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WILLIAMSBURG EDITION | YOUR WELLNESS AND LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

the safest

Seafood & 3 tasty recipes

+

Remembering Drs. Jim Shaw & Howard Jones Go orange & Stamp out hunger can your kids outgrow allergies? the truth about sugary drinks ARE MUSICAL CHILDREN MORE ADJUSTED?

SEPTEMBER 2015 — THEHEALTHJOURNALS.COM


OSC Welcomes

Dr. F. Cal Robinson

OSC

COMMUNITY LECTURE SERIES Speaker: F. CAL ROBINSON, PYS.D., MSCP

Orthopaedic & Spine Center is pleased to introduce Dr. F. Cal Robinson, Psy.D., MSCP. Dr. Robinson is a Medical Psychologist, with an extensive background in pain management and pain medicine. He offers comprehensive psychological evaluation and counseling services to patients who suffer from chronic pain. He is currently accepting new and Workers’ Compensation patients. To make an appointment with Dr. Robinson, please call 757-596-1900.

Approaching Chronic Pain with Mindfulness Join Dr. Cal Robinson as he discusses pain, its biological, psychological and social causes and how mindfulness changes how pain is perceived. Dr. Robinson will lead interactive exercises to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique. Bring a friend, have some

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION Board-Certified by the American Board of Medical Psychology

refreshments and get informed. Tour our state-of-the-art facility after the lecture!

Post-doctoral:

Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology (MSPP) Master of Science in Clinical Psychopharmacology

Doctoral:

Forest Institute of Professional Psychology (FIPP)– Clinical Psychology Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.)

Tuesday, September 15TH, at 7 PM

Graduate:

University of Cincinnati - Rehabilitation Counseling

Orthopaedic and Spine Center 250 Nat Turner Blvd. Newport News 23606 Call Shannon Woods to Register: 1-757-596-1900 ext. 368

Internship & post-doctoral fellowship: Philhaven Hospital, Mt. Gretna, Pennsylvania Fellow:

International College of Prescribing Psychologists; certified with national examination

Boyd W. Haynes lll, M.D. • Robert J. Snyder, M.D. • Jeffrey R. Carlson, M.D. Martin R. Coleman, M.D. • Mark W. McFarland, D.O. • Raj N. Sureja, M.D. Jenny L. F. Andrus, M.D. • John D. Burrow, D.O.• F. Cal Robinson, PsyD, MSCP Tonia Yocum, PA-C • Erin Lee, PA-C • Kim Maigi, FNP-C • Chris Schwizer, PA-C

OSC

ORTHOPAEDIC & SPINE CENTER Open MRI Center

250 NAT TURNER BOULEVARD • NEWPORT NEWS, VA 23606 • 757-596-1900 • www.osc-ortho.com


We’re All About Family Time!

FAMILY MEDICINE IS OUR FOUNDATION

TPMG doctors have been caring for Hampton Roads families for over 50 years. Our patients are our friends and neighbors, and we treat everyone like family. We’re committed to providing outstanding care for all ages. Let our family take care of yours.

Colonial Family Medicine 4125 Ironbound Road, Suite 200 Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 345-2829

White Marsh Family Medicine 4844 George Washington Hwy, Suite 8 White Marsh, VA 23183 (804) 693-0042

Discovery Park Family Medicine 5424 Discovery Park Blvd. Bldg. A, Suite 201 Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 345-2071

Williamsburg Family Medicine 132 Professional Circle Williamsburg, VA 23185 (757) 345-6491 • (757) 645-2981 (757) 707-3669

Norge Family Medicine 7151 Richmond Road, Suite 405 Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 564-3700

Williamsburg Internal Medicine 400 Sentara Circle, Suite 400 Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 645-3150

Urbanna Family Medicine 5399 Old Virginia Street Urbanna, VA 23175 (804) 758-2110

Yorktown Family Medicine 307 Cook Road Yorktown, VA 23690 (757) 898-7261

West Point Family Medicine 408 16th Street West Point, VA 23181 (804) 843-3131

mytpmg.com thehealthjournals.com | 1


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Medical Providers of the Greater Virginia Peninsula don’t just believe in saving the lives of the uninsured.

They’re doing something about it.

Since 2008, Project CARE has been helping low-income uninsured adults get health care they can afford through our partnerships with the area safety net clinics, hospitals, and medical providers. These 409 providers have agreed to care for eligible patients at no charge. We are truly grateful to them for making Project CARE possible. For information about supporting this vital non-profit organization through donations of funds or services, please visit our website or call us. THANK YOU!

416 J. CLYDE MORRIS BOULEVARD • NEWPORT NEWS, VA 23601 (757) 933-2355 • WWW.PROJECTCAREVA.ORG


SEPTEMBER 2015 | CONTENTS

Teen Mental Health PG.20 BITS & PIECES 04 / Contributors 06 / Editor’s Note 07 / Extra / Bra-ha-ha 08 / D.I.Y. / Solar Beach Lamps 08 / Inbox 09 / In My Own Words IN THE KNOW 10 / Calendar

Choosing Seafood PG.39 FOOD

14 / Profile / Donna Tighe & Michele Benson 16 / Q&A / Kimberly Dellinger 18 / Advances in Medicine / Prostate Cancer FEATURES 20 / Feature / Teen Mental Health 24 / Feature / Tribute to Drs. Jones & Shaw 26 / Feature / Outgrowing Allergies

DIGITAL ISSUE

30 / Vine & Dine / Beer Tasting 33 / Food & Nutrition / Sugary Drinks WILLIAMSBURG EDITION | YOUR WELLNESS AND LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

36 / Flavor / Black Garlic 37 / Taste Appeal

the safest

Seafood

& 3 tasty recipes

+

Remembering Drs. Jim Shaw & Howard Jones Go orange & Stamp out hunger can your kids outgrow allergies?

39 / Extra / Safest Seafood [Infographic] YOUR HEALTH 41 / Yoganatomy / Shoulderstand 42 / Fitness / Chisel That Chest 44 / Family / Are Kids Overscheduled? 46 / Outdoors / Stand Up Paddleboarding

13 / Second Opinion

Music and the Mind PG.52

48 / Aging Well / End-of-Life Discussions 50 / Money / Social Security & Retirement

the truth about sugary drinks ARE MUSICAL CHILDREN MORE ADJUSTED?

SEPTEMBER 2015 — THEHEALTHJOURNALS.COM

Don’t forget our digital edition is free, easy to download and supported on a variety of tablets and digital devices. Download your copy at thehealthjournals.com/digital-edition ON THE WEB @ THEHEALTHJOURNALS.COM

Check out our website for even more articles about fitness, health and wellness.

52 / Mind Matters / Music and the Young Mind 54 / Healthy Commute / Road Rage 56 / Extra / March of Dimes STAYING WELL 58 / Accepting New Patients

ON OUR COVER: CHEF KYLE FOWLKES

60 / One Last Thought

Kyle Fowlkes is the executive chef of Cyprus Grille at Embassy Suites, Hampton, Virginia. His cuisine is best described as southernhome cooking with a fine dining twist.

61 / Health Directory 64 / Brain Teasers

thehealthjournals.com | 3


BITS & PIECES | CONTRIBUTORS

BRANDY CENTOLANZA Brandy is a freelance writer who covers health, parenting, education, travel and community issues for various publications in Hampton Roads and Richmond.

Alison is a freelance writer who lives in Yorktown, Virginia. A former full-time newspaper reporter, she specializes in feature stories on health and parenting.

A. E. BAYNE

SHAWN RADCLIFFE

A.E. Bayne is a writer and visual artist who lives in Fredericksburg, Virginia. She has been a frequent contributor to Front Porch Magazine, Fredericksburg Parent Magazine and The Health Journal. She is a co-editor of Fredericksburg Literary Review.

Shawn is a science writer and yoga instructor with over 15 years’ experience writing about science, health and medicine. In addition to The Health Journal, his work has appeared on Healthline and Men’s Fitness.

KELSEY HINTON Kelsey completed her master's degree in creative writing at The New School in New York City, New York. Her published work has appeared in the Central Florida Future, Orlando Magazine, the Orlando Business Journal, and the Orlando Sentinel.

KIMBERLEY CUACHON HAUGH Kimberley has a passion for fashion and food; “Look good. Eat well.” is her philosophy. She is the owner of Kimberley Ashlee Catering where she uses seasonal and sustainable ingredients.

DANIEL SHAYE Dr. Shaye is a chiropractor, Certified Chiropractic Sports Physician and acupuncture fellow (FIAMA) with Performance Chiropractic in Williamsburg, Virginia.

SAPTA YIN, ASCM, RYT 200 Sapta is currently teaching yoga at Body Balance in Williamsburg, Virginia. She holds an ACSM Personal Trainer Certification and is certified as a Yoga instructor underneath Yoga Alliance.

NATALIE MILLER MOORE Natalie is a freelance journalist, with experience as a reporter, editor and columnist. She also works in marketing, as a health care communication consultant.

4 | thehealthjournals.com

ALISON JOHNSON

KIM O'BRIEN ROOT Kim has been a reporter for 20 years and previously worked for the Daily Press and The Roanoke Times. She’s been a freelance journalist since 2010.

MATT SABO Matt Sabo is a writer for Consociate Media. A former newspaper reporter, he has also worked for a non-profit organization that starts schools in Africa and the Caribbean.

SUSAN SMIGIELSKI ACKER Susan Smigielski Acker is a freelance journalist and editor. Previously, she was a newspaper reporter in Georgia, a feature writer on the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, and worked at NASA Langley Research Center.

CATHY WELCH Cathy writes for five Hampton Roads media outlets. She is a ghostwriter, editor and photographer living in Newport News, Virginia.

MIKE VERANO Mike Verano is a licensed therapist, EAP Specialist, Reiki II Practitioner and cancer survivor with 30 years experience in the mental health field. He is the author of several books and has been published in national and international magazines. 

L. D'SHAWN WRIGHT L. D'Shawn Wright is president of Body By D Gym & Fitness Center. He is also a trainer, champion bodybuilder and community leader.


Caring for Women

VOL. 11, NO. 04

Through all Stages of Life.

The Health Journal is a monthly consumer health magazine serving Hampton Roads, Virginia. Magazines are distributed via direct mail, racks and hand delivery. For more information, visit thehealthjournals.com. PUBLISHERS

Since 1976 our team of experts has been supporting women through adolescence, the reproductive years, pregnancy, menopause and beyond. Williamsburg Obstetrics & Gynecology is the exclusive provider of obstetric (OB) care at Sentara Williamsburg Regional Medical Center.

Brian Freer brian@thehealthjournals.com Page Freer page@thehealthjournals.com EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Rita L. Kikoen EDITOR IN CHIEF

Chris Jones chris@thehealthjournals.com

MEDICAL EDITOR

Ravi V. Shamaiengar, M.D. CLIENT LIAISON/ BUSINESS DEVELOPER

Christie Davenport christie@thehealthjournals.com

Daniel G. Jenkins, M.D.

David C. Pearce, M.D.

Emily F. Roberson, M.D.

ART DIRECTOR

Maria Candelaria Daugs maria@thehealthjournals.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Michael Saunders michael@thehealthjournals.com VIDEO PRODUCTION MANAGER

Brandon Freer brandon@thehealthjournals.com

Benjamin T. Isbell, M.D.

Kristy A. Keller, M.D.

Karen McNamara, N.P.

Erin Wilkey, M.D.

CIRCULATION

Ryan Bishop circulation@thehealthjournals.com PHOTOGRAPHY

Brian Freer Brandon Freer

Williamsburg Obstetrics & Gynecology

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Email advertise@thehealthjournals.com, or call (757) 645-4475 for rates. CONTRIBUTE

Email editorial@thehealthjournals.com for editorial and contributor guidelines. SUBSCRIBE

Subscribe for $16/year. Send a check or money order, payable to RIAN Enterprises, LLC to the address below. Include mailing address and contact information. Notify us of any change in address.

e

e This cycl M ag Re ine az

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BITS & PIECES | EDITOR’S NOTE

I

loved playing baseball as a young teen. The day after I signed up for my first little league season, my grandfather bought me a burgundy glove and that evening we sat outside breaking it in. At practice, I would get lumped into the outfield with all of the other new and unpolished players. My coach would stand at the plate, point his bat in my direction and call out, “Chris! Coming your way!” “Ping!” The ball ripped from his metal bat. I had difficulty judging the ball. Sometimes it would stay airborne long enough for me to get under it while other times it would hit the ground and blow past me. Baseball was hard. I didn’t get a lot of playing time at first. I came off the bench late in games where I was shuffled into left or center field. I batted low in the order, too. But one Monday night, one play changed everything. Our team had an away game and I was surprised when I was asked to scurry into left field in the third inning. We collected two outs before a husky, right-handed batter took the plate. My coach yelled for me to shift to the right. “Keep going! Keep going!” he blared, waving me toward the third base line. I don’t recall which pitch he hit, but the ball blasted from his bat like canon fire right in my direction. I watched the ball sail PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN FREER

KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE BALL through the air, looking for the point of descent so I could make a break on it. That’s what coach taught me—don’t move until the ball starts to drop. I stepped forward and raised my glove into the air. “Pow!” It hit my glove. I had it. That was the first catch I ever made in a game. I got a lot of pats on the back and encouragement when I returned to the bench—and it felt great. That one play ignited a fire within me. I didn’t think that I had potential to be a good player, but I did. I went from a late inning sub to working my way into the starting lineup. I rotated in as the lead-off batter and found a home starting in left field. I was getting on base more, driving in runs, scoring and making plays in the outfield. All of this because of one catch. Reflecting on the lesson from that catch, it taught me the importance of taking advantage of opportunities as they present themselves. I don’t have to go into a situation with all of the right answers or all of the necessary tools. I’ll acquire them as

“SELF-WORTH COMES FROM ONE THING— THINKING THAT YOU ARE WORTHY.” — DR. WAYNE DYER

I go. I just need to get into the game when my number is called and keep my eye on the ball. That’s how I became a sportswriter, a sports editor, a contributing writer in two books and now a podcast host. (This is the project I mentioned in my July Editor’s Note “Progress, Not Perfection”). There is no doubt in my mind that you have one or more events in your life that you can look back on, find a lesson and apply it immediately. This is what I have come to find to be the best use of past experiences. Rather than relive old glory or sulk in regret, turn those experiences into relevant references that catapult you toward a better today—and tomorrow.

CHRIS JONES /EDITOR IN CHIEF CHRIS@THEHEALTHJOURNALS.COM

GIVE IT YOUR BREAST SHOT

You could win $1,000 and save a life.

Just decorate a 38C back-closure, underwire bra with any non-perishable things you want, give it a name and submit it with your entry fee. All proceeds from The Bra-ha-ha® provide mammograms and related breast health services to the eligible uninsured, and will help fund breast health technology at Chesapeake Regional Healthcare. Grand prize is $1,000, but in a seriously uplifting event like this, everyone is a winner. For contest rules and entry details, point your peepers to brahaha.org today.

Terminate Breast Cancer


2015 BRA-HA-HA | EXTRA

Bra-Ha-Ha Infusing Creativity, Humor & Hope

Fundraiser a hit within breast cancer awareness community WRITTEN BY BRANDY CENTOLANZA

W

hile breast cancer is a serious disease, a group in Chesapeake, Virginia, has chosen a light-hearted way to support the fight against it with The Bra-Ha-Ha, an annual fundraiser featuring uniquely decorated bras for the cause. “People submit these bras as a way to memorialize someone who lost the fight, or for a loved one who is battling cancer, or for someone who has won the battle against cancer,” says Shirley Forbes, chair of The Bra-Ha-Ha committee. The event began in 2008 to coincide with the opening of the Breast Cancer Center at Chesapeake Regional Medical Center. In 2011, a committee was formed to make the fundraiser a yearlong campaign, culminating with an awards show and auction in celebration of Breast Cancer Awareness Month each fall. “The Bra-Ha-Ha was designed not only to bring people into the breast cancer center but also to help women in need, help those women who are uninsured or underinsured,” says Forbes. “The Bra-Ha-Ha’s message is to spread awareness and to educate women about early detection. Being a part of this project garners excitement from everyone in the community. There are very few of us who have not been impacted by breast cancer in some way.” Forbes has been an active member of The Bra-Ha-Ha committee for years. “I lost a very dear friend to the disease, and I have a sister-in-law in the fight,” she says. “I know a lot of people who are dealing with this. This cause is something I am very passionate about because it is about saving lives.” Dee Dooley of Chesapeake has designed three bras for The Bra-Ha-Ha through the years. The first bra she made was decorated like Dorothy’s dress from “The Wizard of Oz” in honor of a close friend who died of the

disease. This year, she will be making a bra and dedicating it to a friend from church who is currently undergoing treatment. “This is definitely a cause I believe in,” says Dooley. “I like it because I like to be creative, and I like to sew. I just think it’s a fun way to support a cause. It’s awesome. The show is also interesting because it is a nice gala and you just feel so good being there because you know you are supporting a cause that is so important.” The Bra-Ha-Ha raises funds to provide mammograms and other breast cancer services for ladies in need throughout Southeastern Virginia and Northeastern North Carolina. Roughly $500,000 has been raised through the campaign during the past five years. People of various ages and backgrounds decorate the bras in many imaginary ways. The bra design finalists are unveiled at The Bra-Ha-Ha Awards Show & Auction. Men get into the spirit, too, with 35 men this year committed to raising $3,500 each as part of the “Men in Pink” portion of the campaign. “This is not just about women,” Forbes says. “Breast cancer affects everyone. Breast cancer isn’t something fun to talk about, but we’ve turned it into something fun and creative. When you are dealing with something like this, it is important to remember to laugh and celebrate as well.” The Bra-Ha-Ha Awards Show & Auction is set for Friday, September 25, from 6:30 to 10 p.m. at Chesapeake Conference Center in Chesapeake. Tickets are $100. For more information, visit brahaha.org.


BITS & PIECES | DIY & INBOX

MAKE YOUR OWN

Beach Lamps

SOLAR-POWERED

You Will Need: • 1 (approx.) 14 oz. glass jar with screw-top metal lid

DIRECTIONS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHELLY BREITBEIL

To Make: 1 With the lid removed, carefully drill a hole into the center of the metal lid.

(relish jars are great!)

• •

Twine

2

An inexpensive outdoor solar path light, with the lighted housing removed (these unscrew easily)

Carefully center the solar light’s bulb over the drilled hole and use glue to attach light housing firmly to lid.

3

• • • •

Strong glue

Fill the jar with sand, then half way with gems. Place foam stickers around the edges of the jar, using the gems to hold them in place. Fill the remainder of the jar with gems (to the top).

4 5

Using glue to keep lid secure, replace the lid and seal tightly.

• •

6

Sea-themed foam stickers or shapes

Leave jar in sunlight for up to 8 hours or more to charge, and enjoy the beach lamp that evening!

Sand Sea colored glass “gems” A small hand drill and drill bit the size of the solar light’s bulb compartment Scissors

AUGUST SUDOKU 4

B

Using glue, attach twine in a spiraling design around the metal lid to cover. Finish with a bow!

RAIN TEASER

7

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AUGUST WINNER D.R. DANSBY Williamsburg, Virginia

8 | thehealthjournals.com

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AUGUST WORD SEARCH 8

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UP FOR THE CHALLENGE? Challenge your brain! Turn to page 64 to find out how you can win a gift card!

AUGUST CRYPTOGRAM The highest levels of performance come to people who are centered, intuitive, creative, and reflective - people who know to see a problem as an opportunity. —Deepak Chopra


IN MY OWN WORDS | BITS & PIECES

STACY WHITE

IN MY

OWN

I’m passionate about family and service to my community. Health to me is being comfortable in your own skin—not being defined by what society and others dictate you should be and having the courage and tenacity to embrace all that life brings your way. I love The Health Journal because it focuses on people as a whole. There are many components that make up our overall health, from physical wellness and leisure activities to emotional well-being and mental clarity.

