, indeed, timely and relevant for CHED is about to come out with its CHED Memorandum Order on “POLICY-STANDARD TO ENHANCE QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) IN PHILIPPINE HIGHER EDUCATION THROUGH AN OUTCOMES-BASED AND TYPOLOGY BASED QA”. As of now, the CMO is still at its draft level. This is one of the educational reforms that CHED is currently implementing. Higher education is, basically, making a shift from teacher-centered to a learner-centered paradigm within a lifelong learning framework. Outcomes-based education/learning competency-based education or “obe” becomes the direction where higher education is taking. It implies that the best way to learn is to first determine what needs to be achieved. Once the desired results or ‘exit outcome’ have been determined, the strategies, processes, techniques and means are put in place to achieve the predetermined goals. In essence, it is working-backwards with students as the centre of the learning-teaching milieu. The adoption of “obe” in higher education has already started with Engineering, but later on it will permeate through all the disciplines. Another paradigm shift that higher education is taking, is the typology based quality assurance. There are two kinds of typologies in this system: Horizontal Typology which is based on the functional differentiation of HEIs vis-avis their service to the nation, and Vertical Typology that is based on quality measures within each horizontal type. In this typology, there are three kinds of HEIs: Professional Institutions, Colleges, and Universities. Each of them has each own unique contribution to nation building. So we could not say that one is better than the other. They are all equals. Vertical typology refers to the classification of HEIs according to the results from both program and institutional quality outcomes: a) Autonomous HEIs (by Evaluation), b)Deregulated HEIs (by Evaluation), an d c) Regulated HEIs. We might ask ourselves, where is research in all of these educational reforms? Research is one of the major criteria of being classified in both typologies. I would not go into details regarding the dynamics of research vis-a-vis outcomes-based and typology based quality assurance, for I might be preempting the areas you would touch during your training workshop. Suffice it to say that at all times research plays a very critical role in carrying out successfully educational reforms. And all of us here being research advocates are the ones that could make it happen. As what Barack Obama, the newly re-elected President of the United States of America has said: “The Internet didn’t get invented on its own. Government research created the Internet so that all the companies could make money off the Internet. The point is , is that when we succeed, we succeed not only because of our own individual initiative, but also because we do things together.” Again, CONGRATULATIONS and MABUHAY KAYONG LAHAT!

ZENAIDA G. GERSANA, Ph.D., CESO III Director IV Commission on Higher Education Regional Office No. 10

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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PROGRAMME Conference and Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and Best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education Day 1. November 14, 2012 8: 00 – 9:00

Registration

9:01 – 9:06 Opening Prayer FR. AMADO EMMANUEL A. BOLILIA University of San Jose Recoletos 9:07 – 9:10 Philippine National Anthem 9:11 – 9: 15 Opening Remarks DR. JOY M. MIRASOL Research Director, Bukidnon State University 9:16 – 9:26 Welcome Address DR. TERESITA T. TUMAPON Vice President for Academic Affairs Liceo de Cagayan University

DR. REYNALDO O. CUIZON University of Mindanao DR. JOY M. MIRASOL Bukidnon State University DR. SALVADOR C. DE LA PEÑA Liceo de Cagayan University

DR. JOY JAMAGO Central Mindanao University

11:08 – 11:15

Grand Pictorials

11:16 – 12:00 Enabling Policies, Programs and Best Practices in Research and Publication: The Experience of the Mindanao University of Science and Technology DR. OLIVA P. CANENCIA Research Director Mindanao University of Science and Technology 12:00 – 12:59 LUNCH/ Video Presentation of Research Conferences MR. LAWRENCE S. BABANTO Web Administrator, PAIR and IAMURE

9:27 – 9:37 Messages DR. MARIANO M. LERIN, CPA Liceo de Cagayan University 1:00 – 3:00 ISO Certification Process in Response to 9:38 – 9:48 DR. ZENAIDA G. GERSANA CHED’s Typology in Higher Education CHEDRO X, Director MR. KEVIN CASTILLON Lead Auditor, AJA Registrars, Inc. 9:49 – 9:50 Presentation of ISO Certification by AJA Registrars to DR. MARIANO M. LERIN, CPA 3:01 – 3:15 Open Forum Liceo de Cagayan University – Research and Publication Office 3:16 – 4:30 Sharing of Best Practices in ISO Certification of Educational Institutions, Private DR. GENARO V. JAPOS Companies, Government Organizations IAMURE Multidisciplinary Research 4:30 – 6:30 Paper Presentations 9:51 – 10:05 Message Awarding of Winners MR. PAUL B. BAGATSING Vice President and General Manager EMCEE: AJA Registrars, Inc. DR. SALVADOR DE LA PEÑA III University Editor, Liceo de Cagayan 10:06 – 10:12 Introduction of the Keynote Speaker University DR. FRANCIS ANN R. SY Research Director, Day 2. November 15, 2012 Southern Leyte State University 8: 00 – 8:30 Registration 10:13 – 11:00 Keynote Address DR. ROBERTO N. PADUA Typology-Based QA for Philippine 8:31 – 8:40 Invocation Education MS. EMMA SAGARINO Institutions: Through the Fabric of University of the Immaculate Conception Institutions, Research and Extension Functions of HEI’s National Anthem 11:01 – 11:07 Awarding of Outstanding Filipino Researchers 2012 DR. OLIVA P. CANENCIA Mindanao University of Science and Technology

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8:41 – 9:10 Opening Remarks MS. IRISH JANE P. BALIOS Vice President for Operations PAIR and IAMURE

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


9:11 – 9:20 Welcome Address DR. PRECY C. DELIMA Research Director, Isabela State University

Day 3. November 16, 2012

9:21 – 9: 30 Message DR. ELENITA B. SANTAMARIA Vice President for Academic Affairs Surigao del Sur State University

8:31 – 9:05 Invocation MS. ROXAN G. EUPEÑA Surigao del Sur State University

9:31 – 9:38 Synthesis of Day 1 DR. ERNESTO O. GOLOSINO Holy Name University

9:06 – 9:15 Opening Remarks MR. JAIME T. PURACAN Surigao State College of Technology 9:16 – 9:22 Welcome Address DR. JUANITO B. ALIÑO, JR. Research Director, University of San Jose Recoletos

10:16 – 11:00 Enabling Policies, Programs and Best Practices in Research and Publication: A. University of the Immaculate Conception DR. RENAN P. LIMJUCO MS. EMMA V. SAGARINO UIC Research Center 11:01 – 11:30 B. Liceo de Cagayan University DR. LESLEY C. LUBOS Associate Director, Liceo Mindanao Center for Biodiversity Conservation 11:31 – 12:00 C. University of Mindanao DR. REYNALDO O. CUIZON Director, Qualitative Research University of Mindanao Research Center LUNCH

1:00 – 1:15

Oath Taking of New Members

Registration

National Anthem

9:39 – 10:15 ISO Consultation MR. PAUL B. BAGATSING General Manager, AJA Registrars Inc.

