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PAIDEIA HIGH SCHOOL

2017 SHORT TERM A COURSE OFFERINGS

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Elective Courses in Short Term:

​ Short-terms at Paideia are a time for you to explore and experiment in different types of classes and academic departments. They offer you the opportunity to: • • • • • • • •

Study a topic in greater depth and intensity than is possible in a long-term class Take a class outside of a traditional academic offering or department Take team taught classes by different teachers throughout the school Take an interdisciplinary course Have classes that provide hands-on learning experiences Try a new skill or improve an old one Explore personal creativity and academic passions Meet graduation requirements such as: PE, Art, Music or Drama, or Internship

Short-term is great opportunity to learn in different ways and in new fields of study. It is not a time to forget about academic and intellectual rigor. Your short term courses may not be structured in the same manner as your Long Term ones, however, our expectations in the classroom are the same. Your choices are important and will be honored as best as possible. Your final schedule will be determined based on your choices, advisor and teacher recommendations, space available in classes, and a review of your overall schedule. We would like you to have a balanced schedule in both academic and non-academic classes. Your advisors can help guide you on what is an appropriate number of academic and non-academic classes. You should have ​at least 50 percent​ of academic classified courses over short term A and B. Academic courses are those identified in departments such as: Science, Math, Modern Language, English, Social Studies, and Interdisciplinary. Non-academic courses are in Fine Arts, Music, PE and Health, Other. Typically, academic courses have a number of different assignments and assessment, such as: quizzes, tests, papers, presentations and labs. Non-academic typically may have fewer assignments or assessment and do not fall under a specific academic discipline. Courses that are considered academic are given grades and count towards your GPA. Courses that are considered non-academic can be given grades or be pass/fail but do not count towards your GPA. If you have any questions please speak with your advisor or Laura Magnanini, Director of Studies. As a reminder, Paideia’s graduation requirements include: • 3 credits of Art, Music, or Drama (One long-term course or 3 different short-term courses) • 3 credits of PE (Pi League, JV and Varsity Sports, short-term classes, and outside activity approved by Mike Emery can fulfill this credit) • 60 hours of internship requirement (Seniors must have completed the internship requirement by the end of Term A) All of these credits can be fulfilled throughout all 4 years at Paideia during both Long and Short Terms.

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Required Courses in Short Term: Each grade and academic department in short-term has some courses that are required for students to take. Please review the following information to see what courses apply for your short-term schedule. Depending on your long-term schedule, there are courses that continue through short-term A and B. These required courses are a continuation of their long-term courses and are separated by term and department. By department: Modern Language Short Term A French 1– 1 hr (A only) Spanish 1 - 1 hr (A only) French 2 – 1hr ( A only) Spanish 2 – 1hr (A only) Math Short Term A Algebra 1 ( Term A and B) Algebra 2 – 1 hr (A and B term) Algebra 2 / Trig- 1 hr (A and B term)

Short Term B No Modern Language requirements

Short Term B Algebra 1 (Term A and B) Introduction to Algebra 2- 1 hr. (A and B terms) All students in A2 and A2T are required to take a STB stat class. More info to follow.

AP AB Calculus -1 hr (A only) AP BC Calculus – 1 hr. (A only) Introduction to Algebra 2- 1 hr. (A and B terms) Social Studies Short Term A US History – 1 hr. (A and B terms) US Politics ( 9​th​ grade – A or B term)

Short Term B US History – 1 hr. (A and B terms) US Politics ( 9​th​ grade – A or B term)

Science Short Term A Short Term B AP Biology- 1 hr (A Term only) No required courses in Term B. AP Chemistry -2 hr (A Term only) AP Physics C -1 hr (A Term only) AP Physics 2 – 1hr ( A Term only) Humans and Environment – 1 hr. (A Term only) By Grade: 9​th​ grade Required Courses Short Term A US Politics (A or B term) Making Healthy Life Decisions (A or B term) 10​th​ grade required courses Short Term A US History (A and B Term) Introduction to Ethical Dialogue (A Term only)

Short Term B US Politics (A or B term) Making Healthy Life Decisions (A or B Term)

Short Term B US History (A and B Term)

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PERIODS 1&2 TWO-HOUR COURSES ACADEMIC: AP CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (SCIENCE) Jo Morton This 2-hour course is a continuation of the long term AP Chemistry class. This is a required course for all AP Chemistry students. (2 hrs.) SCIENCE OLYMPIAD​ (SCIENCE) Rick Goldstein You will prepare for one or more of the 23 different science related events, including building events (like bridges, towers, robots, and helicopters) and/or collection events (like fossils, geology, birds, and astronomy) and/or applied lab knowledge (like biology lab, chem. lab, physics lab, forensics science, and environmental science). This is a one hour class open to any grade and there are no tests, or no papers, or weekly quizzes. You will need to either create a notebook of material for the event or complete a build during the month class. You will be working on your own much of the time with some guidance. You are expected to compete in one of the tournaments in January, February or March, so the more you prepare, the better you will do representing Paideia. It's science, it’s creative, it's fun -- It's Science Olympiad. (1 hr. or 2 hrs.) THE BRAIN AND WHAT WE ARE (SCIENCE) Katy Martin An exciting advanced course in neuroscience ​open to past and current APBio, Bio 2H, and Anatomy and Physiology students.​ The topics will include the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, perception, emotions, drugs, and neurodegenerative diseases. The course will be taught by researchers, doctors and surgeons from Emory University. (2 hr.) FUN WITH FERMENTATION (SCIENCE) Lindsay Reid In this course we will dive into fermentation. This includes but is not limited to, the biochemical differences in the types of fermentation, a study of the organisms that have made fermentation a successful survival strategy, a historical and genetic survey of the significance of ​Homo sapiens harnessing fermentation, an appreciation of the anthropologic and economic significance of fermented products and an emphasis on putting zymology into practice throughout. Labs will include brewing root beer, leavening bread, fermenting yogurt, making Kombucha and others as time and interest allow. (2hr) THE USE OF NATURE ( ENGLISH) Gavin Drummond We have reached a moment in human culture where we have to look hard to find unspoiled nature. Robert McFarlane's recent book ​The Wild Places wondered whether there were any places or spaces in modern Britain that could be considered genuinely wild. Perhaps a related question is wondering what is ​natural around our Paideia campus and further afield (like State Parks, for example). I’d like to consider the idea of domesticated and wild places here in Atlanta, examining land usage both immediately around us and further afield. Reading will consider views on our American surroundings from Puritans to Romantics to contemporaries. There will be a strong emphasis on walking and thinking. One component of this will also be a consideration of parks and protected nature - both in terms of the philosophy of these places and also as a possible service project.(2hr) SHORT STORY WRITING I (ENGLISH) Sarah Schiff This class will be run in a workshop format. You will be expected to share your writing with your fellow students as well as to respectfully critique theirs. We will review the major elements of the short story—plot, characterization, point-of-view, theme, setting, dialogue—and read several published short stories to serve as models. By the end of the term, you will have written several vignettes as well as a fully polished short story, which you are encouraged to submit to Blue Rider. Expect lively class discussion, 4


constructive workshops, brainstorming exercises, drafting, and lots of revising. To paraphrase Ron Rash, it’s during the revision process when the real writing begins. Depending on sign up, we will offer SSW1 or 2. (2 hrs.) SHORT STORY WRITING II ( ENGLISH) Sarah Schiff This is a more advanced and rigorous version of Short Story Writing I, which is a prerequisite for Short Story Writing II. (In other words, if you have taken a creative writing class with Sarah before, then you are eligible for this one.) This class will be even more workshop-based than the first; will require more writing, more revising, more reading of other students’ work; and will assume a core knowledge of the elements of the short story. We will write daily using prompts. By the end of the term, you will have completed at least two full-length stories as well as several shorter pieces, including some flash fiction. Depending on sign up, we will offer SSW1 or 2. (2hrs) THE WITCH IN LITERATURE (ENGLISH) Donna Ellwood/Catharine Tipton From the beginning of the Western historical and literary tradition, the woman of feeling and power has been reviled as either a witch or a bitch. What is so fearsome about strong women that makes us regard them as "secret, black, and midnight hags"? This class will explore the image of the powerful female in literature by examining the character of the witch in traditional stories such as the fairy tale and the Arthurian legend. In addition, students will look at case studies of actual accused witches, midwives, and churchwomen from history. This is a heavy reading load class; some of the material is college-level text. Lectures, films, and guest speakers will also be a part of this course. Students' grades will be determined by quizzes on the material.11​th​ and 12​th​ grade only class. (2hrs).

PERIODS 1&2 TWO HOUR COURSES NON-ACADEMIC:

SHEEP TO SHAWL Magnus Edlund In this class we will explore several traditional handcrafts. You will learn about spinning fibers (with an emphasis on wool), what makes a good yarn, how to make usable yarn, and how to ply. We will perform most of the steps needed to process fleece from the back of the sheep to a finished product. The steps include: cleaning, carding, and using a drop spindle, as well as different styles of felting, weaving and knitting. If you love handwork, this is a class for you. This is a non-academic class (pass/fail), and you will have ample time and the freedom to work on fiber projects of your choice. Prerequisite: Because we will be using sharp needle-felting tools, you'll need an up to date Tetanus booster/shot. Check with your doctor, if you are unsure whether your Tetanus booster is up-to-date. (2 hrs.) INTRO TO SHORT FILM MAKING (OTHER) Shanye Crawford/Leo Mancuso-Ungaro This introductory video editing and production course is open to students with all levels of experience, however, those of serious interest are preferred. Students will learn about camera equipment, editing/production apps, video story-telling, and shooting. Students should be prepared to produce, edit and turn in several short video projects including, but not limited to: a movie trailer and a short-term video summary. YEARBOOK ​(OTHER) Janet Sowers Yearbook staff would appreciate having your energy, enthusiasm and help so they can make their final deadlines and get the yearbooks delivered on time. Short Term A is a very busy time for them, and all their focus will be aimed at and working toward meeting those last three deadlines: end of January, 5