WORDS

HU Z Z AAAAHHHH.

AU T U M N S PA S P E C I A L S It feels good to kick off your fall with significant savings on a rejuvenating massage or treatment. Really, really good.

C H O O S E YO U R FAV O R I T E C O M B O ! Monday – Thursday only Enjoy a 60-minute Williamsburg Massage with a Signature Manicure for $110 OR Enjoy a 60-minute Williamsburg Massage with a Signature Pedicure for $150

To book your service, call 757-220-7720.

OF

All offers are subject to availability and cannot be combined with any other offers or discounts. Please make reservations. Prices do not include gratuities. Packages with multiple services may not be split between persons, and all services must be enjoyed on same day. No rain checks. No substitutions on packages. Sales of Spa products and services support the preservation, research, and educational programs of The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. © 2015 The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

COLONIAL

A

W ILLIAMSBURG

CONTINUUM OF WELLNESS

colonialwilliamsburg.com/spa 7/15-SPA-10781437


IN THE KNOW | CALENDAR

september

EVENTS

5

12

17

TOANO FARMERS MARKET Get fresh local produce.

DROOL IN THE POOL Bring your pet out for a swim to raise funds for Heritage Humane Society

HAPPY HIKERS For active adults 50-plus who love to walk, hike and explore outdoors.

WHEN: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. WHERE: Chickahominy Riverfront Park $$: $10 per dog CONTACT: heritagehumanesociety.org

WHEN: 9 a.m. WHERE: call for location $$: free CONTACT: 757-259-4200

WHEN: 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays WHERE: Corner of Forge and Richmond Roads $$: free CONTACT: 757-566-1905

5 WILLIAMSBURG FARMERS MARKET Fresh local produce and more. WHEN: 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays through October WHERE: Merchants Square $$: free CONTACT: williamsburgfarmersmarket.com

STROKE AWARENESS & BLOOD PRESSURE CHECK Learn risk factors of stroke and what to do if you suspect someone is having a stroke. WHEN: 9 a.m. to noon WHERE: James City County Recreation Center $$: free CONTACT: 757-259-420

10

12-13

PEDIATRIC ASSOCIATES OF WILLIAMSBURG OPEN HOUSE Open house for parents looking for a pediatrician.

PATRIOTS TRIATHLON FESTIVAL Event features various races. Come out as a participant or spectator.

WHEN: 5:30 p.m. WHERE: Pediatric Associates of Williamsburg $$: free CONTACT: chkd.org

11 BIRTH CIRCLE Pregnant women and new moms are invited to share their birthing experiences. WHEN: 6:30 p.m. WHERE: Williamsburg Regional Library $$: free CONTACT: bmva.williamsburg@gmail.com

12 HARE & TORTOISE 8K RUN/WALK Race raises funds and awareness for ovarian cancer. WHEN: 8:30 a.m. WHERE: New Quarter Park $$: $35 CONTACT: hareandtortoiserunwalk.com

WHEN: all day WHERE: Jamestown Beach Park $$: See website for specific race fees CONTACT: vtsmts.com/patriotshalf

15 TOA LECTURE SERIES Learn the latest about Ankle Arthritis with Dr. Paul B. Maloof. WHEN: 6:30 p.m. WHERE: Legacy Hall, Williamsburg $$: Free CONTACT: 757-827-2480, ext. 332

16 ARCHERY FOR ADULTS Learn the basics of archery. WHEN: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays through October 7 WHERE: call for location $$: $45 residents; $50, non-residents CONTACT: 757-259-5355

GET MORE EVENTS AT:

10 | thehealthjournals.com

BABY CARE 101 Learn how to provide a safe and secure environment for your baby. WHEN: 6 to 7 p.m. WHERE: Pediatric Associates of Williamsburg $$: free CONTACT: chkd.org

GROCERY STORE TOUR Diabetes patients learn to read food labels and eat healthier. WHEN: 10 a.m. WHERE: Food Lion, Premium Outlets $$: free CONTACT: 800-736-8272

19 HARVEST FESTIVAL Event includes food, crafts, and activities. WHEN: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. WHERE: Chickahominy Riverfront Park $$: $10 per vehicle CONTACT: jamescitycountyva.gov/ recreation

BRING YOUR OWN KAYAK Come out and paddle along the Queen’s Creek. WHEN: 9 a.m. WHERE: New Quarter Park $$: free with own kayak; $30 rental CONTACT: 757-890-5840

PINK CARPET GALA Event benefits Beyond Boobs and includes dinner, dancing and an auction. WHEN: 6 to 11 p.m. WHERE: Doubletree by Hilton $$: $75, adults; $30, children CONTACT: 757-645-2649

18 CHRONIC DISEASE SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Learn techniques to manage a chronic health issue. WHEN: 9:30 a.m. to noon Fridays through October 23 WHERE: Riverside Doctors’ Hospital $$: free CONTACT: 757-220-4751

19 WILLIAMSBURG INTERNATIONAL FOOD & ARTS FESTIVAL Enjoy foods from all over the world. Event benefits Literacy for Life. WHEN: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. WHERE: William & Mary School of Education $$: free CONTACT: 757-221-3325

22 TOA LECTURE SERIES Learn the latest about Robotic Knee Replacements with Dr. Michael E. Higgins. WHEN: 6:30 p.m. WHERE: Williamsburg Regional Library $$: Free CONTACT: 757-827-2480, ext. 332

26 COLONIAL FONDO BIKE RIDE Join pro bike rider Ted King for this ride to coincide with the Richmond 2015 UCI Road World Championships. WHEN: 7 to 11 a.m. WHERE: Colonial Williamsburg $$: see website for specific fees CONTACT: colonialwilliamsburg.com

THEHEALTHJOURNALS.COM/CALENDAR


thehealthjournals.com | 11


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special advertising section

second opinion I brush my teeth every day. How did I get a cavity? Cavities are the softening of your enamel caused by acids, which form when bacteria break down sugar in your mouth. Sugary and starchy foods cause more cavities because they feed the bacteria as they stick to teeth. Frequent snacking and sipping creates a continual acid bath over your teeth. With more exposures of acid, your enamel has no chance to recover before another attack. Brushing twice daily with fluoride toothpaste is recommended for cleaning the teeth’s surfaces. The fluoride in toothpaste builds the enamel’s defenses against acid. Flossing once daily removes the plaque and bacteria from between the teeth and gums where the toothbrush cannot reach. Visit the dentist twice per year. We can catch cavities early and can help clean areas that are frequently missed. We also provide in-office fluoride treatment for prevention of future cavities.

Kasey Rhyne Petersen, D.M.D. Williamsburg Center for Dental Health 757-565-6303

Is natural, bio-identical, hormone replacement therapy safer or more effective than the synthetics? Bio-Identical hormones are biologically identical in chemical and molecular structure to the hormones naturally occurring in the body. The building blocks for these bio-identicals lie in the unique compounds of wild yams, chemically crafted into exact replicas of our natural hormones, thus eliminating many of the risks and negative side effects. Studies demonstrate bioidenticals to be more effective and have greater health benefits when compared to synthetics. In contrast, synthetic preparations are comprised of horse hormones that are foreign, causing the body to not recognize them normally, while treating them as toxins and increasing the risk of adverse reactions. In extreme cases synthetic hormones may trigger heart attacks, strokes, or cause cancer. Pellet therapy, the superior method of hormone delivery, automatically secretes hormones into the bloodstream in small amounts throughout the day. Whenever the body’s hormonal requirement increases due to mental or physical stress, the pellets are always available in correct amounts. No other delivery method can offer this consistency of hormones.

Harriet McCoy, NP-BC, MSN Hormone Health and Weight Loss 757-298-7966

Should weight loss surgery be considered a last resort?

your health care questions answered

Absolutely not! You may think this is a strong statement; however weight loss surgery shouldn’t be your first option, either. For someone who is overweight and has tried other weight loss programs without success, weight loss surgery can be a great option. The optimal time for surgery is before your weight is too high and your health problems more severe. An ideal candidate is someone between 75-150 pounds overweight. While the incidences of health problems—such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and sleep apnea—increase as your weight goes up, you should consider surgery before they become too severe and increase your surgical risk. I’ve seen a significant decrease in the fear and negative connotations surrounding weight loss surgery since starting my weight loss surgery career in 1994. The procedures are safer and more effective with return to work often within two weeks. Something I hear commonly from patients after surgery is “I should have had weight loss surgery years ago!” If you are overweight, it is an option worth considering, especially when it is combined with a comprehensive post-surgical program.

Thomas W. Clark, MS, M.D., FACS

Medical Director Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Sentara CarePlex Hospital 1-800-SENTARA thehealthjournals.com | 13


special advertising section

second opinion Why is vitamin D important? Should I be concerned about taking daily vitamin D and, if so, how much should I take and what kind? Vitamin D regulates calcium metabolism. It also seems to support the body’s immune system and, when deficient, serves as a risk factor for heart disease. About 35 percent of people tested are deficient and, over the last 30 years, the trend is toward more deficiency. The best explanation is that we spend less time outside. Sunlight contains ultraviolet light that converts the vitamin D we consume into a form the body needs, vitamin D3. Next, this form must also be modified in the liver and kidneys before it assumes its active form. You can also buy vitamin D2 in the store, but D3 is a better supplement because it stays in the body longer so it can be converted to its active form. If deficient, you can develop decreased bone density and muscle weakness. Vitamin D supplementation is good for everyone. Two thousand IU/day is an adequate yet safe daily dose. Take it with food that contains some fat to achieve better absorption. And with adequate supplementation, you’re taking over where the sun left off.

Ralph Robertson M.D. Medical Director of Lackey Free Clinic 757-886-0608

I have heard that hormones can cause dental problems. Is this true? Yes, it is true. Especially for women, hormonal changes can contribute to a host of dental issues, primarily periodontal (gum) disease. Bacterial plaque is the most common cause of periodontal disease, but hormonal changes, from pre-puberty to post-menopause, encourage the oral soft tissues to react more dramatically to the presence of bacteria. Periodontal disease is the number one cause for adult tooth loss and afflicts over 85 percent of the American adult population. Beyond damage to the oral cavity, periodontal disease is linked to strikingly dangerous consequences in the rest of the body, even contributing to serious outcome for an unborn child. Because hormonal changes (particularly progesterone and estrogen levels) experienced by women through different life stages can increase susceptibility to periodontal disease, there are specific times in a woman’s life when she needs to take extra care of her oral health, namely: puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, birth control and menopause. Osteoporosis can also lead to the breakdown of the jawbone and increases in tooth loss.

Lisa Marie Samaha, D.D.S. Port Warwick Dental Arts 757-223-9270 pwdentalarts.com

Should weight loss surgery be considered a last resort?

your health care questions answered

Absolutely not! You may think this is a strong statement; however weight loss surgery shouldn’t be your first option, either. For someone who is overweight and has tried other weight loss programs without success, weight loss surgery can be a great option. The optimal time for surgery is before your weight is too high and your health problems more severe. An ideal candidate is someone between 75-150 pounds overweight. While the incidences of health problems—such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and sleep apnea—increase as your weight goes up, you should consider surgery before they become too severe and increase your surgical risk. I’ve seen a significant decrease in the fear and negative connotations surrounding weight loss surgery since starting my weight loss surgery career in 1994. The procedures are safer and more effective with return to work often within two weeks. Something I hear commonly from patients after surgery is “I should have had weight loss surgery years ago!” If you are overweight, it is an option worth considering, especially when it is combined with a comprehensive post-surgical program.

Thomas W. Clark, MS, M.D., FACS

Medical Director Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Sentara CarePlex Hospital 1-800-SENTARA thehealthjournals.com | 13


IN THE KNOW | PROFILE

SEPTEMBER IS HUNGER ACTION MONTH

Stamping Out

HUNGER with

&

Donna Tighe Michele Benson WRITTEN BY ALISON JOHNSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN FREER

T

Donna Tighe

14 | thehealthjournals.com

hink you’re good at stretching a dollar? You’ve likely got nothing on the Virginia Peninsula Foodbank: it can provide four complete meals for that buck. So if you save a dollar a day to donate throughout September—Hunger Action Month nationwide—you could cover 120 meals for local families. Worried you’d be giving your money to a bunch of lazy people? In fact, many who rely on the Foodbank are hard-working parents living from paycheck to paycheck or momentarily thrown off by a hardship such as an illness or even a car breaking down. On average, Foodbank clients come for help just nine times a year—not every week. “A lot of people would be surprised by what the face of hunger looks like nowadays,” says Donna Tighe, food/fund drive manager for the Hampton-based organization. “It’s anybody: children, seniors and people who need help getting through tough times.” For Hunger Action Month, the Foodbank has published a calendar with daily ideas for people who want to help (visit hrfoodbank.org). Orange is the month’s designated color, so wearing orange clothes or decorating businesses and other spaces with orange balloons and lights is a good move any day. Michele Benson, chief development officer for the Foodbank, would love to see as much orange in September as she sees pink during October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month or red during February’s American Heart Month. “Our goal is to raise as much awareness about hunger as people have about other worthy causes,” Benson says. “People just don’t realize the need here. It’s tremendous.”


IF YOU SAVE A DOLLAR A DAY TO DONATE THROUGHOUT SEPTEMBER, YOU COULD COVER 120 MEALS FOR LOCAL FAMILIES.”

The Peninsula bank serves a population with one of the state’s largest rates of food insecurity— defined as not having enough food to lead a normal healthy lifestyle. The collective rate for Hampton, Newport News, Poquoson, Williamsburg and Gloucester, James City, Mathews, York and Surry counties is 13.8 percent, compared to a state Michelle Benson average of 11.9 percent. Each year, more than 152,000 people—a quarter of them children—rely on the Foodbank and its partner agencies for help. The organization also fills backpacks with weekend food for schoolchildren, runs 28 community cafes with hot meals for kids and offers a free Culinary Training Program for adults that includes job skills such as time management, resume writing and interview techniques. Poor nutrition isn’t just about growling bellies, Benson notes. Hunger raises the risk of all illnesses, worsens common health conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes, and disrupts growth and brain development in children. Nationally, 74 percent of food bank clients report that they were facing a choice between paying for food or medicine. A few ideas for this month:

• Include a food or fund drive as part of any event,

including birthday parties, weddings or yard sales.

• Use social media to follow the Foodbank on Twitter (@hrfoodbank), “like” the organization’s page on Facebook and link to its website from your page after posting some statistics on hunger.

• Plan to be a regular donor; make a monthly pledge or

pack more lunches and contribute the money that would have gone to restaurants.

• Schedule a tour of the Foodbank by calling 757-596-7188.

TPMG Hospitalists Providing Patients with the Best Care

A hospitalist is a physician who oversees the patient’s care throughout his or her stay. The hospitalists of Tidewater Physicians Multispecialty Group check on patients daily, monitor their care and work to coordinate care with the patient’s primary care physician and other specialists. A physician-to-physician phone call will ensure our TPMG Hospitalists at Mary Immaculate Hospital or DePaul Medical Center can provide the best care to your patients.

Bring your kids and friends and educate them, too.

MARY IMMACULATE HOSPITAL

• Remember the BOGO principle (Buy One, Give One)

2 Bernardine Drive, Newport News, VA 23602

when picking up items at the grocery store.

The Foodbank always needs non-perishables, such as canned meats, peanut butter, pasta, rice and granola bars, as well as the fresh fruits and vegetables it is working harder to get into the community. As for what families can do in their own kitchens, Tighe and Benson say their jobs have taught them the importance of not wasting food. Watching portion sizes and planning at least several days’ worth of meals before grocery shopping helps keep food out of the trash and, therefore, available for stores to donate to needy families instead. Finally, be aware that the Foodbank receives about 60 percent of its donations during two months alone—November and December, for the holidays—though the demand is high year-round. “Hunger is not a seasonal problem,” Tighe says. “In fact, summer is one of our biggest times of need.” In other words, orange is always a good color to wear.

Weekdays:

(757) 886-6877

Weekends/Evenings/Holidays:

(757) 220-4477 DEPAUL MEDICAL CENTER 150 Kingsley Lane, Norfolk, VA 23505

(757) 889-5157

mytpmg.com


IN THE KNOW | Q&A

K

imberly Dellinger is the new executive director of Bacon Street Youth and Family Services, a substance abuse prevention and treatment center. This nonprofit organization serves teens and their families in Williamsburg, James City County, Upper York County and Poquoson, Virginia. WRITTEN BY BRANDY CENTOLANZA PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN FREER

KIMBERLYDELLINGER What can you tell us about Bacon Street?

What are your goals as Executive Director?

Bacon Street Youth and Family Services was established in 1971 and has been an agency in this community. Originally, we were a substance abuse prevention and treatment facility for adolescents. Although we are not currently grant-funded for prevention services, I am hoping to change that in the future. We have a strong track record, and are well respected in the community. Bacon Street is unique because the work we do is research based, supportive and centered on the family. We have excellent clinicians and staff and a dynamic board of directors.

One goal is to bring prevention services back to our community; I was brought on because of my background and passion in the area. I spent eight years in the field in Vermont, and it was a great experience working with youth and helping them to make healthy choices. Right now I am reaching out to administrators at our local schools, business leaders and community members to re-engage in the work we are doing. Research shows that the longer you can help students abstain from using substances, the more likely they will not become dependent. We are currently offering Parent Support Groups and I’d like this to include opportunities for parents to come if they have questions about how to start the conversation with their children, or how to help them find out what is going on with their children and make them successful. I’m committed to creating a positive change in the community where I live and where I am raising my family.

I’m committed to creating a positive change in the community where I live and where I am raising my family.”

16 | thehealthjournals.com


Q&A | IN THE KNOW

How do you plan to accomplish your goals through prevention? Through parenting and education programs where we have the opportunity to raise awareness of the dangers of substance use and abuse, we want to help support adolescents in making healthy choices; to help them be successful rather than “punish” them for making a poor choice.

What are teens abusing? Predominantly alcohol, tobacco and marijuana. Prescription drug use is also a current and present challenge for our youth and their families as teens are able to easily obtain drugs from their parents’ medicine cabinet. This issue is on the national radar and includes the abuse of prescription stimulants, sedatives and pain medication. We have an opportunity to be working with pharmacists and doctors to make sure children and families aren’t being overprescribed. This is just one form of how prevention can effectively change a community for the better.

How can parents help? It is developmentally normal for adolescents to want to take risks; it helps them figure out what is acceptable and not acceptable as they grow into adulthood. Parents can help their teens find ways to ensure that the risks they are taking are healthy risks. Teens may try sailing, rock climbing or mountain biking. Others might like drama, performing as a musician, slam poetry, stand-up comedy or something else creative. Teens could consider participating in a STEM competition if they are into math, engineering, or computer science. Teens need to find out what they are good at and take it to the next level; to challenge themselves. Parents shouldn’t miss the opportunity to talk to their children on a regular basis, particularly about drugs and alcohol. Don’t wait to have the conversation about alcohol and drugs until high school, because by then they already know a lot and not from you. Check in with your teens; get to know who their friends are and where they might be visiting. Having conversations with your kids is the best impact you will have as a parent; by finding out what is going on in their lives and what they are doing, you are showing them you care.

What are some of the reasons teens may turn to substances? Peer pressure is one of the most common reasons a teen might use alcohol and/or drugs, although traditional and social media have a significant influence, particularly through the use of product placement. One effective strategy is through raising awareness with teens that they are being intentionally marketed to by the industry. The amount of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use in the media is highly detrimental to the health and well-being of youth. What adolescents see in social media and the general media does impact the way they see the world. This is a struggle that parents and families are having to combat on a daily basis.