12:00

8: 00 – 8:30

1:16 – 2:30 Workshop on Enabling Policies and Programs for Research and Publication in Compliance to Typology Requirements DR. GENARO V. JAPOS President, PAIR and IAMURE

9:23 – 9:30 Message DR. NENITA PALMES VP RDEAS Mindanao University of Science and Technology 9:31 – 10:30 10:31 – 10:45

A Critical Analysis of CHED Typology in Higher Education: Trends and Prospects and CMU’s Best Practices in Research DR. JOY JAMAGO Open Forum

10:46 – 11:00 2013 International Conferences of IAMURE MR. JONY V. BERJES Executive Vice President IAMURE Multidisciplinary Research 11:01 – 11:30 The International Journals of PAIR and IAMURE: Responses to CHED Typology Requirements Towards Inclusion in Thomson Reuters and Scopus DR. GENARO V. JAPOS President, PAIR and IAMURE 11:31 – 11:45

Open Forum

12:00

LUNCH

2:31 – 3:00 Cross Reference and International Indexing of Journal Publications MR. DARRYL M. NUYDA Web Administrator, Asian Scientific Journals Liceo de Cagayan University

1:00 – 2:30 Calibrating Scientific Writing Skills for Acceptance of Journal Articles in International Publications DR. SALVADOR DE LA PEÑA III University Editor Liceo de Cagayan University

3:01 – 3:30 The Use of Grammarly and Plagiarism Software MS. KAYE HAZEL ABAO Executive Editor IAMURE and PAIR Journals

2:31 – 4:20 Workshop on International Journal Evaluation: Application, Process and Outcomes DR. GENARO V. JAPOS President, PAIR and IAMURE

3:31 – 6:00

Paper Presentations 4:21 – 4:30 Paper Presentation A. Best Practices B. Multidisciplinary Research 5:31 – 5:40 Awarding of Winners Awarding of Winners Emcee: DR. RENAN LIMJUCO Emcee: University of the Immaculate Conception DR. ERNESTO O. GOLOSINO Holy Name University

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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Keynote Speech Typology-Based Qa For Philippine Higher Education Institutions: Through The Fabric Of Instruction, Research And Extension Functions Of Hei’s Roberto N. Padua , Ph.D. (Former CHED Commissioner)

Abstract - To CHED’s credit, the proposed two-dimensional approach to Quality Assurance in higher education is the first comprehensive, detailed and well-studied document for ensuring quality in Philippine higher education. The paper attempts to simplify the conceptual presentation of the two-dimensional (horizontal and vertical typologies) quality assurance space of HEIs to better appreciate the beauty and logic of the approach. The simplification highlights the shift from pure quality control (QC) perspective to a more comprehensive quality assurance (QA) view of managing quality in higher education. Underlying the QA system is the radical shift towards Competency-Based curriculum for all higher education programs. The system is shown to lead to four(4) distinctive outcomes in Philippine higher education: (1.) clarification of roles of Universities, Colleges and Professional Institutes, (2.) motivation to gain prestige and status through the vertical typologies (regulated, deregulated and autonomous), (3.) production of competent graduates, and (4.) efficient and effective higher education system that can globally compete. The paper ends with some Technical, Administrative, Political and Economic challenges that the new system may encounter. Keywords - quality control, quality assurance, higher education, typology INTRODUCTION A recent CHED order entitled: “Policy standard to enhance quality assurance in Philippine higher education through an outcomes-based and typology-based Quality Assurance” has made some universities and colleges happy while leaving the majority of the higher education institutions confused about how exactly they will be evaluated by the Commission. In this lecture, we will attempt to simplify the contents of this document in a manner that will be understandable to a non-specialist in quality assurance. W. Deming (1975), the acknowledged world expert on quality control and assurance once said :” while the concepts of quality control and quality assurance are, in theory, easy to understand particularly for those with statistical background, their implementation is , at best, a messy business”. We shall gloss over the technical details of the concept of quality assurance espoused by CHED in order to make it more understandable and also so that we can better appreciate the beauty and logic of this new paradigm. From QC to QA The main thesis of the CHED order concerns the shift from Quality Control (QC) to Quality Assurance(QA) in higher education. In the past, when there were only a few hundred higher education institutions in the country,