mid-February and early March. Pages will need to be finished and photos will need to be taken. You will learn how to take good candids and how we decide which ones to use for each event. Pages will need to be finished, from sports to senior superlatives, so there will be plenty of opportunities to learn the basics of good page layout and eDesign. An interest in art and design is helpful, especially if there are theme pages that remain unfinished. There will be two mandatory workdays for short term staff; we schedule them on Friday afternoons and weekends. If you are interested in learning how a 340 page book gets made, or simply want to help Paideia’s yearbook staff cross the finish line, join them in January; they will be most appreciative! (1 hr. or 2 hrs.) JEWELRY AND SMALL METALS FOR PATIENT STUDENTS (ART) ​Madeleine Soloway Students will learn to create jewelry and/or small metal sculptures using a variety of techniques, including forming, soldering, riveting, etching, casting and basic stone setting. This class will also emphasize strong design skills. Class size is limited to 12 students. This class is not appropriate for impatient students who expect instant jewelry and who frustrate easily. (2 hrs.) WOMEN AND WELLNESS (OTHER) Nisha Simama In this course, we will look at literature that speaks to what it means to be female. We will explore topics including the female body and its make-up, wellness to include exercise, care of the body and how to maintain a healthy self. We will discuss external influences and how they affect the decisions women make. This course is designed for 9th through 12th graders. (Open to girls only). (2 hrs.) INTERNSHIP (OTHER) Natalie Rogovin The internship is a component of a larger, school-wide initiative designed to strengthen the community stewardship ethic and deepen learning through volunteerism and civic involvement. The goal of this endeavor is to provide you with an opportunity to investigate pressing issues of social justice in your community. It is also a graduation requirement; ​two internships​, at separate organizations, with a minimum of 30 hours each, must be completed (only one internship credit is awarded for on campus service work). Students are encouraged to do 1 internship their 9th or 10th grade year and a second one in their 11th or 12th grade year. SETTING UP INTERNSHIP: Step 1. Start by making general observations of issues social justice that affect your community. In your exploration of these issues begin researching local, non-profit organizations whose mission statements aim at addressing solutions. Step 2. Once you have identified an issue and/or an agency, check in with Natalie. She may already have a contact or opportunity lined up that you can take part in. She can also offer support when you are contacting an organization yourself for the first time. It is important to be sure that the organization can also offer you a minimum of 30 hours of service related work. Step 3: Submit your internship proposal to Natalie via the Student Portal. Internships are set up by the student with the help of Natalie, who must approve all proposals for internship credit. The process of setting up an internship is part of the experience; students, rather than parents, should handle essential communication and coordinate details through Natalie. Proposals must be submitted prior to the start of service. Step 4: During the internship, it is suggested that students keep a journal of their experiences. Regular communication with Natalie during the internship is expected. Step 5. TO RECEIVE CREDIT students must complete the Reflection Essay and have site supervisors complete the Supervisor Evaluation Form. Both must be completed for credit and both are available on the Student Portal

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PERIOD 1 ONE-HOUR COURSES ACADEMIC: AP PHYSICS​ 2 (SCIENCE) Martin Aguilera This is a continuation of the Long Term course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of students in Long Term AP Physics). (1 hr.) ALGEBRA 2​ (MATH) Math Faculty This is a continuation of the Long Term course. You may sign up with any math teacher during any section of Algebra 2. (One hour in Short Term A and B is required of students enrolled in Algebra 2.) (1 hr.) AP BC CALCULUS​ (MATH) Jack Bross This is a continuation of the Long Term course. You may sign up for either section. P (One hour in Short Term A is required of students enrolled in AP BC Calculus.) (1 hr.) INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA 2 (MATH) Stacey Winston This is a continuation of the Long Term Course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of students enrolled in Intermediate.) (1hr.) HUMANS AND THE ENVIRONMENT (SCIENCE) Brian Smith This is a continuation of the Long Term course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of all students in the LT course Humans and the Environment). (1 hr.) AP BIOLOGY (SCIENCE) Miranda Knowles This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Bridget will be teaching both sections of this course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of students in Long Term AP Biology). (1 hr.) US HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT​ (SOCSTUDIES) Barrington Edwards This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Students must stay with their Long Term teacher during Short Terms. (One hour each Short Term is required of students in American History). (1 hr.) SPANISH 2 (FORLANG) Marci Weiland This is a continuation of the Long Term course. It is a required course for all students in Spanish 2. If you have Marci in Long Term, you should sign up for one of her sections of Spanish 2. (1 hr.) INTRODUCTION TO ETHICAL DIALOGUE (INTERDISC) High School Faculty This class will be taught by two high school faculty members who will use cases, short stories, articles, poems, and a variety of exercises and discussions to introduce students to the kinds of ethical dialogue and the knowledge and skills necessary to listen to others, be fully present and to understand our own biases. The course will review ethical theories, philosophy, self-understanding, listening and dialogue skills. We will read short stories, current event articles and engage in healthy dialogue about what we think is right and wrong and all of the shades of grey in-between. ​All 10th grade students need to sign up for one hour in term A. (1 hr.) MODEL UNITED NATIONS (SOCSTUDIES) Joy Lewis Mendez/Ashley Austin This class is a preparatory course for students participating in the Model United Nations team/club at Paideia. Emphasis will be on preparing for future conferences, so we will cover speaking and research skills, position paper writing, and resolution writing. If you are not yet a member of the Model UN club and would like to participate in this course, please see Joy Lewis-Méndez or Ashley Austin for permission.(1hr)

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ENTREPRENEURIALISM (SOCSTUDIES) Todd Zeldin Over the past decade large, more established companies have experienced flat or declining job growth, while start-ups and small businesses have witnessed explosive growth. In fact, the majority of job growth in this country comes from small businesses with fewer than 50 employees. Entrepreneurialism is alive and well in both small and large companies, and business students across the globe are providing the ideacreation needed to fuel future revenue growth and profitability. This course is designed to teach high school students how to take a business idea, create a business plan, and present the plan to potential investors. The course “final exam” involves students presenting their plan to a team of expert panelists who have experience investing in startup ventures. The format will be similar to a “Shark Tank” presentation with prizes at the end of the term. (1hr.) SCIENCE OLYMPIAD​ (SCIENCE) Rick Goldstein You will prepare for one or more of the 23 different science related events, including building events (like bridges, towers, robots, and helicopters) and/or collection events (like fossils, geology, birds, and astronomy) and/or applied lab knowledge (like biology lab, chem. lab, physics lab, forensics science, and environmental science). This is a one hour class open to any grade and there are no tests, or no papers, or weekly quizzes. You will need to either create a notebook of material for the event or complete a build during the month class. You will be working on your own much of the time with some guidance. You are expected to compete in one of the tournaments in January, February or March, so the more you prepare, the better you will do representing Paideia. It's science, it’s creative, it's fun -- It's Science Olympiad. (1 hr. or 2 hrs.) JAVASCRIPT (SCIENCE) Dave Fergemann Take your web design skills to the next level! This course is for students who have already learned to design web pages with HTML and CSS, either in a class or on your own. JavaScript is the the language that makes web pages interactive, allowing you to create anything from drop-down menus to games. We'll have a few assignments and a quiz or two, but most of the class will be spent making an interactive web page of your own. (1hr) POETRY OUT LOUD (ENGLISH) Clark Cloyd For the past eleven years The Poetry Foundation has sponsored a national poetry recitation competition called Poetry Out Loud. Participants in this class will prepare three poems to recite from memory. The class and a panel of judges will select the school winner who will then move on to participate in the state competition. The winner at the state level will receive $200 and an all-expenses-paid trip with an adult chaperone to Washington, DC, to compete in the National Finals (the National Champion will receive $20,000). Obviously, not everyone will be able to compete beyond Paideia, but everyone will benefit from preparing poems for the class – reading, analyzing and memorizing some very good poetry. (1 Hour) RACE AND GENDER IN SCIENCE FICTION ( ENGLISH) Gregory Mancini/Lynn Jacobs "I was attracted to science fiction because it was so wide open. I was able to do anything and there were no walls to hem you in and there was no human condition that you were stopped from examining." – Octavia Butler, the most prominent African-American Science Fiction Writer Science fiction writing might explore fantastical futures, but it is often driven by writers’ concerns about our world today. Great science fiction compels us to think critically about contemporary society. During the past decades, important sci-fi authors have used the genre’s conventions (i.e., aliens, genetic engineering, time travel, etc.) to examine two pressing social issues: race and gender. In this course, we will look at how some sci-fi writers have wrestled with these two issues. Our main text will be Octavia Butler’s ​Kindred, a novel in which an African-American writer living in 1970s Los Angeles finds her consciousness inexplicably transported into the body of one of her ancestors, a slave on a Maryland Plantation in 1815. In the novel, as Butler’s character moves back and forth in time, the author forces us to grapple with slavery’s hold on the present and the way in which multiple aspects of one’s identity (race, gender, class, and more) affect one’s political and social status. In addition, we will read two short stories and excerpts from Ursula 8


Le Guin’s sci-fi classic ​The Left Hand of Darkness, a novel in which a human ambassador makes first contact with a species of genderless aliens. Le Guin’s writing challenges us to consider the inadequacy of binary “male” and “female” gender divisions. As conflicts over race have emerged in new heated ways in America today and debates over gender identity and sexuality have come to the fore, Butler and Le Guin’s writings might occur in other places and times, but they are unquestionably about our here and now. Expectations: a moderate amount of reading each night, a couple of quizzes, a final test or creative piece, and passionate critical discussion about some great writing.