Parents shouldn’t miss the opportunity to talk to their children on a regular basis, particularly about drugs and alcohol.”

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IN THE KNOW | ADVANCES IN MEDICINE

RapidArc Zeroes In on Prostate Cancer

P

rostate cancer is one of the most common cancers that affects men, with more than 240,000 cases diagnosed each year. Fortunately, it’s also very curable. In the past 25 years, the five-year survival rate for all stages has jumped from 69 percent to nearly 100 percent, according to the American Cancer Society. Treatment for prostate cancer, which affects a walnut-sized gland found in the male reproductive tract, is constantly improving. There are several options that exist once a diagnosis is made. Sometimes, a doctor might decide the cancer doesn’t need to be treated right away. Other times, surgery or radiation therapy might be called for. There are two broad categories of radiation therapy—internal and external. Both are designed to target the tumor while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissue. Internal radiation therapy, or brachytherapy, treats cancer with radioactive seeds that are placed inside the body at the treatment area. External therapy administers radiation through high-energy beams. Fauquier County, Virginia, resident Mike Jones had already had surgery to remove his prostate last year when doctors realized his PSA, or prostatespecific antigen, numbers weren’t going down. A PSA blood test and digital rectal exam can help identify prostate cancer in its early stages; PSA levels are also tracked followed treatment. Jones chose to have a form of external radiation therapy called IMRT, or intensity modulated radiation therapy, at the Novant Health Cancer Center in Gainesville, Virginia. This technique uses 3-D scans of the body to guide the 18 | thehealthjournals.com

WRITTEN BY KIM O’BRIEN ROOT

beams of radiation to a tumor from many different angles resulting in less exposure to healthy tissue. Jones, 57, went for eight weeks’ worth of radiation therapy—five days a week, 10 minutes at a time—before finishing his treatment in June. Each time, he had to lie still while the machine, a linear accelerator, rotated twice around him. Jones was able to use the Novant center’s latest machine, which is able to penetrate a tumor even more than before. Jones will have to have his PSA numbers checked again in October to make sure the treatment worked. His radiation oncologist, Dr. Sanjeev Aggarwal, was “pretty confident,” Jones says. “He said it would work. I’m hoping he’s right.” At the Novant center, doctors use a type of image-guided treatment called RapidArc, which is able to deliver radiation two to eight times faster than previously possible. Faster treatments are good for patients: one, they’re more comfortable, not requiring the need to be still for as long, and two, they’re more accurate. RapidArc can deliver a beam the size of a pencil tip. RapidArc uses computer-generated images to plan and deliver the necessary dose of radiation. While a patient is lying flat, the machine revolves around him, rotating 360 degrees as it delivers the radiation where it needs to go, adjusting the beam as needed. RapidArc delivers its dose in a single rotation, taking only about two minutes.


ADVANCES IN MEDICINE | IN THE KNOW

Aggarwal, the cancer center’s medical director, helped bring RapidArc to the Washington, D.C., area. The treatment system is used to treat various types of cancer, including brain tumors, breast cancers, pancreatic cancers and rectal cancer. “We have pioneered the use of innovative technologies,” Aggarwal says. In Hampton Roads, Virginia, the RapidArc system is available at Bon Secours’ Martha W. Davis Cancer Treatment Center in Portsmouth. Other cancer centers offer various ways of treatment. The Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute uses protons as part of its radiation therapy. Traditional radiotherapy uses photons, which are like X-rays (also used with the CyberKnife at the Sentara Advanced Radiosurgery Center at Norfolk General Hospital.) Both methods treat tumors similarly, damaging the DNA and inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Proton therapy, however, is able to drop the bulk of its energy right at the tumor, with the intent of limiting exposure to healthy tissue.

Not damaging surrounding areas is a big goal when treating prostate cancer. The prostate is located close to the bladder and urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder. When Jones did his therapy, he had to first drink 42 ounces of water to keep the bladder away from the rectum. Overall, however, “it was a painless treatment,” Jones says. Although it’s sometimes a delicate subject for men, Jones—a married father of three grown children and grandfather to three— says he highly recommends all men start getting prostate exams after age 50. He had been having exams done every year with his physicals when his prostate showed signs of swelling early last year. His doctor quickly investigated further, allowing his cancer to be caught early. All men are at risk for prostate cancer, and the risk gets stronger with age. Nearly two-thirds of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over the age of 65. Prostate cancer is also more common among black men. The prevalence of prostate

cancer in Hampton Roads—where more men die from it than anywhere else in the country—is one factor that led Hampton University to build its proton therapy institute. “If anyone is 50, I strongly recommend you get the exam,” Jones says. “Whether you want to know or not. The amount of technology they have these days, you have options.”

“All men are at risk

for prostate cancer, and the risk gets stronger with age.”

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FEATURES | TEEN MENTAL HEALTH

spotlight on

TEEN

MENTAL HEALTH Back-to-School

for

B

WRITTEN BY SHAWN RADCLIFFE

eing a teenager is challenging. With so many changes happening in their bodies and brains—along with the pressures of school and their social lives— it is normal for teens to feel overwhelmed.

20 | thehealthjournals.com


On top of this stress, 1 in 5 adolescents has a mental disorder, such as depression or anxiety, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Effective treatments are available for these conditions—including a combination of psychotherapy and medication—but less than half of affected teens were treated in the past year. Although teens may feel like they are dealing with mental illness alone, a strong support network of friends and families can encourage them to seek out the treatment they need. Improving their mental health earlier can also help them as they enter adulthood. “It’s the untreated mental disorders that are at higher risk,” says Dr. Eve Weber, a clinical psychologist with a practice in Williamsburg, Virginia. “So the sooner interventions or treatments are in place, then I think that the adolescent or child may develop better coping skills.” Teens face a wide range of mental health problems, including mood and anxiety disorders, behavioral problems, eating disorders, substance abuse and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Many of these conditions are more common than parents may realize and a couple—such as “sexting” and self-injury— may not receive as much attention as they should. SEXTING COMMON AMONG TEENS

“Sexting”—the sending of sexually-explicit text messages—has yet to be categorized as a mental illness, but it can have long-term consequences for a teens mental health and even their adult life. “Too frequently they think that if they’re a teen and are sending it to a teen, there’s nothing wrong with that,” says Weber, “but it’s considered trafficking child porn. And there are criminal charges for that.” While some states have laws aimed specifically at sexting, Virginia treats it as child pornography, a felony that can lead to years of prison time. A teen may even be added to the registry of sex offenders. A 2014 survey by researchers at Drexel University found that more than 50 percent of the people surveyed had “sexted” while they were minors. More than a quarter had included naked or other sexual images of themselves in the text message. Why are so many teens sexting? Because this behavior is so common, some may think it is no big deal, especially when they don’t realize the potential legal consequences. Others may just be going along with the crowd. “Part of it could be personality, maybe some maladaptive characteristics that the child may have,” says Weber, “but it could be anxiety, some social anxiety—trying to fit in in a way that they’re also susceptible to some peer pressure, maybe bullying.” Unfortunately, like most things digital, it is very easy for a text message intended for one person to be forwarded—accidentally or intentionally—to many other students in a teen’s school. This sudden exposure is embarrassing and may lead to harassment, further bullying as well as long-term emotional problems. SELF-INJURY OFTEN MISUNDERSTOOD

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FEATURES | TEEN MENTAL HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH RED FLAGS Mood changes are common among teenagers, so not every down day is a sign of a bigger problem. Parents should be on the lookout for more severe changes. “Usually it becomes a disorder when someone has occupationally, educationally or socially impaired functioning—[meaning] if it starts interrupting their life on a regular basis,” says Weber. Parents should keep an eye out for these common mental health red flags:

+ Bad moods that last for more than a few days

+ Unexpected personality shifts such as anger or irritability

+ Excessive sleeping, including having difficulty getting out of bed

+ Withdrawal from friends + Loss of interest in favorite activities + Sharp and unexpected drop in academic performance

+ Decrease in self-esteem + Dramatic changes in appetite or sudden changes in weight

While females are more likely to cut themselves with a sharp object, males may engage in other behaviors to cause themselves pain. “When males self-injure,” says Weber, “it presents differently—a lot of times they’ll initiate a fight where somebody would hit them, or they’ll dare somebody to hit them.” For parents, it can be difficult to understand why a teen would hurt themselves. For some teens, self-injury provides a way to cope with things that are going on in their life. They sometimes describe the physical pain as providing an outlet for emotional pain—in a way that they can control. “You get that release after that pain goes away. So teens will self-injure,

even though they’re experiencing pain and an unpleasant effect or reaction to the pain,” says Weber. Not every teen that hurts themselves intends to commit suicide. Research, though, shows those teens who selfinjure are more likely to attempt suicide later, especially when they frequently hurt themselves. HELP FOR STRUGGLING TEENS

One of the best ways for parents to help their teens is to keep the lines of communication open. Let your teen know that they can talk to you about anything. But if you notice any red flags, (see left sidebar) it’s time to seek professional help.

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TEEN MENTAL HEALTH | FEATURES

“Generally the first line of defense is the pediatrician,” says Weber, “because they can begin the evaluation by ruling out any medical, developmental, physical or medication side effects that may be causing the symptoms.” The doctor may refer a teen to an adolescent psychiatrist or psychologist. Treatment will depend upon the underlying mental health issue, but in many cases a multi-pronged approach is more effective. “Medication may be fine. And psychotherapy may be fine,” says Weber. “But sometimes they need a combination of both. A pill just isn’t going to get to the root of the problem.” Certain types of therapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, can help teens break free of their negative patterns of thinking and behavior. These techniques provide them with more healthy ways to cope with stress in their life, both now and later on during adulthood. “If you teach them cognitive behavioral training earlier,” says Weber, “then they’re like: ‘Okay, what’s another way I can look at this?’ So they don’t get stuck in that maladaptive thinking.” To make this type of therapy more effective, parents can model these coping skills in their own lives. “It’s good for [parents] to practice using it with some effective communication,” says Weber, “making sure they have empathy as they’re teaching it.”

HOW PARENTS CAN HELP TEENS Adolescence can be just as challenging for parents as for teens. But parents can help their children navigate the pressures and problems they will run into along the way. Here’s how:

+ Keep lines of communication open and honest. Even before your children become teens, let them know that they can talk to you about any topic. Listen openly and share your own experiences from your teenage years. + Stay informed. Learning more about the mental health disorders that affect teens can help you know what to expect during the adolescent years. + Remember that treatments are available. Many effective interventions are available to treat mental health problems, including medications, psychotherapy and creative therapies. + Seek help early. If you notice any mental health red flags (see left sidebar on page 22), make an appointment for your child with their pediatrician or doctor.

LEARN MORE + Virginia Internet Laws: bit.ly/VANetLaws + Sexting & Consequences: bit.ly/DrexelStudy + Who Self-Injures?: bit.ly/WhoSelfInjures

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FEATURES | REMEMBERED WITH AFFECTION

WRITTEN BY A.E. BAYNE

with Affection Thereafter

THE LEGACIES OF DRS. JIM SHAW AND HOWARD JONES

A

LACKEY CLINIC’S FOUNDATION OF FAITH

fter years as a successful pulmonologist with the Riverside Health System and Medical Group, Dr. Jim Shaw and his wife Cooka changed course in life in response to a call to faith. In 1995, they opened Lackey Clinic in the Sunday school classroom of a local church. Lackey is a small hamlet just outside Yorktown, Virginia, where some residents live at 200 percent below the federal poverty line and often have limited access to health insurance. After some time, a member of the church’s choir stopped by for a blood pressure check. That opened the door for other members of the community to trust Shaw, and a legacy was born. From its humble beginnings, Lackey Clinic expanded to the Charles Brown Community Center, just a mile from the church. Volunteers and patients continued to fill its pop-up facility, and the clinic outgrew its home once again. Shaw and his volunteers broke ground on their own building in 2003, this time a 3,000-square-foot facility with four exam rooms, a small pharmacy and a waiting area. The group operated out of this facility for over seven years, expanding when 24 | thehealthjournals.com

needed. After a capital campaign in 2012, the clinic added 6,000 square feet, creating a 10,000-square-foot space to house 10 medical exam rooms and five dental operatories. Carol Sale, executive director of Lackey Clinic, says, “The clinic has grown exponentially under Dr. Shaw’s guidance and care over the last 20 years. He and his wife Cooka founded the clinic together and have both been volunteering their time ever since. Dr. Shaw dedicated his life to this clinic and the work that was being done for the community.” Today, Lackey Clinic serves around 1,600 patients each year, with over 12,500 patient visits in that same time. It employs a part-time medical director, one full-time and two part-time nurse practitioners and 40 physician specialists who rotate schedules to care for patients. The clinic offers 14 subspecialty clinics, while the medical director and nurse practitioners provide acute primary care on an ongoing basis to patients. Shaw died at the age of 70 on July 29, 2015, but his vision has dynamically changed the health and wellness of an entire community.

IVF PIONEER LEAVES A FERTILE LEGACY

F

rom his earliest days working at Johns Hopkins Hospital, to his fame as the “father of in vitro fertilization” in the United States, Dr. Howard Jones Jr., surgeon, inspired his colleagues and rose to the challenge of advancing fertility options for women and families. He and his equally illustrious wife, Dr. Georgeanna Jones, endocrinologist, took mandatory retirement at age 65 from Johns Hopkins and transferred to Eastern Virginia Medical School (EVMS) to head up the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Working in tandem, the pair revolutionized fertility options for women, perfecting the first successful IVF treatments and birth in the U.S. in 1981. Beyond his successes in OB-GYN, Jones was admired and respected. Nancy Garcia, his friend and administrative assistant of 36 years, says Jones was a caring person who treated everyone with respect. She describes working with Jones during the first days of IVF treatment, “We went through a lot of controversy in the beginning because it was a new procedure. He’s most well known for IVF, but he and Georgeanna helped women with all kinds of infertility problems. They were quite a team.” An inspirational leader in his field, Jones made a lasting impression on his colleagues. Dr. Richard Horman, M.D., president and provost of EVMS and dean of the School of Medicine, credits Drs. Howard and Georgeanna Jones with bringing international attention to the school. Horman says, “There are few people who inspire you when you first meet them. Dr. Jones was one of those individuals. He exuded an enthusiasm and a curiosity, and he was intellectually


REMEMBERED WITH AFFECTION | FEATURES

keen and extraordinarily bright, yet humble and human and approachable. He was the consummate scholar, academician and physician and a role model for all of us to emulate.” Dr. Alfred Abuhamad, chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Mason C. Andrews chair in Obstetrics and Gynecology, considers Jones a mentor. He says, “He and Dr. Georgeanna revolutionized how we care for women with infertility problems. Everywhere you look around the world you can see

Howard and Georgeanna Jones in the fellows they trained, in the discoveries they made and in the countless patients they impacted.” Garcia says Jones was alert and working until his death on July 31, 2015 at the age of 104. He had just finished a book about his and Georgeanna’s days as young doctors that will be edited posthumously and released sometime next year.

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FEATURES | OUTGROWING ALLERGIES

Outgrowing

Allergies WRITTEN BY NATALIE MILLER MOORE

W

hen LaNeatra Hammond’s daughter Lianna was 4 months old, she ended up in the emergency room with rashes and vomiting. An allergist determined she was allergic to milk, corn and soy. By the time she was 2 years old, she had avoided those foods but a skin test showed she was still allergic to milk. But the test indicated she was not allergic to corn and soy anymore. “By age 4, she didn’t test positive for milk either. She does not have any food restrictions anymore,” says Hammond. “We’re relieved, but the idea of outgrowing allergies is a little confusing.” CONTINUED ON PG. 28

26 | thehealthjournals.com


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FEATURES | OUTGROWING ALLERGIES CONTINUED FROM PG. 26

In nearly every classroom today, there’s one or two children with a diagnosis of food allergies (1 in 12 nationally, according to a 2011 study published in “Pediatrics.”) Many of them were diagnosed as babies or toddlers. But more than a quarter of them probably aren’t allergic anymore. WHY DOES OUTGROWING HAPPEN?

Dr. Robert Wood, director of pediatric allergy and immunology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, says that the answer will vary a lot depending on the age of the child and the specific foods involved. “We think of it as their immune system gradually forgetting that it ever cared about that food. Why some do and some don’t, and why some foods are far less likely to be outgrown than others, is still not known,” says Wood. THE ALLERGEN MAKES A DIFFERENCE

Consistent evidence shows allergies to certain foods that are more likely to be outgrown. With 90 percent of food

allergies being to “The Big Eight”: milk, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, fish, shellfish, wheat and soy, research has determined that they aren’t all equally likely to remain allergies over a lifetime. Dr. Brian Vickery, an allergistimmunologist and assistant professor of pediatrics at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, researches allergies and how they manifest in children. “Most are the same foods over and over. When you look at that— differences in natural history are significant. Milk, wheat or soy— most will outgrow,” says Vickery. Another factor that may affect outgrowing allergies is if they are multiple or single allergies, with multiple ones being more challenging to completely outgrow. WHAT’S HAPPENING INSIDE A CHILD’S BODY?

Vickery says that the outgrowing is not literal—it’s not the dilution of the allergy in the child’s body because they are getting bigger.

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OUTGROWING ALLERGIES | FEATURES

IN EVERY CLASSROOM,

THERE’S ONE CHILD WITH

25%

DIAGNOSED AS

BABIES

FOOD

AREN’T ALLERGIC ANYMORE.

OR TODDLERS.

ALLERGIES. “It does not appear to be proportional to the size of the child. We used to think milk and egg were outgrown early in life—and gone by grade school. Some studies suggested that previously, but now, we see them well into the late teenage years. It can happen any time, to any sized child.” Vickery says that outgrowing allergies is a key scientific question—it might help find a cure or treatment. “We don’t understand mechanistically why it happens, but we observe it happening all the time. This is tolerance of the allergen, which is what we hope for when we develop treatments,” he says. “Part of our inability to come up with a cure is that we don’t understand what happens in nature when it cures it.” It appears now that the outgrowing is really

BUT MORE THAN

MANY OF THEM WERE

the rapidly changing immune system, which is less reactive to the allergens it once reacted strongly to. TO TEST OR NOT TO TEST: HOW ACCURATE IS THE TESTING?

“Food allergy testing by both blood and skin tests are extremely inaccurate. While negative tests are usually correct, positive tests indicate a true food allergy less than half of the time. All tests therefore need to be interpreted very carefully,” says Wood. Dr. Geoffrey Bacon, an allergist from Hampton Roads ENT-Allergy, says that testing doesn’t always eliminate confusion. “A clinical history from parents is so important, along with a journal of symptoms. There are false negatives on the RAST test so we might miss something and the skin test

has a higher false positive rate, says Bacon. “Symptoms are most important. We are treating a patient, not a test.” While it is common to redo testing every few years, the food challenge is the true test. “A swallow test is the most accurate. Then we know what food they were exposed to and can observe the symptoms and confirm they are characteristic of an allergic reaction,” says Vickery. There’s evidence that the levels of an antibody called IgE are correlated to outgrowing allergies, and testing those levels to see if they’ve decreased may indicate less of an allergy. Unfortunately, when it comes to allergies and outgrowing them, allergists and researchers are still playing detective to find out what happens and why.

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FOOD | VINE & DINE

bar CODE G

WRITTEN BY CHRIS JONES

eneral manager Michael Claar is the beverage program designer behind the extensive and eclectic selection at DoG Street Pub and Hair of the Dog Bottle Shop, an offshoot of the popular pub owned by Chef David Everett. Everett transformed an eightyyear old bank into one of the most iconic attractions in Colonial Williamsburg complete with great food, a rustic layout and an authentic bar atmosphere complete with a cute logo inspired by Everette’s dog, Maizie.

