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Healthcare Renovations


With roots extending back to a two-person partnership formed in 1898 in, Page is one of the most prolific and enduring architecture and engineering design practices. From offices in Austin, Dallas, Denver, Houston, San Francisco and Washington DC—as well as international affiliate offices—over 500 Page architects, engineers, interior designers, planners, strategic analysts and technical specialists provide services throughout the United States and in over 50 countries. Our diverse, international portfolio includes projects in the healthcare, academic, government and science and technology sectors, as well as civic, corporate and urban housing projects. The Page portfolio consists largely of complex projects that benefit from our integrated disciplines and that make a significant impact on the communities they serve. We are guided by the three core values of creativity, collaboration, and commitment, and through the force of these ideals, we live up to our promise of design that makes lives better.

Visit our website at pagethink.com/healthcare


We start with your vision. We design for the future.

Page Serves The Following Core Markets:

Academic Civic/Government Corporate/Commercial Healthcare Housing/Hospitality Science/Technology

Design is the crux of what we do. Throughout the generations, Page has promised, and delivered, design that makes lives better. We believe buildings are important for what they do and for the positive impact they make on individual lives. That’s why we have a solution-driven project focus that results in life-enhancing buildings and places. Our multidisciplinary services allow complete integration from conceptualization to engineering to interiors and more, resulting in an improved client experience and final product. We recognize that good talent can be applied to complex projects regardless of industry. And good talent becomes great when it gains experience in a variety of situations. We create crossover teams so that individuals can work on different projects and share their own expertise and insights with other team members. Our collective commitment to visionary design is reflected in our portfolio of successful, complex projects. Our work spans the globe, from more than 25 U.S. diplomatic compounds to mission critical facilities in the Middle East to five-star resorts in Africa and beyond. Since Page has multiple offices in the US and affiliates abroad, we have the capability to staff projects onsite as well as set up “follow the sun” workflows to increase efficiency. While Page is distinguished by our portfolio of successes, we also are distinguished by our full spectrum of architectural and engineering design services. This allows us to provide an integrated “total design” single team approach. Our clients benefit from the highest levels of interdisciplinary coordination, quality control and quick response demanded on today’s highly complex and technically sophisticated projects.

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Healthcare Renovations


Page Southerland Page, Inc.

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51% Architects

28% Engineers

9% Consulting Staff

Architecture Engineering Interiors Consulting

Branding & Graphics Commissioning Laboratory Planning Programming Predictive Analytics Sustainability

Planning

4

12% Interior Designers

Healthcare Renovations As a leading architectural practice, Page has extensive experience in the renovation, modernization and adaptive re-use of healthcare facilities including community clinics, medical centers and research laboratories. Our architects and engineers understand the complexities of evaluating existing conditions and bringing new life to a structure while meeting the demands of ever-changing economics and new technologies. Projects of this nature require comprehensive design solutions that will provide a sustainable, comforting and innovative healing environment. Through our design process, we build consensus among all stakeholders to determine optimal solutions that will yield the maximum return on investment. At Page, we believe the roots of healthcare design must always remain focused on issues of a human level. It is more than a business; it is a commitment to creating a positive experience for patients, families, visitors and staff. We elevate the design experience by creating environments that improve not only individual lives but entire communities.

Healthcare Renovations


This we believe. As agents for positive change, we are driven by the ideals we hold dear. In the delivery of our services, we are guided by three core values: Creativity

Think curiosity/innovation/ imagination/optimism/originality.

Collaboration

Think sharing/community/ camaraderie/civility/teamwork.

Commitment

Think integrity/respect/giving/ discipline/rigor.

Architecture Page is known for their well-researched program-driven solutions aided by integrated multidisciplinary expertise and a strategic mindset. We bring global thinking and experience to bear on projects that build communities. Our portfolio reflects a commitment to visionary design, a record of innovation and fresh ideas and most importantly, demonstrated success with complex projects. We develop a uniquely created design for every project that reflects the building type, client, need and location. We take pride in knowing that a Page project is one of the best possible solutions to the needs of its multiple stakeholders from owner to operator to neighbor. Engineering Engineering is a historical part of Page’s services, and a critical part. In the mid-1900s, we were one of the first architectural firms in the nation to integrate in-house engineering design services, which was an innovative approach for a single design organization. Today, our engineers are responsible for designing interdependent mechanical, electrical, plumbing, civil and structural systems for a wide range of projects. These vary in complexity and innovation from office buildings and corporate interiors, to academic institutions to technology and healthcare facilities.

