Issuu on Google+

Training Qualification Review 2013 What is changing? ROC and units have been reviewed to ensure that there is consistency across all the new training qualifications. The knowledge and skills units have been combined into one integrated unit and have been improved to create a more streamlined, user friendly layout. By removing repetition and reviewing the units against the current NOS the content is now up-to-date and clearer to deliver. All Core Units that sit across the Diplomas have been reviewed and updated to reflect current NOS and customer feedback. They are now purely knowledge based units with the relevant skills elements incorporated into the occupational units. We have been able to include Level 1 core units within some Level 2 qualifications and also some Level 2 core units within Level 3 qualifications. The main aim of these new core units is to give every learner, whether studying full time or on an apprenticeship framework, an overview of the range of knowledge applicable and transferable

across a range of occupational areas within the construction and associated industries. Credit values and GLHs have been reviewed and updated with input from trainers/lecturers to ensure that delivery of the new units is appropriate, reflective of current QCF guidelines and maximise new funding regimes. Notes for Guidance for the units – we are looking at how we can improve these to ensure that they will give you the support you need in delivering these new qualifications. Unit referencing – all new units will have new unit references and a full matrix will be supplied to enable you to map the old units to the new ones. New Practical Assignments and Knowledge Question and Answer Banks are being developed for each unit to give flexibility for delivery.

Qualification specific changes for Level 2 Diploma in Painting and Decorating Rules of Combination (ROC) – the ROC have been changed as detailed above for all qualifications being reviewed. Also unit CC2024 – Erect and dismantle access platform and working platforms has been replaced with Level 1 unit CSA-L1Occ12 – Erect and dismantle access equipment and working platforms. Credit values and Guided Learning Hours (GLH) have changed as follows: Current minimum credit value: 86

New minimum credit value:

Current minimum GLHs :

New minimum GLHs:

860

77 629

See overleaf for more details.

Support and Guidance To support these new qualifications; we are reviewing the Synoptic Practical Assignments (SPA) that support the qualifications and developing new Practical Assignments for each unit. These new unit assignments will give you the flexibility of delivering them either unit by unit, groups of units or still continue to deliver synoptically at the end of the training. All new assignments have been developed to ensure they are not too prescriptive, reflect current industry practises and are cost effective without compromising quality. We are also developing new Question and Answer Banks for each unit, which will be delivered through the new Cskills Awards testing platform, again allowing flexibility on their delivery; unit by unit, group of units or at the end of the training to suit all individual learners’ needs. Paper based tests will also remain available. These new knowledge tests will replace the current unit Question and Answer Banks and the end knowledge test delivered through Evolve. Watch out for further information on the new knowledge and skills tests in the March inserts.

• All new training qualifications will be available through the qualification search facility on the website, making it easier to find the information you need to support you with the delivery of the new qualifications. • The new Practical Assignments will be available through a new secure area on Awards on-line (AOL). • The new Question and Answer Banks will be delivered through the new Cskills Awards testing platform. • A matrix to show you old to new qualifications and units will be provided. • Guidance on Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) from old to new units. • Where you can find old qualification information from 01 August 2013. • Dedicated area on the Cskills Awards website to support the transition to the new qualifications.

Review status • All new units and qualifications reviewed and agreed by Product Development Groups are now in the process of being submitted to Ofqual for approval and regulation in time for an April 2013 launch.

• Following regulation you will be able to see all new qualifications on The Register, giving you full information on the ROC, units, credit values/GLHs and the new Ofqual QRN.

You can contact your customer co-ordinator on 0344 994 4020 or email us at cskillsawards@cskills.org DIP018


Rules of Combination The Rule of Combination (RoC) below specifies the combination of units that need to be achieved for the individual to be awarded the qualification.

Qualification title:

Cskills Awards Level 2 Diploma in Painting and Decorating

QRN (Ofqual Ref):

600/8609/9

CSA Qualification Code:

DIP063

Qualification Start Date:

01/08/2013

End Registration Date:

31/08/2016

End Certification Date:

31/08/2018

Minimum credit value:

77

Minimum Guided Learning Hours (GLH) for this qualification:

629

To achieve this qualification a minimum of 77credits needs to be attained. This comprises 9 mandatory units of which 3 are core units and 6 are occupational units. Mandatory units Unit code CSA-L1Core01 CSA-L1Core02

Credit value: 77 Title Health, Safety and Welfare in Construction and Associated Industries Knowledge of Technical Information, Quantities and Communication with Others

Units required: 9 Credits

GLH

Level

Unit Ref No.

5

45

1

J/504/7856

2

18

1

A/504/7854

CSA-L1Core03

Knowledge of Construction Technology

2

18

1

L/504/7860

CSA-L2Occ47

Prepare Surfaces for Decoration

14

112

2

R/504/8007

CSA-L2Occ48

Apply Paint Systems by Brush and Roller

13

104

2

D/504/7958

CSA-L2Occ49

Apply Standard Papers to Ceilings and Walls

18

144

2

Y/504/7957

CSA-L2Occ50

Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes

12

96

2

J/504/7954

CSA-L2Occ51

Apply Water-borne Paint Systems Using High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) Spray Equipment

7

56

2

L/504/7955

CSA-L1Occ12

Erect and Dismantle Access Equipment and Working Platforms

4

36

1

R/504/7956


Title:

Health, safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

Unit Code:

CSA-L1Core01

Level:

1

Credit Value:

5

GLH:

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1

1.1

Know the health and safety regulations, roles and responsibilities.

45

Identify key health and safety legislation relevant to and used in a construction environment.

Notes for guidance

In relation to: − health and safety at work act (HASAWA) − reporting injuries, diseases, and dangerous Occurrences (RIDDOR) − control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH) - Control of asbestos at work regulations − provision and use of work equipment (PUWER) − manual handling − personal protective equipment (PPE) − working at height

1.2 State the key employer responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act (HASAWA).

In relation to: − safe working environment − adequate staff training − health and safety information − risk assessment − supervision

1.3 State the key employee responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act (HASAWA).

In relation to: − working safely − working in partnership with the employer − reporting hazards, near misses and accidents correctly

1.4 State the roles and responsibilities of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

Including: − enforcement − legislation and advice − inspection

1.5

Including: − Health and Safety Executive− CITB – Construction

Identify other sources of relevant health and safety information.

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

v2 5.13

1


Skills - British Standards Institute (BSI) − Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (ROSPA) − Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH)

2

Know the accident and emergency procedures and how to report them.

1.6

State when legislation would require the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to be informed.

1.7

State why there is a requirement for enforcing stringent guidance in health and safety.

1.8

State the importance of holding on-site safety inductions and toolbox talks.

1.9

State how your behaviour and actions could affect others.

2.1

State the major types of emergencies that could occur in the workplace.

Including: − fires − bombs and security alerts - flooding - collapses - gas

2.2

State the key legislation used for reporting accidents.

- Reporting Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous occurrences RIDDOR

2.3

State the different types of injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences in the workplace.

2.4

State the main types of records used in the event of an accident or emergency.

2.5

State why it is important to report accidents and near misses.

2.6

State the difference between major and minor injuries and the meaning of a near miss.

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

Including: − accident reporting documentation − first aid records − organisational records and documentation

v2 5.13

2


2.7

List the key accident trends within the United Kingdom construction industry.

In reference to: - Health and Safety Executive - ROSPA

2.8

State the effects that common types of accidents and injuries could have on the employer.

Including: − poor company image − loss of production − insurance − closure of site

2.9

List the authorised personnel who could be involved in dealing with accident and emergency situations.

Including: − first aiders / emergency responders − supervisors/managers − health and safety executive − emergency services

2.10 List the contents of a basic first aid kit. 2.11 State the actions to be taken on discovering an accident.

3

Know how to identify hazards on construction sites.

Including: − area made safe − call for help − emergency services

3.1

State the importance of good housekeeping.

3.2

State the purpose of risk assessments and method statements.

Including: − forms − near miss reports − hazard books

3.3

List the major types of hazards in the workplace.

Including: − fires − tripping − chemical spills − falls from height − burns − electrical - exposure to hazardous substances (asbestos or mould infestation) - plant / vehicles

3.4

State the importance and methods of reporting hazards.

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

Including: - prevent danger to others - prevent accidents / dangerous occurrences - hazard/accident books / near miss registers - site/company/workplace procedures

v2 5.13

3


3.5 State why hazards can be created by changing circumstances in the workplace.

4

Know about health and hygiene in a construction environment.

3.6

State the importance of the correct storage of combustibles and chemicals on site.

4.1

List the requirements for welfare facilities in a construction environment.

Including: - construction site developments - plant and vehicles - new intake of work personnel - periods of extreme weather e.g. flood, wind, heat and snow

Including: − toilets − washing facilities

4.2 State the health effects of noise and the appropriate precautions that can be taken.

Including: − personal protective equipment − isolation

4.3 Identify the various substances hazardous to health and the appropriate precautions that need to be taken.

Including: Legislation: - COSHH - asbestos regulations - explosives regulations Substances: e.g. - lead paint - solvents, adhesives - cements - dust - contaminated soil or water - asbestos containing products/materials Precautions - personal protective equipment - respiratory equipment (RPE) - isolation - exposure times

4.4 State the importance of personal hygiene. 4.5 List possible consequences of health risks in the workplace.

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

Including: - dermatitis, skin cancer - infection, eye damage - head injury, cuts - leptospirosis (Weils disease) - burns

v2 5.13

4


- hearing damage - respiratory failure - lung damage, lung disease - asbestosis - Hand/Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) or vibration white finger - death

5

6

Know how to handle and store materials and equipment safely.

Know about basic working platforms and access equipment.

5.1 State the procedures for safe lifting in accordance with guidance and legislation.

Including: - manual handling techniques - mechanical lifting equipment/devices - team lifting

5.2 State the importance of using site safety equipment when handling and storing materials and equipment.

Including: - Provision of different types of safety equipment to minimise risk

5.3 Identify the key legislation relating to the safe handling of materials and equipment.

Including: - HASAWA - manual Handling - COSHH - asbestos regulations

5.4 State the importance of correct storage of construction materials

In relation to: - minimising and dealing with spillages - maximising shelf life / stock rotation ensuring safety to others when collecting resources from storage areas - manufacturers’ guidance / instructions - correct environment

5.5

State the importance of waste control procedures in the workplace.

Including: - reuse - recycling - general waste - contractual obligations / environmental considerations

6.1

State the safe methods of use and appropriate parts of working platforms and access equipment.

Including: - ensuring any work at height is planned, so proper precautions are put in place - ensuring equipment to be used for working at heights is inspected and maintained prior to and during use Taking in to account:

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

v2 5.13

5


- ground conditions - loading - manufacturers’ guidance and instructions Types of working platforms and access equipment: - working platforms - step ladders, ladders, extension ladders - proprietary scaffolds (e.g. mobile tower scaffolds)

6.2

State good practice methods in the use of working platforms and access equipment.

In relation to the use of: - working platforms - stepladders, ladders, extension ladders - proprietary scaffolding e.g. mobile tower scaffolds Including: - moving - loading - storing materials on platforms

6.3 Identify the dangers of working at height when using basic working platforms and access equipment.

7

Know how to work safely around electricity in a construction environment.