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


quality control was deemed tenable and appropriate. The task of regulating, say, 50 colleges and universities in the country is certainly feasible but it becomes an impossible undertaking when over 2000 colleges and universities are involved. CHED would have to spend 100% of its time running after errant schools and will not be able to do anything else to improve the quality of higher education in the country. CHED will be too busy putting out fires in all directions if it continues to emphasize quality control. The first batch of CHED Commissioners had a motto: “To work hard to make CHED unnecessary in the next 20 years”. Indeed, if quality is assured in the country’s higher education system, then the system takes a life of its own and CHED will no longer be a necessary external government agency intervening in the system’s operations. This is precisely where we are heading – each higher education institution playing specific roles in the system and doing an excellent job at producing quality graduates and world-class research. Thus, the CHED order is NOT another regulation designed to make our lives miserable but is a LIBERATING instrument to develop independent, robust and autonomous higher education institutions in the Philippines. The Nebulous Concept of “Quality” Everyone talks about “quality” yet no one has ever defined precisely what this concept means in the context of higher education. It is extremely important that we agree on a definition of this concept prior to implementing any form of quality control or quality assurance measures in the system. According to Section 6 of the CHED Order, “Quality is the alignment and consistency of the learning environment with the institution’s vision, mission, and goals demonstrated by exceptional learning and service outcomes and the development of a culture of quality (sic)”. Let us, for the moment, forgive this circular definition and concentrate on its implications instead. First, the notion of quality involves “fitness for purpose” when we enforce alignment of the learning environment with the institution’s vision, mission, and goals. This is the notion held by international and local accrediting bodies when they accredit your programs and systems. Second, quality for CHED also means “exceptional” in the sense that certain standards are established to which the institutions conform to and also exceed such standards. The standards are phrased in terms of comparability with criteria and ratings (metrics). Third, CHED desires to develop a culture of quality in Philippine higher education institutions which now constitutes the transformational dimension of CHED’s notion of quality. The third implication is not necessarily part of CHED’s definition of quality but is, instead, a description of a “Quality-Assured” higher education system. Ergo, CHED’s notion of quality involves only the first and second implications: “fitness for purpose” and “exceptional”. Visualizing the Quality Assurance Space We can get a better handle on CHED’s paradigm for quality assurance if we are able to visualize the space where our higher education institutions stand in relation to “fitness for purpose” and “exceptional”. Article V of the CHED order talks about a “Horizontal Typology of HEIs for QA”. This is the “fitness for purpose “ axis. With the aid of Rene Descartes’ Cartesian plane, we can plot the institutions on the horizontal axis and label them as : Professional Institutions, Colleges and Universities. A professional institution has a different purpose in higher education from colleges and from universities. Each category, therefore, represents a different purpose in the scheme of things in higher education.

Article VII of the CHED order, next , talks about a “Vertical Typology for HEIs for QA”. This the “exceptional” axis. Once again, we plot the higher education institutions on a vertical axis and label them as : Regulated, De-regulated and Autonomous. Each category consists of higher education institutions that comply with certain standards set by CHED (and spelled out in the document).

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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We now plot the Cartesian coordinate system consisting of the Horizontal (“Fitness for Purpose”) axis and the Vertical (“Exceptional”) axis to visualize the system that CHED is envisioning in the document:

Figure 1: CHED’s QA Space

The QA space defines 9 possible “states of being” for the higher education institutions, namely: (1.) Professional-Regulated, (2.) Professional-Deregulated, (3.) Professional-Autonomous, (4.) College-Regulated, (5.) College-Deregulated, (6.) College-Autonomous, (7.) University-Regulated, (8.) University-Deregulated, and (9.) University-Autonomous. A higher education institution, essentially, defines its own niche in the lattice of the Quality-Assurance space. Do you want to stay as a Regulated Professional Institution? Do you wish to become an Autonomous University? These are decisions that public and private higher education institutions have to make because movement from one state space to the next implies considerable investment. Fitness for Purpose: Implications to Higher Education Institutions Professional Institutions exist to provide educational experiences to develop technical knowledge and skills at the undergraduate and graduate levels leading to professional practice (practitioners’ degrees). Professional

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


institutions develop adults who will have the practical and technical know-how to staff the various professional sectors that are required to sustain the economic and social development of the country and the world , as well as to contribute to innovation in their respective areas. Examples: Engineering, Medicine, Law, IT, Management, Teacher Education, Agriculture and Fisheries and Maritime Education. An HEI is considered a Professional Institution if: • At least 60% of the academic degree programs are in the professional areas (like the ones mentioned above) and 70% of the enrolment are in these areas too. • At least 50% of the faculty are full time and permanent having relevant degrees or professional experience. In the event that the PI has graduate degrees, then all faculty teaching in these graduate courses must hold the appropriate master’s or doctoral degrees; • It has sustained program linkages with the industries, professional groups and organizations. • Outreach programs that promote professional practice. Next, CHED defines Colleges (to distinguish them from Professional Institutions) as those institutions which develop adults with the thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, communication, technical and social skills to participate in various types of employment, development activities, and public discourses. This definition IS NOT MEANT TO imply that the Professional Institutions do not develop these skills as well. In order to avoid this misinterpretation, we provide some examples (which is not an exhaustive list ): Natural and Physical Sciences, Social Sciences, Humanities, Language and Letters and other courses traditionally labelled “Liberal Arts”. An institution qualifies as a College if: • At least 70% of the undergraduate programs are in the Liberal Arts and Sciences (develops thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, communication, technical and social skills); • Same faculty requirements as in the Professional Institutions; • Adequate library and laboratory resources; • Outreach programs that promote contextualization of knowledge within actual social and human experiences. Finally, CHED defines Universities as those institutions which provide highly specialized educational experiences to train experts in the various disciplinal and technical areas with emphasis on RESEARCH. Universities offer both the Professional Courses of the PI’s and the Liberal Arts/Science courses of the Colleges but they are expected to do a lot of RESEARCH. An institution is considered a University if: • It has at least 20 degree programs of which at least 6 are in the graduate level; • At least 3 doctoral programs, one each in three different fields of study (distinct Fields of Study examples: Education, Management, Sciences etc.); • All graduate programs require thesis/dissertation and 50% of undergraduate programs require thesis or research papers; • At least 30 full-time faculty members or 20% of the full time faculty (whichever is higher) should be actively involved in research (evidenced by publication in refereed and CHED -acknowledged journals); • Annual research cost expenditures of P75,000/faculty involved in research; • Links with research agencies in various parts of the world. We are expected by CHED to: (a.) define where we belong, and (b.) provide documentary evidence that indeed we belong where we want to belong. What if we DO NOT BELONG to where we WANT TO BELONG? In this case, CHED defines your category and then assists you to reach the place where you want to belong (the developmental nature of CHED). Can a University status be withdrawn by CHED if the requirements are not met? The theory or principle here is simple: The authority that gives a status is the only authority that can withdraw the same. In practice, CHED will most probably do the following: (1.) generate a tentative listing of HEI’s with their prescribed horizontal categories, (2.) identify the HEIs which are misclassified based on the HEI-indicated preference and the requirements for each category, (3.) give the misclassified HEIs until 2017 to be correctly classified.