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Project Details Project Size Site, Main Campus: 80 Acres +1.5M BGSF 554 Inpatient Beds Services Provided Planning / Architecture / Design / MEP Engineering / Contract Administration

Phoebe Putney Health System Albany, Georgia In 1910, Judge Francis Flagg Putney donated $25,000 to establish a hospital to serve the citizens of Southwest Georgia. The hospital opened its doors on August 1, 1911 and in 10 decades has grown to be a provider of the most advanced medical talent and technology in one of the country’s progressive community health systems. Phoebe Putney grew from a single hospital to a health system with a not-for-profit network of more than 4,500 physicians, nurses and professional staff who deliver care to more than 500,000 residents in their 35-county region. For almost 30 years, Page has master planned and designed healthcare projects for Phoebe Putney Health System. The main campus has buildings dating from 1944 to 2008. The first project Page completed was an eight-story 200,000-square-foot medical office building (MOB I) with a comprehensive cancer center, imaging center, ambulatory surgery center and physician suites, which then led to designs for more than 1,500,000 SF of new and renovated facilities across multiple acute care and ambulatory campuses. Towers A & B were constructed in 1966 and 1977 and house inpatient rooms for medical / surgical, cardiology, neurology and oncology patients. Page has renovated these towers over the past 10 years to create single-patient rooms and support cores that achieve flexibility and optimal operation flow for caregivers and physicians, completing this work while the patient floors were still in operation through a coordinated phasing plan.

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Healthcare Renovations


Page also renovated the ICU suites in T Tower in a similar manner. The most challenging circumstances through each renovation project has been the limiting floor to floor heights, MEP troubleshooting, infrastructure upgrades, and continuous expansion and evolution of the low voltage systems. During the ongoing implementation of the master plan projects, expansion of the Central Plant was completed in 2002, which also included routing new utility lines and pipes through the city and campus streets providing capacity to reach the long term goals of the master plan and beyond. Each project has succeeded in obtaining Phoebe Putney’s vision of “World-Class Health Care with Hometown Commitment”.

Lee County

Meredyth Place

7 Miles 12 Minutes

82

4.3 Miles 15 Minutes

North

Phoebe Northwest

3.5 Miles 11 Minutes

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Main

Phoebe East 6.6 Miles 10 Minutes

PhoebePhoebe Putney Putney Health Health System| Albany Location GAOverview

Chronology Color Legend 1940 1950

§§ Over 1 Million Square Feet §§ 434 Patient Beds §§ Over 2,200 Parking Spaces New Lobby

1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010

Phoebe Putney Main Phoebe PutneyHealth HealthSystem | Albany GACampus

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Over 100 Projects Implemented from Masterplan, Including: Masterplan Development: Service Line Identification / Capacity Utilization / National to Regional Trends / Infrastructure Assessment / Campus Identity / Wayfinding Improvements / Community Outreach Objectives / Capital Improvement Projects: Assessment of Masterplan / Critical Infrastructure Assessment / Feasibility Studies / Cost Modeling / Outpatient | Ambulatory Care Expansion: Medical Village / Medical Office Building / Community Clinics | Urgent Care / Diagnostic Expansion / Renovations of Inpatient Rooms to All Private / Corporate Offices / Parking Garages / Site Improvements / Infrastructure Upgrades / Central Plant Upgrades / Life Safety | ADA Updates

TomoTherapy Existing

TomoTherapy Existing

Infusion / Chemo Suite

Caption Caption Caption

New Lobby

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Healthcare Renovations


Existing Stacking AB Tower

Floor 9th

22 22

8th

38 51

7th

30 35

6th

38 38

5th

30 44

4th

36 52

3rd 2nd

Oncology

Medical / Surgical Ante Partum Post Partum Cardiovascular

Cardiology Cath Labs

0

LL Rooms

Medical Surgical

35 50

1st

North Wing

C Wing

D Wing

12

12

E Wing

11

11

10

10

0

12

12

12

12

11

12

15 0

ICU

Step-Down

Renal Dialysis NICU Level II ICU

NICU Level III Labor & Delivery

Discharge

13

ICU

Non-Invasive Cardiology

18 12

Labor & Delivery

21

Children

26

0

Physcial Medicine

16

Hospitel

0

Respiratory Health

0

Food Service

Emergency

Emergency

Imaging

Medical Staff

Material Management

Material Management

Material Management

Environmental Services

Facilities

229

Beds

T Tower

Ortho

69 270

12 83

52

24

0 26

Phoebe Main = 452 Beds Phoebe North = 35 Beds (24 Med-Surg | 11 ICU)