30 | thehealthjournals.com


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With Oktoberfest in the wings and a lineup of flavorful fall beers lining the shelves, the bottle shop, as it’s called by locals, is a great place to try beer. Lauren Davidson, manager, and Zac Moore, bar manager, offered their insights on all things brew.

Glassware

Those heavy beer glasses you know and love are steeped in European tradition. Glasses used to come with the names of the beer or the brewery on them for branding purposes. Davidson points out that the best beer experience comes from teku glasses, which look like shorter, fatter wine glasses. “Honestly, wine drinkers have it right in the fact that they have a very specific glass they drink out of. The reason wine drinkers love their glass so much is that they hold their glass here (she grips the stem). That makes it excellent. You are holding your beverage without changing the temperature of your beverage,” she says. “On a beer glass…your body temperature changes the temperature of the beer. So in a stemmed glass, you’re protecting the beer. Also, the way the glass tapers up, it is going to push all of the aroma into a more condensed space. So when I go to smell it, it’s going to be a stronger aroma and I can pull more from it. When I pour it, it’s going to cause more foam and foam is a good thing. Foam is going to protect the beer from oxygen while making the aroma more distinct,” she explains.

Beer Tasting

Davidson and Moore offered a few tips for those wanting to host a beer tasting with a small group of friends. 1. The more the merrier. It’s best to get a group together and try a wide variety. “Bottle shares are great when everyone brings one or two bottles to pop open and try together. Sharing means you can try more,” says Davidson. Adds Moore, “You might notice a certain aspect of the beer that someone else doesn’t. [In] one beer you might taste licorice and someone else might taste clove. Your palate might not be as attune as someone else’s.” 2. Learn style guidelines. Learn about beer styles, colors, aromas and flavors for a complete experience and to find what best suits your palate. “Beer tasting is completely subjective, especially when you’re getting to know a style. You could pour a beer that says its a pilsner, but it has a grapefruit nose and has an amber color. It might be a great beer, but it’s not a pilsner. It’s veered too far away in its style,” says Davidson. 3. Clear glassware. Both recommend drinking from a clear glass so that you can see the characteristics and color of your beer.

If you like Budweiser, the pair advises that you should try Bell’s Lager. “It’s light in the body, very clean finishing, but without the hoppy bitterness that lager drinkers don’t care for,” says Moore. “We have a lot of local, Virginia-made lagers here, too” adds Davidson. And you like a heavier beer, like Guinness, Founder’s Oatmeal Stout will give you the density and flavor you're after. “Guinness is a light stout, less full-bodied. We have Founders Oatmeal Stout. You can start on a light stout and work your way to a meaty, high AVB stout,” chuckles Davidson.

Seasonal Suggestions

Like fruits, vegetables and fashion, beer has its seasons. Here are beers that Davidson and Moore recommend that you try in each season. Fall: Pumpkin Ale by Williamsburg Alewerks “If you’re going to do pumpkin, do Alewerks Pumpkin Ale. It’s not overly sweet, not overly sugary. It’s an excellent display of what pumpkin beer should be,” says Davidson. Winter: Gingerbread Stout by Hardywood Park Craft Brewery “There is a lot to choose from locally,” says Moore. “Alewerks has its Bourbon Barrel Porter, Hardywood out of Richmond has its Gingerbread Stout and ah, it is fantastic!” Spring: Founders All Day IPA Says Moore, “It’s hard to narrow it down to one since so much comes through, but the more popular styles are the session IPAs and the lighter lagers. Founder’s All day IPA has a really nice floral hop, but not the heavier body.” Summer: Bell’s Oberon “As far as wheat beers go, Bells Oberon is definitely one of the most popular beers,” says Moore.

Bottles versus Cans

Years ago, if you drank beer from a can you would have drawn a comparison to the filthy and uncouth Joe Dirt or the paranoid Dale Gribble of King of the Hill fame. Now, cans are the mark of a person who knows and understands how good beer is stored. “Cans are becoming popular again because they keep the beer so safe. The reason your bottles are darker in color is because you’re protecting the beer from light so the beer doesn’t skunk out. A can is the ultimate protection. Fifteen years ago, beer in cans was thought to be cheap beer,” tells Davidson. Moore agrees, “The can linings used to not be as good. Now the liners are so good that it won’t affect the flavor of the beer; the beer is safer and fresher longer. They’re also great because they chill faster.”

Exploring Craft Beer

For mainstream beer drinkers who like light beers, like Budweiser, or darker beers, like Guinness, here are two comparable beers to get your taste buds primed. thehealthjournals.com | 31


32 | thehealthjournals.com


FOOD & NUTRITION | FOOD

A Delicious Death

The Unsweet Consequences of Sugary Drinks on Kids WRITTEN BY KELSEY HINTON

“It’s the path of least

resistance to go along with that flow. Unfortunately, it’s a ‘flow’ that’s killing our kids.” —Dr. Alison Scott, assistant professor of kinesiology and health sciences at the College of William & Mary

M

ore than one-third of children and adolescents were overweight or obese in 2012, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and a Tufts University study published in June points at least one finger directly at sugary drinks. According to the study, 1 in10 obesity- and diabetes-related deaths of those younger than 45 in the United States are attributable to sugar-sweetened beverages.

“That’s a huge number of deaths from just one source,” says Dr. Alison Scott, assistant professor of kinesiology and health sciences at the College of William & Mary. SSBs—the health industry’s shorthand for sugar-sweetened beverages—are “ubiquitous in kids’ worlds,” “marketed to them like crazy,” and “designed to maximize enjoyment,” Scott, a mother of twin 6-year-olds, says. “It’s the path of least resistance to go along with that flow. Unfortunately, it’s a ‘flow’ that’s killing our kids.” In addition to SSBs, Dr. Amy Lazev, supervisor of the Williamsburg-James City County Schools’ School Health Initiative Program (SHIP), cites decreased physical activity and increased “screen time” as a cause for the rise in childhood obesity and diabetes, which the CDC calls “one of the most common chronic diseases among children in the United States.” According to data collected by Rev Your Bev, a statewide, event-based initiative that raises awareness about sugary drinks, 33 percent of those ages 5 to 19 years old drink at least one SSB each day, corresponding nicely with CDC’s one-third figure and begging the question: Is sugar making our kids fat?

A Sweet Convenience

“We live in an environment where sugary drinks and foods are everywhere,” says Scott. “You’re bombarded with them at the grocery store, in restaurants, at extracurricular activities and sporting events, at gas stations and often even at school.” We all know there are few places that are absent the temptation of sugar (we’re talking about you, Best Buy checkout). Worse, sugary drinks are as convenient in price as they are in accessibility, Scott says, pointing out that soda is cheaper than milk. “In a culture where families are busy, stressed, and often struggling to make ends meet, these things matter,” she says. Scott blames generous government subsidies for corn and soy production as one reason processed foods and drinks are so inexpensive. “Paradoxically, taxpayers have helped fund the production of the products now threatening our kids,” she says. Sugary Substitutes

“Sugar isn’t just called ‘sugar’ on food labels,” Scott says. “I’ve spent many an unpleasant hour

squinting at labels in the grocery store. Even if we all had PhDs in biochemistry and could identify all the compounds and their relative badness, who the heck has time for that?” Lazev says she has noticed SHIP students cutting down on sodas. The problem, though, is what she calls a “significant” increase in the consumption of other sugary drinks, like sports and fruit drinks. “I believe that many parents are not aware of just how much sugar is in sports drinks,” she says. Scott, who points to coffee and energy drinks as additional culprits, says switching kids from Coke to Gatorade isn’t helpful. Sugar, she says, “comes in many different forms with different properties.” The School's Role

Lazev says schools have an obligation to teach students about health and nutrition as part of Virginia’s Standards of Learning. “I believe that teaching students about health and nutrition happens not only in the classroom, but also in the cafeteria,” she says. “By providing healthy choices, students have the opportunity to directly apply what they have learned.”

thehealthjournals.com | 33


FOOD | FOOD & NUTRITION

The concern, despite such knowledge, is what students will pick when given the choice between a salad and a cheeseburger. Scott points out the public’s sensitivity to the “policing” of personal choice. “Schools and governments can’t tell people what to eat,” she says, “but they can support the creation of environments for kids, in schools and communities, where healthy choices are provided and supported.” Another issue at schools, Scott says, is budget-related. In the past, schools have entered into exclusive contracts with beverage companies—sometimes called “pouring rights”—in exchange for desperately needed funds. “That’s an indictment of our society at large, in my opinion, that schools are so poorly supported that they need to resort to these strategies,” Scott says. “Yes…Pepsi will sell well in the lunchroom, which will help keep operations funded, but at what cost?”

“People often think of health as things we need to do: diet, exercise, go to the doctor or dentist. To me, it’s ironic that not doing—not buying, not serving, not providing—sugary drinks to children can have such a positive, lasting effect on their health.” —Allison J. Brody, director of community resource development and engagement

Scott realizes the balance between individual rights and community well-being is “sticky” but says the problem must ultimately be solved on a community level, not an individual one. “You can purge your kitchen of sugary beverages and foods, but that only goes so far,” she says. “Kids live in communities, so we have to address these things as a community, both locally and nationally.”

Looking Ahead

Effective August 27, 2013, federal regulations imposed stricter limitations on beverages offered at schools participating in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. The regulations limit elementary and middle school students to water, milk, fruit juice and vegetable juice, and allow high school students caffeinated options with calorie restrictions.

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FOOD & NUTRITION | FOOD

Sugar Facts

SUGARY DRINKS IN SCHOOL:

67%

of eighth graders said they had access to sugary drinks at school.

30%

of those surveyed report puchasing sugary drinks

85%

of students surveyed drank sugar-sweetened beverages at least once per day

22%

prevalence of obesity in middle schoolers

$ TOTAL SUGAR YOUR DRINK CONTAINS: The American Heart Association guidelines state that children ages 4-8 should consume no more than 3 teaspoons of sugar per day, and teens & preteens no more than 5-8 teaspoons per day. 8oz glass of water

20 oz sports drink

20oz sweetend iced tea

20oz soft drink

*STATISTICAL DATA FROM AHELATHBLOG.COM, GUYSINGOODHEALTH.COM, LIVESCIENCE.COM

on kids and sugary drinks

= 1 teaspoon of sugar

NAMES FOR ADDED SUGARS: Dextrose, Glucose, Maltose, Galactose, Glucomalt, Maltodextrin, Agave, Diatase, Saccharose and Xylose.

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FOOD | FLAVOR

Black garlic.

W

hen you see it, it looks like garlic went on vacay. Its tanned skin and slightly crisper exterior mirrors that a of sunworshiping Floridian that says, “Just a little bit more.” And when it comes time to peel back the skin, it reveals a deep and mysterious looking gem that is delicate to the touch. So, as my husband and I stood in true "Raiders of the Lost Ark" fashion, we both tasted a clove. Rich, nutty, earthy, a bit sweet with a whisper of garlic flavor just to remind you what the heck you’re actually eating. Black garlic is one of those morphed ingredients that make you take a few steps back. I, like many of you, love and respect garlic. I’m talking about real garlic—not the powder that comes from a screw-on top but real garlic. You’re rolling you’re eyes. But if you’re too lazy to peel it, then as far as I’m concerned, you don’t deserve to use it.

WRITTEN BY KIMBERLEY CUACHON HAUGH

36 | thehealthjournals.com

Black garlic is the magnificent product of a 40-day process. The garlic is steamed and then placed in an airtight container in a low-heat oven. Humidity and temperature are varied during the process, and more steam is added. Some home chefs have argued that this process can be done at home. Other chefs say making black garlic at home is like trying to make your own caviar. The process originated in Asia. Koreans have perfected the art of fermentation, patiently coaxing everyday humble ingredients to be transported to an entirely different flavor dimension—kimchi. So, it’s not surprising that the origin of black garlic started in Korea. Like many things ancient and natural, you can bet that black garlic possesses some pretty wicked health benefits. In Thailand, it is thought to help people live longer. Studies have shown that the fermentation of black garlic basically turns it into a super garlic. The compound S-allylcysteine, a natural component of fresh garlic and a derivative of the amino acid cysteine, was found in much greater concentrations in black garlic and is thought to help lower cholesterol and decrease the risk of cancer, reports HealthMad.com. Garlic contains a biologically active component called allicin containing

antimicrobial, antibiotic and antifungal agents. In black garlic, S-allylcysteine assists with the absorption of allicin, helping it metabolize more easily, which could offer boosted protection against infections. High levels of antioxidants can be found in garlic. But twice the amount can be found in black garlic. Antioxidants protect the cells from disease and are thought to slow down the aging process—I guess the Thai people were right. Because black garlic is a powerhouse, the increased levels of antioxidants giving protection from free radical damage make it a super food for preventing chronic disease. Free radicals damage cells leading to heart disease, Alzheimer’s, circulatory problems, rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic diseases. Black garlic is a compelling gastronomical à la mode. I’ve seen it popping up more and more over the past few years being used in both Asian—try it with some ginger and rice wine vinegar—and Italian cooking—at home it’s my secret ingredient to my bolognaise sauce. But I also love it spread on top of a warm crusty piece of bread drizzled with good olive oil. Its earthy flavor profile makes it a natural pairing with wild mushrooms as well.


TASTE APPEAL | FOOD

Casablanca Fish Stew RECIPE BY CHEF IDRISS BENSASSI OF VERENA AT THE RESERVE This is a standard stew commonly made in Morocco and the fish can be substituted with other proteins sources such a beef, chicken or lamb. INGREDIENTS

RECIPE COURTESY OF THE AMBER LANTERN RESTAURANT Enjoy this savory and sweet dish made with a delectable garlic sauce, topped with a raspberry coulis. INGREDIENTS (1) 8 ounce salmon filet Cajun seasoning 3 tablespoons of butter 1 tablespoon of olive oil (do not use light olive oil) 1/2 tablespoon of fresh chopped garlic 1 teaspoon of fresh basil 1 teaspoon of fresh tarragon 1 teaspoon of fresh rosemary 1 teaspoon of fresh thyme 1 ounce of white wine 1 tablespoon of lemon juice 2 ounces of fresh raspberries* *if making your own raspberry coulis, see recipe below for correct amount 1 ounce of raspberry coulis (recipe to follow)

For Raspberry Coulis: 1/2 cup of sugar

MAKES 2 SERVINGS

PREPARATION • Dust the salmon filet with a pinch of Cajun seasoning. • Sear on medium high heat in 1 tablespoon of olive oil to desired texture (served best rare or medium rare)—move to a plate. Beurre Blanc Sauce: • Sautée 1 tablespoon of butter, chopped garlic, and fresh herbs on medium high heat until garlic is browned. • On medium high heat, deglaze the pan with 1 ounce of white wine and 1 tablespoon of lemon juice for one minute. • Add 2 tablespoons of butter, 1 ounce of raspberry coulis, and 2 ounces of fresh raspberries.

2 pounds firm white fish (or tuna)

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1 bundle of parsley, chopped

1 1/2 tablespoons. Spanish paprika

1/2 bundle cilantro, chopped

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

3 cloves of garlic 2 medium, diced tomatoes SNIP-SNIP! CUT ALONG THE LINE TO KEEP THIS RECIPE.

Black Garlic.

Pan-seared Salmon with Raspberry Beurre Blanc Sauce

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

1 green pepper, sliced julienne 5 large diced potatoes, yellow Yukon 3 carrots, sliced

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/2 cup green olives Dash of lemon juice 1/2 cup tomato sauce

1/2 teaspoon ground tumeric

PREPARATION • Cut fish into stew-sized cubes or strips. • Arrange all of the herbs and vegetables on the bottom of a medium-depth stock pot or dutch oven. • Place the pieces of fish on top of the vegetables.  • Sprinkle the dry seasonings, tomato sauce, lemon juice and olive oil over the entire dish. • Cover the pot and cook over medium heat for about 25 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. If you are using a different protein, you will need to adjust the cooking time accordingly.

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• Shake the pan until everything is mixed. Do not stir. • Pour over the salmon. Raspberry Coulis: • Heat the sugar and water in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring from time to time, until the sugar dissolves completely, about 5 minutes. • Put the raspberries and the sugar syrup in a blender and puree. Strain through a fine mesh sieve to remove the seeds.

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Spicy Tuna Cucumber Roll-Ups

RECIPE BY RELAY FOODS Ditch the carbs and try this tuna fish with a kick. Spicy sriracha sauce is balanced with a cool and refreshing cucumber wrap. It is a super quick, healthy and economical appetizer for your summer party, or enjoy as a light meal for lunch or dinner.

INGREDIENTS 10 ounces solid tuna fish in water, drained

2 tablespoons mayonnaise 1/2 teaspoon salt black pepper, to taste 1/2 cup scallion, chopped 2 cucumbers, thinly sliced lengthwise

PREPARATION • In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine drained tuna, sriracha, mayonnaise, salt, black pepper, and chopped scallion. • Using a very sharp knife, mandolin, or vegetable peeler cut cucumber vertically into long, thin strips. • Add about 1/2 tablespoon of the tuna salad on the end of a strip of cucumber, roll and secure with a toothpick if needed. Serve with a little soy sauce or sriracha and mayonnaise sauce for dipping. Kid-Friendly Prep Suggestions • Omit the sriracha sauce. Leftover Suggestions • This spicy tuna makes an amazing tuna melt the next day on sourdough bread. Next time try making these roll-ups with canned salmon for a new twist.

SNIP-SNIP! CUT ALONG THE LINE TO KEEP THIS RECIPE.

1 tablespoon sriracha sauce

MAKES 4 SERVIINGS • PREP: 20 MIN

Pan-seared Lane Snapper RECIPE BY EMBASSY SUITES This fall-themed dish features pan-seared snapper with golden beet and mission fig salad over saffron couscous—a flavorful weekend dinner. INGREDIENTS 7 ounce snapper (score skin side) 2 tablespoon olive oil Salt and pepper to taste

For Golden Beet and Mission Fig Salad: 1/2 cup golden beet (julienned) 1/2 cup radish (julienned) 1/4 cup parsnip (julienned) 1/2 cup fig (sliced) 1/4 cup pepitas 1/2 tablespoon fresh thyme 1 tablespoon cilantro

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MAKES 4–6 SERVINGS

PREPARATION • Pat fish dry and season both sides with salt and pepper. • Heat sautée pan on medium high. • Add olive oil. • Gently place snapper into skillet, moments before pan begins to smoke, skin side down. • Using a spatula, gently press down on the snapper for 30 seconds to prevent fish from arching. Cook for 2-4 minutes. • Flip fish over and cook for an additional 2-3 minutes or until fish is done. Golden Beet and Mission Fig Salad: • Combine vinegar, honey, herbs & juice in mixing bowl.

1 tablespoon olive oil

• While whisking, slowly emulsify oil into the mixture.

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

• Combine vegetables and figs in separate bowl.

1 tablespoon honey

• Pour dressing over vegetables anwd lightly toss.

Salt and pepper to taste

Saffron Couscous:

1 tablespoon orange juice

• Heat skillet on medium heat.

For Saffron Couscous:

• Add cranberry, sweet potato, stock, couscous and saffron.

1 cup par cooked pearl couscous 1 pinch saffron 1/2 cup chicken stock 1/2 cup heavy cream 1/2 cup dried cranberry 1/2 cup blanched sweet potato (diced) 1 cup baby Tuscan kale

• Reduce stock until almost evaporated, noticing the vibrant change in color of the pasta. • Add cream and kale. • Cook until tight consistency. Dish Assembly: • Mound couscous in center of the plate • Lay snapper fillet on top of couscous, skin side up, showing off that crispy seared skin • Top with beet salad


HOW TO CHOOSE THE

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SEAFOOD

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Rainbow Trout

Bay Scallops

Striped Bass

Oysters

Catfish

From the Wild Domestic Mahi-Mahi

Spiny & Maine Lobster

Domestic Crayfish

Anchovies

Atlantic Herring

Mussels

Clams

Pacific Cod

Dungeness & Snow Crab

Squid

From the Wild Wild Atlantic Salmon (canned or fresh) Domestic Shrimp (farmed or wild)

Watch Out for These Fish

These species face severe overfishing and/or may contain high levels of contaminants.