​PERIOD 1 ONE-HOUR COURSES NON-ACADEMIC: WOMEN’S STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING (PE/HEALTH) Ivan Asteghene This course will take place in the Fitness Center and it will introduce students to basic strength training techniques and enable them to identify major and secondary muscle groups being contracted. Students will gain an understanding of different training strategies/techniques and be able to set up an individual regimen or program. Cardiovascular training including aerobic, low/high intensity, low/high duration, circuit and interval training will also be included in this course. Students will study, learn, and use spotting techniques, other safety procedures used in the Fitness Center and in any other physical activities. Students do not have to be proficient in any techniques to join the class. If there is enough student interest, there will be one co-ed class and one all women’s class . (1 hr) CLOTHING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION ​(ART) Henry Leonard This course is designed as an opportunity for those who are seeking to expand their imagination in fashion and develop skills in designing and construction of clothing. Instructions in the use of the sewing machine and the use of commercial patterns will be emphasized. Student can use a wide range of materials such as paper, trash bags, tape, reconstructed clothes and other materials in creating a garment. The goal of this course is to help students in creating wearable garments for the annual Green Fashion Show hosted by Club Moda scheduled for early Spring. (1 hr) GROUNDSWELL (OTHER) Laura Magnanini Civil Rights Movement through Documentary and Film One of the best ways to understand the Civil Rights movement is to view it first hand. This class will cover the Civil Rights Movement starting from Brown v Board of Education in 1954 and the desegregation of schools and end with the March from Selma to Montgomery in 1965. The class will watch the PBS documentary series, “Eyes on the Prize”, read “Warriors Don’t Cry” -the first-hand accounts and diary of Melba Pattillo Beales, one of the first 16 year old students to integrate Little Rock High School, and end with watching the feature film “Selma” that came out in 2014. This is a non-academic class, so most of the work needed for this class will be done in class. To pass, you need to watch, read some, and talk as you feel comfortable.(1hr)

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STRESS IS OPTIONAL (OTHER) Tricia Underwood In this class you will: Develop a set of tools you can use to handle everyday stress ● Find ways to handle anxiety before taking a test or managing school in general ● Learn meditation and mindfulness strategies you can use on your own ● Improve concentration and creativity ● Learn how to notice repetitive negative thoughts and worries in order to feel happier and more confident even in the face of setbacks ● Discover how to improve relationships with friends and family that cause you stress This course uses relevant and recent research on learning, the brain, psychology and mindfulness. On top of learning the foundations, you will also have the opportunity to try out a variety of specific practices to integrate into your daily life so that you can find the ones that are a good fit for you and your life. The last week of the course will be dedicated to you designing and exhibiting a proposal for what a mindful high school might look like where stress is an optional, not inevitable, part of the experience. (1hr) S​HUFFLIN’, HITCHIN’ AND TWIRLIN’: COUNTRY LINE DANCING AND TWO-STEPPING ​(PE) Jen Leon/Eddy Hernandez So you think you can dance? Even if you don’t, you can still learn to look good on the dance floor with the dances you’ll do in this course. You’ll learn basic two-step and turns as well as super fun, choreographed line dances. You’ll even get a chance to choreograph one of your own!!! No previous experience necessary. Yee-haw! (1 hr.) YEARBOOK (OTHER) Janet Sowers Yearbook staff would appreciate having your energy, enthusiasm and help so they can make their final deadlines and get the yearbooks delivered on time. Short Term A is a very busy time for them, and all their focus will be aimed at and working toward meeting those last three deadlines: end of January, mid-February and early March. Pages will need to be finished and photos will need to be taken. You will learn how to take good candids and how we decide which ones to use for each event. Pages will need to be finished, from sports to senior superlatives, so there will be plenty of opportunities to learn the basics of good page layout and eDesign. An interest in art and design is helpful, especially if there are theme pages that remain unfinished. There will be two mandatory workdays for short term staff; we schedule them on Friday afternoons and weekends. If you are interested in learning how a 340 page book gets made, or simply want to help Paideia’s yearbook staff cross the finish line, join them in January; they will be most

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PERIOD 2 ONE-HOUR COURSES ACADEMIC: ALGEBRA 2/TRIG​ (MATH) Paul Myers This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Paul Myers will be teaching this class instead of Rosalinda R. (1hr) ALGEBRA 2​ (MATH) Math Faculty This is a continuation of the Long Term course. You may sign up with ​any teacher ​in any Algebra 2 sections. (One hour in Short Term A and B is required of students enrolled in Algebra 2.) (1 hr.) AP BC CALCULUS​ (MATH) Jack Bross This is a continuation of the Long Term course. You may sign up for either section. P (One hour in Short Term A is required of students enrolled in AP BC Calculus.) (1 hr.) AP AB CALCULUS​ (MATH) Mark Schmitt This is a continuation of the Long Term course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of students enrolled in AP AB Calculus.) (1 hr.) AP PHYSICS​ C (SCIENCE) Martin Aguilera This is a continuation of the Long Term course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of students in Long Term AP Physics). (1 hr.) FRENCH 2 (MODLANG) Joanna Gibson This is a continuation of the Long Term Course. It is a required course for all students in French 2. (1 hr.) FRENCH 1 (MODLANG) Eddy Hernandez This is a continuation of the Long Term Course. It is a required course for all students in French 1. (1hr.) SPANISH 2 (MODLANG) Joy Lewis-Mendez This is a continuation of the Long Term course. It is a required course for all students in Spanish 2. If you have Joy in Long Term, you should sign up for her sections of Spanish 2. (1 hr.) US HISTORY & GOVERNMENT (SOCSTUDIES) Ashley Austin/ Rachel Peterson This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Students must stay with their Long Term teacher during Short Terms. (One hour each Short Term is required of students in US History and Government). (1 hr.) US POLITICS​ (SOCSTUDIES) Social Studies Faculty The presidential election, immigration, education and the struggling economy are all major issues facing our government today. Are you curious about how the government handles so many complex issues? Then U.S. Politics is the course for you. This course will look at the current structure of government and analyze how the government actually works. We will go beyond the basics and look at the many forces that influence our local, state and federal government (media, lobbyists, money, elections and citizens). This course takes a hands-on approach in which everyone will participate in the process of understanding the U.S. Government. This class will have a few short papers and one end of term test. ​(​One hour IN EITHER Short Term is required of all 9th grade students).

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BLACK FEMINISM (SOCSTUDIES) Stacey Winston/Felicia Jacques This course is designed to look into the origins of black feminism, critically analyze black feminist writing, and review the different issues black feminism addresses. We will also study influential women, writers, and activist who have have an impact on and helped shape black feminism. This class is open to all students at school. (1hr) INTRODUCTION TO ETHICAL DIALOGUE (INTERDISC)​ High School Faculty This class will be taught by two high school faculty members who will use cases, short stories, articles, poems, and a variety of exercises and discussions to introduce students to the kinds of ethical dialogue and the knowledge and skills necessary to listen to others, be fully present and to understand our own biases. The course will review ethical theories, philosophy, self-understanding, listening and dialogue skills. We will read short stories, current event articles and engage in healthy dialogue about what we think is right and wrong and all of the shades of grey in-between. ​All 10th grade students need to sign up for one hour in term A. (1 hr.) SCIENCE OLYMPIAD​ (SCIENCE) Rick Goldstein You will prepare for one or more of the 23 different science related events, including building events (like bridges, towers, robots, and helicopters) and/or collection events (like fossils, geology, birds, and astronomy) and/or applied lab knowledge (like biology lab, chem. lab, physics lab, forensics science, and environmental science). This is a one hour class open to any grade and there are no tests, or no papers, or weekly quizzes. You will need to either create a notebook of material for the event or complete a build during the month class. You will be working on your own much of the time with some guidance. You are expected to compete in one of the tournaments in January, February or March, so the more you prepare, the better you will do representing Paideia. It's science, it’s creative, it's fun -- It's Science Olympiad. (1 hr. or 2 hrs.) CRYPTOGRAPHY (SCIENCE) Dave Fergemann ​Vs lbh jnag gb yrnea gb ernq guvf, gnxr guvf pynff. If you want to learn to read this, take this class. We’ll study the variety of codes and ciphers that people have used since ancient times to prevent information from falling into the wrong hands. We’ll practice the techniques that can be used to break those codes. We’ll learn about the importance of codes and code breaking in World War II. We’ll spend some time creating codes and breaking them. And we’ll see how modern cryptography keeps people from stealing your sensitive information on the internet. Students can expect nightly reading, a few homework assignments, and two quizzes.(1hr) ALICE IN WONDERLAND (ENGLISH) Joseph Cullen Alice in Wonderland. A book everyone knows and few read; weird and wonderful, "curiouser and curiouser". Perhaps the first serious children's book by a real odd fellow about a tough little girl in an unreal world who is struggling to grow up and remain so. "Would you tell me which way I ought to go from here?" "That depends a good deal on where you want to go." "I don't much care where ." " Then it doesn't matter which way you go." So why not this short-term go down the rabbit-hole; it will make you wonder.

The First Shall be Last - Discontinuous Narratives (ENGLISH) Jim Veal In this course we will read essays and stories and watch films in which the material is presented in discontinuous form: autobiographical essays arranged in ABC order or presented as annotated bibliographies; stories that are conglomerations of lists and memories, or compilations of letters, or sequences of instructions, or collages of historical and cultural references; films told in reverse order or composed almost entirely of flashbacks. Each student will compose a creative piece, - a story or essay employing one of the discontinuous forms we encountered in our readings.

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SPREAD SCIENCE! ​(SCIENCE) Brian Smith In this class we will imagine, organize, prepare, and test unique science lessons and experiments for kids at Whitefoord Elementary and Coan Middle School. We’ll think of things about the universe that interest us and survey younger students for ideas before finding ways to demonstrate and explain them in an accessible way. We’ll try to challenge ourselves by taking on subjects that have more complex principals than the kids are used to seeing. Some examples of past lessons include “Why is the Sky Blue?”, “Why is Soda Fizzy?”, “How do Planes Fly?” and “Intro to Evolution”. The entire course is pretty much about discussing, throwing around ideas, and actively testing experiments, so participation is important. Students who take this class will also be encouraged to participate in at least one lesson presentation at one of the schools. This class will count for an academic credit, and time spent at Whitefoord or Coan will count for internship hours. (1 hr.)

​PERIOD 2 ONE-HOUR COURSES NON -ACADEMIC:

BEGINNING WEST AFRICAN DRUMMING (MUSIC) Chuck Cogliandro Participants will learn the elements of West African Drum Music, including playing technique, ensemble playing, songs, and essential background information on the people, history and culture from which the music and instruments come. The focus will be on the music of the djembe orchestra, which comes from the Maninka ethnic group who live in the extended regions of the old Mali empire in West Africa- what is now mainly Guinea and Mali, but also includes parts of Senegal, Gambia, Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso. Students will learn the importance of playing one part while hearing how it fits into a larger orchestrated piece being played by others- an essential principle for living peacefully in community. (1 hr. YEARBOOK (OTHER) Janet Sowers Yearbook staff would appreciate having your energy, enthusiasm and help so they can make their final deadlines and get the yearbooks delivered on time. Short Term A is a very busy time for them, and all their focus will be aimed at and working toward meeting those last three deadlines: end of January, mid-February and early March. Pages will need to be finished and photos will need to be taken. You will learn how to take good candids and how we decide which ones to use for each event. Pages will need to be finished, from sports to senior superlatives, so there will be plenty of opportunities to learn the basics of good page layout and eDesign. An interest in art and design is helpful, especially if there are theme pages that remain unfinished. There will be two mandatory workdays for short term staff; we schedule them on Friday afternoons and weekends. If you are interested in learning how a 340 page book gets made, or simply want to help Paideia’s yearbook staff cross the finish line, join them in January; they will be most appreciative! (1 hr. or 2 hrs.) DIGITAL LAYERS: Photoshop and Other Digital Editing Software (ART) John Wrede The main power of Photoshop and other programs is the ability to edit your project without destroying the original. This is done with layers. We will explore the power of layers focusing on Photoshop, but also exploring of other programs. We will use desktop, laptop and iPad computers. The class is structured as an open environment to experiment with these tools. No previous experience is necessary, but all skill levels will find something new and interesting (1hr.)