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Behavioral Health

13

19

Behavioral Health

14

14

Just for Women Administration

Crawl Space 402

40 16

452

33

Total Beds = 487

Phoebe Putney Health | Albany GA

Private Room Conversion AB Tower

Floor 9th

22 22

8th

38 38

7th

30 35

6th

38 38

Medical / Surgical Oncology Medical / Surgical Medical / Surgical

5th

30 30

4th

14 36 22

Just for Women FLEX

35 35

Ante Partum Post Partum

3rd 2nd

Cath Labs

0

1st LL Rooms Beds

T Tower

North Wing

C Wing

D Wing

E Wing

Ortho

12

12

11

11

10

10

0

0

12

12

12 12

Medical / Surgical FLEX Renal Dialysis FLEX FLEX

11

Ante Partum Post Partum

15

NICU Labor & Delivery

12

NICU II NICU III Labor & Delivery

Non-Invasive Cardiology

18 21

26

Children

0

16

Physcial Medicine Hospitel

0

Respiratory Health

0

Food Service

Emergency

Emergency

Imaging

Medical Staff

Material Management

Material Management

Material Management

Environmental Services

Facilities

229

69 212

Backfill New Tower

Discharge

13 12 15

12 71

24

52 27

0 26

Behavioral Health

13 13

19

14

0 Administration Crawl Space 402

40 16

Behavioral Health

19

395

= 395 Beds = 159 Beds

Total Beds = 554

Phoebe Putney Health | Albany GA

Page Southerland Page, Inc.

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Original Campus Current Campus

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Project Details Project Size Site, Main Campus: 80 Acres 918 Inpatient Beds Services Provided Architecture / Engineering / Design / Interiors / MEP Engineering / Planning / Programming / Contract Administration

Saint Francis Health System Yale Campus Tulsa, Oklahoma Saint Francis Health System (SFHS) is a 918-bed hospital representing 24 medical and surgical specialties offering care in the Tulsa, Oklahoma region. Through the generosity of its founder, William K. Warren and the continual support by the William K. Warren Foundation, Saint Francis Health System has become a regional leader in healthcare. Saint Francis Hospital, Yale Campus, opened in 1960 with 275 beds and through several expansions has grown to the current 918 beds. In 2008, Saint Francis opened the new Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis opening a large wing for redevelopment into the Saint Francis Heart Hospital. With this move, the Saint Francis administration embarked on a major masterplan departmental realignment allowing for the latest building expansion including a new acute and critical care facility; an eight-story, 150-bed patient care tower; and a new chapel and convent, which opened in 2014. As stated above, the original facility dates back to 1960 and is still in use today, along with multiple expansions throughout the 1960’s, 70’, 90’s and the largest in 2008 and 2014. Page was SFHS’s architect and engineer of record 2006 – 2014. We were involved with numerous interior renovation projects including modality and department realignment throughout the campus. These projects were extremely complex in that they were required to be implemented while ongoing clinical operations were maintained on adjacent floors and wings. Often times, these projects required complete infrastructure replacement back to the main utility and HVAC rooms, and sometimes all the way to the central plant.

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Usually, renovations in older building are more complex due to original designs and construction in times that did not require large floor to floor heights and less than ideal structural bay dimensions. A prime example of a complex project was the renovation of the cath labs where the new technology required 9’-6” ceilings and the bottom of the structure above was at 9’-7”. The cath labs are located on level 2 and the floor-to-floor heights in this wing are only 11’-4”. Additionally, other wings of the hospital had induction HVAC units and or perforated metal ceilings with pressurized plenums. Each of the interior renovations brought its own set of complexities, but the floor-to-floor height was one of the biggest issues we encountered throughout the hospital; yet our mechanical and architectural teams were able to coordinate the complexities of the new designs and systems to meet the current design guideline standards, codes and owner’s needs. These projects for Saint Francis were a long-term commitment and our team approach exemplified the expertise that Page represents.

Over 50 Projects Implemented from Masterplan

Summary of past projects Page has worked on at Saint Francis Health System – Yale Campus: §§ Facility Existing Conditions Assessment & Documentation §§ Interiors Master Plan §§ Facility Master Plan §§ Various Nursing Unit Interiors Upgrades §§ NICU - Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis §§ C-Section Rooms Renovations §§ Kitchen Renovations §§ Natalie Pain Center Renovations §§ Post-Partum Expansion §§ A-Special Non-Invasive Cardiology Suite §§ A-Special Infusion Therapy Suite §§ 1-North Endoscopy §§ 2-East Cath Labs (3); 2-Special Cardiology §§ 3-East EP Labs (2); 3-East Inpatient Non-Invasive Cardiology; 3-Special Universal Beds §§ 4-East ICU; 4-Special Universal Beds; 4-West Interiors Refresh §§ 5-North Joint Center and Orthopedic Patient Rooms; 5-South Patient Toilet Renovations & ADA compliance; S-Special Critical Care Unit with Isolation Rooms; 5-West ICU §§ Trauma and Emergency Center §§ Pharmacy Relocation & Expansion §§ Chapel and Convent Replacement §§ Heart Hospital Lobby §§ Heart Hospital Non-Invasive Cardiology Suite §§ Eight-story 150-bed patient care tower §§ Southwest Parking Garage §§ PET Scanner and Building Addition at Out-Patient Imaging Center Page has also been responsible for projects at other SFHS campuses including: §§ Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital §§ NICU Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis §§ Saint Francis Hospital South

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Original Nursing Station

Renovated Nursing Station

Page Southerland Page, Inc.