In relation to: - general public - employees - head injuries - falling from height - materials and objects falling from height - proximity hazards - fragile roofs

7.1

State the precautions to be taken to avoid risks to themselves and others when working with electricity.

In relation to: - PAT testing - RCD devices - visually inspecting leads and cables prior to use - use of appropriate access equipment - use of portable power tools

7.2

State the dangers and effects of those dangers associated with the use of electricity.

Including: - burns - electrocution - fire

7.3

State the different voltages that could be used in the workplace.

Including: - 110, 240 and 415 volts

7.4 State why there is a need for cables to be colour coded.

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

Including: - live, neutral and earth colours

v2 5.13

6


8

9

Know how to use personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly.

Know the fire and emergency procedures.

Including: - 100, 240 and 415 volts - use of protection devices e.g. RCD’s with any 240 volt tools - Only use other voltages above 110 volts if part of a safe system of work

7.5

State the requirements for working safely with equipment of differing electrical voltages.

7.6

State the methods and importance of storing electrical equipment correctly.

8.1

State the importance of and the different types of personal protective equipment (PPE) used in the workplace.

Including: - hard hats - eye/ear protection - face/dust masks, respiratory equipment (RPE)protective clothing - hi-vis - toe protection, boots, non slip soles - gloves, hand protection - sun protection, barrier cream

8.2

State the legislation governing personal protective equipment (PPE).

Including: - control of hazardous substances (COSHH) - provision and use of work equipment - head protection and PPE

8.3

State why it is important to store and maintain personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly.

8.4 List the possible consequences of not using the correct personal protective equipment (PPE).

Including: - dermatitis, skin cancer - infection, eye damage - head injury, cuts - leptospirosis (weil’s disease) - including the consequences of not adopting appropriate working hygiene practices - burns - hearing damage - respiratory failure - lung damage / lung disease - asbestosis - death

9.1

List the three elements essential to creating a fire.

In relation to: - oxygen, fuel, heat

9.2

State the ways in which a fire could

In relation to:

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

v2 5.13

7


spread and identify methods of fire prevention.

-fire Prevention -identify hazards -report hazards -remove or reduce sources of ignition how fires can spread- fuel eg timber, paper and flammable liquids - sources of heat, such as a spark, welding torch blow lamp, or a cigarette that has not been put out - hot works- areas where smoking is allowed or even cooking in the canteen Fire Prevention: -keeping work areas tidy - removal of flammable waste material - complying with site/organisational rules for fire safety - being aware of things that can cause fires - reporting to your supervisor or employer anything that maybe a fire risk

10. Know about signs and safety notices.

9.3

State the actions to be taken on discovering a fire.

9.4

State the correct fire evacuation procedures.

Including: - raising the alarm - alerting others - clearing exists - leaving the building via escape routes/ assembling at the correct assembly point Including: - clearing exits - moving to the assembly area

9.5 State the different types of fire extinguishers and their correct uses.

Including: - water - organic fires - foam - liquid and organic fires - CO - electrical fires - dry powder –electrical, liquids

10.1 List the categories of signs and safety notices used in the workplace.

Including: - prohibition - mandatory - warning - safe condition.

10.2 State the key differences between signs and safety notices used in the workplace.

Including: - specific colour - purpose - shape (either individual i.e. circular or triangular or

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

v2 5.13

8


shape within a rectangular enclosure)

CSA-L1Core01 Health safety and welfare in construction and associated industries

v2 5.13

9


Title:

Knowledge of technical information, quantities and communication with others

Unit Code:

CSA-L1Core2

Level:

1

Credit Value:

2

GLH: 18

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1

1.1

2

Know how to interpret construction related technical information.

Know how to determine quantities of materials.

Notes for guidance

State why documentation must be looked after and stored correctly.

1.2 Identify basic symbols and hatchings from working drawings.

BS 1192 Drawing Office Practice

1.3

Identify the appropriate scale to be used with a range of drawings.

In relation to: - Block plans - Site plans - Working drawings Scales could include: - 1:1, 1:5, 1:10, 1:20, 1:100 and 1:1250

1.4

Select information from basic location drawings and specifications.

1.5

Select information from basic work schedules in general use.

2.1

State the importance of checking deliveries of building materials.

Including: - correct type of materials delivered - correct quantities of materials delivered - check for missing or incorrect materials - damaged items on arrival

2.2 State why it is important to calculate the correct amount of materials and resources required.

Including: - cost of materials - wastage - storage

2.3

Including: - linear and perimeter in metres and millimetres - area, volume

State the methods used to calculate basic material quantities.

1 CSA-L1Core02 Knowledge of technical information, quantities and communication with others

v2 05.13


3

4

Know how to relay information in the construction environment.

Know how to communicate with others in the construction environment.

3.1

List the basic content and requirements for recording a message.

3.2

State what is meant by positive and negative communication.

3.3

State the benefits of clear and effective communication when relaying information.

Including: - date, time, message content, contact name and details - legible, clear record of message for person intended

4.1 State how to communicate in the appropriate manner with others to ensure work is carried out productively

Including: - Managers, supervisors, colleagues, clients/ customers, other occupations

4.2 State the importance of maintaining good working relationships.

Including: - clear communications - productive working environment - avoids negative impact on working environment - interpersonal skills - other trades / occupations

4.3 State the importance of applying equality and diversity when communicating and working with others.

In relation to: - respect for others - creed, race, gender, ability etc.

2 CSA-L1Core02 Knowledge of technical information, quantities and communication with others

v2 05.13


Title:

Knowledge of construction technology

Unit Code:

CSA-L1Core03

Level:

1

Credit Value:

2

GLH: 18

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1

1.1

State the purpose of a foundation.

Including: - structural stability

1.2

State the different types of foundations used in modern construction.

Including: traditional strip, raft, trench fill In relation to: - ground conditions (subsoil)

1.3

List the materials used in domestic foundations.

Including: - aggregate - cement, - water - additives - reinforcement

2.1

State the different methods of floor construction.

Including: - solid - suspended

2.2

List the materials used in floor construction

Including: - timber - concrete

3.1

State the different methods of wall construction.

Could include: - cavity masonry - timber frame - internal partitions

3.2

List the materials used in wall construction

Could include: - brickwork, blockwork, stonework - timber - timber and metal partitions - insulation

2

3

Know about foundation construction.

Know about floor construction

Know about wall construction

Notes for guidance

1 CSA-L1Core03 Knowledge of Construction Technology

V2 05.13


4

5

Know about roof construction

Know about utilities and services within construction

6. Know about sustainability within construction

3.3

State the reason for the use of dampproof membrane (DPM) and damp-proof course (DPC).

4.1

State the different types of roof construction.

Including: − flat, pitched, gable, hipped

4.2

State the different exterior features used in roof construction

Including: − rridge, apex, fascia, soffit, bargeboard, eaves

4.3 State different types of roof coverings

Including: - felt - slate - tile - metals

5.1

Including: - drainage - waste water/ sewerage - water - gas - electricity - communications (telephone/ data/cable) - ducting (heating & ventilation)

List the different utilities and services provided to structures

6.1 State what is meant by the term sustainability.

In relation to: - finite and renewable resources - impact of construction on the environment

6.2 List examples of how sustainability can be incorporated into construction projects

Could include: - using local managed resources e.g. timber - eco-friendly sustainable manufactured products - environmentally sourced timber / resources - alternative methods of building e.g. timber frame - architecture and design considerations

6.3 State what is meant by the term Energy Efficiency

Could include:- energy saving measures - alternative energy sources e.g. wind, solar, water - impact on the environment

6.4

Could include: - alternative energy sources e.g. wind, solar, water - alternative heating sources - heat loss prevention e.g. insulation and controlling draughts, double glazing - building design e.g. maximising natural light, ventilation etc. - using energy rated products and services e.g.

List examples of how Energy Efficiency can be incorporated into construction projects

2 CSA-L1Core03 Knowledge of Construction Technology

V2 05.13


insulation, light fittings, light bulbs etc.

3 CSA-L1Core03 Knowledge of Construction Technology

V2 05.13


Title:

Prepare surfaces for decoration

Unit Code:

CSA-L2Occ47

Level:

2

Credit Value:

14

GLH: 112

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1.

1.1

State the potential hazards associated with preparing surfaces for decoration and how to prevent breaches in Health and Safety using risk assessment.

Referring to: - Construction Health and Safety - The Work at Height Regulations 2005 - Manufacturers’ instructions - Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) - Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

1.2

State the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for preparing surfaces for decoration.

Could include: - overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

1.3

Describe the properties and applications of timber and timber sheet products.

Timber: − softwood (pine, cedar, spruce) and hardwoods (oak, beech, mahogany). Timber sheet products: − medium density fibreboard (MDF), plywood, hardwood, blockboard. Applications: − structural, first fix, second fix, decorative. Surface properties: − tactility, porosity, aesthetics. Physical properties: − insulation, hardness, strength, flexibility.

1.4

Describe the properties and applications of metal surfaces.

Metal types: − ferrous (cast iron, wrought iron, mild sheet, steel), and non-ferrous (copper, aluminium, lead,

Know how to prepare surfaces to receive finishing systems

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13

Notes for guidance


galvanised steel). Applications: − BSSB, railings/fencing, garage doors, pipes, window frames, flashings. Surface properties: − colour, hardness, porosity, toxicity. Physical properties: − thermal expansion and contraction, electrical conductivity.

1.5

Describe the properties and applications of trowel finishes and plasterboard.

Surface types: − gypsum plaster, plasterboards (square and featheredge), brickwork, blockwork. Applications: − dry lining, structural, surface finishing, internal, external. Physical properties: − tactility, porosity, capillarity, adhesion, effects of moisture. Chemical properties: Alkalinity, acidity, inertness, soluble salt content

1.6

Describe the preparation processes for a range of surfaces.

Preparation processes: − solvent wiping, dry abrading, knotting, priming, stopping and filling. - hand tool preparation, descaling, degreasing, powered tool preparation, priming. − raking out, wetting in, making good, abrading, scraping, caulking, taping, proud filling, flush filling, degreasing. Surfaces: Timbers: softwoods, sheet materials. Metals: ferrous and non-ferrous Trowel finishes and plasterboard Plastics: – PVCu, rainwater goods, windows/doors (internal and external), pipework.

1.7

Describe the causes of metal corrosion using appropriate terminology.

Metal types: − ferrous (cast iron, wrought iron, mild sheet, steel), and non-ferrous (copper, aluminium, lead, galvanised steel). Corrosion factors: − oxygen, hydrogen, moisture, atmospheric

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13


pollution. Terminology: − surface corrosion, pitting, oxides, millscale, galvanic action, cathodic protection.

2.

Be able to prepare surfaces to receive finishing systems

1.8

Describe appropriate solvent-borne and water-borne primers for the following:  timber and timber sheet products  metal surfaces  trowel and plasterboard surfaces

Primers: − solvent-borne primers: aluminium, white, pink, water-borne primers:, size, acrylic, emulsion - zinc phosphate, metal primer, etch primer. − alkali resisting primer (ARP), primer sealer, emulsion. - new technology coatings

1.9

Describe how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

Protect against: damage from general workplace activities, other occupations and adverse weather conditions.

2.1

Select and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when preparing surfaces for decoration.

Could include: - overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

2.2

Protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

Could include: maintaining a clean work space, disposal of waste.