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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Exceptional Axis: Implications to Higher Education Institutions The vertical typology defines three upward levels of HEIs: Regulated, Deregulated and Autonomous. The vertical axis contains two information: (1.) Commitment to Excellence score (CE) and (2.) Institutional Sustainability and Enhancement Score (ISE). Regulated HEIs are, by definition, those which need to demonstrate good institutional quality and program outcomes. Over the period when these HEIs are “demonstrating”, they will be under the strict regulation of CHED. Deregulated HEIs, on the other hand, are those which demonstrate very good institutional quality and a robust QA system with a good proportion of accredited programs, international certification and presence of COE/ COD. CHED deregulates such institutions in the sense that they can offer new programs and other initiatives without the need for formal permits. The institutions are required , however, to inform CHED of such. Autonomous HEIs are those that demonstrate exceptional institutional quality through their QA systems and excellent program outcomes. Exceptional performance shall be gauged according to the horizontal type of institutions viz. Research and Publication for Universities; Creative work and Extension programs for Colleges and Employability and Linkages for Professional Institutes. Autonomous HEIs enjoy the full freedom to do what they wish to do in their academic endeavours without the need to even inform CHED. The CE and ISE points are added to obtain a vertical score:

Vertical Score = CE + ISE

Subject to:

CE is less than or equal to 70% ( CE ≤ 0.70) ISE is less than or equal to 30% (ISE ≤ 0.30)

The table below summarizes the minimum vertical score needed for the respective vertical categories: VERTICAL CATEGORY

MINIMUM POINTS

REMARKS

AUTONOMOUS

80

With additional requirements for: Universities, Colleges and Professional Institutes

DEREGULATED

65

With additional requirements for Universities, colleges and professional institutes

CHED’s method will be to first ensure attainment of the Minimum Points and then to ensure that the additional requirements are complied with prior to the grant of the appropriate vertical category for the HEI. CHED has extended the grant of deregulated or autonomous status for the HEIs until May 31,2104. Those which have pending applications for the same statuses shall be evaluated on the basis of the new scheme if they are ready or else be evaluated based on CMO 48, s. 1996. BY 2017, CHED expects that requirements for University status under the new scheme shall have been fully implemented. Net Outcomes of the Two-Dimensional QA System for Higher Education If successful, the two-dimensional(horizontal-vertical typologies) QA system of CHED should result into the following: 1. Graduates of higher education institutions are quality-assured since they will all be products of Competency-Based curricula. The focus on skills (problem-solving, decision-making etc.) formation yields

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


competencies (group of related skills) that are responsive to the needs of the end-users of the graduates. The DACUM is the most efficient and effective means of developing such curricula. 2. Higher education institutions can now be sharply differentiated e.g. why a certain HEI is a college and not a University, because the definition of each type of HEI in terms of their functional roles in human capital development is also clearly defined. 3. University status is no longer a status of prestige under the new scheme. A University is not higher in status than a College (than a Professional Institute) because the role of a University is different from the role of a College ( or a Professional Institute). This should deter the propensity of HEIs to convert their statuses from colleges to universities unless the Colleges really want to change roles by emphasizing on RESEARCH (production of new knowledge) rather than on INSTRUCTION. 4. Prestige or status comes from the Vertical classification of HEIs because the vertical axis of the twodimensional QA defines which institution possesses higher quality (and therefore of more value to society). In other words, one should prefer a deregulated Professional Institute over a regulated College or a regulated University. Challenges and Prospects of the Two-Dimensional QA System in Higher Education The beauty and logic of the two-dimensional QA system in higher education are, without doubt, ideal and beneficial to the Philippine society. To CHED’s credit, this is the first most comprehensive and well-studied document on Quality Assurance in higher education after years of implementing ad hoc quality assurance systems in the country without appreciable results. However, the actual implementation of this QA system faces the following challenges: Technical Challenge: 1. How do we demonstrate that the two-dimensional QA system will be the most efficient, effective and equitable means of managing quality in Philippine higher education ? In order to convince the stakeholders of the rationality of the new quality assurance system, we must be able to show concretely that by applying the system in higher education, we will be able to extract maximum outputs from minimum inputs (efficiency), that we will be able to rationalize the existence of over 2000 higher education institutions in the country (effectiveness) and that no one will be unduly disadvantaged by the new scheme (Pareto rule). Administrative Challenge 2. How do we “typologize” each of the two thousand (2000) higher education institutions along the horizontal and vertical dimensions given the current higher education resources of CHED and time limits imposed for the system’s full implementation? For this, CHED needs to construct a Data-Based Empirical Two-Dimensional Quality Map of the 2000 HEIs in order to assess the magnitude of the administrative work that needs to be done prior to 2014. On the basis of this map, CHED can then optimize its available administrative resources (regional offices, external experts, technical panels, consultants and others) to overcome this challenge. 3. How do we keep the “number” of HEIs at the same current levels when the establishment of new private HEIs is an authority given to SEC and for the public schools from the Congress of the Philippines? CHED’s authority begins to manifest only at the stage where the institutions ask for permits to operate new programs. CHED can of course reject such new applications for newly established schools but it will have to do so at the risk of lawsuits.

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Political Challenge 4.

How do we convince the political leadership of the country to support the two-dimensional QA system?

This is particularly true for the public higher education institutions whose establishment/conversion hinge on the sponsorship of the House of Representatives and the Senate. The political problem is magnified ten-fold once CHED withdraws a University status even among the private higher education institutions. Economic Challenge 5. How do we economically value movements from one state space to the next of the higher education institutions in the two-dimensional QA space? For example, how expensive would it be for a University to move from a regulated status to a deregulated one? This is certainly something that can be done by our higher education experts in Economics, and, perhaps, CHED can even support a Commissioned study for this purpose. LITERATURE CITED Aguayo, Rafael 1991). Dr. Deming: The American Who Taught the Japanese About Quality. Fireside edition. Baker, Edward Martin (1999). Scoring a Whole in One: People in Enterprise Playing in Concert. Crisp Learning.  CHED Unnumbered Memorandum Order (2012). “ Policy-Standard to Enhance Quality Assurance in Philippine Higher Education Through Outcomes-Based and Typology-Based QA”, (October, 2012). Delavigne Kenneth T. and J. Daniel Robertson, “Deming’s Profound Changes: When Will the Sleeping Giant Awaken?” (PTR Prentice Hall, 1994),  Deming, W. Edwards (1966). Some Theory of Sampling. Dover Publications.  Deming, W. Edwards (1986). Out of the Crisis. MIT Press.  Deming, W. Edwards (2000). The New Economics for Industry, Government, Education (2nd ed.). MIT Press. . Gabor, Andrea (1992). The Man Who Discovered Quality: How W. Edwards Deming Brought the Quality Revolution to America. Penguin.  Gitlow, Howard S., Shelly J. Gitlow, “The Deming Guide to Quality and Competitive Position” Prentice Hall Trade (January 1987)  Haller, Harold S (1993).  Managing with profound knowledge: A management process based on the Deming management theory. Harold S. Haller & Company.  Joiner, Brian L (1994). Fourth Generation Management: The New Business Consciousness. McGraw-Hill.  Kilian, Cecelia S (1992). The World of W. Edwards Deming - 2nd Edition. SPC Press, Inc.  Kohn, Alfie (1992). No Contest: The Case Against Competition; Revised edition. Mariner Books. Kohn, Alfie (1999).  Punished By Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s, Praise, and Other Bribes. Mariner Books.  Langley, Gerald J., Kevin M. Nolan, Clifford L. Norman, Lloyd P. Provost, Thomas W. Nolan, “The Improvement Guide: A Practical Approach to Enhancing Organizational Performance” Jossey-Bass (July 26, 1996) 