Bluefin Tuna Albacore Tuna Chilean Sea Bass Eel

Call for an appointment today!

Halibut, Flounder, Sole King Mackerel Atlantic Salmon

Here’s what to ask about your seafood before purchasing at the store or ordering from the menu. Opt for domestic over imported, both for How is it farmed? safety and sustainability. Choose USDA-farmed fish. Opt for a low-/ Is it caught or no-output recirculating farmed locally? system if possible. Locally caught fish are usually safer to eat (and often fresher)!

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YOUR HEALTH | YOGANATOMY

Shoulderstand

sanskrit: Salamba Sarvangasana ❥ WRITTEN BY SAPTA YIN, ACSM, RYT 200

❥ PHOTO BY BRIAN FREER

ready? Begin lying down—palms open—observing the current of your breath. With an inhale, press your lower back into the ground to raise your legs straight over your hips. With your next exhale, begin to raise your hips off the floor to bring your legs over your head. Your toes will end pointing towards the floor. Your back is lifted off the floor at this point, body supported by shoulders pressing into the ground. With your elbows shoulder-width apart, bend them to place your hands at your lower back— fingers pointing towards hips. Take an inhale to prepare, exhale, bending your knees into your chest to press the legs straight over the hips. Hug the abdominals up and underneath the ribcage. Imagine a string lifting your hips towards the sky. Squeeze your inner thighs together. Breathe deeply and slowly, rolling one vertebra at a time out of the pose when ready.

Body line Shoulders, hips and ankles will create a straight line when core is activated

Core Hug glutes and abdominals to your hipbone—lifting the toes toward the sky

Elbows

Back

Shoulder-width apart, upper arms actively pressing against the ground

Try to lift the upper spine off the floor by pressing from your tripod base

40 | thehealthjournals.com


Pick up a FREE copy of The Health Journal at any of these Williamsburg locations. 4808 Courthouse Street Agape Home Care, LLC Ageless Dermatology & Laser Center Allergy Partners of Eastern Virginia Alzheimer’s Association American Family Fitness Aromas Coffeehouse B-Defined BAEPLEX Family Martial Arts Center Barnes & Noble Booksellers – New Town Benefits Personal Training Berrybody Frozen Yogurt Bike Beat Body Balance Studio Books-A-Million / Joe Muggs Coffee Buggy Bathe Auto Wash Cardiovascular Health CEALH Chambrel Child Development Resources CHKD - Pediatric Associates of Williamsburg City of Williamsburg Municipal Building Cloud 9 Bodywork Cogan’s Deli & Sports Pub College of William & Mary Bookstore College of William & Mary Health Clinic College of William & Mary Recreation Center Colonial Behavioral Health Colonial Center for Hearing Colonial Family Medicine Colonial Sports Comber Physical Therapy Comfort Keepers Conte’s Bike Shop CORE FITNESS / PEAK Physical Therapy Cullom Eye & Laser Center Dominion Village Eye Center of Virginia Family Living Institute Food Lion – select locations GNC - Monticello Marketplace Great Clips Hampton Roads Neuromuscular & Aesthetic Dentistry Heritage Commons Historic Triangle Dental Care Hospice House and Support Care Integrative Chiropractic Ironbound Gym James A. Burden DDS James City County Public Library

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YOUR HEALTH | FITNESS

CHISEL THAT

CHEST WRITTEN BY L. D’SHAWN WRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRANDON FREER

E

veryone loves a well-defined chest. Since the days of Arnold Schwarzenegger the chest has been revered. The question of how much can you bench is timeless. Made up of upper, middle and lower pecs, the chest—with proper training—can be a showcase for men or women.

Here is a workout Comprised of 19 total sets to improve your pecs and build that centerpiece. FLY Machine

•  Lower the seat to isolate the upper chest. Complete 4 sets of 12-15 reps

42 | thehealthjournals.com

INCline Bar Bell Press

•  Lower the barbell just beneath your chin. •  Pause, and then drive the weight up making sure to not lock your elbows when you fully extend. Complete 4 sets of 12-15 reps

Dumbbell Bench Press

•  With feet flat on the floor, lift the bar and lower it to your center chest. •  Pause, and extend the weights upward completing the rep. Complete 4 sets of 12-15 reps


Wide Chest Press

yourself

FEEL LIKE ati ebr ng

25

cel

•  Position the chair aligning handles at your chest line. •  Extend arms, squeezing at the top of the movement. •  Lower using controlled movements. Complete 4 sets of 12-15 reps

AG A I N !

ye a rs

Incline dumbBell flys •  On an inclined bench, open arms wide bending at the elbow at 45 degrees. •  Maintain form, bringing dumbbells together to create a “circle.” •  Pause, slowly lower arms back to open 45-degree position •  Repeat. Complete 3 sets of 12-15 reps

Dr. Robert Pinto Dr. Anne Pinto | Dr. Kenneth Boecker Schedule a consultation today, call 757.645.9353

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CELEBRATING

10

flat DumbBell Flys •  On a flat bench, open arms wide bending at the elbow at 45 degrees. •  Maintain form, bringing dumbbells together to create a “circle.” •  Pause, slowly lower arms back to open 45-degree position. Repeat. Complete 3 sets of 12-15 reps

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YOUR HEALTH | FAMILY

ARE KIDS

OVERSCHEDULED? WRITTEN BY SUSAN SMIGIELSKI ACKER

M

y middle school-aged daughter asked if she could have a classmate over after school one day. I told her sure and suggested a couple of days. My daughter responded, “She told me she can only come over on Tuesdays because that is her day off.” My daughter proceeded to tell me that the girl was in three activities after school four days a week and on runs to two of them on Saturdays. “She does field hockey, takes piano lessons and does karate,” my daughter says. “Wow! When does she eat?” I jokingly ask, wondering how her parents afford all that. “She says she eats a lot in the car. Her favorite is Taco Bell,” my daughter replies.

44 | thehealthjournals.com

WHAT OVERSCHEDULING LOOKS LIKE This child could be considered overscheduled, says Dr. Velma Bacek, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at Churchland Psychiatry Associates in Portsmouth, Virginia. By definition, an overscheduled child could have one activity outside of school that is five or six days a week for several hours. Bacek says the typical parents of an overscheduled child are frequently middle class and married. “They feel if their child is not doing something it is problematic,” she says, adding, “Children, like adults, need some downtime. It is okay to be bored. Everyone needs some time just to walk in the park and look around. “Boredom is okay because it allows children time to write or draw or even just make a birthday card,” Bacek says. “When they are overscheduled, they don’t have a chance to be creative,” Bacek adds.


FAMILY | YOUR HEALTH

THRIVING OR PLEASING? Michelle Pryon, a parent educator, says some children might thrive in this environment, but it could also be overwhelming. In addition to the stress of running from one activity to another, stress can be from the child not wanting to disappoint the parent. “It depends on the child,” Pryon says. “Many times it can cause stress. The child may not want to tell their parents that they do not like a certain activity.”

RECENT STUDIES SHOW THAT 40 TO 50 PERCENT OF CHILDREN HAVE ABOUT FOUR TO FIVE HOURS A WEEK OF AFTER-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES, WHILE LESS THAN 6 PERCENT ARE DOING MORE THAN 20 HOURS A WEEK Pryon believes that some parents feel they must provide a lot of opportunities for their child to succeed, but encourages parents to consider why they want their child in so many activities. “There are

those [parents] that are living vicariously through their kids,” she says. “Maybe they always wanted to be the best swimmer.” In addition, Bacek says a stress factor for parents is transporting their child each afternoon to the activities.

A CASE FOR ACTIVE CHILDHOOD Dr. James Paulson, a practicing clinical child and adolescent psychologist and associate professor at Old Dominion University, counters that some children might enjoy being busy. Using himself as an example, Paulson says, “I manage a practice and manage being here at the university. I am really happy despite being very busy.” Recent studies show that 40 to 50 percent of children have about four to five hours a week of after-school activities, while less than 6 percent are doing more than 20 hours a week, Paulson says. Many children do well in school when involved in an activity after school, Paulson adds. “What is most important is that children are doing an activity that they want not something the parent wants. Just like adults, children will do better at an activity they enjoy,” Paulson says. However, Paulson says parents should be concerned if the child shows signs of anxiety and schoolwork suffers. “Parents need to ask themselves, is there plenty of time for homework? Is the child getting enough sleep? Are other family members negatively affected? Is getting to the activities creating tension and stress? If there are problems with those, then it is time to reconsider the activities,” he says.

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YOUR HEALTH | OUTDOORS

UP A

CREEK

Stand Up Paddleboarding is among fastest growing recreational sports in U.S. WRITTEN BY MATT SABO

D

itch the cubicle.

If you need some relief from the office or cubicle and want to workout, but don’t want to hit the gym, try hitting the water with a paddleboard. Stand up paddleboarding is a sport that may not be in its infancy— it’s traced back thousands of years to ancient cultures of Africa, South America and Polynesia, after all—but just might be in the toddler stage in terms of its popularity. It’s among the fastest-growing outdoor and recreation sports in America over the past decade and in addition to the benefits of exercise that works multiple muscle groups, paddleboarding can be an enchanting, adventurous way to work out in a natural environment. According to the Outdoor Federation’s 2014 Outdoor Recreation Participation Topline Report, stand up paddleboarding topped the nation’s trending activities segment, with a one-year increase in participation of 29 percent. That topped kayak fishing, whitewater kayaking and trail running for the highest one-year percentage increase. Over the past three years, participation in stand up paddleboarding has shot up 24 percent, according to the Outdoor Federation report. The sport burst onto the recreation sports scene around 2005 and has grown exponentially, nearly doubling in participation since 2010 with about 2 million participants, according to the report.

The Benefits of Stand Up Paddleboarding The physical benefits of stand up paddleboarding are many. In addition to improving balance, stand up paddleboarders can achieve improved cardiovascular endurance, says Elena Black, PT, DPT, a physical therapist at Tidewater Physical Therapy’s First Colonial Clinic in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Black recommends stand up paddleboarding because it is a low-impact, full-body workout since 46 | thehealthjournals.com


OUTDOORS | YOUR HEALTH

the legs are constantly working to maintain balance on the board and the arms, back and shoulder girdle are worked with each stroke. The body’s “core stabilizers”—muscles in the trunk, hips and shoulders that keep everything in place while the body is moving—work throughout the activity in an effort to maintain balance as well as an upright posture on the board, she says. Paddleboarding can also be used as an alternative exercise to incorporate into cross-training for athletes such as runners. Not to mention, paddleboarding can be a calorie-burner that reduces the impacts on the body’s joints and ligaments unlike running, when you may literally be pounding the pavement or sidewalk. “It’s a low-impact exercise in comparison to contact sports, and it’s a stress reducer,” Black says.

Exercises for Preparation

Like any exercise, there are a number of ways to prepare for paddleboarding that both enhances your body’s ability to undertake the sport and prepares you to be successful at it. Specifically, Black recommends a number of exercises to prepare or train for paddleboarding, including incorporate a BOSU ball—a fitness training device that promotes balance and strength training—and pushups. Other exercises recommended by Black to prepare for stand up paddleboarding include: • lat pull-downs • squat row • rotational chop • planks • side planks

Getting Started

Here are a few companies offering SUP sales, rentals and/or tours: • Peninsula Paddle Co. in Williamsburg. Call 888-325-5955 • Beach Echo Tours in Virginia Beach. Call 757-754-8382 • Chesapeake Outdoors in Virginia Beach. Call 757-961-0447 • East Coast Paddleboards in Virginia Beach. Call 757-426-4878 • Happy Winds Kitesurfing in Virginia Beach. Call 757-705-1743 • Surf & Adventure Co. in Virginia Beach. Call 757-721-6210 • SUP Barre in Virginia Beach. Call 757-621-1080 • The Virginia Beach Paddleboard Co. in Virginia Beach. Call 757-572-9157 • CXB Paddle Company in Virginia Beach. Call 757-323-0201 • Rudee Inlet Stand Up Paddle in Virginia Beach. Call 757-343-3560 • Great White Water Sports in Norfolk. Call 757-656-3577 • Tula Adventure Sports in Virginia Beach. Call 757-502-8852

TPMG Nephrology Welcomes

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YOUR HEALTH | AGING WELL

BIG TALK

the

End-of-Life Discussions WRITTEN BY DR. DANIEL SHAYE

H

appily retired, my parents were focused on travel, hobbies and grandchildren. Death and incapacity were unattractive topics of discussion; but I knew we had to address them, or wait until a far worse time. It took about a year of convincing, but they began to see the need after this conversation: Me: “I don’t know what your wishes are when you die. I want to do whatever you want.” Parent: “It’s all in the will. You’re our executor, by the way.” Me: “Where’s the will?” Parent: “In the safe deposit box.” Me: “Where’s the safe deposit box?” Parent (exasperated): “At the bank, of course! And our attorney knows all this.” Me: “Um…which bank? What attorney?” Over several meetings, we opened up; and they named the process “Life Wishes.” Here are some key points of discussion for your “Big Talk.”

LOCATE THE KEYS I’m not just talking about physical keys to a safe deposit box (and rights to access it), but passwords, too. If your loved ones use 48 | thehealthjournals.com

computers or accounting software, be sure you can get in.

INVENTORY MAJOR ASSETS AND LIABILITIES Who holds the mortgage? Is there a life insurance policy? Stocks? Who will bear funeral costs? Are there other financial details you’ll need to know? Probe gently, without greed. Ask in love, and respect boundaries.

MAKE A LIST OF “WHO GETS WHAT” Decide who gets the silverware and that old painting of…well, whoever that is. Have them make a list. My parents’ list is in their safe deposit box.

DISCUSS POWER OF ATTORNEY AND LIVING WILLS What are their wishes for tube feeding, DNR, other medical decisions? How can you prepare for a senile parent, and have a legal leg (document) to stand on? If a will exists, know the executor. If these documents do not exist (an estimated 50 percent of Americans die without a will), rectify that.

DISCUSS LONG-TERM CARE I asked my parents to research insurance coverage and costs. Whether or not they decided to purchase wasn’t my call, but at least they got to make an informed decision.

DISCUSS THE NITTY GRITTY Do they wish to be cremated? Would they like to purchase a plot (or two)? Do they want a ceremony? Who pays for this? Note: I discovered that you could pick headstone wording in advance—even the font!

ROLL WITH IT Your loved ones are going to have unique ideas. Example: “Whatever you do, don’t put this in a computer.” Keeping track of a physical file or scribble-filled napkin may be inconvenient, but you need to be flexible. It’s a difficult topic, and you don’t want to lose momentum. By planning for the inevitable, we can make the transitions a little less bumpy.


AGING WELL | YOUR HEALTH

REASONS TO AVOID THE TALK: Overcoming Parental Objections

Objection: “I don’t want to deal with this.”

Response: “I understand. It’s not a fun topic. Let’s have a brief conversation so we don’t need to do this again.”

Objection: “We’re healthy.” Response: “Exactly. Let’s do this without added burdens of physical or mental incapacity.”

Objection: “We’ll deal with this when the time comes.” Response: “That may be a tough time. I want to be sure everything you want happens according to your wishes. Can we start by having lunch, and seeing if my understanding matches what you want?”

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YOUR HEALTH | MONEY

How Does Social Security Fit Into My Retirement Plan? WRITTEN BY KELSEY HINTON

$

R

etirement as Americans know it is retiring. With workers transitioning from a system of defined benefits, i.e. pensions, to one of defined contributions like 401(k)s and IRAs, the burden of retirement planning is shifting more and more heavily to the individual—but has this demand for personal responsibility translated to meaningful action? Social Security benefits constituted the only retirement savings for nearly a third of non-retirees who responded to a survey conducted for the Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2014, including 25 percent of respondents age 60 and older who reported no retirement savings outside of Social Security benefits. While about 65 percent of respondents said they expected Social Security as a source of retirement income, 39 percent of non-retirees reported giving little or no thought to financial planning for retirement. Although intentionally simple, however, Social Security poses unique questions worthy of thoughtful consideration.

Common Questions

“When to start taking Social Security is a big question and varies with each individual and their situation,” says Dick Besnier, investment advisor representative and president of Besnier Financial Group, Inc. in Williamsburg, Virginia. “I try and get people to delay taking Social Security unless they have no other source and need the income.”   Jayne Di Vincenzo, president of Lions Bridge Financial Advisors in Newport News, Virginia, agrees with delaying as long as possible. “The break-even point is living to 80 for most beneficiaries,” she says. “If you have longevity in your family, are in good health and have other sources of income to meet your needs, delay taking benefits if you can wait.” Spousal benefits are another concern and tie into deciding when to collect, says Besnier. The main reason he encourages delaying collecting as long as possible, he says, is to maximize the benefit of the surviving spouse. One strategy, which Besnier cautions is not appropriate for everyone, is filing and suspending when both spouses reach their respective full retirement age, which varies based on year born. This enables the couple to receive half of their larger benefit while accumulating delayed retirement credits until age 70. 50 | thehealthjournals.com

Collecting Early Collecting benefits early may be appropriate in some cases, according to John Pawlowski, president of Norseman Advisory Group Inc. in Newport News, Virginia. “If you need it to retire, your health isn’t great, you hate your boss or your job, or any other reason you feel is important, you paid into it and you earned the benefit,” he says. “Take it when you need to.” However, Pawlowski warns that you should be aware of benefits you may sacrifice when collecting early, especially if married. “If you are the higher wage earner, and you are married, remember you are making a decision for both you and your spouse with regard to survivor benefits,” he says, explaining that the surviving spouse receives the higher of the couple’s benefits.

$

“be aware of benefits you may sacrifice when collecting early”


the NUMBERS Numbers BYByTHE

34%

of the workforce has no savings set aside specifically for retirement.

9 out of 10 individuals age 65 and older receive Social Security benefits.

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TPMG Williamsburg Urology Welcomes

TPMG Rheumatology Welcomes

Joseph R. Habibi, M.D.

Ivan A. Marchena, M.D. Dr. Geoffrey B. Kostiner is pleased to welcome Dr. Joseph R. Habibi to our practice. Dr. Habibi received his undergraduate degree in Chemistry at University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, and his Doctorate of Medicine degree at Virginia Commonwealth University. He completed an Internship in General Surgery and Residency in Urology through Virginia Commonwealth University.

Age-based Expectations

Survey findings from the Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2014 may indicate concern over the longterm efficacy of the Social Security program among younger Americans; 92 percent of respondents age 60 and older anticipated Social Security benefits as retirement income compared to 44 percent of respondents age 30 and younger. Whether this indicates younger non-retirees think less actively about Social Security than their older cohorts or represents concern over the program’s future solvency is unclear, the report noted, though Besnier said he believes younger workers are troubled. “Unfortunately, the people in that age group don’t feel confident that [Social Security] will be around,” says Besnier. “I do recognize there are concerns, but I truly believe adjustments will be made to make sure the program continues.” Pawlowski shares Besnier’s optimism, saying he believes Social Security benefits will be “an integral part of our American retirement culture well into the future.”

Joining:

Dr. Habibi provides general urologic care including robotic surgery. TPMG welcomed Dr. Habibi to TPMG Williamsburg Urology in September 2015. He is accepting new patients and welcomes them to call today and reserve an appointment with him.

Geoffrey B. Kostiner, M.D.