2.3

Select the appropriate tools and equipment suitable for the method of preparation.  Timber  Metal  Trowel surfaces and plasterboard

Tools and equipment could include: − scrapers, putty knives, chisel knife, knotting brush, punch, hammer, rubbing blocks (rubber, cork, wood), natural and synthetic brushes, short pile and foam rollers, dusting brush, dust masks, paint pots/kettles, roller trays. Tools and equipment could include: − needle gun, chisel gun, rotary sander, orbital sander, wire brushes, scraper, hand and powered chipping hammers, natural and synthetic brushes, short pile and foam rollers, paint pots/kettles, roller trays, goggles, masks, gloves. Tools and equipment could include: − scrapers, filling knives, filling board, hawk and trowel, caulking blades, roller trays, natural and synthetic brushes, woven fabric rollers, buckets.

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13


2.4

Select the appropriate materials suitable for the method of preparation.  Timber  Metal  Trowel surfaces and plasterboard

Materials could include: − solvents, shellac/patent/white knotting, stoppers, single-pack fillers, two-pack fillers. − degreasing agents, rust removers, mordant solutions, aluminium oxide, emery paper, steel wool, primers (zinc phosphate, single and twopack etch primers, water-borne primers). − plaster-based fillers, joint fillers, joint tapes, reinforced corner tapes, abrasives, degreasing agents, stabilising solutions, water-borne primers, sizes, solvent-borne primers (alkali resisting primer).

2.5

Prepare a range of surfaces using the appropriate processes in accordance with the work instructions.

Timber, a minimum of one of the following: − softwood (pine, spruce) and Timber sheet products, a minimum of one of the following: − medium density fibreboard (MDF), plywood, hardboard, blockboard. Processes could include: − solvent wiping, dry abrading, knotting, priming, stopping, filling. Metals ferrous and non-ferrous. Preparation processes could include: − descaling, degreasing, priming. Primers could include: − zinc phosphate, metal primer, etch primer. Surface types could include: − gypsum plaster, plasterboards (square and featheredge), brickwork and/or blockwork. Preparation processes could include: Raking out, wetting in, making good, abrading, scraping, caulking and taping, proud and flush filling, To receive: paint (water-borne and solvent-borne) paper

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13


3.

Know how to remove paint and paper to receive finishing systems.

2.6

Work in accordance with current environmental and health and safety regulations.

3.1

Explain circumstances under which it may be necessary to remove existing paint and paper prior to redecoration.

Defects: − blistering, cracking or crazing, flaking, excessive film thickness, peeling, mould, redecoration.

3.2

Describe the appropriate methods of removing coatings from a range of substrates.

Substrates: − timbers, ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, plaster, plasterboard, glazed products. Removal processes: − liquid paint removing, electric hot air, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) burning off, hand soaking, steam stripping, peelable strippers, infra-red Including: over-painted and peelable papers.

3.3

Describe the safety precautions required when carrying out a range of paint and paper removal processes.

Removal processes: − liquid paint removing, electric hot air, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) burning off, hand soaking, steam stripping. Hot work: − steam, electricity, naked flam, permits.

3.4

Describe the reason for decontaminating surfaces following the use of liquid paint removers.

3.5

Describe the significances of the starting point and soaking time when removing papers.

3.6

Describe the correct method of storing a range of tools and equipment to remove paint and paper.

Tools and equipment: − scrapers, chisel, knife, shavehooks, metal containers, fibre brush, wall brush, electric hot-air gun, transformer, extension cable, fire extinguisher, polythene sheets, dust sheets, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) burning off equipment, non-combustible panel, steam stripper.

3.7

Describe appropriate methods of disposing of debris and waste produced by preparation processes

Debris and waste: efflorescence, moss and lichen, moulds and fungi, paper contaminated with paste, paper contaminated with mould, textured coatings

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13


Preparation processes using: sugar soap, degreasing products, solvents, in accordance with relevant legislation.

4.

5.

Be able to remove paint and paper to receive finishing systems.

Know how to rectify surface conditions.

4.1

Select the appropriate equipment to remove paint and paper.

Equipment could include: − electric hot-air guns, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) burning off equipment, steam strippers, peelable strippers

4.2

Set up and check functionality of equipment to remove paint and paper.

Equipment could include: − electric hot-air guns, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) burning off equipment, steam strippers.

4.3

Protect the work area prior to removing paint and paper.

4.4

Remove previously applied coatings using the following:  liquid paint removers  heat producing apparatus

4.5

Remove over-painted papers and peelable papers using the following:  steam stripping  hand soaking.

4.6

Check that stripped surfaces are free from liquid paint remover, paint, paper and paste.

4.7

Dispose of removed paint and paper using the appropriate disposal methods.

4.8

Work in accordance with current environmental and health and safety regulations.

5.1

Describe the different types and causes of a range of surface conditions.

Surface conditions: − efflorescence, moss and lichen, moulds and fungi, contamination (dirt, grease, silicone, wax polish, carbon/smoke, friable).

5.2

Describe the suitable rectification process

Rectification process:

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13

Peelable strippers.


for a range of surface conditions with a range of defects.

− scraping, wet and dry abrading, brushing, washing down, degreasing, solvent wiping, washing down for a finish, face putty, hand tools, powered tools, cut out and treat . Defects: − saponification, cissing, discolouration, slow or nondrying surface coating, bleeding (resin, nicotine, bitumen), chalking and powdering, loss of gloss, wrinkling or shrivelling, cracking or crazing, flaking, blistering, bittiness, runs, sags or curtains, missing facing putties. Surface conditions: − efflorescence, moss and lichen, moulds and fungi, contamination (dirt, grease, silicone, wax, polish, carbon/smoke, friable), wet rot and dry rot.

5.3

Describe how to identify a range of defects and the causes of unsound paint on timber and manufactured timber product surfaces.

Defects: − saponification, cissing, discolouration, slow or nondrying surface coating, bleeding (resin, nicotine, bitumen), chalking and powdering, loss of gloss, wrinkling or shrivelling, cracking or crazing, flaking, blistering, bittiness, runs, sags or curtains, missing facing putties.

5.4

Describe a range of cleaning agents and how they are used for removing contamination.

Cleaning agents: − solvents (white spirit, methylated spirit, acetone), detergents, sugar soap.

5.5

Describe how to test for a solvent-borne or water-borne coating.

5.6

State how a range of surface conditions and defects can be avoided.

Surface conditions: − efflorescence, moss and lichen, moulds and fungi, contamination (dirt, grease, silicone, wax, polish, carbon/smoke, friable). Defects: − saponification, cissing, discolouration, slow or nondrying surface coating, bleeding (resin, nicotine, bitumen), chalking and powdering, loss of gloss, wrinkling or shrivelling, cracking or crazing, flaking, blistering, bittiness, runs, sags or curtains, missing facing putties.

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13


5.7

Describe the possible reasons for unsound paint on ferrous and non-ferrous metals.

Reasons: grease, corrosion, contamination, moisture, pollution, oxidisation, mill scale.

5.8

Describe the purposes of abrading surfaces by a range of methods, and the suitable type and grade of abrasive for each method.

Abrading purposes: − key or scratch, level. Abrasives: − glasspaper, aluminium oxide, silicon carbide, steel wool, emery cloths. Methods: wet abrade, dry abrade,

6.

Be able to rectify surface conditions.

5.9

Describe the health and safety precautions to be applied when preparing unsound surface conditions.

6.1

Select the appropriate rectification process for a range of surface conditions.

Rectification process could include: − scraping, wet and dry abrading, brushing, washing down, degreasing, solvent wiping, washing down for a finish, face putty, hand tools, powered tools. Surface conditions could include: − efflorescence, moss and lichen, moulds and fungi, (contamination dirt, grease, silicone, wax, polish, carbon/smoke), friable.

6.2

Select the appropriate tools and equipment suitable for the rectification process.

Rectification process could include: − scraping, wet and dry abrading, brushing, washing down, degreasing, solvent wiping, washing down for a finish, face putty, hand tools, powered tools. Tools and equipment could include: − scrapers, wire brushes, stiff scrubbing brushes, Buckets, sponges, goggles, protective gloves, Moisture meter, orbital sander, lint-free cloths, Palm sander, dusting brush, rubbing blocks (rubber, cork wood), knotting brush, wall brush.

6.3

Select the appropriate materials suitable for the rectification process.

Rectification process could include: − scraping, wet and dry abrading, brushing, washing down, degreasing, solvent wiping, washing down for a finish, face putty, hand tools, powered tools. Materials could include: − sterilising fluids, fungicidal washes, sugar soap,

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13


primers and sealers (alkali resisting, aluminium, wood, acrylic, stabilising solutions), solvents ( white spirit, methylated spirits), shellac and patent knotting, stain blocks (proprietary and nonproprietary), barrier cream. Cleaning agents could include: − solvents (white spirit, methylated spirit, acetone), detergents, sugar soap.

7.

Know how to repair and make good surfaces.

6.4

Carry out the work in accordance with current environmental and health and safety regulations.

7.1

Describe the reasons for cracking to plaster surfaces and how it occurs.

7.2

Explain the stages involved in the process of repairing and making good cracks in plaster surfaces.

7.3

Describe the effects of heat and moisture on plaster.

7.4

Describe defects found on a range of interior and exterior materials.

Surface types and areas: − types – timber, brickwork, plaster, concrete, plasterboard. − areas – ceilings, walls, doors, windows (frames and glazed units), timber trim (skirting, architrave). Defects: − open joints in joinery, splits, indentations, open grained timber, defective putties, holes, cracks (settlement, shrinkage), defective plasterboard joints, blown plaster and render, gaps, defective pointing.

7.5

Describe the appropriate method for making good open grained timber.

Using: abrasives and fillers.

7.6

List the commonly used stoppers when repairing and making good surfaces.

7.7

List the tools required when using

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13

Stages: − scraping, raking out, undercutting, wetting in, back filling, proud filling, flush filling, dry abrading.


stoppers to repair and make good surfaces.

8.

Be able to repair and make good surfaces.

Stoppers: − putty, plastic woods, two-pack stoppers.

7.8

Describe the repair process applied when using a range of stoppers to repair and make good surfaces.

7.9

Describe the safety precautions required when applying a range of stoppers to repair and make good surfaces.

8.1

Select the appropriate tools and equipment for repairing and making good a range of surfaces and areas.

Tools and equipment could include: − scraper, putty knife, chisel knife, shavehooks, filling knife/blade, filling board, dusting brush, craft knife, cartridge gun/cage, sponge, bucket, wetting-in brush, nail punch, hammer, pointing trowel, hawk, caulking blades, rubbing blocks, pole sander, goggles, dust masks. Surface types and areas could include: − types – timber, brickwork, plaster, concrete, plasterboard. − areas – ceilings, walls, doors, windows (frames and glazed units), timber trim (skirting, architrave).

8.2

Select the appropriate interior and exterior materials for repairing and making good a range of surfaces and areas.

Materials could include: − water-based fillers, single pack fillers, solventbased stoppers and fillers, decorator’s caulk and sealants, ready-mixed lightweight filler, plaster, expanding foam, two-pack fillers, acrylic coloured timber fillers, PVA primer/sealer, jointing tape, cement mortar, abrasives. Surface types and areas could include: − types – timber, brickwork, plaster, concrete, plasterboard. − areas – ceilings, walls, doors, windows (frames and glazed units), timber trim (skirting, architrave).