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Mann, Nancy (1989). Keys to Excellence: The Story of the Deming Philosophy - 3rd Edition. Prestwick Books.  Neave, Henry R (1990). The Deming Dimension. SPC Press, Inc.  Perry Gluckman, Diana Reynolds Roome, “Everyday Heroes: From Taylor to Deming: The Journey to Higher Productivity” SPC Press, Inc. (March 1990)  Rodin, Robert (1999).  Free, Perfect, and Now: Connecting to the three insatiable customer demands. Simon and Schuster, Inc. . Salsburg, D. (2002) The Lady Tasting Tea: How Statistics Revolutionized Science in the Twentieth Century, W.H. Freeman / Owl Book.  Scherkenbach, William W (1991). Demings Road to Continual Improvement. SPC Press, Inc. Shewhart, Walter A (1930). Economic Control of Quality of Manufactured Product/50th Anniversary Commemorative Issue. American Society for Quality December 1980. . Shewhart, Walter A (1939). Statistical Method from the Viewpoint of Quality Control. Dover Publications December 1, 1986. . Vertiz, Virginia C. (1993) A look at the quality management audit applying Dr. Deming’s principles for system transformation. In V.C. Vertiz (Ed.) Education, Winter, 1993 Vertiz, Virginia C. (1994) Beware the quality skills and tools trap or learn to fish. Creating Quality K-12. Vertiz, Virginia C. (1995) The other side of the man of quality: The pearl. Quality Progress, American Society for Quality Control. Walton, Mary (1986). The Deming Management Method. The Putnam Publishing Group.  Wheeler, Donald J (1999). Understanding Variation: The Key to Managing Chaos - 2nd Edition. SPC Press, Inc.  William J. Latzko, David M. Saunders, “Four Days with Dr. Deming: A Strategy for Modern Methods of Management” Prentice Hall PTR (January 26, 1995) 

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education Pearlmont Inn, Limketkai Drive, Cagayan de Oro City

Outstanding Filipino Researchers 2012 DR. OLIVA P. CANENCIA Mindanao University of Science and Technology

DR. REYNALDO O. CUIZON University of Mindanao

DR. JOY M. MIRASOL Bukidnon State University

DR. SALVADOR C. DE LA PEÑA Liceo de Cagayan University

DR. JOY JAMAGO

Central Mindanao University In recognition of their leadership contributions in the advancement of research in the Philippines and beyond the borders in terms of organizing conferences and trainings, managing research publications, institutional partnerships, managing research programs; editorship of journals, speakership in major events, leadership in professional research organizations, reaping awards and distinctions, implementing funded research projects and publications in reputable peer reviewed journals. Given this 16th day of November 2012 at Pearlmont Inn, Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines.

DR. GENARO V. JAPOS PRESIDENT, PAIR

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DR. ZENAIDA G. GERSANA REGIONAL DIRECTOR , CHEDRO 10

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


Graduate Tracer Study: Basis for JRMSU’s Alumni Destination and Labor Employments ED NEIL O. MARATAS ARCHER C. CAMPOY Jose Rizal Memorial State University Time: 4:30 – 4:50 (November 14 – First Day) Venue: Princess Diana Function Room This study aimed to trace graduates from their school of origin to their job destination and employment status. The researchers utilized the research modified survey questionnaire developed from the Office of Department of Labor and Employment of Jose Rizal Memorial State University extension and served as the data gathering instrument. Other than that, yahoo and facebook account and mobile or cellular phones were alternative tools of gathering the needed data. There were 288 graduates who participated in the study out of 377 target graduate- respondents coming from the different satellite campuses of Jose Rizal Memorial State University and were drawn randomly from the master lists of 6,677 graduates of different academic programs offered by the University. These were the graduates from School Years 2006 to 2010 five year periods. The findings of the study revealed that majority were female and aged 19 to 23 years old and with good standing performance when they were still in college. In addition, majority were casuals in their present position. It further revealed that most of the respondents work in companies or organizations that have to do with education, wholesale and retail trade, financial intermediation, manufacturing, and public administration. Majority of them, their current job is related to the course they took in college. With regard to the programs with highest percentage of graduates employed, Engineering was ranked top program offered in JRMSU. On the other hand, Teacher Education has more number of employed graduates with highest potentials for highest initial earnings. Lastly, gender, GPA and licensure examination are the best profile that best predict the employment probability of the graduates.

Techno-Guide for a Remote – Controlled Submersible Camera as Fish Finder ALEX E. ALVAREZ Surigao State College of Technology Surigao City Time: 4:51 – 5:10 (November 14 – First Day) Venue: Princess Diana Function Room This study aims to fabricate a remote controlled submersible camera as gadget for fish finder in the seashores of Surigao City , assesses the gadget in terms of its functionality, efficiency and acceptability and identifies problems encountered in its fabrication and testing. It utilized the descriptive survey method to assessed the functionality, efficiency and acceptability of the gadget. There were 34 respondents composed of 14 fishermen, 11 experts from the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) and nine electronic instructors of Surigao State College of Technology, Surigao City Campus. Findings revealed that the Fishermen, BFAR and electronic instructors perceived the gadget as Moderately Functional and Very Much Functional, respectively. As to efficiency and acceptability, the three groups of respondents rated the gadget as Moderately Efficient and Very Much Acceptable. Based on these findings, it was concluded that the remote controlled submersible camera is a convenient gadget in fish finding and it can survey the underwater environment. Moreover, with the aid of a high resolution camera it can identify fish species and other macro organisms underwater. The use of submersible camera is very much acceptable to the respondents considering that it is environment friendly, and easy to use in fishing.