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Original Lobby

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Healthcare Renovations


Lobby Construction

Saint Francis Health System, New Heart Center Lobby

Page Southerland Page, Inc.

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Project Details Services Provided Architecture / Interiors / MEP Engineering / Structural Engineering / Graphics & Wayfinding / Medical Planning

Driscoll Children’s Hospital Corpus Christi, Texas Driscoll Children’s Hospital (DCH) is a 189-bed pediatric tertiary care center with pediatric specialists representing 32 medical and 13 surgical specialties offering care throughout South Texas, including Corpus Christi, the Rio Grande Valley, Victoria and Laredo. Through the vision and generosity of its founder, Clara Driscoll, Driscoll Children’s Hospital opened in 1953, becoming the first, and remains the only, free-standing children’s hospital in South Texas. In 2016, Driscoll had almost 171,000 patient visits, including nearly 38,000 patients seen at South Texas’ first emergency room created specifically for pediatrics. As stated above, the original facility dates back to 1953 and is still in use today, along with multiple expansions throughout the 1970’s and the largest in 1984. Page has been DCH’s architect and engineer of record since 2001. We have been involved with numerous interior renovation and service line expansion projects since that time. These projects are extremely complex in that they are required to be implemented while ongoing clinical operations are maintained. Further, they usually rely on complete infrastructure replacement, often all the way to the central plant. Complicating projects like these are the limitations presented by older buildings designed and constructed in times that did not require large floor to floor heights and less than ideal structural bay dimensions. A prime example of a complex project was in their existing Diagnostic Imaging department, located on the 2nd level of a small building addition constructed in 1964, that was retrofitted to provide a new MRI suite. Page worked with the hospital and local contractors and engineers to not only develop the final design solution but also the means by which the actual magnet would be transported into place. It was a project that exemplified the team approach and expertise that Page represents.

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Existing Conditions

Page is currently working with DCH on their Campus Expansion and Modernization Program. This eight-year, multiphased, $100M program began with an expansion / renovation of DCH’s existing Emergency Department and includes another 82,000-square-foot building as well as a complete renovation of their existing perioperative suite. It will be implemented in numerous, overlapping phases to ensure ongoing hospital and clinical operations. Highlights of the project include: Emergency Department This phase was a renovation and expansion of DCH’s existing Emergency Department which included 20,000 SF of renovations and 5,500 SF of new construction and complete replacement of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems in the affected construction areas. The new unit has 24 private treatment stations and will provide capacity of up to 40,000-patient visits per year. Other aspects of the project include a dedicated hospital elevator connecting the ED to Radiology and Neonatal ICU above and a total replacement of mechanical and electrical distribution systems. Main Hospital Lobby A complete renovation and expansion of the hospital’s main entrance and lobby also included a new gift shop, chapel and healthy food café. Site Improvements and Parking Along with facility expansions and renovations, the modernization program also includes improved drives and simplified access points that improve safety and wayfinding over the entire 23-acre campus. Asphalt surfaces over time have deteriorated and are being replaced with new concrete curbs and drives. The site work package also includes improved site landscaping, signage and replacement of outdated, sub-surface utilities. North Pavilion The crown jewel of the expansion and modernization program is a two-story, 82,000-square-foot expansion that is designed to for a future vertical expansion of three additional levels. The primary service provided in the North Pavilion is a family-focused, yet high-tech 22-Bed Pediatric ICU. Included as part of this phase is a Special Procedures Suite and Family Amenities, such as a parent lounge and shower/changing areas. The ground level of the North Pavilion provides the main outpatient services public drop-off, entry and lobby as well as the outpatient surgery Day Hospital Unit and outpatient phlebotomy and lab services. Perioperative Services This phase includes 30,000 SF of renovations that will be carried out in multiple sub-phases in order for DCH to retain ongoing surgical services. The scope of work will increase the quantity of OR’s from eight to 10 as well as replace and expand their PACU and inpatient holding areas in vacated space that had previously been occupied by DCH’s Pediatric ICU. The ORs will receive new equipment and integration systems. One of the final sub-phases of this portion of the work will include an expanded and completely renovated Instrument Processing Department

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Renovated Spaces Garage Expansion This portion of the work will increase the capacity of DCH’s existing garage by 220 parking spaces. It also adds two-passenger elevators that will be attached to garage to simplify and improve wayfinding from the garage to the main hospital facility. Central Utilities Plant DCH’s central plant will receive a complete equipment replacement to update technology, increase capacity and reduce energy consumption and it includes transformers, chillers, boilers and cooling towers. Wayfinding & Graphics Very little wayfinding enhancements have occurred at this facility in decades. Because new buildings and substantial areas of renovation are included in the modernization program, leadership agreed to add to the scope of the project a completely new and exciting means of wayfinding. The highlight of this part of the work is creation of a ground-level primary circulation path that connects all major buildings of the institution, including their newly expanded garage. The new circulation “highway” is entitled Driscoll Way. It is a comprehensive system that connects site entrances to Driscoll Way all the way to interior clinical departments. The project includes experiential graphics and elevator lobby “mascots” that clearly delineates Driscoll Way from other hospital circulation systems. Furnishings & Accessories Page interior designers are working directly with DCH in the selection, specification and procurement of furnishings and art for each of the components of this project. We are also providing ongoing assistance with an existing FF&E replacement program throughout the institution. Summary of past projects Page has worked on at Driscoll Children’s Hospital main campus: §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§