8.3

Prepare a range of defective areas ready for repair and making good.

Defects could include: − open joints in joinery, splits, indentations, open grained timber, defective putties, holes, cracks (settlement, shrinkage), defective plasterboard joints, blown plaster and render, gaps, defective pointing.

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13


8.4

Prepare appropriate materials for a range of repairing and making good processes.

Materials could include: − water-based fillers, single pack fillers, solventbased stoppers and fillers, decorators caulk and sealants, ready-mixed lightweight filler, plaster, expanding foam, two-pack fillers, acrylic coloured timber fillers, PVA primer/sealer, jointing tape, cement mortar, abrasives, new technology materials. Repair and making good processes could include: − scraping, sinking, nail heads, raking out, undercutting, wetting in, back filling, proud filling, flush filling, stopping, applying caulk and sealants, spot prime and seal, wet and dry abrading.

8.5

Apply and finish a range of materials to repair and make good surfaces.

Materials could include: − water-based fillers, single pack fillers, solventbased stoppers and fillers, decorators caulk and sealants, ready-mixed lightweight filler, plaster, expanding foam, two-pack fillers, acrylic coloured timber fillers, PVA primer/sealer, jointing tape, abrasives.

8.6

Carry out the work in accordance with current environmental and health and safety regulations.

CSA-L2Occ47 Prepare Surfaces for Decoration – V1 02-13


Title:

Apply paint systems by brush and roller

Unit Code:

CSA-L2Occ48

Level:

2

Credit Value:

13

GLH: 104

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1.

1.1

Describe the domestic and commercial factors that need to be considered when preparing the work area

Domestic considerations: − room furniture, floor/carpets, door and window furniture, wall mounted fixtures and fittings. Commercial considerations: − workstations, lighting, machinery, equipment, furniture, public access to premises, climate, weather, temperature, ventilation, debris.

1.2

Compare the properties and appropriate uses for a range of masking tapes.

Masking tape: − exterior, interior, low-tack, crepe, 7 day.

1.3

Describe the appropriate system for applying and removing masking tape.

Including masking machines.

1.4

Compare a range of protective sheeting and their appropriate uses.

Protective sheeting: − polythene sheets, dust sheets (lightweight, protective backing, heavy duty), drop sheets, tarpaulin, self-adhesive protection and new technologies.

1.5

Describe the maintenance and storage requirements for dust sheets and masking machines.

1.6

Describe how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

2.1

Clear and clean the work area in preparation for painting.

2.

Know how to prepare the work area to apply paint systems by brush and roller.

Be able to prepare the work area to apply paint systems by brush and

CSA-L2Occ48 Apply Paint Systems by Brush and Roller V1 02-13

Notes for guidance

Protect against: damage from general workplace activities, other occupations and adverse weather conditions.


roller.

3.

Know how to prepare materials for application by brush and roller.

2.2

Select the appropriate materials to protect surrounding areas, furniture and fittings.

Materials could include: − masking paper, masking shield, polythene sheets, dust sheets (lightweight, protective backing, heavy duty), self-adhesive masking paper, drop sheets, tarpaulin. Tools and equipment could include: − signs, barriers, pliers, screwdrivers (slotted, crosshead, posidriv), claw hammer, brushes, broom, shovels.

2.3

Protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

Protecting by maintaining a clean work space and disposal of waste. Remove and store fittings and furniture.

3.1

Describe the characteristics and function of a range of brush and roller component parts.

Surface properties: − handle, ferrule, setting, filling, frame/yoke, sleeve, extension pole.

3.2

Explain reasons for the selection of application tools for a range of surface coatings.

Application tools: Brushes: natural bristle, synthetic filament Roller sleeve types could include: woven fabric, mohair, sheepskin/lambswool, knitted, short, medium, long pile, foam Surface coatings: − water-borne types (interior, exterior, pigmented, non-pigmented) with finishes in matt, mid sheen silk, eggshell, gloss. − solvent-borne types in matt, eggshell, semi-gloss, gloss. − systems (interior and exterior) for timber, metal (ferrous, non-ferrous), trowelled finishes (plaster), plasterboard; − wood treatments (water-borne and solvent borne) stains, preservatives, varnishes (matt, eggshell and gloss).

3.3

Describe the process of surface coating preparation.

Preparation: − open container, stir, decant, search/strain coatings where appropriate, adjust viscosity.

3.4

Explain the reason for thinning and conditioning paints prior to application.

Thinners: solvents, water Conditioners: proprietary and non-proprietary. Traditional methods and new coating technologies

3.5

Describe the main types of surface

Surface coatings:

CSA-L2Occ48 Apply Paint Systems by Brush and Roller V1 02-13


coating and their components.

− water-borne types (interior, exterior, pigmented, non-pigmented) with finishes in matt, mid sheen silk, eggshell, gloss. − solvent-borne types in matt, eggshell, semi-gloss, Gloss - systems (interior and exterior) for timber, metal (ferrous, non-ferrous), trowelled finishes (plaster), plasterboard; − wood treatments (water-borne and solvent borne) stains, preservatives, varnishes (matt, eggshell and gloss). Components: − water-borne: film former, pigment and extender, dispersant/emulsifier, additives (anti-frothing agent, water, biocides), solvent/thinner, drier. − solvent-borne: film former, pigment, solvent/thinner, driers, additives.

4.

Be able to prepare materials for application by brush and roller.

4.1

Select the appropriate application tools and equipment to carry out the work.

Tools could include:: Brushes: natural bristle, synthetic filament Roller sleeve types could include: woven fabric, mohair, sheepskin/lambswool, knitted, short, medium, long pile, foam Equipment could include: − roller cages, paint stirrers, strainers, paint pots, extension poles, buckets, scuttles, trays, dust sheets.

4.2

Plan and prepare a range of surface coatings to carry out the work .

Surface coatings could include: − water-borne types (interior, exterior, pigmented, non-pigmented) with finishes in matt, mid sheen silk, eggshell, gloss. − solvent-borne types in matt, eggshell, semi-gloss, gloss. - systems (interior and exterior) for timber, metal (ferrous, non-ferrous), trowelled finishes (plaster), plasterboard; − wood treatments (water-borne and solvent borne) stains, preservatives, varnishes ( eggshell and gloss). Colour scheme:

CSA-L2Occ48 Apply Paint Systems by Brush and Roller V1 02-13


monochromatic, achromatic, tint, shade, advancing, receding/retiring, warm and cool colours.

5.

Know how to apply water-borne and solvent-borne coatings by brush and roller.

5.1

State the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for applying paint systems by brush and roller.

Could include: - overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

5.2

State the potential hazards associated with applying paint systems by brush and roller and how to prevent breaches in Health and Safety using risk assessment.

Referring to: - Construction Health and Safety - The Work at Height Regulations 2005 - Manufacturers’ instructions - Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) - Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

5.3

Describe the drying processes and influences for the following:  Water-borne coatings  Solvent-borne coatings

Drying processes: − water-borne (evaporation, coalescence). − solvent-borne (evaporation, oxidation, polymerisation). − flow, set, tack, touch dry, hard dry, through dry. Influences: air, light, temperature, moisture

5.4

Describe how a range of atmospheric conditions can affect the drying process.

Atmospheric conditions: − hot air, cold air, draughts, direct sunlight, lack of light, humidity.

5.5

Describe a range of factors associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

Factors: − relevance to the painting and decorating industry, EU directive 2004/42/EC, product exemptions, categories of coatings, product labelling.

5.6

Describe the reason for painting room areas and components in sequence.

Room areas and components: − ceilings, broad walls, flush doors, panelled doors, casement windows, decorative mouldings, cutting in to features, balusters and spindles.

5.7

Describe the causes and remedies of a range of defects:  visible defects  post application defects

Defects: − misses, grinning, runs and sags, excessive brushmarks and ropiness, fat edges and wet edge build-up, paint on adjacent surfaces, roller edge marks, roller skid marks, irregular cutting in, orange peel, excessive bits and nibs. Post application defects: − retarded drying, cratering, bleeding, blooming, loss of gloss, fading, discolouration, yellowing, cracking/crazing, flaking/peeling.

CSA-L2Occ48 Apply Paint Systems by Brush and Roller V1 02-13


6.

Be able to apply water-borne and solvent-borne coatings by brush and roller.

5.8

Describe a range of common colour terms.

Terms: − primary, secondary, tertiary, colour circle, natural order, monochromatic, achromatic, tint, shade, advancing, receding/retiring, warm and cool colours.

5.9

Explain the reason for the colour organisational systems.

Reasons: − British Standard, RAL, paint colours for building purposes; Munsell colour system.

6.1

Select and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when applying paint systems by brush and roller.

Could include: - overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

6.2

Apply a standard organisational colour system to a surface and colour schemes to a small room / cubicle.

Standard organisational colour system: colour wheel of primary and secondary colours Colour schemes: monochromatic, warm Minimum of three colours to surfaces to include: doors, linear, wall

6.3Apply surface coatings by brush and roller to specified areas in accordance with the work instructions.

Surface coatings could include: − water-borne types (interior, exterior, pigmented, non-pigmented) with finishes in matt, mid-sheen, silk, eggshell, gloss; - solvent-borne types (interior, exterior, pigmented, non-pigmented) with finishes in matt, eggshell, semi-gloss, gloss; - systems (interior and exterior) for timber, metal (ferrous, non-ferrous), trowelled finishes (plaster), plasterboard; - wood treatments (water-borne and solvent-borne): stains, preservatives, varnishes (matt, eggshell and gloss). Brushes could include: natural bristle, synthetic filament Roller sleeve types could include: woven fabric, mohair, sheepskin/lambswool, knitted, short, medium, long pile, foam Specified areas could include: − ceilings, broad walls, flush door and panelled doors, casement windows, linear work, features, decorative mouldings, balusters or spindles Required standard, avoiding visible defects could include: − misses, grinning, runs/sags, excessive brushmarks and ropiness, paint on adjacent

CSA-L2Occ48 Apply Paint Systems by Brush and Roller V1 02-13


surfaces, fat edges/wet edge build-up, excessive bits and nibs, irregular cutting in, orange peel, roller edge marks/ roller skid marks.

6.4 Cut in by brush to angles and obstructions in accordance with the work instructions. 7.

8.

9.

Know how to clean, maintain and store brushes and rollers

Be able to clean, maintain and store brushes and rollers

Know how to store materials.

7.1

Describe the methods available for site and workshop cleaning of:  Brushes  Roller sleeves

7.2

Describe the suitable conditions for short and long term storage of brushes and rollers.

8.1

Clean wet water-borne and solvent borne coatings from the following:  brushes  roller sleeves

8.2

Store synthetic filament and natural bristle brushes and a range of roller sleeve types in the specified conditions.

8.3

Dispose of solvent contaminated rags and contaminated solvent in accordance with legislation and official guidance.

9.1 Describe the suitable storage conditions for a range of relevant materials.

Brushes: natural bristle, synthetic filament Roller sleeve types could include: woven fabric, mohair, sheepskin/lambswool, knitted, short, medium, long pile, foam Surface types: − water steep, solvent steep, suspension, insecticide, dry air. Brushes could include: natural bristle, synthetic filament Roller sleeve types could include: woven fabric, mohair, sheepskin/lambswool, knitted, short, medium, long pile, foam Conditions could include: − water steep, solvent steep, suspension, insecticide, dry air.