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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Hemispheric Brain Dominance and Mathematics Performance of Western Visayas College of Science and Technology Students DOLY JOY C. CAMARIOSA Western Visayas College of Science and Technology Iloilo City Time: 5:11 – 5:30 (November 14 – First Day) Venue: Princess Diana Function Room With Sperry ‘s (1974) Split brain Theory as basis, this study was conducted to determine the significance of the difference in the mathematics performance when grouped according to their hemispheric dominance (HD) , course, and gender of the 172 freshman students of Western Visayas College of Science and Technology, Iloilo City. The participants’ HD was determined by the use of researcher-made Hemispheric Brain Dominance Test, and the math performance was based on their average final grades in the Math. The statistical tools used were the mean, standard deviation, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskal-Wallis Test. The test in hypothesis was set at .05 alpha level. Findings reveal that the level of mathematics performance as a whole was “fair”. When grouped according to HD, the right-brain dominant have “conditional” math performance, while the left-brain dominant have “fair” math performance. As to the course, the BSM and the BSEd participants have “good” math performance while, the BSEE, BSECE, and BSMEAE participants have “conditional” math performance. When grouped as to gender, the males have “conditional” math performance, while the females have “fair” math performance. The dominant hemisphere among the participants is the left brain. When grouped according to course, BSM, BSEd, and BSMEAE are left-brain dominant, BSEE have more right-brain dominant, and BSECE have equal number of right and left-brain dominant participants. As to gender, both male and female have more leftbrain dominant than right-brain dominant participants. Significant differences existed in the level of mathematics performance when the participants were grouped according to HD, course, and gender. The study concluded that the left-brain dominant students performed significantly better than the right-brain dominant students.

Tud-om: The Manobo Oral Tradition RETSY D. TOMAQUIN & RAMEL D. TOMAQUIN Surigao de Sur State University Tandag City Time: 5:31 – 5:50 (November 14 – First Day) Venue: Princess Diana Function Room The paper covers on the discussion of the oral tradition of the Manobos of Caraga as reflected on the “Tud-om”, the oral folklore of the community/communities. As an oral lore/narratives it comprises the oral history, exploits and habitation of the land before Political division was instituted (Burton, 2012) and description of the great Agusan and Tago rivers which at that period a source of transportation and means of living. Its description of the Diwata mountain, narratives of the hierarchy of their myths , family life, oral literatures and its various typologies such : Tud-om of war, peace , child rearing , betrothal, courtship , engagement and wedding, family life, jewelry and tattoos, tribal courtesy, hospitality, indigenous religion, rituals, death, harvest and other world views. The study used the ethnographic methods with the intensive work with the informants. In accordance with RA (Indigenous Peoples Act of 1997) “Free and Prior Informed Consent” was sought. It covers on the Manobo lands of Caraga in the following provinces: Agusan Del Sur, Agusan Del Norte and Surigao Del Sur .A traditional Manobo land (Garvan, 1927). The traditional value and belief system of the Manobo’s are influenced by their worldviews as reflected/illustrated in the Tud-om. The belief of “Tahaw/Magbabaya” as supreme god is visibly discernible. To this end the Manobo’s are very pious people, basing on their indigenous religiosity. The Medicine man / Shaman (Baylan) are not only village herbalists but also keepers of traditions which are the major chanters of the Tud-om. In the kahimunan we can view that the Manobo’s view of natural resources as communal which is also depicted in the Tud-om. That there are several genres of the Tudom such: Tud-om of war, peace , child rearing , betrothal, courtship , engagement and wedding, family life, jewelry and tattoos, tribal courtesy, hospitality, indigenous religion, rituals, death, harvest and other world views. The said typology/ typologies need to be recorded for posterity and for tribal pride/identity. The central theme of the said typologies of chants is the identity of the Manobo’s as highly creative, artistic, and a people with a high valued culture.

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


Impact of Conditional Cash Transfer Program on Preventive Health Measures MARIA TAVITA Q. LUMINTAC Surigao State College of Technology Surigao City Time: 5:51 – 6:10 (November 14 – First Day) Venue: Princess Diana Function Room This study assessed the effectiveness of Philippine Conditional Cash Transfer Program on preventive health care among pregnant women and young children in selected barangays of Cagdianao, Dinagat Island Province. The health care services include prenatal, post-partum, iron supplementation, immunizations, health education, nutritional supplements, and measurements of height and weight. It utilized qualitative research employing focus group methodology. The participants of the study were two different groups, the first group was the twelve beneficiary mothers and the second group was the ten barangay health workers. In the course of discussion, the tone and emotions of each participant was observed. The conversions were recorded to capture the content of discussion. The results of the study were transcribed and analyzed and it appears that this Conditional Cash Transfer Program is an effective approach to increase preventive health measures of the pregnant women and young children though there are other components of the program brings negative effect to the beneficiaries.

Best Practices in Research and Development at Western Visayas College of Science and Technology ARLENE S. ANACAN Western Visayas College of Science and Technology Iloilo City Time: 3:30 – 3:50 (November 15 – Second Day) Venue: Moon River Function Room This paper discusses the accomplishments and achievements of faculty and students of the institution in terms of research involvement, presentations, publications, and awards. It covers the scope of local, national and international levels. The college as the center of intellectual property office in the region boosts for its copyrights, utility model and patents registration. Various awards were given to the faculty and students in the international, national, regional and local arena, hence, this sharing of best practices will surely enliven and enrich our culture of research as an academic institution and as a nation.