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Facility Existing Conditions Assessment & Documentation Pharmacy Relocation IT Data Center Relocation & Expansion MRI in existing Diagnostic Imaging Suite Interiors Master Plan Facility Master Plan Nursing Unit Interiors Upgrades NICU Noise Levels Assessment and Remediation Plan Perioperative Suite Master Plan Physician Office Suites (2) Outpatient Dialysis Center Existing Roofing & Water Proofing Assessment Existing Elevator Modernization Study Joint Commission Survey and Correction Plan Study Facility & Lab Exhaust Analysis 5th Floor Medical / Surgical Unit Upgrades and Isolation Room Employee Child Care & Activity Center Numerous Feasibility & Planning Studies

Healthcare Renovations


Ongoing Page projects associated with DCH’s expansion and modernization project: §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§

Pediatric Sub-Specialty Clinic in McAllen, TX

§§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§

Updated Operations and Facility Master Plan Emergency Department Expansion & Renovation Hospital Lobby Expansion & Renovation Gift Shop, Café and Chapel Replacement Project Parking Garage Expansion and Elevator Project Central Plant Equipment Replacement Project North Pavilion – PICU, Day Hospital, OP Lobby, OP Lab, Special Procedures Suite, Satellite Pharmacy Perioperative Suite Renovations and Upgrades Instrument Processing Replacement & Expansion Wayfinding and Graphics System Site, Landscape & Parking Improvements Corridor Interior Materials Refurbishment Furnishings & Accessories Selection and Specification

Along with work at DCH’s main campus, Page has also been responsible for: §§ §§ §§

54,000 SF Pediatric Sub-Specialty Clinic in McAllen, TX 54,000 SF Pediatric Sub-Specialty Clinic in Brownsville, TX 25,000 SF Pediatric Clinic and Urgent Care Center in Corpus Christi, TX

Pediatric Sub-Specialty Clinic in Brownsville, TX

Pediatric Sub-Specialty Clinic in McAllen, TX

Page Southerland Page, Inc.

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Project Details Project Size 1,000,000 SF Includes New and Renovated Spaces

Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Texas Since 1997, Page has provided programming, planning and design services to Baylor College of Medicine. Projects have ranged from small but complicated renovations such as the 700-squarefoot electron microscopy lab to new research facilities like the 81,000-square-foot Center for Comparative Medicine. Projects have included laboratory, research, teaching, clinical and office spaces. We have highlighted two of our most challenging renovation projects, as well as the new high-technology Human Neuroimaging Center. Baylor College of Medicine DeBakey Building, Gross Anatomy Lab and Neurosurgery Suite The renovation of the Baylor College of Medicine Gross Anatomy Lab, Neurosurgery Suite and Morgue included a new space for the Microsurgical and Endoscopic Center for Clinical Applications Laboratory. This 14,000-square-foot project involved phased demolition and renovation of existing gross anatomy classrooms and laboratories, morgue, cadaver storage and chemical storage facilities. The existing anatomy lab and morgue were located in the basements of the Alkek and DeBakey on the main campus of Baylor College. The 10-story DeBakey building was originally completed in 1980 and the 16-story Alkek building in 1998. The gross anatomy labs were redesigned to perform as highly flexible spaces to accommodate lecture-style desk seating, gross anatomy dissection, prosection instruction and testing. This project, as in all Page projects, started with programming and planning the lab and classroom space, utilizing the problem seeking method to obtain owner and laboratory user input and consensus. The process brought forward the criteria by which the execution phases

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Healthcare Renovations


of the design (CD and CA phases) were judged, thereby minimizing changes at the later and more costly phases of the project. The design was periodically reviewed by the programming team leaders during the construction documents phase, so that important program needs and goals were accounted for and addressed appropriately. The Page team offered successful solutions to difficult problems with the existing lab, which included HVAC and electrical systems shared between two buildings, building-code constraints with the below-grade location adjacent to an atrium, fire code separations at the boundaries between the two buildings and the use of hazardous chemicals within or in conjunction with the lab and morgue spaces. The basement location also created overhead space constraints, a major factor for the HVAC system and ceiling height. Relocating the chemical storage facility (while addressing code-compliance issues) was one of the key drivers for the project; the design team pulled it away from the lab proper and helped make it a shared facility.