Materials: − water-borne coatings, solvent-borne coatings, dry powder materials, ready-mixed fillers, two-packs. Storage conditions: Well ventilated, frost free and racking

9.2 Describe the purpose of using a stock rotation system. 9.3 State the effect on dry powder of incorrect storage. 9.4 Describe the appearance, causes and remedies for a range of storage defects. 10. Be able to store materials.

10.1 Store a range of materials in the

CSA-L2Occ48 Apply Paint Systems by Brush and Roller V1 02-13

Storage defects: − fattening, flocculation, livering, settling, skinning. Materials could include: − water-borne coatings, solvent-borne coatings, dry


appropriate manner.

powder materials, ready-mixed fillers, two-packs.

10.2 Carry out stock taking in accordance with the organisational procedures. 10.3 Check that stock rotation procedures are being followed. 10.4 Carry out risk assessments for stored materials.

CSA-L2Occ48 Apply Paint Systems by Brush and Roller V1 02-13

Materials could include: − water-borne coatings, solvent-borne coatings, dry powder materials, ready-mixed fillers, two-packs.


Title:

Apply standard papers to ceilings and walls

Unit Code:

CSA-L2Occ49

Level:

2

Credit Value:

18

GLH: 144

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1.

1.1

Describe a range of production and printing methods used in the manufacture of papers.

Production methods: − wet embossing, dry embossing, heat expansion. Printing methods: − block, screen, machine, wet, dry, embossing.

1.2

Describe the appearance and characteristics of a range of different paper and pattern types.

Patterns types: − set/straight match, drop/offset match, random/free match Paper types: − pulps, embossed, washable, vinyl, simplex duplex, ready-pasted, blown vinyl.

1.3

State the appropriate locations and uses for a range of paper types.

Paper types: − foundation (lining and preparatory), wood ingrain,, embossed, blown vinyl, washable, vinyl, readypasted, paste the walls, borders.

1.4

Describe the appearance and meaning of a range of international performance symbols.

Symbols: − spongeable, washable, super-washable, scrubbable, moderate light fastness, good light fastness, strippable, peelable, ready pasted, paste-the-wall, free match, straight match, design/distance repeat, offset match, direction of hanging, co-ordinated fabric available, reverse alternate lengths.

2.1

Describe the adhesives suitable for use with a range of papers.

Paper types: − foundation (lining and preparatory), wood ingrain,, embossed, blown vinyl, washable, vinyl, readypasted, paste the walls, borders. Adhesives: − cellulose paste, starch paste, overlap, ready-mixed (medium weight), PVA, multi-purpose

2.

Know the characteristics of standard wallpapers and how they are produced

Know how to select and prepare adhesives to apply standard papers to ceilings and walls.

CSA-L2Occ49 Apply Standard Papers to Ceilings and Walls V1 02-13

Notes for guidance


paste

3.

Be able to select and prepare adhesives to apply standard papers to ceilings and walls.

2.2

Describe the advantages and disadvantages of using different adhesives.

Advantages and disadvantages: − ease of application, adhesive properties, marking quality, mould inhibitor. Adhesives: − cellulose paste, starch paste, overlap, ready-mixed (medium weight), PVA, multi-purpose paste

2.3

Describe the factors that affect the consistency of adhesives.

Factors: − incorrect preparation, paper type, paper weight, room/air temperature, surface, shelf-life.

2.4

Describe the defects caused by the incorrect consistency of adhesives.

Defects: − blisters, delamination, stretching .

2.5

Describe how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

Damage: from general workplace activities, other occupations and adverse weather conditions.

3.1

Select the appropriate type of adhesive to carry out the work.

Adhesives minimum of 2 from: − cellulose paste, starch paste, overlap, ready-mixed (medium weight), PVA, multi-purpose paste.

3.2

Prepare and adjust the consistency of a range of adhesives in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions.

Adhesives, minimum of 2 from: − cellulose paste, starch paste, overlap, ready-mixed (medium weight), PVA, multi-purpose paste. Adjust as per: weight of paper, atmospheric conditions, and substrate.

3.3

Carry out the work in accordance with current and relevant environmental and health and safety regulations.

CSA-L2Occ49 Apply Standard Papers to Ceilings and Walls V1 02-13


3.4

4.

Know how to apply standard papers to ceilings and walls.

Protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

Could include: maintaining a clean work space

4.1 State the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for applying standard papers to ceilings and walls.

Could include: - overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

4.2 State the potential hazards associated with applying standard papers to ceilings and walls and how to prevent breaches in Health and Safety using risk assessment.

Regulations and Codes of Practice: - Construction Health and Safety - The Work at Height Regulations 2005 - Manufacturers’ instructions - Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) - Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

4.3 Describe the different factors to be considered when planning to apply papers to ceilings and walls.

Factors: − starting point, finishing point, centring, doors, features/obstacles, internal and external angles, sockets/switches, ceiling rose, borders, window reveals, natural light source.

4.4 Describe the circumstances under which lining and/or preparatory papers are necessary.

Circumstances: − solvent-borne painted wall, excessive making good, type of finishing paper, surface damp and movement.

4.5 Describe how to use the girthing and area methods of calculating the quantity of paper for a range of pattern types.

Factors: − set/straight match, drop/offset match, random/free match.

4.6 Describe the different cutting considerations when applying papers to ceilings and walls.

Cutting considerations: − pattern type (bold with prominent repeat, small or indefinite pattern), pattern match (set/straight, offset/drop), batches, wastage, shading.

4.7 Describe the reasons for marking lines for:  occasions  position  method  consideration

Occasions: − first drop on wall, after internal/external angle, over and around reveals, after a door frame, features/obstacles. Position: − horizontal, vertical. Method: − spirit level, plumb bob, chalk and line, laser level. Considerations: − access required, light source, room dimensions, economy.

CSA-L2Occ49 Apply Standard Papers to Ceilings and Walls V1 02-13


4.8 Describe the suitable pasting methods for a range of papers.

Standard Papers: − foundation (lining and preparatory), wood ingrain,, embossed, blown vinyl, washable, vinyl, readypasted, paste the walls, borders. Pasting Methods: − pasting machine, brush, roller, ready-pasted.

4.9 Describe the faults that can be caused by careless pasting.

Post application defects: − dry edges, blistering, delaminating, joint gapping, paste staining, polishing, sheen patches, staining, tearing.

4.10 Describe the reasons for selecting concertina and end-to-end/lap folds for horizontal and vertical lengths.

5.

Be able to apply standard papers to ceilings and walls.

4.11 Describe the method for trimming waste from ceiling length ends for different wall finishes.

Methods: -shears, knife and straight edge Wall finishes: -painted, papered

4.12 Describe a range of different hanging processes for applying different paper and pattern types to ceilings and walls.

Paper types: − foundation (lining and preparatory), wood ingrain,, embossed, blown vinyl, washable, vinyl, readypasted, paste the walls, borders. Pattern types: − set/straight match, drop/offset match, random/free match. Complexities: − internal and external angles, sockets/switches, ceiling rose, window reveals, chimney breasts. Cutting methods: − star and half star cuts, borders to walls with mitre cuts, splicing, purposely delaminating blown vinyl.

4.13 Explain the causes of a range of defects associated with paper hanging and how they can be prevented.

Defects: − creasing, inaccurate angle cutting, loss of emboss, Mould growth, delamination, blisters, soaking time (insufficient and excessive), overlapping, poor matching, shading, tearing.

5.1 Select and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when applying standard papers to ceilings and walls.

Could include: - overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

5.2 Plan the position of hanging paper to ceilings and walls.

Considerations: − starting point, finishing point, centring (symmetrical

CSA-L2Occ49 Apply Standard Papers to Ceilings and Walls V1 02-13


balance of pattern), focal point, doors, features/obstacles, internal and external angles, sockets/switches, ceiling rose, borders, reveals.

5.3 Select the appropriate access equipment in accordance with organisational procedures. 5.4 Position and erect appropriate access equipment in accordance with legislation and official guidance. 5.5 Select the appropriate application tools and equipment to carry out the task.

Tools and equipment could include: − tape measure/folding ruler, trimming knife, plumb bob, spirit level, laser level, paperhanging shears, sponges, paperhanging brush, caulker, pencil, spatulas, access equipment, paste brush, buckets, rubbish containers/bags, metal straight edge, chalk and line, paste table.

5.6 Calculate the required quantities of a range of pattern types using different methods.

Pattern types could include: − set/straight match, offset/drop match, random/free match Methods could include: girthing and area methods.

5.7 Shade, measure and cut batches of lengths with minimum wastage. 5.8 Measure and mark lines to hang to, taking into account:  occasions  position  method  different considerations.

Occasions could include: − first drop on wall, after internal/external angle, over and around reveals, after a door frame. Position could include: − horizontal, vertical. Method could include: − spirit level, plumb bob, chalk and line, laser level. Considerations could include: − access required, light source, room dimensions, economy.

5.9 Apply paste using different methods, fold lengths and soak according to manufacturers’ instructions and taking into account a range of pasting factors.

Pasting factors could include: − mixing consistency, application sequence. − faults (misses, excess paste, paste staining, discolouration). − folds (end to centre, concertina). Methods could include:

CSA-L2Occ49 Apply Standard Papers to Ceilings and Walls V1 02-13


− pasting machine, brush, roller, ready pasted.

5.10 Apply and finish a range of papers and pattern types to ceilings and walls using appropriate processes and with minimum defects.

Paper types could include: − foundation (lining and preparatory), wood ingrain,, embossed, blown vinyl, washable/vinyl, readypasted, paste the walls, borders. Pattern types could include: − set/straight match, drop/offset match Processes could include: − complexities (internal and external angles, sockets/switches, ceiling rose, reveals). − cutting methods (star and half star cuts, borders to walls and mitre cuts, splicing).− Defects could include: - creasing, overlaps, blisters, tears, delamination, polished edges, open joints, loose edges, irregular cutting (chewing, snagging), inaccurate matching, flattening of emboss, staining / surface marking, corners incorrectly negotiated, inaccurate plumbing.

6.

7.

Know how to store materials.

Be able to store materials.

5.11 Carry out the work and dispose of waste in accordance with current and relevant environmental and health and safety regulations.

Health and Safety considerations could include: − electrical safety, sharp blades, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), Work at Height Regulations.

6.1 State the physical considerations relating to the storage of standard papers and adhesives.

Considerations: - racks, wrapping and dust, shelf-life, stock rotation.

6.2 State the effect of atmospheric conditions on papers.

Atmospheric conditions: - temperature, dampness and direct sunlight

7.1 Reclaim unused papers and adhesives. 7.2 Store papers and adhesives in accordance with organisational procedures.

CSA-L2Occ49 Apply Standard Papers to Ceilings and Walls V1 02-13


Title:

Produce specialist decorative finishes

Unit Code:

CSA-L2Occ50

Level:

2

Credit Value:

12

GLH: 96

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1.

1.1

State the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for producing specialist decorative finishes.

Could include: - overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

1.2

Describe the appropriate preparation processes used prior to the application of ground coats for decorative work.

Preparation processes: − wet abrading, dry abrading, making good, spot priming.

1.3

Describe the defects that may occur in a range of decorative work if the ground coat finish is not of a high quality.