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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Language Learning Strategies of Freshmen College Students of Surigao State College of Technology CARMELIN PURACAN- MOSA Surigao State College of Technology Malimono Campus Time: 3:51 – 4:10 (November 15 – Second Day) Venue: Moon River Function Room This study evaluates the level of language learning strategies among freshmen English and Technology students of Surigao State College of Technology, Malimono and City Campuses. It also determined the significant difference on the six language learning strategies when grouped with the respondents’ profile. It used the descriptive research design, with the adopted Oxford’s Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) questionnaires as instruments to gather data. These data were analyzed with the aid of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 16 which paved way to determine the frequency count, percentage, Analysis of Variance (ANNOVA) and Scheffe Post – hoc Test. Results showed that the level of language learning strategies of the Freshmen English and Technology students was at medium level. When the language learning strategies were grouped between sex and curriculum, no significant differences were observed. However, when the language learning strategies were paired with Educational attainment and income of parents, significant differences occurred. These imply that the level of language learning strategies of freshmen English and Technology students in the two SSCT campuses needs room for improvement. Economic status and educational attainment of parents can influence the use of language learning strategies which corollary influence learning process.

ICT – Based Lessons: Their Effects on the Conceptual Understanding of Students in Physics JASPER L. PASTRANO Western Visayas College of Science and Technology Iloilo City Time: 4:11 – 4:30 (November 15 – Second Day) Venue: Moon River Function Room This study investigated the effect of ICT-based lessons to the conceptual understanding of students in Physics. It likewise determined whether there is a significant increase in the level of conceptual understanding of high school students before and after exposure to ICT-based lessons. The experimental research utilized 40 randomly chosen fourth year high school students. Employing a counterbalanced design in the experiment, the students were divided into two groups. Each group was alternatively exposed for one month to selected topics in Physics using the ICT. A pre and post tests were given before and after the intervention. The independent variables used in this study are sex, family income and previous grade in physics.

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


The Governance of the Marine Protected Areas in the Coastal Frontier RETSY D. TOMAQUIN & RAMEL D. TOMAQUIN Surigao de Sur State University Tandag City Time: 4:31 – 4:50 (November 15 – Second Day) Venue: Moon River Function Room The study determines the socio-demographic profile of the fishers in Cortes, Surigao Del Sur.A costal town faces the Pacific Sea Board. It presented the Organizational Culture of the MPA’s and determines the extent of support in MPA governance. The method used in the study are survey and ethnographic. The statistical treatment includes, Simple Percentage, Weighted Mean. Social preparedness of the community will lead to effective campaign of social marketing of the MPA’s. The MPA’s of Cortes are considered as a good political strategy geared towards good governance. The program of the LGU of Cortes in MPA management is “holistic” enough that it encompasses the economic, health, cultural, tourism, education, security, sustainable governance of the sites/MPA. Cortes MPA’s aimed to harness people’s empowerment and responsibility. MPA indicators in its monitoring are in placed such: monitoring of coral covers, mangrove covers, evaluation of economic interventions (livelihood projects) and extent of people’s empowerment in the grass roots level. The other approaches in MPA promotion can be “ Rated as very Effective “ such the use of radio program, bill boards, the utilization of the LGU Bus in MPA promotion . The trainings attended by the MPA members in MPA governance are sufficient enough. There is an active collaboration in capability building of the MPA members, NGO’s and GO’s.

Preliminary Assessment on the Floristic Composition of Tamban Hill, Maasim, Iloilo, Philippines and Its Implications for Ecotourism Development JOSELITO TRANDIO P. MENDOZA Western Visayas College of Science and Technology Iloilo City Time: 5:01- 5:20 (November 15 – Second Day) Venue: Moon River Function Room This preliminary study on the floristics composition of Tamban Hill, Maasin, Iloilo, West Central Philippines is geared towards the conservation efforts of the Local Government Unit (LGU) to recognize the site as one of the potential tourist destinations in the future. The highest peak of the hill offers a panoramic view of Mt. Kanlaon, Guimaras Island, Iloilo City, Iloilo Airport, and Maasin Watershed among others. In support to this end, this study tries to determine the different plant species in the area and to describe its floral composition such as its abundance, species richness and species diversity. The significance of the study is to provide baseline information on the status of plants in the locality with implication for ecotourism development. The descriptive survey design was used in the study. A modified quadrate plot method was used in order to gather the data. The results of the study showed that within the sampling plots of mixed tropical secondary growth forest, it had 1,010 individual plants (N) counted in three quadrates that belong to 27 families, 38 genera and 40 species. Tagbak (Alpinia graminea) is the most abundant plant species in the sampling site. Species richness (S) is 40 and diversity index is 2.77, which is classified as moderate.

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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Leadership Spirituality Among Administrators and Faculty Job Satisfaction of State Universities and Colleges in Caraga Region LEONIELYN MALICAY Surigao State College of Technology Surigao City Time: 5:21 – 5:40 (November 15 – Second Day) Venue: Moon River Function Room This study ascertains the leadership spirituality among school administrators and faculty job satisfaction of the State Universities and Colleges in Caraga Region. It utilized the descriptive correlational research design. Participants in this study were 23 school administrators and 449 faculty members. Frequency Count, Mean, Standard Deviation, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were the statistical tools used to analyze the data with the aid of SPSS version 16 software. Regarding administrator’s leadership spirituality as perceived among administrators, result showed that Passion to Work (M=3.83) ranked 1st. while among faculty participants items on establish policies, procedures, vision, and values as guide to the employees got the highest mean. On the of job satisfaction of the faculty-participants, the following indicators were interpreted as Always with Mission and Purpose as the highest, Respect for Management got second and the lowest was on Workplace and Resources. Items interpreted as Often were: Opportunities for Growth and the lowest was Fairness. Results further revealed that leadership spirituality of the school administrators significantly affects faculty’s job satisfaction. Based on the above findings, it can be deduced that leadership spirituality among school administrators influenced job satisfaction among faculty members.

The Exposition of the Filipino Value Logic

JONAS ROBERT L. MIRANDA Surigao City Time: 5:41 – 6:10 (November 15 – Second Day) Venue: Princess Moon River Function Room

This expository paper seeks to address the deficiency of the two-valued deductive logic or the Classical Aristotelian logic in capturing the Filipino psyche. Moreover, this is based on the presumption that indigenous logic is evident in the reasoning processes of all human societies. The study of the two-valued logic has been part of the several degree curriculums in the Philippines but its apparent limitation in capturing the Filipino mind poses a new challenge. With this, the discussion will continue on the ground breaking programmatic investigation of Filipino logic. A preliminary analysis by Florentino Timbreza, et al. What Timbreza and his group did was a random collection of common maxims and sayings, statements and pronouncements of Filipinos from all walks of life in various newspapers, magazines, and komiks; they then collated and analyzed them. They found out that Filipinos with their own ethnic cultures and languages have their particular style or mode of reasoning and arguing. Following their findings regarding what makes the Filipino logic distinct and unique. They discovered that Filipinos arrive at their decisions and judgments using their value systems and they persuade others through Filipino modes of rhetoric and persuasion; in the process they sometimes commit fallacies by Western standards.