Gross Anatomy Lab, Before

As the design was developed, a code compliance plan was developed, then checked and re-checked at each review of the CDs, to make sure the proposed design could be executed both economically and according to current codes and standards. The compliance plan included not only direction from applicable building codes and TAS (Texas Accessibility Standards), but also applicable NFPA, NIH, TDSHS, ANSI and ASHRAE standards adopted or required by and for the Institution. Quality control was implemented with the owner’s assistance by taking advantage of the method of contracting – CM at Risk, where the General Contractor/CM was invited to participate during development of the construction documents by reviewing and offering suggestions for both cost savings and constructability, allowing appropriate details, design alternates and procurement strategies to be coordinated with the drawings and specifications. Technical specifications for products and systems for the project were developed in conjunction with specialty vendors and suppliers where industry standard guidelines (e.g. MasterSpec) were inadequate.

Gross Anatomy Lab, After

As a complex project implemented within an existing complex building, Page used a flexible and adaptable method of managing cost during construction, given that there were many situations where certain details of the design would need to change based on uncovered field conditions. The first opportunity arose when a construction schedule was proposed that conflicted with occupancy of laboratory classrooms. The owner, contractor and Page collaborated on a multiple-phased construction schedule that accounted for construction to continue in unoccupied portions of the construction area during periods of classroom attendance, alternately permitting submittal review and other design-documentation activities to proceed for occupied areas.

Page Southerland Page, Inc.

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Baylor College of Medicine Vivarium The Baylor College of Medicine Vivarium project renovated an existing animal research facility on the 5th floor of the Neurosensory Center, an 11-story research and clinical tower built in the mid-1970’s, and located in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas. The BCM Vivarium is the most complex part of a multiphase renovation of biomedical laboratory and related support space in the Neurosensory Center building and comprises approximately 11,400 square feet of floor area within a multiphase renovation of 120,000 square feet of research and clinical space, all designed by Page. The modernized vivarium accommodates small animal (i.e., rodent) and large animal (i.e., nonhuman primate, swine) research programs. The project upgraded existing animal holding, procedure, surgery, necropsy, feed storage and bedding storage rooms, providing new behavioral/testing and shielded electrophysiological study rooms. The project also improved equipment and infrastructure—including relocating an existing large autoclave in the cage wash facility, installing new animal watering and lab water systems and replacing existing HVAC and plumbing systems. Unique Features Listed by Reuters as one of the 100 Most Innovative Universities in the World, Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) is the top recipient of National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding in the Southwestern United States. All aspects of the newly renovated facilities were updated to current NIH standards to ensure that NIH funding opportunities are preserved for the future.

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Healthcare Renovations


Another unique aspect of the BCM Vivarium is that it co-exists in a building also used for patient care (on other floors), so building egress, circulation and infrastructure (including HVAC, gas piping and electrical) for research and animal functions are carefully segregated from those serving hospital occupancies. Lastly, the entire building is co-owned by two different institutions (BCM and The Methodist Hospital) so that separate building monitoring systems were coordinated to operate independently to serve the research facilities owned by BCM from their main campus location. Construction Methods Since the BCM Vivarium was a continuously occupied and operating research facility, construction was executed in two phases, renovating the eastern and western portions sequentially to allow existing lab occupants and programs to operate with minimal interruption during construction. During construction, complex timelines were navigated to allow for existing conditions typically not encountered in new construction, allowing for periodic design additions and corrections. Page also worked closely with the Contractor/CM at Risk to coordinate earlyissue documentation for long-lead items and special equipment (for example, installing a new deionized water system on a different floor) made necessary as fast-moving research programs changed during the construction period. Specialized Laboratory Design and Construction A primary goal of the renovation project was to bring the existing Neurosensory Center vivarium into conformance with current AAALAC International standards, emphasizing performance of heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) and laboratory infrastructure systems. The BCM Vivarium together with other research laboratories in the multiphase renovation occupied five floors of a high-rise building. Therefore, Page continuously monitored chemical inventories proposed for use in the overall space, and understanding the code limits for maintaining a business occupancy, worked with the Owner to maintain proper storage amounts, storage and containment facilities appropriate for a multistory laboratory. Unlike a new laboratory facility of similar size, the existing building housing the BCM Vivarium and other research renovations was never envisioned to operate with the intensity of laboratory use that was required for the new program. Page applied expertise in HVAC engineering to add new exhaust and air-handling systems adequate for the new vivarium and labs within existing, very restricted mechanical rooms and chases. Animal housing included space for both small (rodents) and large animals (pigs, nonhuman primates). HVAC design for rodent housing, which was originally intended for static caging, was also updated to accommodate ventilated, highdensity cage racks. Certain animal holding rooms were designed for special studies involving light deprivation, low-frequency telemetry, and biocontainment, each requiring special design and construction.