Defects: − uneven colour, ropiness, sinking, bittiness.

1.4

Describe how application methods affect the quality of the ground coat/decorative finish.

Methods: stipple brush, roller, brush, spray.

1.5

Describe the appropriate coating types for use as ground coats for painted decorative work.

1.6

Describe how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

Protect against: damage from general workplace activities, other occupations and adverse weather conditions.

2.1

Select and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when producing specialist decorative finishes.

Could include: - overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

2.2

Protect the work and its surrounding area

Could include: maintaining a clean work space,

2.

Know how to prepare surfaces and produce quality ground coats for specialist decorative finishes.

Be able to prepare surfaces and produce quality ground coats for specialist decorative finishes.

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13

Notes for guidance


3.

Know how to produce broken colour effects using water-borne and solventborne scumbles.

from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

disposal of waste.

2.3

Prepare surfaces using a range of abrasives and preparation processes.

Surfaces could include: − untreated and/or previously painted timber, plaster and/or plasterboard, embossed/relief paper. Abrasives could include: − silicon carbide, aluminium oxide, finishing papers. Preparation processes could include: − wet abrading, dry abrading, making good, spot priming.

2.4

Select the appropriate tools and equipment to produce quality ground coat finishes.

Tools and equipment could include: − hair stipplers, rollers, rubbing blocks, buckets, sponges, dusting brush, paint brushes (natural bristle and synthetic filament), tack rags, stirrers, paint strainers, kettles.

2.5

Prepare and apply appropriate materials to produce quality ground coat finishes.

Materials could include: − fillers, water-borne: mid sheen, vinyl silk, acrylic eggshell solvent borne: primer, eggshell, solvent-borne primer/eggshell

2.6

Carry out the work in accordance with current and relevant environmental and health and safety regulations.

3.1

State the potential hazards associated with producing specialist decorative finishes and how to prevent breaches in Health and Safety using risk assessment.

Referring to: - Construction Health and Safety - The Work at Height Regulations 2005 - Manufacturers’ instructions - Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) - Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

3.2

Describe the appropriate materials required for producing a range of broken colour effects.

Materials: − barrier cream, embossed/relief paper Oil based: glaze, oil colourant, white spirit, linseed oil, driers Water based: acrylic glaze acrylic colourant, glycerine, proprietary retarding agents Broken colour effects: − rag rolling (additive and subtractive), bagging (additive and subtractive), sponge stippling (additive and subtractive), dragging, glaze and wipe.

3.3

State the ingredients of:

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13


 

glazes scumbles

3.4

Describe a range of methods of extending and reducing drying time of oil-based and acrylic scumbles.

Methods: − linseed oil, driers, glycerine, light spray, wet rag, proprietary retarding agents.

3.5

Describe the different factors for the selection of materials for broken colour work.

Factors: − working time of material, yellowing, area size, number of operatives, finished pattern, environmental conditions. Materials: barrier cream, Oil based: glaze, oil colourant, white spirit, linseed oil, driers Water based: acrylic glaze acrylic colourant, glycerine, proprietary retarding agents Broken colour work: − rag rolling (additive and subtractive), bagging (additive and subtractive), sponge stippling (additive and subtractive), dragging, glaze and wipe.

3.6

Explain why it could be advantageous to prepare more than the calculated quantity of scumble for a piece of work.

3.7

Describe methods for producing a uniform effect when broad areas of broken colour are to be produced.

3.8

Describe the effect that incorrect viscosity of scumble has on the appearance of the finished work.

3.9

Describe how to prevent a range of application faults.

Application faults: − loss of wet edge, banding/tracking, slip/skid marks.

3.10 Describe the difference between the terms opaque and translucent in relation to surface coatings. 3.11 State problems created by the careless removal of masking materials.

Problems: − damage to decorative effect, removal of ground coat.

3.12 Describe the cleaning and storage

Tools and equipment:

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13


4.

Be able to produce broken colour effects using water-borne and solventborne scumbles.

procedures for a range of tools and equipment following use in oil-based scumble glaze.

− paint brushes, hair stipplers, mohair roller, lint-free rag, chamois leather, dragging brushes, palettes, kettles.

4.1

Check the suitability of ground coats for defects and colour.

Defects could include: − no visible coating defects (misses, ropiness, bits and nibs, undue texture)

4.2

Set out areas for application of broken colour effects using suitable protection for adjacent areas.

Protection could include: − masking papers and films, masking tape, low tack tape.

4.3

Select and prepare appropriate materials to produce a range of broken colour effects.

Materials could include: − barrier cream, embossed/relief paper Oil based: glaze, oil colourant, white spirit, linseed oil, driers Water based: acrylic glaze acrylic colourant, glycerine, proprietary retarding agents Broken colour effects could include: − rag rolling (additive and subtractive), bagging (additive and subtractive), sponge stippling (additive and subtractive), dragging, glaze and wipe.

4.4

Select the appropriate tools and equipment to produce a range of broken colour effects.

Broken colour effects could include: − rag rolling (additive and subtractive), bagging (additive and subtractive), sponge stippling (additive and subtractive), dragging, glaze and wipe. Tools and equipment could include: − paint brushes, hair stipplers, mohair roller, chamois leather, lint free cloth, cling film, natural sponges, dragging brush, palettes, kettles, plastic pots

4.5

Produce uniform broken colour effects using oil based and acrylic scumbles.

Glaze and wipe and broken colour effects that could include: − rag rolling (additive and subtractive), bagging (additive and subtractive), sponge stippling (additive and subtractive), dragging

4.6

Remove the protection used and dispose of waste products in accordance with legislation and official guidance.

Protection could include: − masking papers and films, masking tape, low tack tape.

4.7

Clean and maintain tools and equipment in an appropriate manner.

Tools and equipment could include: − paint brushes, hair stipplers, mohair roller, chamois leather, lint free cloth, cling film, natural sponges, dragging brush, palettes, kettles, plastic

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13


pots

5.

Know how to prepare stencil plates from given designs and apply stencils.

4.8

Carry out the work in accordance with current and relevant environmental and health and safety regulations.

5.1

State the difference between positive and negative stencil types.

5.2

Describe the different methods of transferring designs onto stencil plate materials of paper and proprietary stencil card.

Methods: − trace, pounce, photocopy, illuminated projection.

5.3

Describe the use of a range of materials for treating paper when manufacturing a stencil plate.

Materials: − linseed oil, shellac knotting.

5.4

Explain why the whole stencil plate should be treated.

5.5

Describe the suitability of a range of base materials used for cutting stencil plates.

Base materials: − glass plate, proprietary cutting mat.

5.6

Describe a range of enlarging and reducing methods used for stencil designs.

Enlarging/reducing methods: − accurate measurement, grid, illuminated projection, photocopy.

5.7

Describe a range of planning considerations for setting out and applying stencils to wall areas.

Considerations: − number of repeats/connections, location of doors, windows, corners, access requirements, room dimensions, stencil size, spacing, order of application.

5.8

Describe the purpose of chalk lines, centre/horizontal/vertical lines and registration marks to mark out an area to be stencilled.

5.9

Describe the reasons for using masking and low tack tapes and proprietary spray adhesive securing methods.

5.10 Describe how to prevent a range of common application faults.

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13

Application faults: − creep, smudging, paint lifting, uneven weight of colour over repeats, bittiness, undue texture.


6.

7.

Be able to prepare stencil plates from given designs and apply stencils.

Know how to produce wood and marble effects using basic techniques.

6.1

Select the appropriate tools, equipment and materials to carry out the work.

Tools and equipment could include: − pencil, ruler/tape measure, chalk and line, stencil knife, craft knife, palette, stencil brushes. Materials could include: − chalk, tape, proprietary spray adhesive, water-borne paints, acetate and films.

6.2

Use a range of methods to transfer given designs to stencil plate material.

Methods could include: − trace, pounce, photocopy, illuminated projection.

6.3

Prepare stencil plate materials, proprietary stencil card and paper, using a range of materials.

Materials could include: − drawing paper, linseed oil, shellac knotting, mineral oil.

6.4

Cut out a range of stencil types from plate materials with accurate and clean cut design and strong ties and observing cutting considerations.

Stencil types could include: positive, negative Plate materials could include: treated paper, treated card, proprietary stencil card Base materials could include: − glass plate, proprietary cutting mat. Cutting considerations could include: − cleanliness, hand position, knife angle, direction of cutting, blade sharpness, repair of broken ties, size and sequence of pattern (small areas and vertical lines first), free movement of stencil plate, margin widths, base materials.

6.5

Set out and mark out stencil locations for linear runs, borders and walls, demonstrating planning considerations.

Planning considerations could include: − number of repeats/connections, location of doors, windows, corners, access requirements, room dimensions, stencil size, spacing.

6.6

Apply stencils with sharp outlines as accurate linear and border work.

Avoiding application faults that could include:: − creep, smudging, paint lifting, uneven weight of colour over repeats, bittiness, undue texture. Stencil types could include: Positive or negative

6.7

Clean and maintain tools and equipment in an appropriate manner.

Tools and equipment could include: − pencil, ruler/tape, measure, chalk and line, stencil knife, craft knife, palette, stencil brushes.

6.8

Carry out the work in accordance with current and relevant environmental and health and safety regulations.

7.1

State the reasons why various timbers and marbles are replicated.

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13

Reasons: - match existing work, availability (sustainability/restoration), weight, size, cost.


7.2

State appropriate colours for the ground coats of a range of wood effects.

Wood effects: − straight grain only (oak, mahogany) Colours could include: British Standards, RAL.

7.3

Describe the importance of using the appropriate colour ground coat.

7.4

State the ingredients used in oil-based scumbles and water graining mediums for wood and marble effects.

Wood effects: − straight grain only (oak, mahogany) Marble effect: Carrara, Verte De Mer At least one effect should be produced using oil based systems, using materials that could include: Oil based system: oil based glaze, oil colourant, oil graining colour/medium, proprietary scumble, solvent-borne varnish, white spirit, linseed oil, driers Water based system: acrylic glaze, acrylic colourant, dry pigments, water graining colour/medium, glue size, crayons, binders (Fuller's earth/whiting, stale beer, vinegar), acrylic varnish, glycerine, proprietary retarding agents

7.5

State materials which will prevent cissing when applying water colour.

Materials: - Fuller’s earth, detergent, whiting.

7.6

Describe the selection, purpose of and effect produced by tools and brushes required to produce wood and marble effects.

Tools: − metal/rubber/card combs, check/tick roller, natural sponges, feathers (e.g. goose-wing). Brushes: − rubbing in brushes, mixing brushes, fitches, floggers and dragging brushes, softeners (hog’s hair, badger), sable pencils and writers, varnish brushes. Wood effects: − straight grain only (oak, mahogany) Marble effect: Carrara, Verte De Mer

7.7

Describe the sequence of graining a range of structural components.

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13

Components: − panelled doors, windows, dado rails, narrow


Linear runs (i.e. architraves and skirtings), small wall panels.

8.

Be able to produce wood and marble effects using basic techniques.

7.8

Describe the cleaning, maintenance and storage of tools and brushes.

Tools: − metal/rubber/card combs, check/tick roller, natural sponges, feathers (e.g. goose-wing). Brushes: − rubbing in brushes, mixing brushes, fitches, Floggers and dragging brushes, softeners (hog’s hair, badger), sable pencils and writers, varnish brushes.