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PERIODS 3&4 TWO-HOUR COURSES ACADEMIC: AP CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (SCIENCE) Jo Morton This 2-hour course is a continuation of the long term AP Chemistry class. This is a required course for all AP Chemistry students. (2 hrs.) WHITE TRASH ( SOCSTUDIES) Donna Ellwood “It’s a put down, the name given to those whites who don’t make it, either because they’re too lazy or too stupid. Or maybe it’s because something’s wrong with their inbred genes.” In this course we will look at the origin and meaning of the expression white trash. We will study the term from its early use at the beginning of the 19th century to its popularity at the end of the 20th century. In order to cover this term we will rely on academic essays, research and critiques from the Eugenics society in the early 20th century and the novel Bastard out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison. Included in our study will be documentaries as well as film to help inform us about the term. A number of the works that will be studied in this class have mature themes. If you are in ninth grade, please check in with Laura M. or Donna E to sign up for the class. HIP HOP, RAP, AND AMERICAN CULTURE (SOCSTUDIES) Jaliwa Albright and Gregory Mancini In this course, we will examine the social and historical roots of Hip Hop and Rap music and this musical genre’s development as a critical part of Modern American Culture. We will look first at Hip Hop’s initial moments of prominence in the 1970s in one of New York’s toughest neighborhoods, the South Bronx, before considering the music’s 1980s move to mainstream success, the powerful emergence of Gangsta Rap and society’s reaction to it in the 1980s and 1990s, and eventually Hip Hop and Rap’s position as a dominant cultural force today. We will also explore other important mediums of Hip Hop expression: graffiti, breakdancing, DJ’ing, and MC’ing. Along the way, we will be especially attentive to the ways in which hip hop artists have illuminated issues of racism, poverty, prejudice, and artistic freedom. The genre came into being as a marginalized community in New York City struggled to find a voice of its own. The best hip hop artists and rappers have kept that spirit alive today as their work engages in social criticism and expresses the concerns and joys of many Americans. In addition, we will address controversies related to the depiction of violence and of women as well as the phenomenon of cultural appropriation. Our work will include reading excerpts from expert historians’ analyses of hip hop and rap and critical essays by scholars, listening to and analyzing music from key artists ranging from Afrika Bambaataa and Grandmaster Flash to Jay-Z and Kendrick Lamar, and watching some select films. Students must be prepared for quizzes, short analytical written work, a test or final project, and, most importantly, passionate discussion.(2hr) WRITE RIGHT (ENGLISH) Marianne Hines/Catharine Tipton do you ever wonder what the world would be like with no grammar try to read and understand writing with no commas capitals periods or basic structural rules it turns into balderdash Are you comma disabled? Do you know verb tense? Can you write an essay in active voice? Take care of those gnarly grammar problems once and for all with this course. The class will include learning grammar rules through drill and practice, then applying those rules in writing assignments. This course will teach you the rules and strategies to improve your knowledge of grammar and boost your writing skills plus train you in the true art of clear communication. It will be fun, interesting, and definitely valuable. (2 hrs.)

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ALL THE KING’S MEN (ENGLISH) Clark Cloyd Seventy years ago Robert Penn Warren published a book that many hailed as a contender for the title of The Great American Novel. Some might not agree but it is a great story, nonetheless: political ideals and corruption, love and infidelity, violent retribution and forgiveness. On the heels of this year’s encounter with demagoguery, reading the story of Jack Burden’s similar experience three score and ten ago seems timely. We will read nightly, discuss daily and write a bit about the novel and then finish the term with two film versions of the book. (2hrs) ELEMENTARY SCIENCE TEACHING (SCIENCE) Rick Goldstein You will work in pairs of high school students, coordinate with elementary teachers, learn the needed science topics with your team, plan and teach the lessons, and get feedback from the other members of the class. There are no tests or papers, but a lot of preparation is required for the classes you teach and a daily journal is also required. This is an academic 2-hour class offered in A term only. Sign up is by invitation only. ​If you are interested, you must get permission from Rick BEFORE doing the course sign up​. Small enrollment. High standards. Little kids. Huge rewards. (2 hrs.) THE SCIENCE IN SCIENCE FICTION (SCIENCE) Paula Nettles Writers of science fiction have typically started with current science and concluded with imaginative future possibilities. This class will explore common themes in science fiction from theatrical and scientific points of view. Topics covered will include alien life, time travel, artificial intelligence, faster than light travel, future weapons systems, and post-apocalyptic futures. Students will read Frank Herbert’s sci-fi classic, Dune,​ as well as view cinematic adaptations of that work and adaptations of other works of science fiction. A paper analyzing and synthesizing what students have learned in the class is required. (2hrs) AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES (SOCSTUDIES) Marty Hays The purpose for having this class is to show that "Native Americans ARE" as opposed to "WERE." When most people think of American Indians, they only consider them as they were in the past, and that past has been brought forward, usually with false stereotypes, both negative and positive, leaving modern day Natives unrecognized and unappreciated. We will look at important historical figures and events in this class, but we will also connect them to the present day. A majority of class time will be spent reading modern day Native authors, like Sherman Alexie, and listening to modern day music, like the Cherokee rapper "Lightfoot" and watching modern films made by directors like Chris Eyre, and featuring native actors and themes. Students will also learn how to powwow dance, drum, and sing and will be encouraged to attend a powwow and make contact with Indian people. This is an academic social studies course with considerable reading and some quizzes and written work. There is no comprehensive final exam. Participation and active involvement are necessary. (2hr)

​PERIODS

3&4 TWO-HOUR COURSES NON-ACADEMIC:

COOKING AND WRITING (OTHER) Gavin Drummond This course will consider such topics as writing about food, describing what things taste like, food journalism and reviewing, and will even involve some cooking as a way of experiencing first-hand the sensory pleasure of the kitchen. Possible texts include Nigel Slater’s ​Kitchen Diaries, Nigella Lawson’s How to Eat, Anthony Bourdain’s ​Kitchen Confidential, and ​The New Yorker’s annual food edition. I also hope to visit with local restaurants, cooks, owners and critics. Expect to cook, talk, eat, read, and write as part of the course.

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THE INDIE FILM (ART) Holly White/Isabelle Poore Independent Film is classically defined as a film made outside of the established studio system. It is the holy grail of filmmaking, and allows filmmakers creative control, and artistic freedom outside of the big commercial market. Through class discussions and film screenings, we will explore the different types, genres and components that make a film truly independent. Class size is limited to 11 students. (2 hrs.) COSTUME DESIGN / COSPLAY (OTHER) Fiona Leonard If you love dressing up or Cosplay, come and learn the techniques you need to make and design your own creations! We’ll cover sewing, crafting, principles of design, form, and function. Our project as a class will be to invent a collection of unique costumes for the JH school’s production of “The Lion King”. You will also have an opportunity to play “Iron Costumer” or “Project Cosplay” at the end of term! VIVA LAS VEGAS (OTHER) Paul Myers How did a desert railroad stop become an entertainment and gambling showplace? Through historical footage, this course will explore the history, the role of the mob, the night life and the casinos of Las Vegas. Playing and examining the probability of the casino games will highlight each session. (2 hr.) INTERNSHIP (OTHER) Natalie Rogovin The internship is a component of a larger, school-wide initiative designed to strengthen the community stewardship ethic and deepen learning through volunteerism and civic involvement. The goal of this endeavor is to provide you with an opportunity to investigate pressing issues of social justice in your community. It is also a graduation requirement; ​two internships​, at separate organizations, with a minimum of 30 hours each, must be completed (only one internship credit is awarded for on campus service work). Students are encouraged to do 1 internship their 9th or 10th grade year and a second one in their 11th or 12th grade year. SETTING UP INTERNSHIP: Step 1. Start by making general observations of issues social justice that affect your community. In your exploration of these issues begin researching local, non-profit organizations whose mission statements aim at addressing solutions. Step 2. Once you have identified an issue and/or an agency, check in with Natalie. She may already have a contact or opportunity lined up that you can take part in. She can also offer support when you are contacting an organization yourself for the first time. It is important to be sure that the organization can also offer you a minimum of 30 hours of service related work. Step 3: Submit your internship proposal to Natalie via the Student Portal. Internships are set up by the student with the help of Natalie, who must approve all proposals for internship credit. The process of setting up an internship is part of the experience; students, rather than parents, should handle essential communication and coordinate details through Natalie. Proposals must be submitted prior to the start of service. Step 4: During the internship, it is suggested that students keep a journal of their experiences. Regular communication with Natalie during the internship is expected. Step 5. TO RECEIVE CREDIT students must complete the Reflection Essay and have site supervisors complete the Supervisor Evaluation Form. Both must be completed for credit and both are available on the Student Portal

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PERIOD 3 ONE-HOUR COURSES ACADEMIC: AP BIOLOGY (SCIENCE) Miranda Knowles This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Bridget will be teaching both sections of this course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of students in Long Term AP Biology). (1 hr.) HUMANS AND THE ENVIRONMENT (SCIENCE) Brian Smith This is a continuation of the Long Term course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of all students in the LT course Humans and the Environment). (1 hr.) ALGEBRA 2 (MATH) Math Faculty This is a continuation of the Long Term course. You may sign up with ​any teacher ​in any Algebra 2 sections. (One hour in Short Term A and B is required of students enrolled in Algebra 2.) (1 hr.) ALGEBRA 1 (MATH) ​Sue Apolinksy This is a continuation of the Long Term Course. (One hour in Short Term A and B is required of students enrolled in Algebra 1.) (1hr.) SPANISH 1 (MODLANG) Ruth Dinkins This is a continuation of the Long Term Course.(One hour in Short Termis required of students enrolled in Spanish 1.) SPANISH 2 (MODLANG) Melissa McKay Hagan This is a continuation of the Long Term course. It is a required course for all students in Spanish 2. Students in Melissa’s long-term class must sign up for one of her short term sections. (1 hr.) US HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT​ (SOCSTUDIES) Barrington Edwards/Ashley Austin This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Students must stay with their Long Term teacher during Short Terms, but can take it any period offered. (One hour each Short Term is required of students in American History). (1 hr.) INTRODUCTION TO ETHICAL DIALOGUE (OTHER)​ High School Faculty This class will be taught by two high school faculty members who will use cases, short stories, articles, poems, and a variety of exercises and discussions to introduce students to the kinds of ethical dialogue and the knowledge and skills necessary to listen to others, be fully present and to understand our own biases. The course will review ethical theories, philosophy, self-understanding, listening and dialogue skills. We will read short stories, current event articles and engage in healthy dialogue about what we think is right and wrong and all of the shades of grey in-between. ​All 10th grade students need to sign up for one hour in term A. (1 hr.) US POLITICS​ (SOCSTUDIES) Social Studies Faculty The presidential election, immigration, education and the struggling economy are all major issues facing our government today. Are you curious about how the government handles so many complex issues? Then U.S. Politics is the course for you. This course will look at the current structure of government and analyze how the government actually works. We will go beyond the basics and look at the many forces that influence our local, state and federal government (media, lobbyists, money, elections and citizens). This course takes a hands-on approach in which everyone will participate in the process of understanding the U.S. Government. This class will have a few short papers and one end of term test. ​(​One hour IN EITHER Short Term is required of all 9th grade students). 17