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


Analysis of Mothering in Amy Tan’s “The Joy Luck Club” and Bret Lott’s “Jewel” ANNABELLE R. NAIG Surigao State College of Technology Surigao City Time: 4:30 – 4:50 (November 16 – Third Day) Venue: Princess Moon River Function Room Employing a descriptive-analytical research design, this study analyzed the concept of mothering in Amy Tan’s “The Joy Luck Club” and Bret Lott’s “Jewel”. The complexity of mothering and the mother and daughter relationship were discussed taking into account the oppressive circumstances confronting the mother characters, their coping strategies, roles and qualities. Findings showed that with their individual writing styles, the authors effectively used plot and setting to develop dynamic and memorable characters. The emotionally absorbing act of mothering was influenced by a number of factors like a mother’s childhood, past experiences, present hardships and cultural orientations. But whatever circumstances they found themselves in, mothers remained strong because of their love and hope for their daughters. Mothers being resilient, self-sacrificing, and nurturing are the concepts of mothering derived from the novels. Based on the findings, the researcher proposed the following recommendations: Researchers should conduct an in-depth study as to how mothers from different cultures and backgrounds are portrayed in novels; congressmen should come up with specific government laws which aim to give assistance to mothers of special children, and teachers should incorporate literatures on mothering in their classes to provide for a better appreciation of women who made significant achievements in their respective field of endeavour as mothers.

Implementation of the Fisheries Education Program in the Higher Education Institutions in Mindanao TERESITA AMPER PIA-SENADOS Surigao State College of Technology-Malimono Campus Malimono, Surigao del Norte Time: 4:51 – 5:10 (November 16 – Third Day) Venue: Princess Moon River Function Room This study determined the extent of implementation of the fisheries education program in the higher education institutions in Mindanao. The research utilized the descriptive-evaluative research design which utilized a questionnaire adopted from Stufflebeam. The data from 146 participants were treated statistically using Simple Percentage, Mean and Standard Deviation, Analysis of Variance and Scheffe test. Results revealed that the fisheries education program in Mindanao is perceived to be very extensive (M=3.29). On the perception of the administrators and teachers regarding the extent of implementation of the fisheries education program when they are grouped according to profile and educational attainment of the respondents, statistics showed no significant and a significant difference (0.0164) occurred, respectively. However, perception faculty members do not significantly differ when they are grouped according to age (0.0952), sex (0.3268), civil status (0.4021) and number of years in teaching (0.0904). Likewise, perceptions among students do not differ in terms of age (0.3761) and sex (0.3298). Along these findings, therefore, the fisheries education program among the HEIs in Mindanao is fully implemented in the Context that the program caters to the development needs of the community where the school is established. However, some program components need improvement especially on Input, Process and Product.

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Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) in the Teaching of Biology EMMYLOU A. BORJA Surigao State College of Technology Surigao City Time: 5:11 – 5:30 (November 16 – Third Day) Venue: Moon River Function Room This study aims to determine the effectiveness of using Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) in the teaching of Biology. The researcher used the quantitative method of research. A quasi-experimental design was employed in the 86 1st year BSED students of SSCT Main Campus, who were the respondents of the study. It utilized the following instruments: the learning guides for the lessons using VLE and traditional media, a researcher-made achievement test, modified Biology Attitude Scale and Interest Scale. For the analysis of data, z-test, t-test of Correlated Means, t-test of Mean Difference, t-test of Independent Samples and Spearman Brown Formula were used and hypothetical significance was pegged at α=.05. Results revealed that the experimental and control groups performed Below Average in the pre-test. However, during posttest both groups obtained an increased performance to “Average”. These findings indicated that the use of Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is as effective as the use of Traditional Media in teaching Biology. This implies that both media improved academic performance of students. Therefore, teachers can still rely on traditional media or use VLE. It also implies that both media can be used together in one biology lesson.

Work Attitude, Work Environment, Job Satisfaction and Performance of Private Tertiary Instructors MARIA TAVITA Q. LUMINTAC Surigao State College of Technology Surigao City Time: 5:31 – 5:50 (November 16 – Third Day) Venue: Princess Moon River Function Room This study determined the relationship of work attitude, work environment, level of job satisfaction and the level of performance of college teachers of private higher education institutions (HEIs) in Caraga Region. A sample of 316 teachers was selected using stratified random sampling from the 41 private higher education institutions of Caraga Region per CHED list. Pearson Product- Moment Coefficient Correlation indicates that work attitude of the teachers is affected with the work environment from which they acquire self satisfaction and high level of performance. High level of performance and positive work attitude of the teachers can be attributed to a healthy work environment which has an impact to the job satisfaction of teachers. Getting higher level of satisfaction makes one perform efficiently all because the work environment is showing commonality and support with each other.

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education


Best Practices A Juxtaposition of Best Practices in Research and Publication and Typology Framework for a University Status: A University of the Immaculate Conception Experience Renan P. Limjuco, PhD ren02lim@yahoo.com Research Director University of the Immaculate Conception Emma V. Sagarino, MBA emz_vilz@yahoo.com Research Associate University of the Immaculate Conception Davao City This paper reveals the top 10 best practices in research and publications of the University of the Immaculate Conception (UIC) and explains how they become reflective evidences of the strength and effectiveness of the research policies, programs, incentive schemes and values that describe the research culture of UIC. All these manifestations are also embedded in the five-year development plan of the UIC Research and Development Center to effectively address the challenges that the institution would be facing to meet the requirements of the typology framework for the university status. Thus, one objective of this paper is to identify various elements of the institutional research program which might be considered critical in the next 4 or 5 school-years, especially with respect to the faculty’s capability in technical writing, scientific and creative works, forged international linkages and success in refereed international publications.

Training Workshop on Enabling Policies, Programs and best Practices in Research and Publication in Compliance to CHED’s Typology in Higher Education

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Training Workshop on Enabling Policies