8.1

Check the suitability of ground coats for defects and colour.

Defects could include: − no visible coating defects (misses, ropiness, bits and nibs, undue texture)

8.2

Select suitable colourants and pigments appropriate for the following:  Wood effects - straight grain oak and mahogany  Marble effects - Carrara and Verte de Mer

Colourants could include: − artists oil, acrylics, poster colours, powder pigment, universal stainers. Pigments could include: − various colours

8.3

Prepare a range of graining and marbling materials to carry out the work.

At least one effect should be produced using oil based systems, using materials that could include: Oil based system: oil based glaze, oil colourant, oil graining colour/medium, proprietary scumble, solvent-borne varnish, white spirit, linseed oil, driers Water based system: acrylic glaze, acrylic colourant, dry pigments, water graining colour/medium, glue size, crayons, binders (Fuller's earth/whiting, stale beer, vinegar), acrylic varnish, glycerine, proprietary retarding agents

8.4

Select the appropriate tools, brushes and equipment to carry out the work.

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13

Tools could include: − metal/rubber/card combs, check/tick roller, natural Sponges, feathers (e.g. goose-wing). Brushes could include: − rubbing in brushes, mixing brushes, fitches, floggers/dragging brushes, softeners (hog’s hair, badger), sable pencils and writers, varnish brushes. Equipment could include: − lint-free rag, palette knives, palettes, kettles, plastic pots.


9. Know how to form painted lines and bands

10. Be able to form painted lines and bands

8.5

Produce the following effects using the appropriate processes:  Wood effects - straight grain oak and mahogany  Marble effects - Carrara and Verte de Mer

Processes could include: − oil-in or rubbing in, flogging, combing, veining, Softening, glazing, cissing or opening out, Stippling, wiping out.

8.6

Clean and maintain tools, brushes and equipment in an appropriate manner.

Tools could include: − metal/rubber/card combs, check/tick roller, natural Sponges, feathers (e.g. goose-wing). Brushes could include: − rubbing in brushes, mixing brushes, fitches, floggers/dragging brushes, softeners (hog’s hair, badger), sable pencils and writers, varnish brushes. Equipment could include: − lint-free rag, palette knives, palettes, kettles, plastic pots.

8.7

Carry out the work in accordance with current and relevant environmental and health and safety regulations.

9.1

Describe the different usage of chamfered and square-edge straight edges.

9.2

Describe the purpose of a sash tool when applying painted bands.

9.3

Describe appropriate cleaning and maintenance of tools and equipment.

10.1 Select the appropriate tools, equipment and materials.

10.2 Set out lines and bands according to the work instructions. 10.3 Prepare water-borne paint of appropriate viscosity. 10.4 Form straight lines and bands of uniform CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13

Tools and equipment: ruler, chalk line, lining fitch, straight edge (chamfered, square-edge), sash tool, mohair pad Tools and equipment could include: ruler, chalk line, lining fitch, straight edge (chamfered, square-edge), sash tool, mohair pad Materials: chalk, water-borne paint


thickness, using water-borne paint according to the work instructions.

11. Know how to produce basic textured finishes by brush and roller.

10.5 Clean, maintain and store tools and equipment.

Tools and equipment could include: ruler, chalk line, lining fitch, straight edge (chamfered, square-edge), sash tool, mohair pad

11.1 Describe the suitability of a surface to receive a texture coating and why.

Considerations: − clean, keyed, porous, non-porous, sealed, distemper, loose friable surfaces, new plasterboard, awareness of asbestos content in early coatings.

11.2 Explain the suitability and reasons for selection of a range of:  texture materials and designs  masking and jointing materials

Texture designs: − stipple, bark, swirl, broken leather. Texture materials: − Powder, ready-mix and related high-build products. Masking and protection: − masking paper, polythene sheets, drop sheets, self-adhesive masking paper, dust sheet (various types). Reasons: New build, fashion trends, working time, cost, Jointing materials: Scrim, paper tape, edge tape, caulker

11.3 State the personal protective equipment (PPE) that must be used to reduce the risk from the hazards involved with the mixing of powdered textured materials.

Hazards: − inhalation, eye irritation, ingestion.

11.4 Explain the importance of material consistency when producing texture designs.

Texture designs: − stipple, bark, swirl, broken leather.

11.5 Explain the purpose and the timing for finishing processes.

Including: lacing and applying a margin.

11.6 Describe the effects of high temperature and ventilation when applying texture paint and on the wet texture finish. 12. Be able to produce basic textured finishes by brush and roller.

12.1

Check factors relating to surface suitability and rectify if required.

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13

Factors could include: Clean, keyed, porous, non-porous, sealed


Tools could include: − paddle/bumper, wall brushes, bark roller, lacer, rubber stipple brush. Equipment could include: − access equipment/working platform, buckets, Sponges, plastic bag.

12.2

Select the appropriate tools and equipment suitable for the texture design to be produced.

12.3

Protect areas adjacent to the work in an appropriate manner.

12.4

Prepare texture materials (powder or ready-mixed) to a consistency suitable for the design.

12.5

Apply texture material to ceilings and/or walls and produce a range of brush or roller texture designs.

Texture designs: broken leather, and two of stipple, bark, swirl (one to be laced)

12.6

Clean and maintain tools, brushes and equipment in an appropriate manner.

Tools could include: − paddle/bumper, wall brushes, bark roller, lacer, rubber stipple brush Equipment could include: − access equipment/working platform, buckets, Sponges, plastic bag.

12.7

Carry out the work in accordance with current and relevant environmental and health and safety regulations.

Regulations could include: − personal protective equipment (PPE), inhalation (of powder material), Health and Safety at Work Act, eye irritation, ingestion, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations.

CSA-L2Occ50 Produce Specialist Decorative Finishes V1 02-13


Title:

Apply water-borne paint systems using high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment

Unit Code:

CSA-L2Occ51

Level:

2

Credit Value:

7

GLH: 56

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1.

1.1

Describe the domestic and commercial factors that need to be considered when preparing the work area in these types of environments.

Domestic factors: − door and window furniture, wall-mounted fixtures and fittings, air quality within the work area, room furniture, floor coverings. Commercial factors: − workstations, lighting, machinery, equipment, furniture, public access to premises, climate/weather, temperature, air quality within the work area, ventilation, debris.

1.2

Describe the properties of a range of masking tapes and their appropriate uses.

Masking tapes: − exterior, interior, low-tack, crepe, 7 day.

1.3

Describe the procedure and sequence for applying and removing masking tapes.

Masking tapes: − exterior, interior, low-tack, crepe, 7 day. Procedure: − continuous masking by overlapping each previously applied strip, starting at first area to be sprayed, use of masking machines.

1.4

Compare a range of protective sheeting and their appropriate uses.

Protective sheeting: − polythene sheets, dust sheets (lightweight, protective backing, heavy duty), drop sheets, tarpaulin.

1.5

Describe the maintenance and storage requirements for protective sheeting.

Protective sheeting: − polythene sheets, dust sheets (lightweight, protective backing, heavy duty), drop sheets, tarpaulin.

1.6

Describe how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational

Protect against: damage from general workplace activities, other occupations and adverse weather conditions.

Know how to prepare the work area for applying paint systems using high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment.

Notes for guidance

CSA-L2Occ51 Apply Water-borne Paint Systems Using High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) Spray Equipment V1 02-13


procedures. 2.

3.

Be able to prepare the work area for applying paint systems using high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment.

Know how to set up high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment for spray application.

2.1

Protect the work and its surrounding areas ready for spray painting in accordance with organisational procedures.

Could include: maintaining a clean work space, disposal of waste.

2.2

Select appropriate materials to protect adjacent surfaces, furniture and fittings.

Materials could include: − masking paper, masking machine, masking shield, dust sheets (lightweight, protective backing, heavy duty), self-adhesive masking paper, drop sheets, polythene sheets, tarpaulin.

2.3

Position and fix protective materials.

Materials could include: − masking paper, masking machine, masking shield, dust sheets (lightweight, protective backing, heavy duty), self-adhesive masking paper, drop sheets, polythene sheets, tarpaulin.

2.4

Set up adequate local extract ventilation (LEV) and natural ventilation for the work area.

3.1

Describe the features of a range of spray system types.

Spray system types: − air spray high volume low pressure (HVLP), gravity feed, suction feed, pressure feed.

3.2

Describe the function of a range of pressure pot components.

Pressure pot components: − container, lid, clamps, seal, air inlet valve, pressure regulator, pressure gauge, safety valve, fluid delivery tube, fluid outlet valve (where applicable).

3.3

Describe the function of a range of component parts.

Component parts: − turbine unit, high volume (HV) airline, gravity feed gun, suction feed gun, pressure feed gun, fluid line, airline, transformer, pressure pot, set-up (fluid tip, fluid needle, air cap), air compression outfit (ACO), extension cable. Spray gun components: − spray gun body, air inlet connector, air valve, trigger, air baffle, air cap, fluid needle, fluid tip, fluid needle packing, spreader control valve (where appropriate), fluid needle adjuster.

3.4

Describe the assembly sequence for component parts and the different spray

Component parts: − turbine unit, high volume (HV) airline, gravity feed gun, suction feed gun, pressure feed gun, fluid

CSA-L2Occ51 Apply Water-borne Paint Systems Using High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) Spray Equipment V1 02-13


system types.

4.

Be able to set up high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment for spray application

line, airline, transformer, pressure pot, set-up (fluid tip, fluid needle, air cap), air compression outfit (ACO), extension cable. Spray system types: − air spray high volume low pressure (HVLP), gravity feed, suction feed, pressure feed.

3.5

Describe the adjustment procedures to ensure the correct spray application.

3.6

Explain why an air pressure check at the nozzle is required.

3.7

Describe a range of health and safety considerations when working with high volume low pressure (HVLP) systems.

Health and safety considerations: − personal protective equipment (PPE), respiratory Protective equipment (RPE), Health and Safety at Work Act, inhalation (of overspray), eye irritation, Ingestion, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) regulations.

4.1

Select the appropriate high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray system type to carry out the work.

Including one of the following high volume low pressure (HVLP) systems: gravity feed, suction feed, pressure feed

4.2

Select the appropriate system and spray gun component parts for the suitable spray system type.

System components could include: − turbine unit, high volume (HV) airline, gravity feed gun, suction feed gun, pressure feed gun, fluid line, airline, transformer, pressure pot, set-up (fluid tip, fluid needle, air cap), air compression outfit (ACO), extension cable. Spray gun components could include: − spray gun body, air inlet connector, air valve, trigger, air baffle, air cap, fluid needle, fluid tip, fluid needle packing, spreader control valve (where appropriate), fluid needle adjuster.

4.3

Assemble component parts to produce high volume low pressure (HVLP) working units.

System components could include: − turbine unit, high volume (HV) airline, gravity feed gun, pressure feed gun, suction feed gun, fluid line, airline, transformer, pressure pot, set-up (fluid tip, fluid needle, air cap), air compression outfit (ACO), extension cable. Spray gun components could include: − spray gun body, air inlet connector, air valve, trigger, air baffle, air cap, fluid needle, fluid tip, fluid needle packing, spreader control valve (where appropriate), fluid needle adjuster.

CSA-L2Occ51 Apply Water-borne Paint Systems Using High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) Spray Equipment V1 02-13


5.