FUTURE OF FOOD (SCIENCE) Korri Ellis/Magnus Edlund /Virginia Davis/ Carmen Tappero In 2050, the world population will have grown to 9 billion. The current food infrastructure cannot support so many people. Will agriculture change to support so many stomachs? Through reading, cooking, debate and discussion, we will explore the past, present and future of food. Assignments will include selections from The Omnivore's Dilemma and National Geographic and a final presentation. (1hr) MAKING POETRY​ ​(ENGLISH) ​Thrower Starr It’s just a fact: something in us wants to be expressed in poetry. Poetry also slows us down and is therefore a tonic for the hectic speed of our lives. As we slow down, we often find ourselves connecting both with our deeper selves and with a deeper sense of the world outside of ourselves. The primary focus in this class will be on creating your own poetry. You will read poetry by others that will serve as models and as inspiration, and you will try different kinds of exercises and topics, some meant to focus attention, others to open up imagination. This class will be run in a workshop format so that students will be reading their work aloud and hearing responses from others about it. (1hr.) BEAT! (ENGLISH) John Capute/Beth Zerihun The Beat Generation Writers were often remembered for their restless wandering and devotion to sex, drugs, and literature. They were responsible for everything from the re-examining of the system that banned books that were determined improper in some way, to the name of the Beatles, to the hippie movement. They did all this despite the fact that most of them died between the ages of 40 and 70. In this class we will read a few excerpts by the most prolific and well known authors of this generation including Allen Ginsberg's ​Howl and Jack Kerouac's ​On The Road and spend class time discussing

what we read. We will also delve into how the times they were writing in affected them and their literature as well as how they affected literature and history to follow. We will watch a recent movie based on their lives starring Daniel Radcliffe at some point during the term. Then we will finish off with final a presentation on an aspect of The Beats Generation. There will be a quiz or two and a few blogposts as well throughout the term. (1hr). MERE ANARCHY: European Colonialism in Africa (ENGLISH) Sarah Schiff/ Stuart Duffield In this class, we will study the spiritual and psychological impact of European colonialism in Africa. We will read a couple short stories/novellas such as “The River Between” by Ngũgĩ Wa Thiong'o and “The Doum Tree of Wad Hamid” by Tayeb Salih. Most of the class will focus on discussion. At the end of the class we will watch a movie. This is an academic class, and will be graded on participation, a couple blog posts, and a short essay assignment.(1hr) MAKING HEALTHY LIFE DECISIONS​ (INTERDISC) High School Faculty Required of all 9th graders, Making Healthy Life Decisions was designed to help bring into clear focus the many issues that confront teens during their years in high school. In your teen years, you will confront important issues that challenge and reinforce your values about drugs, alcohol, sex, body image, and coping with stress. In this class students will have an opportunity to better understand these issues through discussions, videos, readings, written exercises, and speakers. Students will also complete a final project, which will help to synthesize the information they learned throughout the course and to reflect on the ways in which this information can be incorporated into future decisions. The overall focus of the class is to provide scientific and sociological information that we hope will help frame healthy life decisions.This course will be fun and serious, and draw upon your insights, struggles, and our support to help you make the best decisions possible. ​This course counts as an academic course. (1hr.)

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PERIOD 3 ONE-HOUR COURSES NON-ACADEMIC: THE CLAY CANVAS: An Exploration of Image Transfer on Clay (ART) Dianne Bush This short-term class will provide an introduction to various image transfer techniques for clay. Students will create several ceramic pieces such as plates, platters, or vases and use the clay surface as a canvas for their own narrative exploration. Layering of printed imagery, text, and color will allow students to develop imagery that is personally meaningful. Students will attain an understanding of the tools, materials, and techniques for monoprinting, screening, stenciling, embossing and relief printing onto clay slabs and forms. Students will be able to make their own printing tools to create images with screens, relief blocks, and stencils. (1 hr.) WONDERSTRUCK (OTHER) Beth Schild/Abdul Mia/Dennis Morales In this short term course learn how to make people complete fools of themselves. Magic has been around for centuries, and it is an art form that takes a lot of practice. There're many branches of magic that work with cards, mentalism (mind reading), and creative tricks with everyday objects. When performing street magic it also takes crowd management and charisma to perform well or have someone interested. In general learn sleights, misdirection, cold reading skills. We'll watch some tv magic specials, documentaries and some YouTube videos; there'll be some reading a couple nights a week. Towards the last week of short term everyone will film their own street magic video, and it might even be posted on YouTube! Sign up if you want to have just a have a good time while learning and practicing magic. Depending on sign up, this will either be a beginners class or and advanced class for students who took the course last year in STB.(1hr) THE HEROINE’S JOURNEY: We’ll save ourselves (OTHER) Tally Johnson This class is designed to be a space to reflect on what it means to be female, particularly in this time and place. We will think about origins ñ who were the first heroines in literature and film? We will discuss safety ñ consent, self-defense, and rape culture. We will consider stresses unique to girls and women in our society. We will look at the image of ​woman, and how it has changed through place and time. What does it mean to be beautiful, and does that concept empower or imprison us? What can strengthen us, and what do we need to protect against? This class will involve a lot of discussion, some journaling, and a presentation. Girls Only. (1hr) CO-ED STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING (PE/HEALTH) Ivan Asteghene This course will take place in the Fitness Center and it will introduce students to basic strength training techniques and enable them to identify major and secondary muscle groups being contracted. Students will gain an understanding of different training strategies/techniques and be able to set up an individual regimen or program. Cardiovascular training including aerobic, low/high intensity, low/high duration, circuit and interval training will also be included in this course. Students will study, learn, and use spotting techniques, other safety procedures used in the Fitness Center and in any other physical activities. Students do not have to be proficient in any techniques to join the class. If there is enough student interest, there will be one co-ed class and one all women’s class . (1 hr) UNDERSTANDING YOUR DOG (OTHER) John Abert From its ancestral roots as a wolf, ​canis lupus familiaris has become the most varied mammal species on Earth . . . and one of the most misunderstood. Our “best friends” are cherished because they are so much like us, but they are also so different. This course will dispel some myths, help you understand how your 19


dog thinks, and enhance your relationship with your canine companion. John has over thirty years of experience training his dogs and teaching people to train theirs. (1 hr.) TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANT ​(OTHER) Tami Oliver A large part of the success of the computer program at Paideia has been the willingness of students to take an interest in the operation of the computer labs and the school-wide network. Responsibilities include assisting people in finding software or other materials, helping newcomers use the computers, answering questions, maintaining and installing equipment. The assistant may use free time to work on his/her own assignment from other classes. ​(*Permission of instructor required)​ (1 hr.) MUSICAL LEADS (MUSIC) Scott Morris/Kate Murray/Dee Wagner Fiddler on the Roof is the High School Musical for 2017. The story centers around Tevye and his five daughters as he strives to maintain his Jewish culture despite outside forces (Tsar) that threatens their lives and forces them to leave their village. Auditions for the show will be on November 2,3 and 4. Information about the auditions will be available in early October.

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PERIOD 4 ONE-HOUR COURSES ACADEMIC: ALGEBRA 2 (MATH) Math Faculty This is a continuation of the Long Term course. You may sign up with ​any teacher ​in any Algebra 2 sections. (One hour in Short Term A and B is required of students enrolled in Algebra 2.) (1 hr.) HUMANS AND THE ENVIRONMENT (SCIENCE) Brian Smith This is a continuation of the Long Term course. (One hour in Short Term A is required of all students in the LT course Humans and the Environment). (1 hr.) US HISTORY & GOVERNMENT (SOCSTUDIES) Carl Rosenbaum/Ashley Austin This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Students must stay with their Long Term teacher during Short Terms. (One hour each Short Term is required of students in US History and Government). (1 hr.) US POLITICS​ (SOCSTUDIES) SS Faculty The presidential election, immigration, education and the struggling economy are all major issues facing our government today. Are you curious about how the government handles so many complex issues? Then U.S. Politics is the course for you. This course will look at the current structure of government and analyze how the government actually works. We will go beyond the basics and look at the many forces that influence our local, state and federal government (media, lobbyists, money, elections and citizens). This course takes a hands-on approach in which everyone will participate in the process of understanding the U.S. Government. This class will have a few short papers and one end of term test. ​(​One hour IN EITHER Short Term is required of all 9th grade students). FRENCH 2 (MODLANG) Joanna Gibson This is a continuation of the Long Term Course. It is a required course for all students in French 2. (1 hr.) SPANISH 2 (MODLANG) Marci Weiland This is a continuation of the Long Term course. It is a required course for all students in Spanish 2. Students in Marci’s long-term class must sign up for one of her short term sections. (1 hr.) CINE DEL MUNDO HISPANO​ (MODLANG) Joy Lewis-Mendez In this course we will watch three films (in Spanish) from different parts of the Spanish-speaking world; one from Mexico, one from Spain, and one from Bolivia. We will study their historical context, cultural relevance, and language/accent. Students will write one-page film responses, do one presentation, and be expected to fully participate in class discussion. Small quizzes on plot/themes will be given. All assignments and discussion will be in Spanish- so you must have be in or have completed Spanish 3 (or be a native Spanish speaker) to take this course. Tentative list of films we will watch: ​Todo sobre mi madre, Sin nombre, También la lluvia (1hr). HUMAN RIGHTS (SOCSTUDIES) ​Jen Leon Three C’s required: Commitment, Compassion, and Creativity! This course is for any student wishing to learn more about human rights struggles and how to join the fight against injustices. Students with no previous experience will develop an introductory knowledge of contemporary human rights issues while students with experience will deepen this knowledge and take on leadership in the class. Largely the students, according to interest will determine specific topics of study. Students will research a topic of interest and carry out a related action project. (1 hr.)