TPMG Williamsburg Urology Tidewater Medical Center at New Town 5424 Discovery Park Blvd., Bldg. B, Suite 203 Williamsburg, VA 23188

Call (757) 345-6223

to schedule an appointment today.

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YOUR HEALTH | MIND MATTERS

Music & Young Minds

THE EFFECT OF MUSICAL TRAINING ON THE COGNITIVE ABILITY IN YOUTH

F

or years the scientific community has been looking for a link between musical training and improved cognitive ability. Studies considered groundbreaking in the past have subsequently been accepted and refuted by experts. “The earlier you start the better,” Darcey Powell, assistant professor of psychology at Virginia’s Roanoke College, says. “We believe it is more impacting in the areas of musical self-discipline and diligence.” “It’s clear that 3- and 4-year-olds are quite able to be actively involved in music,” Professor Walter Dowling, at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, says. “Kids are beginning to understand how a scale is put together. By 5 or 6, they can make out the difference between major and minor scales.” Christine Weber, Ph.D., clinical neuropsychologist on Long Island, New York, believes there is a period when children are more sensitive to music’s effects on the brain. Changing the brain’s architecture is much easier for children than adults. “During sensitive periods, neural circuits are being reinforced and becoming relatively stable,” Dr. Weber says. “Children engaged in a repetitive activity are altering neural circuits, reinforcing some while pruning others.” Judith Muir, director of programs at The 52 | thehealthjournals.com

WRITTEN BY CATHY WELCH

Institute for Music and Health in Hudson Valley, New York, founded by John Diamond, M.D., is a world authority on the arts for well-being. She begins working with children as young as 3 to make and learn music in a minimally stressful way. Muir says, “I do activities that last two or three minutes. They go on to develop a larger repertoire of songs.” Joanne Lara, M.A., author of “Autism Movement Therapy Method: Waking up the Brain,” agrees that a child’s first experience with music should be simple. “If you take a brain that’s not used to music and present information that’s not too complicated, the brain can process it without shutting down,” she explains. Lara uses specially-selected music without lyrics that scaffolds on each other to introduce movement. She feels this honors the brain. Researchers have studied the effects of various musical genres on cognitive ability. In 1993, “The Mozart Effect” study at the University of California/Irvine exposed college students to Mozart selections, a relaxation tape or silence. Spatial reasoning tests conducted immediately after their sessions showed the subjects who listened to Mozart had improved memory for about 10 to 15 minutes following their session. Follow-up studies have led experts to refute these results.

“What’s good for children is that it should be music they can get into doing themselves,” Professor Dowling explains. “Whatever kind of music their culture/subculture provides them is going to be good for that. I think people have largely given up looking for specific effects of specific kinds of music, though not all have.” According to Dr. Weber, participating in music utilizes auditory, visual and tactile inputs—all vital to cognitive processing. “Children who participate in musical activities are engaged in active learning that can lead to changes in brain structure and neuronal enhancement,” she says.

Right Brain versus Left Brain “Our brain has a right hemisphere and left hemisphere,” Dr. Julia Kim, clinical psychologist for the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City/Manhattan, says. “Learning music uses both sides of the brain. The right hemisphere controls our hearing and emotional expression of music. The left hemisphere works to understand the musical structure which is more analytical. “Individuals with autism have a splintered skill set,” Lara says, having taught hundreds of autistic children in Los Angeles, California, and around the world. “We have kids with


MIND MATTERS | YOUR HEALTH

autism who can’t talk, but can sing. If you have a neurological deficit and it manifests in speech and language impairment, you know the left side of the brain has some kind of a big issue going on.” Learning to play an instrument requires the coordination of sensory skills and higher-order thinking,” Weber explains. “It’s learning to fluidly convert visual and auditory information into tactile information. Notes on a page are processed visually and associated with a particular sound produced by the coordination of the hands with the instrument.” Experts agree that there are a multitude of benefits to be gained from early musical instruction. “Distinguishing sounds is important in learning a new language,” Weber says. “Participation in music is thought to improve this ability.” Dr. Nina Kraus at Northwestern University and Brain Volts Lab in Illinois has identified some brain changes known as “The Signature of Poverty” according to Jean Lachowicz, executive director of The Spirit of Harmony Foundation begun by musician Todd Rundgren’s fans to support the moral imperative of musical education. “This is when a mother has a certain number

of words in her vocabulary. That translates to poverty in the child’s brain, creating a far less level playing field,” Lachowicz, who has worked with Kraus, explains. Kraus’ research found that two years of real music education erased this deficit for a lifetime. Another of music’s benefits to the brain is enhanced neuroplasticity. “What you’re talking about is changes in the brain,” Kim explains. “If you have someone who loses their eyesight, their hearing improves. That’s neuroplasticity.” Lara says, “With neuroplasticity, once we start asking the brain to step up, it can. It’s the age of the brain.” Research indicates musical training can improve a student’s school attendance and increases the likelihood of graduation. “Music students have fewer absences than children who do not participate in music activities,” Weber says. “Music makes school more fun,” Dowling explains. “It leads to improved grades. Musical training provides emotional support which leads to healthy trends in personality.” “If your life energy is high, then the decisions you make become more positive,” Muir explains of her institute’s work. “Music is the mother, so the evolutionary purpose of

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singing, and therefore music, is to comfort the child and strengthen the bond which enhances brain development.” Muir believes that individuals who share their music with others achieve a lasting internal foundation. “Kids stay out of trouble,” she explains. “They know this sharing is important and are forever changed by that. Emphasis on the arts in North American public schools is dwindling. Lara says, “What the people making these decisions don’t understand is that the bridge to academics is through movement and music.” “We have a strong network of committed people around the world who love and want to support music,” Lachowicz says of the Spirit of Harmony Foundation. “Music is being cut. We want to help reverse this trend.” Experts agree that the integration of musical training to improve cognitive ability in children is a two-way street. “As far as we can tell, the causal arrows go both ways,” Dowling says. “The two complement one another. It’s usually the kids who are more cognitively advanced who want to participate in learning music and go further with it.”


YOUR HEALTH | HEALTHY COMMUTE

DRIVEN TO

R E G N A THE PSYCHO-DRAMA OF ROAD RAGE WRITTEN BY MIKE VERANO

I

f you’ve spent any time on our local highways and busy streets, you’ve most likely been annoyed with the occupants of the vehicles streaming past you, or frustrated with those standing still in a long line ahead of you. You may have also noticed your chest tightening and your knuckles turning white from your fingernails digging into the steering wheel. And, if you’re like me, you may have on more than one occasion heard the famous line from the philosopher Sartre in your head, “Hell is other people,” with the added, “and none of them know how to drive.” With alarming regularity, these thoughts often leak out and become words and gestures. When the anger switch is turned on, and the rationality switch turned off, we end up with the drama known as road rage. So common is our contact with angry drivers that a recent AAA Foundation survey found that eight out of 10 drivers rank aggressive driving as a “serious” or “extremely serious” risk that jeopardizes their safety. Who are these folks who see their vehicles as a means for delivering their tension to a road-weary world? Is road rage a psychological condition or a symptom of a culture desperately 54 | thehealthjournals.com

in need of a rest stop? Finally, is there anything we can do to protect ourselves from having our own vehicular temper tantrums? One of the common psychological explanations for road rage is that the driver suffers from intermittent explosive disorder, or IED. IED is characterized by explosive outbursts of anger that are disproportionate to whatever is happening. This disorder has a lot in common with the military IED (improvised explosive device) in that you never know when you might run into one and the damage can be quite extensive. While there are surely ticking time bombs cruising our highways, IED cannot explain why a growing number of sane and rational people get behind the wheel and experience emotional meltdowns. It’s more likely that many people are buckling up for a daily ride into the eye of a perfect stress storm without carrying their emotional repair kits with them. The average daily commute has us sitting strapped into a small space with these known stressors as our passengers: lack of control, excessive worry, being late and multitasking—all potential life-threatening circumstances.

“The average daily commute has us sitting strapped into a small space with these known stressors as our passengers: lack of control, excessive worry, being late, and multi-tasking­— all potentially life-threatening circumstances.”

Add the fact that both adrenaline and the stress hormone cortisol are cruising through our neuropathways, and it’s no wonder that sanity is often the first thing thrown out the window. If stress is what fuels road rage, what is needed is an emotional/mental tuneup to make sure that we’re not heading for a nervous breakdown. In the absence of having devices installed in vehicles that require drivers to pass sanity tests before heading out, we’re going to have to grab the wheel and take responsibility for ourselves.


HEALTHY COMMUTE | YOUR HEALTH

HERE ARE SOME POINTERS TO CHECK ON YOUR INNER STATE BEFORE HITTING THE INTERSTATE:

Don’t Drive Angry

1. Don’t drive angry: Check your personal temperature gauge before starting. If it’s in the red, take a moment to breathe and relax your body.

Check the Pressure

2. Check the pressure: How much stress is in your life currently? If you’re over-inflated you run the risk of a blowout. You might want to make your next destination a therapist’s office.

SWITCH FUEL SOURCES

TURN ON GPS JOIN AAA FILL ‘ER UP PUT ON THE BRAKES

3. Switch to alternate fuel sources: Super-charged energy drinks may make you feel like a “go-getter” on the job, but in the car you run the risk of becoming the hyperactive child stuffed into his desk seat while the teacher pleads with him to sit still. You’re just turbo-charging your stress response.

4. Turn on your GPS (Generating Positive States): Monitor the negative traffic in your head and replace it with a personal mantra that steers you toward your “Happy Place.”

5. Join AAA: Pay Attention to what you’re doing, be Aware of others and Accept that the real meaning of life is the journey not the destination.

6. Fill ‘er up: Go ahead and turn you vehicle into a sacred space. Put calming music on, place meaningful mementos on your dashboard; fill it with relaxing aromas. You just might find everyone wanting to carpool with you.

7. Put on the brakes: Before getting out of your car to confront another driver, take a break from the movie in your head, which has you starring as the road warrior out for justice, and replace it with the scene where you have to explain to the judge why jail time will be bad for your career.

While there will always be times when rage strikes on the roadways—let’s face it, even angry people need to get places—we can make our local streets safer and saner. If everyone who gets behind the wheel remembers the first golden rule of safe driving, “Drive around others the way you would have others drive around you,” we may not only arrive in one piece, but with peace of mind as well. thehealthjournals.com | 55


EXTRA | COOKING UP CHARITY

Cooking Up

Charity

Cooking Up Annual Chefs Auction Returns to Williamsburg WRITTEN BY ALEXANDRIA GRYDER PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN FREER

Charity Annual Chef’s Auction Returns to Williamsburg

S

omething savory is coming to Williamsburg, Virginia, on Sunday, November 1. The March of Dimes 2015 Signature Chefs Auction will take place at Doubletree by Hilton and will feature fine food from local celebrity chefs, wine and an auction to support and benefit the March of Dimes. The March of Dimes is a non-profit organization that was founded in 1938 by President Franklin Roosevelt to combat polio and has since been known for promoting the general health of pregnant women and their babies. The March of Dimes’ mission was to develop a vaccine for polio and to make sure the vaccine was made available worldwide. “We are also the only non-profit to reach their mission,” says Nicole Burn, senior community director for the Virginia March of Dimes Chapter. Burn, who previously worked for Reader’s Digest as the regional sales manager in its fundraising division, has been with the March of Dimes since March of 2010. She believes the Chefs Auction is a way for the community to not only support each other but also support the organization itself. Guests will have the opportunity to bid on wine, travel, entertainment, hotel stays and vacation getaways. “The March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction is a premier culinary gala,” says Burn, “and guests get to enjoy signature dishes from local award-winning chefs. There is also a judging competition as well as an established panel, and it’s wonderful to see your local chefs competing.” There will also be a silent auction that will offer one-of-a-kind packages put together by your favorite chef and includes private parties, wine dinners and spa days paired with dinners. “100 percent of the money raised supports our mission of giving every child a healthy start in life,” says Burn. The participating chefs include Chef Nelson Miller of Silt, Chef Tim Westby-Gibson of Prime 46Forty, Chef Frank Lang of Great Wolf Lodge,

56 | thehealthjournals.com

Chef Mark Florimonte of Fords Colony Country Club, Chef Aaron Guzik of Opus 9, Chef Richard Carr of Berret’s Seafood & Taphouse Grill, Chef Kelvin Moore of Doubletree by Hilton, Chef Kyle Fowlkes of Embassy Suites Hotel & Conference Center, Chef Stephen Losee of William & Mary Catering and Chef Justin Addison of Colonial Williamsburg. The chefs will compete for two awards during the event: the “Dish of the Colonial Peninsula” and the “Sustainable Organic Local” award. The chefs are keeping quiet about their signature pieces, but guests can expect creative, culinary dishes. “We’ve learned that when talented chefs compete, the sky is the limit,” says Burn. “We’ve had dishes that feature scallops, fresh rockfish, prime beef and more. Their dessert dishes are tempting and beautiful and some of our chefs will create signature cocktails for sampling.” Burn created the Signature Chefs Auction in November of 2011. She was able to build a firm and reliable committee and has continued to have great relationships with the chefs who participate in the event.


Meet the Chefs The Waypoint Way

Chef Nelson Miller Silt

Lassen Sie uns feiern! LET’S CELEBRATE!

It’s Oktoberfest time at Waypoint Seafood & Grill. Chef Kyle Fowlkes Embassy Suites & Conference Center

Join us throughout October for lunch and dinner, featuring our annual Oktoberfest menu. Oktoberfest menu runs September 29 through November 1. Special Occasions | Business Meetings | Retreats | Parties | Family Gatherings | Holidays 1480 Quarterpath Road | Next to Harris Teeter | Williamsburg, VA | 757.220.2228 | www.WaypointGrill.com

Chef Stephen Losee William & Mary Catering

Chef Justin Addison Colonial Williamsburg

She says she loves working with her committee of talented business leaders in Williamsburg; they work together yearround to make this event special. “The moment that truly ‘brings it together’ for me is when our local ambassadors speak,” says Burn. “When they take the stage and share their stories, we are reminded that though we are enjoying an amazing night, we are raising funds so that every child is born healthy.” YOU CAN FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE PARTICIPATING CHEFS AND THE EVENT AT:

HRSIGCHEF.COM

HOME HEALTH

GIFT SHOP

POST OFFICE

240 McLaws Circle Suite 147 (Next to Starbucks) Williamsburg, VA 23185

PRESCRIPTIONS

MOBILE

(757) 229-1041 WILLIAMSBURGDRUG.COM


AUDIOLOGY special advertising section

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS are you looking for a provider? Our featured providers are committed to serving the community with the highest-quality health care.

Jude Liptak, Au.D.

Tom Batir

Russian Therapeutic & Sports Massage Tom Batir is a certified massage therapist with a vast knowledge of Russian therapeutic and sport massage, having been a massage therapist in his native country. He attended Soma Institute of Clinical Massage in Chicago, Illinois, thereafter working with chiropractors and physical therapists before moving to Williamsburg, Virginia. He is accredited by the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork. Batir is an expert in pain management and recovery specializing in therapeutic massage, deep tissue, myofascial, trigger point release, sports and Swedish massage.

Russian Therapeutic & Sports Massage

1761 Jamestown Road, Suite 103 A Williamsburg, VA 23185 (434) 229-1855

www.russiantherapeuticsportsmassage.com

Brent Segeleon, O.D.

Colonial Center for Hearing

Colonial Eye Care

Dr. Jude Liptak holds a doctorate degree in Audiology from Salus University. He completed his undergraduate and master’s programs at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Audiology and a member of the Academy of Doctors of Audiology. Dr. Liptak has been practicing audiology since 2000. As a board-certified audiologist and expert, he has helped thousands of people rediscover the joys of healthy hearing. In 2003, he founded Colonial Center for Hearing, a state-of-the-art audiology practice, located in McLaws Circle in Williamsburg, Virginia. Dr. Liptak is passionate about patient care and believes in educating patients about his findings so that they understand their hearing loss and his course of treatment. To Dr. Liptak, you are not just a patient— you are an individual with a hearing situation that requires prompt attention.

Dr. Brent Segeleon, owner of Colonial Eye Care, is a graduate of Gannon University and received his doctor of optometry degree from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry in 2005. He is proficient in comprehensive optometry, including the diagnosis and management of ocular diseases, as well as low vision. Dr. Segeleon has experience in fitting simple and complex contact lenses for complicated, diseased and post-surgical corneas. Dr. Segeleon is a member of the American Optometric Association, Virginia Optometric Association and vice president of the Tidewater Optometric Society. In 2013, the Virginia Optometric Association named him Young Optometrist of the Year. Originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Dr. Segeleon calls Williamsburg home. He lives here with his wife, Brooke, and daughter, Gwen. He enjoys sponsoring the Williamsburg Youth Baseball League and working with William & Mary athletes. When not in the office, you can find him training for an upcoming triathlon or mountain biking on Williamsburg’s fantastic trails.

Colonial Center for Hearing

Colonial Eye Care

430 McLaws Circle, Suite 101 Williamsburg, VA 23185 (757) 229-4004

www.williamsburghears.com

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

OPTOMETRY

DENTISTRY Stacey Sparkman Hall, D.D.S.

Williamsburg Center for Dental Health Dr. Stacey Hall brings her unique outlook on dental care and her personable optimism to the Williamsburg Center for Dental Health. With 12 years of solid dental expertise in the area, she decided in early 2011 to branch out and open her own local practice. After completing her undergraduate degree from Virginia Tech in 1998, Dr. Hall graduated from VCU’s MCV School of Dentistry in 2002, receiving her D.D.S. She is a member of the Academy of General Dentistry, the American Dental Association, and was awarded member fellowship to the International Congress of Oral Implantology in 2008. Dr. Hall is a co-leader of the Tidewater Dawson Study Club and is passionate about pursuing the highest levels of continuing education. She was also voted “Reader’s Choice Best Dentist 2010” by The Health Journal. Stacey and her husband Michael have been blessed with three beautiful girls: Lanie, Gracie and Abbie. She is a loyal Virginia Tech Football fan and enjoys Bible study and missions work.

Williamsburg Center for Dental Health 5231 Monticello Ave., Suite E Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 565-6303

www.williamsburgdentalhealth.com

5121 Center St., Suite 102 Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 903-2633 www.colonialeyecare.com

SKINCARE & AESTHETICS Izabela Padurariu Beauty Therapy by Iza

Iza is a master aesthetician, wax technician, threading specialist and massage therapist practicing in Williamsburg, Virginia. She is originally from Romania, and has worked as a master aesthetician in a variety of settings including in London where she graduated from the West Thames College with a license in aesthetics. She has been working in skin care and beauty therapy industry for over seven years. Upon moving to the United States, Iza continued her education and training at the American Spirit Institute in Williamsburg, Virginia. She is dedicated to helping men and women improve and maintain their skin care regimen. At her Williamsburg location, she’s created a place of tranquility and serenity where clients can come to restore the mind, body and spirit. Beauty Therapy by Iza offers a wide menu of therapeutic skin care treatments including facials, microdermabrasion, microcurrant, Epiblade, chemical peels, Derma Roller, waxing, threading, eyebrow and lash tint, make-up consultations and massage. Beauty Therapy by Iza

161 C John Jefferson Road Williamsburg, VA 23185 757-634-4044 www.beautytherapybyiza.com


AZZURCO, DO ALLERGY & ASTHMA JASON D. MDERMATOLOGY

Jason D. Mazzurco, D.O.