6.

Know how to apply water-borne coatings by high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray.

Be able to apply water-borne coatings

4.4

Load paint materials, test and adjust equipment for correct set up.

4.5

Check that the nozzle air pressure meets environmental compliance.

5.1

State the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for applying waterborne paint systems using high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment.

Could include: - overalls, respiratory protective equipment (RPE), safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

5.2

State the potential hazards associated with applying water-borne and solventborne paint systems using high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment and how to prevent breaches in Health and Safety using risk assessment.

Referring to: - Construction Health and Safety - The Work at Height Regulations 2005 - Manufacturers’ instructions - Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) - Control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH).

5.3

Describe the importance of correct material viscosity and how to adjust and check it in relation to temperature.

Equipment: − viscometer (ford cup), ratio stick.

5.4

Describe the effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation on the viscosity and drying process of surface coatings.

5.5

Describe the potential problems which could arise from using unstrained paint.

5.6

Describe the importance of using a range of application techniques to apply waterborne coatings.

5.7

Describe how wet film thickness (WFT) and dry film thickness (DFT) affect surface protection.

5.8

List the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and respiratory protective equipment (RPE) required when applying paint by high volume low pressure (HVLP) equipment.

6.1

Select and use appropriate personal

Application techniques: − distance adjustment, speed of movement, parallel movement, triggering, internal corners, pipework, external corners (stripe coat), other surface obstructions.

Could include:

CSA-L2Occ51 Apply Water-borne Paint Systems Using High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) Spray Equipment V1 02-13


protective equipment (PPE) when applying water-borne paint systems using high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment.

- overalls, safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures..

6.2

Prepare paint materials using suitable equipment to establish appropriate viscosity and straining.

Equipment could include: − viscometer (ford cup), ratio stick.

6.3

Select the appropriate equipment required to apply surface coatings in accordance with the work instructions.

Equipment could include: − loaded and ready to use high pressure low volume (HVLP) system, wet film thickness (WFT) gauge, dry film thickness (DFT) gauge, masking shield, personal protective equipment (PPE), respiratory protective equipment (RPE).

6.4

Operate the high volume low pressure system (HVLP) system to apply water borne coatings.

Without defects which could include: − runs, sags, dry spray, banding, overspray, orange peel.

6.5

Use a range of application techniques to apply surface coatings in accordance with the work instructions.

Application techniques could include: − distance adjustment, speed of movement, parallel movement, triggering, internal corners, pipework, external corners (stripe coat), other surface obstructions.

6.6

Shut down equipment temporarily to make adjustments.

6.7

Check for wet film thickness (WFT) where appropriate.

6.8

Carry out the work in accordance with current and relevant environmental and health and safety regulations.

6.9

Remove protective materials in a suitable manner upon completion of the paint application.

7.1

Describe a range of potential equipment faults and explain correction and prevention procedures.

by high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray.

7. Know how to rectify faults in spray equipment and defects in applied coatings.

Equipment faults: − electrical failure, dirty air cap, needle packing, fluid tip or needle (loose, damaged or worn), incorrect set-up (fluid tip), fluttering, defective spray patterns, fluid leakage, kinked hoses,

CSA-L2Occ51 Apply Water-borne Paint Systems Using High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) Spray Equipment V1 02-13


spluttering.

8. Be able to rectify faults in spray equipment and defects in applied coatings.

9.

Know how to clean, maintain and store high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment and materials.

7.2

Describe potential material faults and explain correction and prevention procedures.

Faults: Contamination, incorrect viscosity

7.3

Describe the causes and remedies of a range of defects in applied coatings.

Defects: − runs, sags, dry spray, banding, overspray, orange peel.

7.4

Describe what is meant by a range of spray terminology.

Spray terminology: − litres per minute, p.s.i, volumetric delivery, volumetric consumption, triggering, arcing, overlapping, spray distance, gun set-up, pressure drop.

8.1

Rectify a specified range of equipment faults using the appropriate rectification procedures.

Rectification procedures could include: − shutdown, dismantle, clean, replace, reassemble, set up the system, adjust the system. Equipment faults could include: − electrical failure, dirty air cap, needle packing, fluid tip or needle (loose, damaged or worn), incorrect set-up (fluid tip), fluttering, defective spray patterns, fluid leakage, kinked hoses, spluttering.

8.2

Rectify material faults using appropriate rectification procedures.

Material faults could include: Contamination, viscosity.

8.3

Adjust application techniques to ensure a good quality finish is achieved.

9.1

List the safety factors that must be observed when operating shutdown procedures.

9.2

Describe the correct sequence for cleaning and flushing the high volume low pressure (HVLP) system being used.

9.3

Describe the appropriate requirements for

Sequence: − shut down system, remove container, empty container, flush out container with appropriate thinner, recharge with appropriate thinner, reconnect and restart system, spray through gun to flush, shut down, repeat procedure until flushing thinner is clean, shut down system, disassemble component, clean and dry components, lubricate where required, reassemble, store.

CSA-L2Occ51 Apply Water-borne Paint Systems Using High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) Spray Equipment V1 02-13


the maintenance and storage of spray equipment. 9.4

10. Be able to clean, maintain and store high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment and materials.

State the different relevant legislation sources relating to the disposal of waste.

Legislation: − Health and Safety at Work Act, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

10.1 Shut down spray equipment in a safe and appropriate manner.

Spray equipment could include: − gravity feed, suction feed, pressure feed.

10.2 Empty container and dispose of a range of materials in accordance with legislation and official guidance.

Materials could include: − water-borne coatings, solvent, rags, lubricants.

10.3 Clean interior and exterior surfaces, lubricating appropriate component parts, ready for storage. 10.4 Store high volume low pressure (HVLP) spray equipment according to manufacturers’ instructions. 10.5 Work to current requirements of health and safety and environmental legislation.

CSA-L2Occ51 Apply Water-borne Paint Systems Using High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) Spray Equipment V1 02-13


Title:

Erect and dismantle access equipment and working platforms

Unit Code:

CSA-L1Occ12

Level:

1

Credit Value:

4

GLH: 36

Learning outcomes

Assessment criteria

The learner will:

The learner can:

1. Know how to prepare for erecting access equipment and working platforms.

1.1 State the potential hazards associated with erecting and dismantling access equipment and working platforms and how to prevent breaches in Health and Safety following a risk assessment.

Notes for guidance

Referring to: - Construction Health and Safety - The Work at Height Regulations 2005 - Manufacturers’ instructions - Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) - Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

1.2 State the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for erecting and dismantling access equipment and working platforms.

Could include: - safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

1.3 State suitable access equipment and working platforms for:  internal work  external work.

Equipment and platforms: − ladders, mobile towers, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms, proprietary staging and podiums/hop-ups.

1.4 State the different hazards associated with the use of access equipment and working platforms.

Hazards: − falls from height, slips, trips, cuts and abrasions, faulty equipment.

1.5 State the reason for producing a hazard identification record.

Reasons: relating to legislation and safe working practices.

1.6 State the current regulations relating to the use of access equipment and working platforms.

Regulations: − Work at Height Regulations. Equipment and platforms: − ladders, mobile towers, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms, proprietary staging and podiums/hop-ups.

CSA L1 Occ12 Erect and dismantle access equipment and working platforms V1.02.13


1.7 Describe how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures. 2. Be able to prepare for erecting access equipment and working platforms.

3. Know how to inspect access equipment and working platform components and identify defects.

4. Be able to inspect access equipment and working platform components and identify defects.

Protect against: damage from general workplace activities, other occupations and adverse weather conditions. Using screens, notice, timber sheet materials.

2.1

Interpret guidance information to erect and dismantle access equipment and working platforms.

Equipment and platforms: − podiums/hop-ups., step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms and proprietary staging

2.2

Produce a hazard identification record for using access equipment and working platforms correctly.

Equipment and platforms: − podiums/hop-ups, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms and proprietary staging Hazards could include: − falls from height, slips, trips, cuts and abrasions, faulty equipment.

2.3

Select and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when erecting and dismantling access equipment and working platforms.

Could include: - safety glasses/goggles, and other equipment in accordance with organisational procedures.

2.4

Protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.

Could include: maintaining a clean work space, disposal of waste, using screens and notices.

3.1

State suitable access equipment and working platform components for  internal work  external work.

Equipment and components: − stiles, rungs, tie rods, ropes, pulleys, treads, hinges, swingbacks, locking bars, non-slip inserts, scaffold boards, platform staging.

3.2

State the correct function of scaffolding components.

Components: − stiles, rungs, tie rods, ropes, pulleys, treads, hinges, swingbacks, locking bars, non-slip inserts, scaffold boards, platform staging.

3.3

State why it is important to carry out preerection and in-use inspections.

3.4

State the correct inspection intervals for scaffolding.

4.1 Inspect access equipment and working platform components pre-erection and when in use.

CSA L1 Occ12 Erect and dismantle access equipment and working platforms V1.02.13

Inspection intervals: − pre-erection, post-erection, handing over, post accident and incident, inclement weather. Equipment could include: − stiles, rungs, tie rods, ropes, pulleys, treads, hinges, swingbacks, locking bars, non-slip inserts, scaffold boards, platform staging,


Equipment and platforms: − podiums/hop-ups, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms and proprietary staging Pre and post use could include:: − pre-erection, post-erection, handing over, post accident and incident, inclement weather.

4.2 Identify defects and hazards to components and report them to the authorised personnel in accordance with organisational procedures. 5. Know how to erect and work from access equipment and working platforms.

6. Be able to erect and work from access equipment and working platforms.

5.1 State the need for and how to identify a secure base 5.2 State how to load working platforms correctly. 5.3 State the correct manual handling techniques for erecting and moving access and working platforms.

Equipment and platforms: − ladders, mobile towers, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms, proprietary staging and podiums/hop-ups.

6.1 Erect access equipment and working platforms in accordance with organisational procedures and secure where necessary.

Equipment and platforms: − podiums/hop-ups, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms and proprietary staging

6.2 Access, and work from access equipment and working platforms in accordance with current legislation.

Equipment and platforms: − podiums/hop-ups, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms and proprietary staging Regulations: − Work at Height Regulations.

7. Know how to dismantle and store access equipment and working platform components.

8. Be able to dismantle and store access equipment and working platform

7.1 State the correct sequence of dismantling access equipment and working platforms.

Equipment and platforms: − ladders, mobile towers, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms, proprietary staging and podiums/hop-ups.

7.2 State the storage requirements for access equipment and working platforms

Equipment and platforms: − ladders, mobile towers, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms, proprietary staging and podiums/hop-ups.

8.1 Dismantle access equipment and working platforms in accordance with

Equipment and platforms: − podiums/hop-ups, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms and proprietary staging

CSA L1 Occ12 Erect and dismantle access equipment and working platforms V1.02.13


components.

manufacturers’ instructions and organisational procedures. 8.2 Store access equipment and working platforms in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions and organisational procedures.

CSA L1 Occ12 Erect and dismantle access equipment and working platforms V1.02.13

Equipment and platforms: − podiums/hop-ups, step ladders/platform steps, trestle platforms and proprietary staging.


CSA L1 Occ12 Erect and dismantle access equipment and working platforms V1.02.13


New level 2 diploma in painting decorating tcm9 34367