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THE SIMPSONS (ENGLISH) Jim Veal Now in its 28th season, ​The Simpsons is the longest running animated series in television history. It has been called “the greatest creative achievement of our time” (James Fallows) and “the most intelligent, funny and even politically satisfying TV show ever “ (​National Review). Hyperbole? You decide. In this course we’ll watch and discuss classic episodes, plus read from the growing body of ​Simpsons commentary and write some of our own. LORD OF THE RINGS – THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING (ENGLISH) Joseph Cullen/Finn Smith-Ruttan Lord of the Rings is a book that is well known as the father of what is sometimes named “high fantasy” and called by the author “legendarium”. Tolkein was a teacher of Old English at Oxford and based his writings on the mythology, poetry and literature of early England and Europe, especially works like “Beowulf” and “Gawain”. The book is a trilogy and this class is the first book. (1hr.) THE MYTH OF PYGMALION (ENGLISH) Clark Cloyd Though a late addition to the realm of mythic tales, the story of Pygmalion, the artist who fell in love with his artistic creation, has proven an enduring tale. It has shown up in such familiar works as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Shaw’s ​Pygmalion (and of course in the Lerner and Loewe musical adaptation of Shaw’s play, ​My Fair Lady), but also in more recent Hollywood treatments, ​Educating ​Rita (1980) and ​Pretty Woman (1990). In this class we will examine the story starting with its first substantial ancient telling in Ovid’s ​Metamorphoses and then trace its recurrence over the next two millennia in paintings, poems, plays, prose and film. We’ll try our own hand at telling the myth, adding our renderings of the story to the already substantial pile. (1hr) GREAT WRITERS: KAFKA (ENGLISH) John Capute/ Emma Alexandrov “As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect.” -- The Metamorphosis “Someone must have been spreading slander about Josef K., for one morning he was arrested, though he had done nothing wrong.” -- The Trial Kafka’s abrupt beginnings give way to worlds rife with nightmarish predicaments, inscrutable authorities, and convoluted bureaucracies. In fact, definitions for the eponym “Kafkaesque” include “marked by surreal distortion and often a sense of impending danger” and “marked by a senseless, disorienting, and often menacing complexity.” We will explore Kafka’s strange worlds through some of his shorter stories, the longer story The Metamorphosis, and the unfinished novel The Trial. Class periods will be structured around discussion, and homework will include nightly reading and occasional blog posts. (1hr) EX MACHINA (INTERDISC) Jack Bross/Lincoln Sorcher Enter the android. The mysterious exobiologist (who is totally not an android himself) reveals his creation to Captain Kirk: it's an exact android clone of the captain! Both Kirk-on-Kirk violence and existential crisis are sure to ensue. Forty minutes, one alien seduction, and an obligatory "Which Kirk is real?" fight scene later, what are we left with? The inherent difference between how robots and humans think: the difference between artificial and human intelligence. This course takes an interdisciplinary look at machine intelligence and human reasoning. We will borrow ideas and excerpts from Douglas Hofstadter's "Godel, Escher, Bach", look at the pioneering work of Alan Turing, and look at the ideas behind recent advances in Machine Learning. We will explore recursion, self-reference and paradox, and see how these ideas crop up in logic, art, and nature. So welcome the android, because it is becoming increasingly unclear where humanity ends and artificial intelligence begins. (1hr)

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MAKING HEALTHY LIFE DECISIONS​ (INTERDISC) High School Faculty Required of all 9th graders, Making Healthy Life Decisions was designed to help bring into clear focus the many issues that confront teens during their years in high school. In your teen years, you will confront important issues that challenge and reinforce your values about drugs, alcohol, sex, body image, and coping with stress. In this class students will have an opportunity to better understand these issues through discussions, videos, readings, written exercises, and speakers. Students will also complete a final project, which will help to synthesize the information they learned throughout the course and to reflect on the ways in which this information can be incorporated into future decisions. The overall focus of the class is to provide scientific and sociological information that we hope will help frame healthy life decisions.This course will be fun and serious, and draw upon your insights, struggles, and our support to help you make the best decisions possible. ​This course counts as an academic course. (1hr.)

​PERIOD 4 ONE-HOUR COURSES

NON-ACADEMIC:

PORTUGUESE, THE LANGUAGE OF BRAZIL (OTHER) Ruth Dinkins Have you always wanted to learn how to speak Portuguese? Think it's just like Spanish? Take this course and find out. We will cover some of the basics, learn some important phrases, listen to a little Brazilian music, and practice short conversations on everyday life situations. This course will focus on Brazilian portuguese, and will include some aspects of the culture of Brazil, but the emphasis will be on the language itself. You won't become fluent, but you'll be able to tell the difference between Spanish and Portuguese when you hear it. You might even be able to brave a conversation the next time you run into someone speaking Portuguese. (1 hr.) INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THEORY (MUSIC) John Abert/Amy Ensel Theory sometimes is referred to as "the science of music", is a detailed study of music notation and the rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic practices that have predominated music from Bach to rock. Students will learn the basic principles of "common practice" music writing as well as enhancing their analytical listening skills through ear training and sight singing exercises. Extensive previous musical experience is a prerequisite for this course, preferably including several years of performance on a wind or string instrument or voice. Instructor approval is required. (1hr) THE CLAY CANVAS: An Exploration of Image Transfer on Clay (ART) Dianne Bush This short-term class will provide an introduction to various image transfer techniques for clay. Students will create several ceramic pieces such as plates, platters, or vases and use the clay surface as a canvas for their own narrative exploration. Layering of printed imagery, text, and color will allow students to develop imagery that is personally meaningful. Students will attain an understanding of the tools, materials, and techniques for monoprinting, screening, stenciling, embossing and relief printing onto clay slabs and forms. Students will be able to make their own printing tools to create images with screens, relief blocks, and stencils. (1 hr.) MUSICAL LEADS AND CAST (MUSIC) Scott Morris/Kate Murray/Dee Wagner Fiddler on the Roof is the High School Musical for 2017. The story centers around Tevye and his five daughters as he strives to maintain his Jewish culture despite outside forces (Tsar) that threatens their lives and forces them to leave their village. Auditions for the show will be on November 2,3 and 4. Information about the auditions will be available in early October.

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SHORT TERM PLAY​( DRAMA) ​Jesse Evans This class will involve putting on a play during this Short Term. The play goes up one week after Short Term ends. You will be required to meet after school on certain days. You need to audition for this class, and that will happen in November. The play will be a comedy. If you are interested in taking the class as a set designer, tech crew, etc. you can do that as well. (3 hrs.) THEATER TECH (DRAMA) Jesse Evans This role will help with the technical aspects of the theater and black box. They will help run assemblies, work on building sets for the plays, setting a rep lighting plot for the black box, as well and more. You will learn how to use the sound and light board as well work with power tools. It will be a lot of work, but a lot of fun. (1hr)

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​PERIODS

5&6 TWO-HOUR COURSES ACADEMIC:

AP CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (SCIENCE) Jo Morton This 2-hour course is a continuation of the long term AP Chemistry class. This is a required course for all AP Chemistry students. (2 hrs.) ION CHANNELS AND DISEASE (SCIENCE) Miranda Knowles From biology courses, you know that cell membranes have proteins in them. You also know that mutations can cause genetic disease (like cystic fibrosis, hypersomnia or cardiac arrhythmia). But HOW does a mutation cause an error in a membrane protein which then leads to a disease state? In Ion Channels & Disease we will discuss the cellular and molecular physiology and biophysics that underlie important functions of the nervous, cardiovascular and renal systems and how when those properties change, disease states can result. We will read chapters from Bertil Hille's textbook Ion Channels of Excitable Membranes and recent research papers from biophysics labs. We will also visit labs and professors at Emory, Georgia State and/or Georgia Tech to get firsthand experience with biophysics lab techniques. Previous or concurrent enrollment in AP Biology is required, or permission from the instructor. (2hrs) COMPETITION ROBOTICS (SCIENCE) Jen Leon In this course, students will design, build, and program robots to compete in the VEX Robotics competition. It is open to students who are currently on the Paideia Robotics Team or have already taken Martin Aguilera's Robotics course. We will learn more advanced techniques in the design of robot mechanisms and autonomous programming. We'll use those techniques to build robots to compete against each other and against other schools in the region and -- we hope -- the World Championships. If you are not involved on the robotics team, but would like to take the class, please see Jen. (2 hrs.) CRIME AND PUNISHMENT: THE COP AND CROOK IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FILM AND TV ( ENGLISH) John Capute/Rick Goldstein The crime drama has become a staple of American pop culture. Think of two of the most successful television franchises on American TV: CSI and Law and Order and their numerous spin-offs. Perhaps now more than ever, in our post 9/11 world of heightened anxiety, the appeal and comfort of dramas which remind us of our fears and then dispel them through the tireless work of crime scene technicians or hardworking cops and D.A.’s is not surprising. But not every crime drama reflects a universe so easily ordered. We start with that Fox Television staple, Cops, and see how “reality” TV has helped create our attitudes and perceptions of the world and profession of law enforcement. From here we go into the way film and serial TV have presented the job of the cop: the attitudes they take toward him or her and the how they reflect the respective values, issues, and concerns of their particular time. LA Confidential with Russell Crowe and Kevin Spacey; Dirty Harry with Clint Eastwood; Serpico with Al Pacino; Training Day with Denzel Washington; Lethal Weapon with Mel Gibson and Danny Glover; NYPD Blue; Homicide: Life on The Streets; Law and Order: Special Victims Unit; The Wire: these and more are what we will be watching and talking about. There will also be guest speakers from the local law enforcement and judicial community. At the end of the term there will be a test. (2 hrs.) ART MAGAZINE​ / BLUE RIDER (ENGLISH) Joseph Cullen/Tally Johnson This course is for the art magazine staff and consists mostly of reading submissions for our May release of the new magazine. Work will include fund-raising, design, poster making and making literary allusions. You can sign up for this course as a 2 hour or 1 hour course in 5/6 period. (2 hr. or 1hr)