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Baylor College of Medicine Human Neuroimaging Center I and II Page helped Baylor establish a first-of-its-kind, 9,000-square-foot Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) research space with the design of the Human Neuroimaging Laboratory. This laboratory uses powerful, twin 3.0 - Tesla Siemens MRI scanners to simultaneously analyze the brains of two test subjects who are processing the same information - a technique called hyperscanning. The research aims to detect synchronized brain activity, and discover how it is affected by social interaction. In addition to spaces for the control equipment and imaging computers, the facility contains a separate, specially-cooled data center with high density servers and high speed networking equipment to store and share the data generated from hyperscanning experiments. This complex project required gutting and rebuilding of the space, in a sensitive location directly above an existing vivarium. Because of the possibility of disturbing research animals in the vivarium, below-floor reinforcement for the extra weight of the magnets proved unworkable, so a stainless-steel structural raised floor system was designed and built to support the MRI suite. In addition, acoustically designed walls and sound control doors provide protection to adjacent offices and workspaces from the loud operation of the equipment.

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Healthcare Renovations


Page Southerland Page, Inc.

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Project Details Services Provided Architecture / MEP Engineering / FEMA Consulting / Facility Assessments / Planning / Programming

University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, Texas Keiller Laboratory Building is a multistory “historical� laboratory research building that resides on the UTMB Campus in Galveston, Texas. The Keiller Building was opened in 1925 as the Laboratory Building to serve the campus and in 1932 the building was enlarged with a mirror-image addition to the original structure. Keiller Building currently houses the Department of Pathology, the Center of Tropical Diseases and some parts of the Center of Biodefense. In September of 2008, the building sustained heavy flood damage as a result of the tidal surge induced from Hurricane Ike. Architectural, mechanical and electrical items throughout the ground floor level were either partially or totally submerged by contaminated flood waters. As a result, the ground floor of the building, which is used for animal research, was flooded and sustained heavy damage, to the point that the space was abandoned until the program for the space could be re-evaluated. The existing program included animal research labs (ABSL2), a necropsy space, insectaries and animal holding areas. In order to re-examine the possible programs the existing space could be utilized for, UTMB required a mitigation strategy plan be developed that would categorize the level of exposure the space would be vulnerable to, as well as the supporting infrastructure that would be affected. Page recommended several different mitigation strategies that were considered for the space (both wet and dry flood-proof), and in conjunction with FEMA requirements, it was determined that the space would be provided with a wet flood proofing mitigation strategy that would allow:

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§§ §§

The upper floors of the laboratory building to operate during a flood event leaving the ground floor to be expendable. Allow the ground floor equipment, program and infrastructure to be removed and replaced efficiently once the flood waters receded, which would minimize the amount of downtime the space would incur after the flood event.

In addition to the mitigation strategy, several design considerations were required for evaluation that not only supported the mitigation strategy for the building, but also dealt with the physical limitations above ceiling: §§ Infrastructure density required to operate a laboratory facility §§ Reduced finished floor to bottom of structure height (approximately 9’-3”). Once completed, the renovated space not only houses the same program as previously utilized, but also utilizes materials that are resistant to flood waters and is served by dedicated systems that are either not connected to other building systems, or can be disconnected during a flood event.

University of Texas Medical Branch, Campus

Similar mitigation work Page provided as a result of Hurricane Ike: §§ Building 006 - Children’s Hospital Testing Center §§ Building 017 – Research Support Building §§ Building 020 – Research Support Building §§ Building 054 – Basic Sciences Building -Mitigation Strategy -Scientific Alley -Fire Command Center -Crystallography §§ Building 071 – Ewing Hall Research Building -Wet Flood Proof Mitigation Strategy -Elevated Redundant Power Generator §§ Building 073 – NMR Building -Dry Flood Proof Mitigation Strategy -Helium Recovery System

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Project Details Services Provided Architecture / Design Services / Lab Design / Construction Documents / Contract Administration

The University of Delaware Cyber Range, Maker Space and Collaboration Area Newark, Delaware When Page was initially approached by the University of Delaware to create a new, 4,032-square-foot Cyber Range, Maker Space and Collaboration Area, we were given three separate rooms located in a former foundry that had been infilled on three sides by a fourstory classroom building. After listening to the College of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences’ aspirations for this project, the Page team quickly realized that the project would be considerably more dynamic if the spaces could be made contiguous so that synergies from one space could overflow to energize the activities of the other two related areas. Page toured the 1920’s portion of the building and during the programming process we demonstrated the potential to re-arrange other intervening classrooms and laboratories in a cost effective manner. In fact, we were so convinced of the power of this concept, we gladly traded off two separate, windowed classrooms for the opportunity to create three contiguous, albeit windowless, interior spaces. Equipped with what we thought were good drawings from a 1980’s renovation, we started to plan the project knowing that the facility would be occupied during renovation and that long-term experiments which were in progress could not be interrupted during construction.