Stephen Shield, M.D. Allergy Partners of Hampton Roads

1144 Professional Drive Williamsburg, VA 23185 (757) 259-0443

relocated to the Peninsula with his wife and daughter. In his leisure time, he enjoys outdoor activities and spending time with his family and friends. Dermatology Specialists

11844new Rock Landing Drive, inSuite Dr. Mazzurco welcomes patients to his practice the B Newport News, VA 23606 Newport News office. (757) 873-0161

www.allergypartners.com/hamptonroads

UROLOGY

www.opderm.net

CARDIOLOGY

TPMG Williamsburg Urology

A native of West Point, Virginia, Dr. Rana Graham-Montaque has returned home to serve the area’s youth and patients with special needs by providing specialty care. She completed her undergraduate and master’s degree at Hampton University. She graduated from VCU/MCVs School of Dentistry in 2006. After practicing in private practice and public health, Dr. Graham-Montaque returned to VCU to complete a residency in pediatric dentistry, where she was awarded an additional master’s degree. As Williamsburg’s full-service pediatric dental practice, she provides one-year-old first dental visits, oral sedation, nitrous oxide, dental trauma management, growth and development checkups as well as general anesthesia cases at a local hospital. She is a member of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Dental Association. She was awarded the public service award at VCU School of Dentistry. She serves as adjunct faculty in the dental programs at VCU and TNCC. She establishes a “dental home” for patients by reaching them by age one. Dr. Graham-Mantaque is board certified. Pediatric Dental Specialists of Williamsburg 213 Bulifants Blvd., Suite B Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 903-4525

HAND SURGERY

Hugh McCormick Jr., M.D.

Joseph R. Habibi, M.D.

Joseph R. Habibi, M.D., received his undergraduate degree in Chemistry at University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, and his Doctorate of Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University in 2010. He completed an internship in general surgery and residency in urology through Virginia Commonwealth University. Dr. Habibi provides general urologic care including robotic surgery. Dr. Habibi was born in Richmond, Virginia, and enjoys spending time with family, traveling, golfing and running. TPMG welcomed Dr. Habibi to TPMG Williamsburg Urology in September 2015. He is accepting new patients and welcomes them to call today and reserve an appointment with him.

Pediatric Dental Specialists of Williamsburg

www.williamsburgpediatricdentist.com

11844 Rock Landing Drive, Suite B • Newport News, VA 23606 (757) 873-0161 • www.opderm.net

TPMG Williamsburg Urology

Rana GrahamMontaque, D.D.S., M.S., M.S.D.

Dermatology Specialists

Dr. Stephen Shield knows Dr. Jason D. Mazzurco is a allergies and asthma. As a board-certified dermatologist child growing up in Newport and fellowship trained News, Virginia he suffered Mohs Surgeon. He earned from both problems. As the his Bachelor of Science and parent of children with allergies, he’s aware of the Master of Science degrees from The Ohio State is a Board Certified Dermatologist impact allergies can have on a child’s educational Dr. andJason D. Mazzurco University, where he was a two-time Big Ten and Fellowship trained Mohs Surgeon. He earned his social development; and as a board-certified, fellowshipChampion He continued his education Bachelor of Science and MasterGymnast. of Science degrees from Ohio State University, whereUniversity he was a two Heritage time Big TenCollege of Osteopathic trained specialist who’s been in practice for over 20 at Ohio Champion Gymnast. He continued his education at Ohio years, he has the knowledge and experience that can Medicine, he earned medical degree. University Heritage College of where Osteopathic Medicine his where help you and your children with your quest for better completed a residency in dermatology and he earned his medicalHe degree. health. He knows that allergies and asthma don’t have to a fellowship in Mohs micrographic surgery at St. Dr. Mazzurco completed a residency in Dermatology and a control you. He helps you control them. Joseph MercySurgery Hospital Fellowship in Mohs Micrographic at St.through Joseph Michigan State Practicing locally since 1993, Dr. Shield joinedMercy withHospital through Michigan University where he resident. University andState served as the chief served as the Chief Resident. He is published in numerous Allergy Partners, the nation’s largest medical practice Dr. Mazzurco practices surgical dermatology peer-reviewed journals and has presented both nationally dedicated to treating allergies, in 2010. This partnership treating both oncology. benign and malignant lesions of the skin. and internationally on cutaneous allows patients on the Peninsula to receive some of the He specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin Dr. Mazzurco practices primarily surgical dermatology treating most advanced care available from a local physician cancer, Mohs surgery and reconstructive surgery. both benign and malignant lesions of the skin. He specializes who cares about his community. Dr. Shield sees in the diagnosis and Dr. Mazzurco joined Dermatology Specialists treatment of skin cancer, Mohs Surgery children and adults, and is accepting new patientsand in reconstructive insurgery. 2014. his Williamsburg and Newport News offices. In 2014, Dr. Mazzurco joined Dermatology Specialists and Allergy Partners of Hampton Roads

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

Robert M. Campolattaro, M.D.

TPMG Cardiovascular Diagnostic Center Dr. Hugh McCormick Jr. graduated from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He completed his internship, residency and fellowship training at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, and the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Diseases. He served in the U.S. Navy Medical Corps as an assistant to the Attending Physician, U.S. Congress as a member of the teaching staff of Bethesda Naval Hospital and as the Chief, Division of Cardiology Naval Regional Medical Center, Portsmouth, Virginia. Dr. McCormick came to TPMG with more than 45 years of experience and a long history of community service. He was presented with a Certificate of Appreciation in recognition of 39 years of Academic Contribution with Eastern Virginia Medical School as a member of the EVMS community faculty. Dr. McCormick has also been honored with several yearly Top Doctors awards presented by Coastal Virginia Magazine. He is a Fellow in both the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association, and has been active with the Heart Association on the Peninsula as a past president, and as a board member. Now offering diagnostic testing and cardiac evaluation exclusively in Williamsburg.

Tidewater Ortho

Dr. Campolattaro, an expert in the field of hand surgery, has been with Tidewater Ortho since September 2004. He began his career attending the College of William & Mary for undergraduate school and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey for medical school. Afterward, Dr. Campolattaro completed his residency at University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry before completing his fellowship training in hand surgery at Wake Forest University. Tidewater Ortho serves the Peninsula with the only two board-certified orthopaedic surgeons with further subspecialty certification in hand surgery. The hand specialists at Tidewater Ortho rely on the knowledge, training and skill of the board-certified hand therapists who complete the team at Tidewater Ortho. Dr. Campolattaro’s practice solely focuses on the treatment of hand and wrist conditions.

Tidewater Medical Center at New Town 5424 Discovery Park Blvd., Bldg. B, Suite 203 Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 345-6223

Tidewater Medical Center at New Town

Tidewater Ortho

www.mytpmg.com

www.mytpmg.com

www.tidewaterortho.com

5424 Discovery Park Boulevard, Bldg. B, Suite 203 Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 565-0600

5208 Monitcello Ave, Suite 180 Williamsburg, VA 23188 (757) 637-7008


ALLERGY & ASTHMA special advertising section

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS are you looking for a provider? Our featured providers are committed to serving the community with the highest-quality health care.

PERSONAL TRAINING

Stephen Shield, M.D.

Brian Cole, CPFT, CMT

Allergy Partners of Hampton Roads

Dr. Stephen Shield knows allergies and asthma. As a child growing up in Newport News, Virginia he suffered from both problems. As the parent of children with allergies, he’s aware of the impact allergies can have on a child’s educational and social development; and as a board-certified, fellowshiptrained specialist who’s been in practice for over 20 years, he has the knowledge and experience that can help you and your children with your quest for better health. He knows that allergies and asthma don’t have to control you. He helps you control them. Practicing locally since 1993, Dr. Shield joined with Allergy Partners, the nation’s largest medical practice dedicated to treating allergies, in 2010. This partnership allows patients on the Peninsula to receive some of the most advanced care available from a local physician who cares about his community. Dr. Shield sees children and adults, and is accepting new patients in his Williamsburg and Newport News offices.

Personal Training Associates For over 20 years Brian has been building his personal training practice to serve not only those who want to improve their overall health and fitness but also those in need of postrehab conditioning following physical therapy, injury and/or surgery. Brian is certified as a personal fitness trainer by the American Council on Exercise (ACE), a massage therapist by the Virginia Deptartment of Health Professions, a post-rehab conditioning specialist by the American Academy of Fitness Professionals and a weight management consultant by ACE. Brian is also the co-inventor of The Back Unit for low back strengthening and injury prevention. His trainers have college degrees in exercise science or fitness management, national certification by ACSM, ACE, or NASM, and in addition, they regularly earn advanced specialty certifications in a vatriety of disciplines. They are knowledgeable and experienced working with hip/knee replacements, ACL tears, spinal and shoulder surgeries, mastectomies, rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, scoliosis, etc. Personal Training Associates - Private Studios

Allergy Partners of Hampton Roads 1144 Professional Drive Williamsburg, VA 23185 (757) 259-0443

www.allergypartners.com/hamptonroads

Port Warwick Hilton Village 210 Nat Turner Blvd. 97 Main St. Newport News, VA 23606 Newport News, VA 23601 (757) 599-5999 www.briancoleandassociates.com

RHEUMATOLOGY Ivan A. Marchena Mendez, M.D. TPMG Rheumatology

Ivan A. Marchena Mendez, M.D. earned his Doctorate of Medicine at Universidad Nacional Pedro Henriquez Urena, Dominican Republic in 2005. He completed an internship and residency in internal medicine at Abington Memorial Hospital, Abington, Pennsylvania, in 2013, and a fellowship in Rheumatology at Upstate University Hospital, Syracuse, New York, in 2015. Dr. Marchena is board-certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is a member of the American College of Physicians, American College of Rheumatology and Dominican College of Physicians-Dominican Republic. He has co-authored several publications and presentations. In his spare time, Dr. Marchena enjoys basketball, baseball, softball, fishing, watching movies, spending time with his wife, family and friends and savors relaxation activities. He also enjoys participating in community service by providing medical knowledge outreach education to the Latino community. Dr. Marchena joined Dr. Kristi Mizelle at TPMG Rheumatology in August 2015, and is currently accepting new patients by physician referral. TPMG Rheumatology

Tidewater Medical Center 860 Omni Boulevard, Suite 111 Newport News, VA 23606 (757) 369-8138 www.mytpmg.com


JASON D. MDERMATOLOGY AZZURCO, DO

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Jason D. Mazzurco, D.O.

Allen R. Jones Jr., D.P.T., P.T.

Dermatology Specialists

Dr. Jason D. Mazzurco is a board-certified dermatologist and fellowship trained Mohs Surgeon. He earned his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees from The Ohio State r. Jason D. Mazzurco is a Board Certified Dermatologist University, where he was a two-time Big Ten nd Fellowship trained Mohs Surgeon. He earned his Champion He continued his education achelor of Science and MasterGymnast. of Science degrees from hio State University, whereUniversity he was a two Heritage time Big TenCollege of Osteopathic at Ohio hampion Gymnast. He continued his education at Ohio Medicine, he earned medical degree. niversity Heritage College of where Osteopathic Medicine his where completed a residency in dermatology and e earned his medicalHe degree. a fellowship in Mohs micrographic surgery at St. r. Mazzurco completed a residency in Dermatology and a Joseph MercySurgery Hospital ellowship in Mohs Micrographic at St.through Joseph Michigan State Michigan University where he resident. ercy Hospital through University andState served as the chief rved as the Chief Resident. He is published in numerous Dr. Mazzurco practices surgical dermatology eer-reviewed journals and has presented both nationally treating both oncology. benign and malignant lesions of the skin. nd internationally on cutaneous He specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin r. Mazzurco practices primarily surgical dermatology treating cancer, Mohs surgery and reconstructive surgery. oth benign and malignant lesions of the skin. He specializes Mazzurco joined Dermatology Specialists the diagnosis and Dr. treatment of skin cancer, Mohs Surgery nd reconstructive insurgery. 2014.

2014, Dr. Mazzurco joined Dermatology Specialists and located to the Peninsula with his wife and daughter. In his isure time, he enjoys outdoor activities and spending time ith his family and friends. Dermatology Specialists

11844new Rock Landing Drive, inSuite r. Mazzurco welcomes patients to his practice the B Newport News, VA 23606 ewport News office. (757) 873-0161 www.opderm.net

NEPHROLOGY Shkendie Velia, M.D. TPMG Nephrology

Shkendie Velia, M.D. earned, her Doctorate of Medicine degree at Tirana University, Tirana, Albania, in 1997. She completed a residency in Internal Medicine at St. Barnabas Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York in 2013 and a fellowship in Nephrology at University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, in 2015. Dr. Velia is board certified as a Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine. She is a member of the American College of Physicians, American Society of Nephrology, Albanian American Medical Society and Medical Society of the State of New York. She is authored in numerous publications and has participated with several research projects. Dr. Velia volunteered with the Kosova humanitarian and war crises, the Polio Eradication Program in Albania and the Rubella eradication in Albania. Dr. Velia specializes in acute and chronic kidney disease, hypertension, kidney stones, kidney transplant, etc. Her hobbies include running, swimming and reading. Dr. Velia joined Dr. Amini and Dr. Vengal at TPMG Nephrology in August 2015. She welcome new patients to reserve an appointment with her. TPMG Nephrology

555 Denbigh Boulevard Suite C Newport News, VA 23608 (757) 599-3436 www.mytpmg.com

Dominion Physical Therapy & Associates, Inc.

Dr. Allen R. Jones is pleased to announce the opening of his Virginia Beach, Virginia office. The practice specializes in the treatment of neck and back pain, sports and personal injury and other musculoskeletal conditions. Dominion has six locations throughout Hampton Roads and is celebrating its 25th year in business. Dr. Jones earned degrees in physical therapy from the University of Connecticut and from Rocky Mountain University School of Health Professions where he received his Doctor of Physical Therapy. Governor McAuliffe appointed Dr. Jones to the Virginia board of health professions and Virginia board of physical therapy. Dominion offers an Annual Doctorate of Physical Therapy Scholarship to second year students enrolled in the Physical Therapy program at Old Dominion and Hampton University. Dominion Physical Therapy & Associates, Inc. 304 Marcella Road, Suite E Hampton, VA 23666 (757) 825-9446 www.dompt.com *See Health Directory for additional locations

1844 Rock Landing Drive, Suite B • Newport News, VA 23606 (757) 873-0161 • www.opderm.net

410 Marcella Road Suite A Hampton, VA 23666 (757) 599-3436

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT

JOINT REPLACEMENT Michael E. Higgins, M.D.

Tidewater Orthopaedics Dr. Higgins, a fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon specializing in hip and knee replacement surgery joined Tidewater Ortho in 2006. He obtained his medical degree from Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York, and did his internship and residency in orthopaedic surgery at State University of New York-Buffalo. He went on to complete a one-year fellowship in total joint replacement surgery at the Roanoke Orthopaedic Center in Roanoke, Virginia. Dr. Higgins has written many articles and lectured on hip and knee replacements. He has been named a Top Doctor by U.S. News & World Report. Dr. Higgins is performing computer navigated knee replacements and direct anterior hip replacements (“jiffy hip”), as well as revision hip and knee replacement at the only dedicated orthopaedic hospital on the peninsula, The Orthopaedic Hospital at Sentara CarePlex.

Tidewater Orthopaedics

Caroline Fornshell, M.S., R.D., C.P.T. LWell

Caroline is an integrative nutritionist who opened LWell, a modern health club for real people. By incorporating all the components of weight loss into one warm and friendly hospitality-oriented fitness and wellness facility, she guides people towards better health by improving nutrition, fitness, fun, stress, sleep and support. Caroline works to support you and your physician in improving your health through wellness. Caroline enjoys working with a wide range of nutrition-related conditions and concerns. She graduated from Virginia Tech with a bachelor’s degree, then worked as a personal trainer for many years before becoming a registered dietitian and earning a master’s degree in nutrition from State University of New York (Oneonta). She is a member of the academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), the American Association of Diabetic Educators (AADE), the American Diabetes Association (ADA), IDEA and the Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM). She is certified in Adult Weight Management (AND) and is a Certified Personal Trainer (NASM). LWell

301-A Village Ave. Yorktown, VA 23693 (757) 585-3441 www.lwell.com

COSMETIC DENTAL Lisa Marie Samaha, D.D.S. Port Warwick Dental Arts

Dr. Lisa Marie Samaha has created beautiful, healthy smiles for Hampton Roads since opening her Newport News practice in 1982. She and her exceptional team have created a practice of comprehensive, individualized and holistic dental care. They partner with their patients to achieve “BEST” dental health and overall wellness. Dr. Samaha is internationally published and esteemed as an educator and top clinician. She offers a wide range of advanced cosmetic and mercury-free dental care. She also maintains focus on a leadingedge protocol for the diagnosis, prevention and non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease. As an enthusiastic supporter of the arts, Dr. Samaha is also an award-winning watercolorist. Her most compelling contribution to the arts of Hampton Roads is her tranquil Port Warwick Dental Arts venue where she often hosts a rich and diversified array of musical talent and artistic exhibitions. Port Warwick Dental Arts

901 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 900 Hampton, VA 23666 (757) 637-7008

251 Nat Turner Blvd S Newport News, VA 23606 (757) 223-9270

www.tidewaterortho.com

www.pwdentalarts.com


YOUR HEALTH | ONE LAST THOUGHT

Run or walk— just for the health of it. ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT:

Saving lives is why we walk.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2015 Warhill Sports Complex, Williamsburg, VA

Presented by

MEDALS AWARDED TO ALL!

HAMPTON ROADS HEART WALKS

Help fight the #1 and #5 killers – heart disease and stroke.

Virginia Beach

Mt. Trashmore Park Saturday, October 10 at 9am

Hampton

Peninsula Town Center Saturday, October 17 at 8am

PRIZES FOR BEST DECORATED BRA OR PINKED OUT PARTICIPANTS

Visit www.hamptonroadsheartwalk.org to join or start a team or call (757) 628-2610!

REGISTER AS A TEAM

with your friends, family, or colleagues! Prizes Awarded!

FUN FAMILY EVENTS:

1 Mile Fun Run • 5K Run • 10K Run* Cornhole Tournament • Raffles and more * A Colonial Road Runner’s Grand Prix Event

Nationally sponsored by:

Sanford B. Wanner Stadium • 4725 Stadium Drive • Williamsburg, VA 23188

Locally sponsored by:

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES, CONTACT VICKI VAWTER • (757) 645-2649 • VICKI@BEYONDBOOBS.ORG

AHA-HR-HW'15-FullPgAd-1.indd 1

8/12/15 8:41 AM

By all these lovely tokens September days are here, with summer’s best of weather and autumn’s best of cheer. —Helen Hunt Jackson 60 | thehealthjournals.com


HEALTH DIRECTORY | STAYING WELL

HEALTH DIRECTORY EMERGENCY NUMBERS National Response Center Toll-Free: (800) 424-8802

National Suicide Crisis Hotline Toll-Free: (800) 784-2433

National Suicide Prevention Hotline

Toll-Free: (800) 273-8255

Poison Control Center Toll-Free: (800) 222-1222

ADDICTION TREATMENT The Farley Center

Williamsburg Center for Dental Health

Pinto Chiropractic & Rehabilitation

Stacey Sparkman Hall, DDS 5231 Monticello Ave., Ste. E Williamsburg (757) 565-6303

Dermatology Center of Williamsburg

Dermatology Specialists

7570 Hospital Drive, Building B, Suite 105 Gloucester (804) 693-3478

Wade Quinn, DC

Benjamin T. Watson, DDS, PLC Family, Cosmetic, & Sedation Dentistry

AUDIOLOGY & HEARING

COSMETIC & PLASTIC SURGERY

Patrick R. Wyatt, DDS Orthodontics

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

Riverside Ear, Nose & Throat Physicians & Surgeons 120 Kings Way, Suite 2900 Williamsburg (757) 345-2600

895 Middle Ground Blvd., Suite 152 Newport News (757) 599-5505

Colonial Center For Hearing 430 McLaws Circle, Suite 101 Williamsburg (757) 229-4004

5477 Mooretown Road Williamsburg (877) 389-4968

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH & PSYCHIATRY

ALLERGY & ENT

The Pavilion at Williamsburg Place

Hampton Roads ENT & Allergy 5408 Discovery Park Drive Williamsburg (757) 253-8722

11842 Rock Landing Drive, Suite 100 Newport News (757) 873-0338 901 Enterprise Pkwy., Suite 300 Hampton (757) 825-2500

5483 Mooretown Road Williamsburg (800) 582-6066

CHIROPRACTIC & ACUPUNCTURE

5408 Discovery Park Blvd., Ste. 200 Williamsburg (757) 645-9353 1318 Jamestown Road, Suite 102 Williamsburg (757) 253-1900

Reneau Medical Center for Age Management & Aesthetic Medicine

120 Kings Way, Suite 2550 Williamsburg (757) 345-3064

Williamsburg Plastic Surgery

333 McLaws Circle Williamsburg (757) 345-2275

CARDIOLOGY

DENTISTRY

Riverside Cardiovascular Health

New Town Dental Arts

117 Bulifants Blvd., Suite B Williamsburg (757) 259-9540

Sebastiana G. Springmann, DDS 4939 Courthouse Street Williamsburg (757) 259-0741

729 Thimble Shoals Blvd. Bldg. 7E Newport News (757) 873-3322

12528 Warwick Blvd., Suite F Newport News (757) 595-7990 7151 Richmond Road Williamsburg (757) 565-3737

Historic Triangle Dental Care Michael J. Whyte, DDS 134 Professional Circle Williamsburg (757) 903-2527

DERMATOLOGY Associates In Dermatology, Inc.