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SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF RACE ( SOCSTUDIES) Barrington Edwards This is a discussion-based class that explores the social construction of race, focusing on race as both a biological notion and a social reality, particularly in the development of Western sciences from the 18​th century to today. Reading select primary, secondary and contemporary literary pieces, we will pay special attention to how the intersection of science and race has persisted and maintained its social force for the past three centuries. Further, we will look at the relationship between race, gender, and contemporary scientific research, particularly in the medical sciences and health disparities research. By the end of the three-week course, students will be able to critically evaluate claims about the science of race, analyze the social construction of race in debates about social inequality, and demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of ethnic and racial differences in society. The main reader for the course includes Joan Ferrante's and Prince Brown's reader, ​The Social Construction of Race and Ethnicity in the United States. We will also screen documentaries that deal specifically with race and science in society. The evaluative assessments will be essay-based, no examinations. (1hr) HISTORY TAKES ON HOLLYWOOD (SOCSTUDIES) Jeanne Lee For many Americans, Hollywood is their history teacher. Of the nine movies nominated as Best Picture this year, six were based on true events. Docudramas have been a staple of moviemaking since moviemaking began. What was true and what was not in the movie you saw? Hollywood has few qualms about mangling timelines, physical locales, or almost any element, even those that are firmly established as fact. It is no wonder that audiences confuse the real world with movie representations. In this course we will take a sampling of these historical films and research the actual events on which they are based to see how faithful Hollywood has been to what really happened. (2 hrs.) BREAKING BARRIERS (SOCSTUDIES) Marty Hays This is a sports history class that will do case studies of several important world-class athletes who broke down racial barriers and changed the face of American sport and society. Some of the athletes who will be studied include Jackie Robinson, who broke the color barrier in baseball, Althea Gibson, the first black tennis player and first black woman to win a grand slam event. Arthur Ashe the first black tennis player named to the Davis Cup team. Jim Thorpe and Billy Mills, the first two American Indians to win gold medals in Olympic track competition. Jesse Owens, first black track athlete to win Olympic Gold and considered by many to be the greatest athlete of all time. He embarrassed Hitler in the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Wilma Rudolph, the greatest black female athlete and first to win Olympic Gold, and Jack Johnson, the first black boxer to become heavyweight champion. We will examine these magnificent athletes by reading books, articles, watching films, and having lectures and discussions. It will be an academic course and will involve considerable reading, a few quizzes, and a short paper. (2hrs)

PERIODS 5&6 TWO-HOUR COURSES NON-ACADEMIC: THE HUMAN FORM IN CLAY(ART) Dianne Bush There are few things as satisfying as transforming a soft lump of clay into a recognizable representation of a human face or body. This course is an introduction to figure sculpture using fired clay as the medium and will include a study of the human head and body and options for its representation in three dimensions. An orientation to building, surfacing, and firing ceramics and processes of hand-forming clay including pinching, coil-building, slab building, modeling, and carving will be introduced. While the class will teach proper proportions and placement of facial features, we will also examine how sculptors can take liberties with realistic representation in order to allow for creative expression. Students will have the opportunity to express zoomorphic, fantasy, or thematic interpretations of the figure if desired. (2hrs)

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PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT (ART) Madeleine Soloway This class is designed for serious and advanced Juniors interested in furthering the development of their college portfolio. Students will create a small body of work based on a theme using a variety of materials and media. Teacher permission to enroll in this class is necessary. (2 hrs.) SHOOTING ON LOCATION (ART) Holly White Through field trips, students will explore different neighborhoods through the lens of their camera. Class will focus on shooting and technical skills needed when shooting on location. This is for both serious students and beginners who are interested in a studio class that explores different areas, allowing them time to shoot and work on their portfolio. Class size is limited to 11 students. (2 hrs.) URBAN AGRICULTURE INTERNSHIP (OTHER) Tania Herbert/ Magnus Edlund Depending on the time of year, topics covered include: building soil fertility, composting, growing in Georgia, harvesting, managing a flock of chickens, aquaponics, designing/implementing building projects, and food justice. Interns will work on projects at our school farms and gardens, as well as outreach projects in under-served communities around town. We will also visit and work at other innovative urban farms and urban ag projects and get to know the farmers and community organizers. Inside, interns will get time in the kitchen learning how to use seasonal ingredients to create simple and delicious dishes. If time permits, we will also learn basic food preservation techniques, including a class on How NOT to die from Botulism. (2hr) CLASSIC FILMS (OTHER) Paula Nettles The goal of the course is to introduce and examine great films produced prior to 1970. Specific genres and outstanding directors will be covered. Students will view, discuss and critique American and foreign films. (2hr) CONTRACT BRIDGE (OTHER) Joanna Gibson/Ansley Yeomans Learn to play the best card game ever! Study bidding and playing strategies, conventions and tricks of the trade. Bridge is something you will play your whole life. This course is for beginners; no experience of any type is required. (2 hr.) DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS (OTHER​) Jack Bross With the release of a new edition of the classic role playing game Dungeons and Dragons, we will be trying out the new rules system. We will also likely be looking at other rather different role playing games such as the Firefly RPG. There will be RPG-related board and card games as well, such as Munchkin and Lords of Waterdeep. Students interested in being a GM for this course should let the teacher know in advance. (2 hrs.) THE MUSICAL LEADS AND CAST (MUSIC) Scott Morris/Kate Murray/Dee Wagner Fiddler on the Roof is the High School Musical for 2017. The story centers around Tevye and his five daughters as he strives to maintain his Jewish culture despite outside forces (Tsar) that threatens their lives and forces them to leave their village. Auditions for the show will be on November 2,3 and 4. Information about the auditions will be available in early October. HS MUSICAL PIT ORCHESTRA (MUSIC) Pete Ciaschini/Elisabeth Copeland/Amy Ensel The Pit Orchestra will rehearse two hours a day and be responsible for providing the music for the musical “Fiddler on the Roof” in January. All students must be available for the dress rehearsals and show dates. TECH CREW MUSICAL (OTHER) Dee Wagner This class will take care of all the technical work for the Musical. It will meet primarily for the last two hours of the school day, but some Friday afternoon and weekend work will be required. (2 hrs.) 27


SHORT TERM PLAY (DRAMA) ​Jesse Evans This class will involve putting on a play during this Short Term. The play goes up one week after Short Term ends. You will be required to meet after school on certain days. You need to audition for this class, and that will happen in November. The play will be a comedy. If you are interested in taking the class as a set designer, tech crew, etc. you can do that as well. (3 hrs.) BOWLING (PE) ​Mark Schmitt The short term A Bowling class meets every day for two hours and travels by bus to Cosmic Lanes in Decatur. The class is for all levels of bowlers, from beginner to experienced. The purpose of the course is to learn the basics of this "lifetime sport" and when the class is over, students will learn bowling terminology, how to score, and most importantly how to bowl. There is hands-on instruction available at the lanes for those who wish to take it seriously, and those who just want to learn the basics and have "fun" bowling, are able to accomplish that. We have tournaments and competitions, but it is all handicapped, so the winners are not necessarily the best bowlers, but those who can bowl the highest above their average. This class is open to all high school students. (2 hrs.) ZUMBA FITNESS(PE) Shanye Crawford/Felicia Jaques/Vlada Watkins/Katy Jordan/Alexis Myers In this class, we will dance unapologetically and enthusiastically. Both boys and girls are welcome. Since this course is 2 periods long, one can expect a lot of different activities. We will be doing the following things: learning dance moves to certain songs (e.g. Beyonce, Chris Brown, and others of one’s choosing), talking about health in general, and somewhere down the road we will have time for students to make his/her own favorite healthy meal and bring it to class to share. Of course, we will also incorporate plenty of time for stretching. However, there is one twist to the Zumba Class. Before we dance, and after we stretch, we will do legs, glutes, and core muscle strength workouts for about 15 minutes prior to dancing. To hone in on certain areas, we will alternate certain workouts every day INTERNSHIP (OTHER) Natalie Rogovin The internship is a component of a larger, school-wide initiative designed to strengthen the community stewardship ethic and deepen learning through volunteerism and civic involvement. The goal of this endeavor is to provide you with an opportunity to investigate pressing issues of social justice in your community. It is also a graduation requirement; ​two internships​, at separate organizations, with a minimum of 30 hours each, must be completed (only one internship credit is awarded for on campus service work). Students are encouraged to do 1 internship their 9th or 10th grade year and a second one in their 11th or 12th grade year.

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SETTING UP INTERNSHIP: Step 1. Start by making general observations of issues social justice that affect your community. In your exploration of these issues begin researching local, non-profit organizations whose mission statements aim at addressing solutions. Step 2. Once you have identified an issue and/or an agency, check in with Natalie. She may already have a contact or opportunity lined up that you can take part in. She can also offer support when you are contacting an organization yourself for the first time. It is important to be sure that the organization can also offer you a minimum of 30 hours of service related work. Step 3: Submit your internship proposal to Natalie via the Student Portal. Internships are set up by the student with the help of Natalie, who must approve all proposals for internship credit. The process of setting up an internship is part of the experience; students, rather than parents, should handle essential communication and coordinate details through Natalie. Proposals must be submitted prior to the start of service. Step 4: During the internship, it is suggested that students keep a journal of their experiences. Regular communication with Natalie during the internship is expected. Step 5. TO RECEIVE CREDIT students must complete the Reflection Essay and have site supervisors complete the Supervisor Evaluation Form. Both must be completed for credit and both are available on the Student Portal