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During Page’s initial site investigation, when looking above a suspended ceiling, the team found a former saw-toothed skylight that had been roofed over so long ago it had been forgotten. The spaces we had chosen came complete with a raised access floor and from what we could see, the area above the ceiling was relatively clear. In short order we were able to develop an innovative design using motifs based on waveforms and Faraday cages that are integral to electronics and cyber related operations. In order to meet tight funding deadlines, we rapidly completed the conceptual design and construction documents. Shortly after demolition commenced, the beautiful opportunity we had envisioned through re-glazing the existing skylight to provide daylight into the space almost evaporated when we discovered the infill panels used to close it, included large sheets of transite (asbestos) panels. Fortunately, we had included an alternate to replace not only the glazing, but the skylight framing as well. As demolition progressed and the existing ceilings and walls were removed, we were first amazed by what we didn’t see. One complete line of columns and beams which had been documented in both the original and subsequent renovation drawings, simply did not exist. Other buried treasures included lead paint on structural steel; asbestos floor tile that had been tiled over located beneath the raised access floor; portions of corridor walls which should have extended to the existing roof deck but did not, along with the usual assortment of abandoned piping and ductwork. Collaboration Space with Monitor Page took a step back to partner with the Fire Marshal to develop a work-around that was code compliant and within the budget. We also worked closely with the contractor to resolve the ‘found conditions’ as expeditiously as possible. Hazardous materials were either removed and abated or encapsulated and we developed low cost solutions toward addressing the missing structure and portions of corridor walls. Although these ‘found’ items have had an impact on the budget, Page has been able to maintain the original schedule and will complete construction in the spring of 2017. In order to minimize the impact on the clients’ budget, Page held firm with aggressive sub-contractors change orders and negotiated fiercely to ensure the university received a fair price. Page also identified savings in the furniture budget by substituting custom furniture elements. It’s not unusual in renovation projects where even the best effort to perform due diligence may not be enough to overcome hidden conditions. In these situations, Page architects and engineers rely on their technical expertise and a working knowledge of building codes to communicate quickly and respond effectively to a dynamic situation in order work through these issues as a team.

Lab with Monitor

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During Construction

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Existing Space

Classroom

Page Southerland Page, Inc.

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Project Details Services Provided Programming / Schematic Design / Design Development Documents / Equipment Planning / Construction Administration

Johns Hopkins University Macaulay Hall Renovation Study and Fit-up Baltimore, Maryland Macaulay Hall was first constructed in 1963-64 as a laboratory building. The majority of the building currently houses the Department of Biology. Since 1999, the Department of Anthropology has occupied the 4th floor, as well as the south offices of the 1st floor. Three additional departments utilize the first floor. The northeast corner is used for the Beginning School Studies research offices of the Department of Sociology; the southeast corner consists of a Registrar classroom; and the northwest area consists of a Biology Research laboratory. The basement includes a high hazard chemical storage area, a radiation safety lab, and a newly constructed animal holding area. Macaulay Hall is located north of the upper quadrangle of the Homewood Campus of Johns Hopkins University and built in a Federal Revival architectural style. The Federal architectural style of the campus is based on the Homewood House, a historic residence built in 1801 and located on campus. While the Homewood House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the campus itself and Macaulay Hall are not listed. Macaulay Hall is largely unchanged since it opened in 1964. There have been discrete renovations to selected office suites or laboratories, particularly on the 4th floor and the basement levels. The site was modified in 1985 when a road was replaced with a loading dock areaway on the west side of the building. Original construction drawings and drawings of discrete fitouts can be found at the JHU Facilities Plan Room.

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Johns Hopkins University engaged Page/SST Planners as part of an architectural team to determine the feasibility of completely renovating Macaulay Hall on its traditional Homewood Campus for use as laboratory space for yet to be identified users. Johns Hopkins will maintain the original faรงade and roof but replace the interior with contemporary laboratory space for the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. Page/SST Planners evaluated the existing floor plates and proposed multiple fit-up patterns that would be suitable for a range of future research occupants consistent with other laboratory facilities on the Hopkins campus. With the architectural team, Page/SST Planners developed multiple approaches that would work with the existing building core, as well as options for laboratory fit-up after optimization of the core. The project is currently in design and will be renovated in two stages: core and shell followed by floor by floor fit-up projects for specific users. Total net assignable area in the renovated project is approximately 19,000 SF. The basement floor is currently being designed to contain a complete microscopy core that will contain a TEM, Tecnai microscopes, Talos microscope and a Titan microscope with associated support lab and office space. This facility has required careful environmental, vibration/ acoustic and infrastructure coordination. The design of the facility has also required numerous meetings with both faculty and instrument representatives to achieve the optimal layout. This type of collaboration has been essential in the design and engineering of this very sophisticated core facility. Based on the conditions assessment and proposed change in use, recommendations were provided for necessary short-term and long-term capital improvements, such as HVAC replacement, life safety improvements and accessibility compliance. In addition, asbestos abatement will be required prior to demolition and renovation work.

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Existing Research Lab

Existing 60’s Era Lab Building in Federal Style

Existing Utility Corridor

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Existing Mechanical Room

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