ONE HOUR COURSES 5​TH​ PERIOD ACADEMIC ALGEBRA 2/TRIG​ (MATH) Paul Myers This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Paul Myers will be teaching this class instead of Rosalinda R. (One hour in Short Term A is required of students enrolled in Algebra 2/Trig.) (1 hr.) SPANISH 2 (MODLANG) Joy Lewis-Mendez This is a continuation of the Long Term course. It is a required course for all students in Spanish 2. Students should sign up for their respective teacher in any period. (1 hr.) FRENCH 2 (MODLANG) Eddy Hernandez This is a continuation of the Long Term course. It is a required course for all students in French 2. Students should sign up for their respective teacher in any period. (1 hr.) US POLITICS​ (SOCSTUDIES) SS Faculty The presidential election, immigration, education and the struggling economy are all major issues facing our government today. Are you curious about how the government handles so many complex issues? Then U.S. Politics is the course for you. This course will look at the current structure of government and analyze how the government actually works. We will go beyond the basics and look at the many forces that influence our local, state and federal government (media, lobbyists, money, elections and citizens). This course takes a hands-on approach in which everyone will participate in the process of understanding the U.S. Government. This class will have a few short papers and one end of term test. ​(​One hour IN EITHER Short Term is required of all 9th grade students). US HISTORY & GOVERNMENT​ (SOCSTUDIES) Carl Rosenbaum This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Students must stay with their Long Term teacher during Short Terms. (One hour each Short Term is required of students in US History and Government). (1 hr.) SPORTS ANALYTICS: HOW GAMES ARE WON (INTERDISC) Juan Jewell The combination of the genius of Bill James, the development of the personal computer, and the Internet has transformed our understanding of sports. Bill James popularized the use of the treasure trove of 29


historical baseball data to examine critically much of the received wisdom in baseball. His work spawned an explosion in analytics in other sports, such as basketball, football, and soccer. In this course, we will examine how readlily available statistical evidence can be used to answer questions about the various factors that contribute to success in sports. We will read some of Bill James' work as well as sections of a more recent book, Scorecasting: The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports are Played and Games Won, by Tobias Moskowitz and L. Jon Wertheim. Students will be expected to design a study of their own.(1 hr.) ART MAGAZINE​ / BLUE RIDER (ENGLISH) Joseph Cullen/Tally Johnson This course is for the art magazine staff and consists mostly of reading submissions for our May release of the new magazine. Work will include fund-raising, design, poster making and making literary allusions. You can sign up for this course for either 1 or 2 hours. (2 hr. or 1hr) WHAT’S SO STRANGE ABOUT EXISTENTIALISM?(ENGLISH) Sarah Schiff/Alexa Levy “There is no sun without shadow, and it is essential to know the night.” -Albert Camus Have you ever said that you are “having an existential crisis?” In this course, we will explore the evolution of the “existential crisis” from the 1940’s to today through a discussion of The Stranger by Albert Camus and its modern remix, The Meursault Investigation, by Kamel Daoud. We will spend class time discussing the two books in the context of questions such as: Does life have one definitive meaning or purpose? If so, what is it, and how can we align ourselves with it? “Real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present.” -Camus Come to this class ready to give your all to these enthralling, existential questions! Grades will be based on short reading quizzes and one paper. INTRODUCTION TO ETHICAL DIALOGUE (INTERDISC)​ High School Faculty This class will be taught by two high school faculty members who will use cases, short stories, articles, poems, and a variety of exercises and discussions to introduce students to the kinds of ethical dialogue and the knowledge and skills necessary to listen to others, be fully present and to understand our own biases. The course will review ethical theories, philosophy, self-understanding, listening and dialogue skills. We will read short stories, current event articles and engage in healthy dialogue about what we think is right and wrong and all of the shades of grey in-between. ​All 10th grade students need to sign up for one hour in term A. (1 hr.) MAKING HEALTHY LIFE DECISIONS​ (INTERDISC) High School Faculty​Required of all 9th graders, Making Healthy Life Decisions was designed to help bring into clear focus the many issues that confront teens during their years in high school. In your teen years, you will confront important issues that challenge and reinforce your values about drugs, alcohol, sex, body image, and coping with stress. In this class students will have an opportunity to better understand these issues through discussions, videos, readings, written exercises, and speakers. Students will also complete a final project, which will help to synthesize the information they learned throughout the course and to reflect on the ways in which this information can be incorporated into future decisions. The overall focus of the class is to provide scientific and sociological information that we hope will help frame healthy life decisions.This course will be fun and serious, and draw upon your insights, struggles, and our support to help you make the best decisions possible. ​This course counts as an academic course. (1hr.)

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ONE HOUR COURSES 5​TH​ PERIOD NON-ACADEMIC: C​RYPTIC CROSSWORDS (OTHER) Martin Aguilera Cryptic crosswords are crosswords where the clues are one of 8 types of riddles. While mastering regular crosswords requires knowledge and familiarity with the writer, solving a cryptic requires creativity and vision. We will be starting this course with some regular cross words, then branch into some different types of crossword formats before jumping into solving cryptics. The goal of this course is to improve the student's creativity with understanding and dissecting language. (1 hr.) CODE LIKE A GIRL: The Short Term Experience (OTHER) Kathy Washington Learn to code by making music! This introductory computer science course will introduce girls with little to no prior programming experience to the Python coding language. Students will use EarSketch to learn topics in computer science and music technology. Participants will manipulate loops, compose beats, and apply effects to a multi-track digital audio workstation. STRANGER THINGS (OTHER) Beth Schild Obsessed with ​Stranger Things? Come explore the similarities between ​Stranger Things and 80's classic/cult movies (​Close Encounters of the Third Kind, ET, Firestarter, Goonies, etc.). Be prepared to watch the series and discuss the Upside Down World. Is Barb alive?! Where is Eleven???!! YOGA (PE/HEALTH) Anita Aysola Yoga means union. In this course in classical hatha yoga we will learn yoga asanas, unifying our breathing and our minds with postures and movement. Yoga encompasses proper breathing, flexibility, strength and vitality in the body while calming the mind. Come, stretch and relax! No previous experience necessary.

ONE HOUR COURSE 6​TH​ PERIOD ACADEMIC: ALGEBRA 2 (MATH) Beth Schild1 This is a continuation of the Long Term course. You may sign up with ​any teacher ​in any Algebra 2 sections. (One hour in Short Term A and B is required of students enrolled in Algebra 2.) (1 hr.) SPANISH 2 (MODLANG) Marci Wieland This is a continuation of the Long Term course. It is a required course for all students in Spanish 2. Students should sign up for their respective teacher in any period. (1 hr.) US HISTORY & GOVERNMENT​ (SOCSTUDIES) Natalie Rogovin This is a continuation of the Long Term course. Students must stay with their Long Term teacher during Short Terms. (One hour each Short Term is required of students in US History and Government). (1 hr.)

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CHOOSING A PRESIDENT (SOCSTUDIES) Juan Jewell On January 20, 2017, that is, right in the middle of Short Term A, a new President will take office. And on November 3, 2020, many of you will vote for a President for the first time. In an article written for Slate in September, 2012, John Dickerson posed an interesting question: What if we approached presidential campaigns the way a large corporation approaches its search for a new chief executive? The purpose of the campaign would be to test for the skills and attributes actually required for the job. Companies such as McDonald's and Target do this even at the junior levels. Applicants are asked questions like “Tell us about a conflict at work you helped resolve” and “What’s the biggest obstacle you overcame?” The qualities employers are seeking are the same ones voters should be looking for in presidential candidates: initiative, experience, creativity, and problem solving. That article led to a series examining some of the attributes that might prove relevant to being President as well as a recently published book, Whistlestop, in which Dickerson sought to find lessons in Presidential campaigns of the past. In this course, we will read Dickerson's articles from 2012 as well as chapters of his book, seeking to determine key qualities we should be looking for in a President and whether our system, as currently constructed, allow us to determine which candidate possesses those qualities. There will be a couple of quizzes and a final project. (1hr). INTRODUCTION TO ETHICAL DIALOGUE (INTERDISC) High School Faculty This class will be taught by two high school faculty members who will use cases, short stories, articles, poems, and a variety of exercises and discussions to introduce students to the kinds of ethical dialogue and the knowledge and skills necessary to listen to others, be fully present and to understand our own biases. The course will review ethical theories, philosophy, self-understanding, listening and dialogue skills. We will read short stories, current event articles and engage in healthy dialogue about what we think is right and wrong and all of the shades of grey in-between. ​All 10th grade students need to sign up for one hour in term A. (1 hr.) MAKING HEALTHY LIFE DECISIONS​ (INTERDISC) High School Faculty Required of all 9th graders, Making Healthy Life Decisions was designed to help bring into clear focus the many issues that confront teens during their years in high school. In your teen years, you will confront important issues that challenge and reinforce your values about drugs, alcohol, sex, body image, and coping with stress. In this class students will have an opportunity to better understand these issues through discussions, videos, readings, written exercises, and speakers. Students will also complete a final project, which will help to synthesize the information they learned throughout the course and to reflect on the ways in which this information can be incorporated into future decisions. The overall focus of the class is to provide scientific and sociological information that we hope will help frame healthy life decisions.This course will be fun and serious, and draw upon your insights, struggles, and our support to help you make the best decisions possible. ​This course counts as an academic course. (1hr.) US POLITICS​ (SOCSTUDIES) SS Faculty The presidential election, immigration, education and the struggling economy are all major issues facing our government today. Are you curious about how the government handles so many complex issues? Then U.S. Politics is the course for you. This course will look at the current structure of government and analyze how the government actually works. We will go beyond the basics and look at the many forces that influence our local, state and federal government (media, lobbyists, money, elections and citizens). This course takes a hands-on approach in which everyone will participate in the process of understanding the U.S. Government. This class will have a few short papers and one end of term test. ​(​One hour IN EITHER Short Term is required of all 9th grade students).

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ONE HOUR COURSE 6​TH​ PERIOD NON-ACADEMIC: IS ANYBODY ALIVE OUT THERE?: THE SONGS OF BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN( OTHER) Thrower Starr Bruce Springsteen released his first album in 1973 and his latest album was just released in October. His recording and performing career is in its fourth decade and is still going strong. It's not longevity alone, however, that makes him a contemporary figure worthy of study. Bruce Springsteen's work touches on many core aspects of American culture--escape, community, work, patriotism, class, and politics--and he does most of it with really good songs too. We will explore all of this and more, including his influences, his growth as a man, and the unique relationship he has with his audience. Plus, we'll listen to lots of really great music. (1 hr.) WINNING PLAYS For Your Mathematical Plays (or, how to take the fun out of games) (OTHER) Martin Aguilera This class is about taking a more mathematical approach to certain games. We will be focusing on three games: For Sale, Sushi Go! and Seven Wonders. Students will be asked to play these games numerous times, while figuring out a way to turn the game into numbers and data to be analyzed. After analyzing the data students will be asked to turn that analysis into a strategy for playing the games, then play-test those strategies. The course will utilize the book of the same title to teach students a bit about game theory and how to take the fun out of games.(1hr) MEDITATION (PE/HEALTH) Marci Weiland In this class, we will gain a greater understanding about what our minds and bodies are capable of by learning more about the mind-body connection, and by practicing and integrating meditation techniques that invite balance into our lives. We will do a different meditation every day. Students will be required to keep a journal to note observations of their meditation and to come to each class ready to meditate and share observations and experiences. (1 hr). YOGA (PE/HEALTH) Anita Aysola Yoga means union. In this course in classical hatha yoga we will learn yoga asanas, unifying our breathing and our minds with postures and movement. Yoga encompasses proper breathing, flexibility, strength and vitality in the body while calming the mind. Come, stretch and relax! No previous experience necessary.

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Paideia STA Course Booklet 2017  
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