17 Manhattan Square Hampton (757) 838-8030

Schumann Dermatology Group 5309 Discovery Park Blvd. Williamsburg (757) 564-1200

Donna M. Corvette, MD 5335 Discovery Park Blvd., Suite A Williamsburg (757) 645-3787 Jason D. Mazzurco, DO 11844 Rock Landing Drive, Suite B Newport News, VA 23606 (757) 873-0161

Orthopaedic & Spine Center 250 Nat Turner Blvd. Newport News (757) 596-1444

Tidewater Diagnostic Imaging 100 Sentara Circle Williamsburg (757) 984-6000

ENDOCRINOLOGY Riverside Endocrinology & Diabetes Center

120 Kings Way, Suite 2550 Williamsburg (757) 534-5909


STAYING WELL | HEALTH DIRECTORY FAMILY PRACTICE Riverside Family Practice & Extended Care 5231 John Tyer Highway Williamsburg (757) 220-8300

Riverside Norge Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Center 7364 Richmond Road Williamsburg (757) 345-0011

Riverside Williamsburg Family Medicine

120 Kings Way, Suite 1400 Williamsburg (757) 345-2555

FITNESS B-defined Innovative Personal Training & Wellness 4801 Courthouse St., Ste. 122 Williamsburg (757) 345-6801

LWell - Longevity Wellness 301-A Village Ave. Yorktown (757) 585-3441

FREE CLINICS American Red Cross Adult Dental Clinic 606 West 29th St. Norfolk (757) 446-7756

Angels of Mercy Medical Clinic

7151 Richmond Road, Suite 401 Williamsburg (757) 565-1700

Beach Health Clinic

3396 Holland Road, Suite 102 Virginia Beach (757) 428-5601

Chesapeake Care

Digestive Disease Center of Virginia, PC

Richard J. Hartle, M.D. 5424 Discovery Park Blvd., Ste. 104 Williamsburg (757) 206-1190

Riverside Williamsburg Gastroenterology

457 McLaws Circle, Suite 1 Williamsburg (757) 221-0750

GENERAL SURGERY Riverside Hampton Roads Surgical Specialists 120 Kings Way, Suite 2600 Williamsburg (757) 345-0141

HEALTH CARE ATTORNEYS Brain Injury Law Center 2100 Kecoughtan Road Hampton (877) 840-3431

Mellette PC

428 McLaws Circle, Suite 200 Williamsburg (757) 259-9200

HEALTH SPAS/ ESTHETICIANS Beauty Therapy By Iza

1325 LaSalle Ave. Hampton (757) 727-2577

Lackey Free Clinic

1620 Old Williamsburg Road Yorktown (757) 886-0608

Olde Towne Medical and Dental Center

5249 Olde Towne Road Williamsburg (757) 259-3258

Surry Area Free Clinic 474 Colonial Trail West Surry (757) 294-0132

Western Tidewater Free Clinic

2019 Meade Parkway Suffolk (757) 923-1060

GASTROENTEROLOGY Colonial Gastroenterology 400 Sentara Circle, Suite 103 Williamsburg (757) 534-7701

11803 Jefferson Ave., Suite 230 Newport News (757) 534-7701

62 | thehealthjournals.com

Dorothy G. Hoefer Comprehensive Breast Center 11803 Jefferson Ave., Suite 130 Newport News (757) 594-1899

Riverside Hampton Roads Surgical Specialists 120 Kings Way, Suite 2800 Williamsburg (757) 345-0141

Riverside Doctors’ Hospital

HERNIA SPECIALISTS The Hernia Center at Mary Immaculate Hospital

Agapé Home Care

350 McLaws Circle, Suite 2 Williamsburg (757) 229-6115

Visiting Angels

12388 Warwick Blvd., Suite 206 Newport News (757) 599-4145

HOSPITALS & MEDICAL CENTERS Bon Secours Mary Immaculate Hospital

2 Bernardine Drive Newport News (757) 886-6000

Bon Secours DePaul Medical Center Granby St. & Kingsley Lane Norfolk (757) 889-5310

Bon Secours Maryview Medical Center

3636 High St. Portsmouth (757) 398-2200

Bon Secours Health Center at Harbour View 5818 Harbour View Blvd. Suffolk (757) 673-5800

Bon Secours Surgery Center at Harbour View

5818 Harbour View Blvd., Ste. 102 Suffolk (757) 215-0499

NEUROLOGY Williamsburg Neurology & Sleep Disorders Center 120 Kings Way, Suite 2700 Williamsburg (757) 221-0110

NEUROSURGERY Riverside Neurosurgical & Spine Specialists 120 Kings Way, Suite 3500 Williamsburg (757) 220-6823

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Access AIDS Support 218 S. Armistead Ave. Hampton (757) 722-5511

1500 Commonwealth Ave. Williamsburg (757) 585-2200

222 W. 21st St., Suite F-308 Norfolk (757) 622-2989

Riverside Regional Medical Center

Alzheimer’s Association

Sentara Independence

213-B McLaws Circle Williamsburg (757) 221-7272 24-hour Helpline: (800) 272-3900

500 J. Clyde Morris Blvd. Newport News (757) 594-2000 800 Independence Blvd. Virginia Beach (757) 363-6100

Sentara Heart Hospital

307 South England Street Williamsburg 757) 220-7720

HOME CARE

H.E.L.P. Free Dental Clinic

601 Children’s Lane Norfolk (757) 668-7098

Spa of Colonial Williamsburg

The Community Free Clinic of Newport News

1320 LaSalle Ave. Hampton (757) 727-2577

Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters

Sentara CarePlex Hospital

860 Omni Blvd., Suite 204 Williamsburg (757) 874-1077

H.E.L.P. Free Clinic

736 Battlefield Blvd. North Chesapeake (757) 312-8121

161-C John Jefferson Rd. Williamsburg, VA 23185 (757) 634-4004

2145 South Military Highway Chesapeake (757) 545-5700

727 25th St. Newport News (757) 594-4060

Chesapeake Regional Medical Center

3000 Coliseum Drive Hampton (757) 736-1000 600 Gresham Drive Norfolk (757) 388-8000

Sentara Leigh Hospital 830 Kempsville Road Norfolk (757) 261-6000

Sentara Norfolk General Hospital

600 Gresham Drive Norfolk (757) 388-3000

Sentara Obici Hospital 2800 Godwin Blvd. Suffolk (757) 934-4000

6350 Center Drive, Suite 102 Norfolk (757) 459-2405

American Cancer Society

11835 Canon Blvd., Suite 102-A Newport News (757) 591-8330

American Diabetes Association 870 Greenbrier Circle, Ste. 404 Chesapeake (757) 424-6662

American Heart Association 500 Plume St. East, Suite 110 Norfolk (757) 628-2610

American Parkinson’s Disease Association

4560 Princess Anne Road Virginia Beach (757) 495-3062

American Red Cross

1323 W. Pembroke Ave. Hampton (757) 838-7320

Sentara Port Warwick

1317 Jamestown Road, Suite 105 Williamsburg (757) 253-0228

Sentara Princess Anne

6912 George Washington Memorial Highway Yorktown (757) 898-3090

1031 Loftis Blvd. Newport News (757) 736-9898 2025 Glenn Mitchell Drive Virginia Beach (757) 507-0000

Sentara Virginia Beach General Hospital

1060 First Colonial Road Virginia Beach (757) 395-8000

Sentara Williamsburg Regional Medical Center 100 Sentara Circle (757) 984-6000

MASSAGE THERAPY Beauty Therapy By Iza 161-C John Jefferson Rd. Williamsburg, VA 23185 (757) 634-4004

Massage By David

David Presnesll, CMT Yorktown/Newport News/ Williamsburg (860) 449-3156

The Arc of Greater Williamsburg

202 Packets Court Williamsburg (757) 229-0643

The Arthritis Foundation 2201 W. Broad St., Suite 100 Richmond (804) 359-1700

Avalon: A Center for Women & Children

Williamsburg (757) 258-9362

AWARE Worldwide, Inc.

6350 Center Drive, Bldg. 5, Ste. 228 Norfolk (757) 965-8373

Beacon House Clubhouse for Brain Injury Survivors 3808-C Virginia Beach Blvd. Virginia Beach (757) 631-0222

Beyond Boobs! Inc.

1311 Jamestown Road, Suite 202 Williamsburg (757) 645-2649

Cancer Care Foundation of Tidewater 5900 Lake Wright Drive Norfolk (757) 461-8488

Center for Excellence in Aging & Lifelong Health 3901 Treyburn Drive, Suite 100 Williamsburg (757) 220-4751

CHEAR, Inc. c/o Department of Otolaryngology, EVMS 600 Gresham Drive, Suite 1100 Norfolk (757) 388-6229

Child Development Resources 150 Point O’ Woods Road Norge (757) 566-3300

Citizens’ Committee to Protect the Elderly

PO Box 10100 Virginia Beach (757) 518-8500

Colonial Behavioral Health 1657 Merrimac Trail Williamsburg (757) 220-3200

Denbigh Clubhouse for Brain Injury Survivors

12725 McManus Blvd, Suite 2E Newport News (757) 833-7845

Dream Catchers Therapeutic Riding

10120 Fire Tower Road Toano (757) 566-1775

Edmarc Hospice for Children 516 London St. Portsmouth (757) 967-9251

Endependence Center, Inc. 6300 E. Virginia Beach Blvd. Norfolk (757) 461-8007

Faith in Action

354 McLaws Circle, Suite 2 Williamsburg (757) 258-5890

Food Bank of the Virginia Peninsula

2401 Aluminum Ave. Hampton (757) 596-7188

Food Bank of SEVA

800 Tidewater Drive Norfolk (757) 627-6599

Hope House Foundation 801 Boush St., Suite 302 Norfolk (757) 625-6161

Hospice House & Support Care of Williamsburg 4445 Powhatan Parkway Williamsburg (757) 253-1220

Jewish Family Service

260 Grayson Road Virginia Beach (757) 321-2223

Lee’s Friends: Helping People Live with Cancer 7400 Hampton Blvd., Suite 201 Norfolk (757) 440-7501

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society 6350 Center Drive, Suite 216 Norfolk (757) 459-4670

National MS Society

760 Lynnhaven Parkway., Suite 201 Virginia Beach (757) 490-9627

The Needs Network, Inc.

9905 Warwick Blvd. Newport News (757) 251-0600


HEALTH DIRECTORY | STAYING WELL National Alliance on Mental Illness-Williamsburg Area P.O. Box 89 Williamsburg (757) 220-8535

National Alliance on Mental Illness-Norfolk Contact Marylin Copeland Norfolk (757) 375-5298

Norfolk Community Services Board

229 W. Olney Road, Room 1 Norfolk (757) 664-6670

Peninsula Agency on Aging

739 Thimble Shoals Blvd., Ste. 1006 Newport News (757) 873-0541

Peninsula Institute for Community Health

1033 28th St. Newport News (757) 591-0643

Peninsula Pastoral Counseling Center

707 Gum Rock Court Newport News (757) 873-2273

Protect Our Kids

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Riverside Partners In Women’s Health

120 Kings Way, Suite 3400 Williamsburg (757) 253-5600

Williamsburg Obstetrics & Gynecology

1115 Professional Drive Williamsburg (757) 253-5653

ONCOLOGY Riverside Peninsula Cancer Institute

3000 Coliseum Drive, Suite 104 Hampton (757) 827-9400 1051 Loftis Blvd., Suite 100 Newport News (757) 873-9400

1950 Glenn Mitchell Drive, Suite 102 Virginia Beach (757) 368-0437 5838 Harbour View Blvd., Suite 105 Suffolk (757) 484-0215 2790 Godwin Blvd., Suite 101 Suffolk (757) 539-0670

St. Mary’s Home for Disabled Children

OPTOMETRY & OPHTHALMOLOGY

1 Singleton Drive Hampton (757) 827-8757

Senior Center of York

5314 George Washington Hwy. Yorktown (757) 898-3807

Senior Services Coalition

3901 Treyburn Drive, Suite 100 Williamsburg (757) 220-3480

United Way

739 Thimble Shoals Blvd., Suite 400 Newport News (757) 873-9328 5400 Discovery Park Blvd., Ste. 104 Williamsburg (757) 253-2264

The Up Center

1805 Airline Blvd. Portsmouth (757) 397-2121

901 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 900 Hampton (757) 827-2480

Virginia Oncology Associates

5900 Lake Wright Drive Norfolk (757) 466-8683

The Sarah Bonwell Hudgins Foundation

Tidewater Orthopaedic Associates

Riverside Pain Medicine & Rehabilitation Specialists

12388 Warwick Blvd., Suite 201 Newport News (757) 595-9037

6171 Kempsville Circle Norfolk (757) 622-2208

850 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 2000 Hampton (757) 534-9988

PAIN MANAGEMENT

725 Volvo Parkway, Suite 200 Chesapeake (757) 549-4403

RSVP: Retired Senior Volunteers

12200 Warwick Blvd., Suite 310 Newport News (757) 534-9988

12100 Warwick Blvd., Suite 201 Newport News (757) 534-5555

Respite Care Center for Adults with Special Needs

404 Colley Ave. Norfolk (757) 627-5386

Riverside Orthopedic Specialists

120 Kings Way, Suite 3100 Williamsburg (757) 345-5724

500 Sentara Circle, Suite 203 Williamsburg (757) 229-2236

Ronald McDonald House

120 Kings Way, Suite 2800 Williamsburg (757) 534-9988

5208 Monticello Ave. Williamsburg (757) 206-1004

P.O. Box 561 Hampton (757) 727-0651

500 Jamestown Road Williamsburg (757) 229-1771

Riverside Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine

Retina & Glaucoma Associates 113 Bulifants Blvd., Suite A Williamsburg (757) 220-3375

Riverside Hampton Roads Eye Associates 120 Kings Way, Suite 1300 Williamsburg (757) 345-3001

ORTHODONTICS Wyatt Orthodontics

Patrick R. Wyatt, D.D.S. 195 Strawberry Plains Road Williamsburg 757-869-1908 12528 Warwick Blvd. F Newport News 757-595-7990

120 Kings Way, Suite 2550 Williamsburg (757) 345-3050

PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION

SLEEP MEDICINE Pulmonary & Sleep Consultants of Williamsburg

5701 Cleveland St., Suite 600 Virginia Beach (757) 995-2700

120 Kings Way, Suite 2200 Williamsburg (757) 645-3460

500 Rodman Ave., Suite 4 Portsmouth (757) 393-6119

Williamsburg Neurology and Sleep Disorders Center

Hampton Roads Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine 730 Thimble Shoals Blvd., Suite 130 Newport News (757) 873-1554

Orthopaedic & Spine Center Physical Therapy 250 Nat Turner Blvd. Newport News (757) 596-1900

Tidewater Orthopaedic Associates

120 Kings Way, Suite 2700 Williamsburg (757) 221-0110

URGENT CARE MD Express

120 Monticello Ave. Williamsburg (757) 564-3627 4740 George Washington Memorial Highway Yorktown (757) 890-6339

3321 West Mercury Blvd. Hampton (757) 224-0056

2012 Meade Parkway Suffolk (757) 934-3366

Tidewater Physical Therapy

Riverside Williamsburg Family Practice & Extended Care

5553 Portsmouth Blvd. Portsmouth (757) 465-7906 3300 High St., Suite 1-A Portsmouth (757) 673-5689 4900 High St. West Portsmouth (757) 483-4518 7300 Newport Ave., Ste. 300 Norfolk (757) 217-0333 885 Kempsville Road, Ste. 300 Norfolk (757) 955-2800 14703 Warwick Blvd., Ste. B Newport News (757) 947-1230
 2 Bernardine Drive Newport News (757) 886-6480 13609 Carrollton Blvd., Ste. 15 Carrollton (757) 238-2690 235 Hanbury Road East Chesapeake (757) 391-7660 4300 Portsmouth Blvd., Ste. 220 Chesapeake (757) 465-7651 1416 Stephanie Way, Ste. A Chesapeake (757) 391-7676 5 Armistead Pointe Parkway Hampton (757) 224-4601

Hampton Roads Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine

828 Healthy Way Virginia Beach (757) 463-2540


VersAbility Resources

4374 New Town Road, Suite 102 Williamsburg (757) 873-1554

1253 Nimmo Parkway, Ste. 105 Virginia Beach (757) 943-3060

Orthopaedic & Spine Center

101 Long Green Blvd. Yorktown (757) 952-1900

We Promise Foundation

301 Riverview Ave. Norfolk (757) 963-5588

5208 Monticello Ave. Williamsburg (757) 206-1004

ORTHOPEDICS & SPORTS MEDICINE

250 Nat Turner Blvd. Newport News (757) 596-1900

729 Thimble Shoals Blvd., Suite 4-C Newport News (757) 873-2932

1580 Armory Drive, Ste. B Franklin (757) 562-0990

5838 Harbour View Blvd. Suffolk (757) 673-5971

1817 Laskin Road, Ste. 100
 Virginia Beach (757) 437-0471

Hampton (757) 722-9961, ext. 3009

466 Denbigh Blvd. Newport News (757) 875-0861

6161 Kempsville Circle, Suite 250 Norfolk (757) 965-4890

12997 Warwick Blvd. Newport News (757) 369-9446

730 Thimble Shoals Blvd., Suite 130 Newport News (757) 873-1554

Vets Advocating for Vets

304 Marcella Road, Suite E Hampton (757) 825-9446

927 N. Battlefield Blvd., Ste. 200 Chesapeake (757) 436.3350

901 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 900 Hampton (757) 827-2480

Bon Secours In Motion Physical Therapy

222 W. 19th St. Norfolk (757) 622-7017 2520 58th St. Hampton (757) 896-6461

Dominion Physical Therapy & Associates, Inc.

2106 Executive Drive Hampton (757) 838-6678

9 Manhattan Square, Suite B Hampton (757) 825-3400 2695 McManus Blvd., Building 6, Suite B Newport News (757)223-5612 751 J. Clyde Morris Blvd. Newport News (757) 873-2123 12655 Warwick Blvd., Suite B Newport News (757) 599-5551 156-B Strawberry Plains Road Williamsburg (757) 565-3400 7151 Richmond Road, Suite 101 Williamsburg (757) 345-0753 4125 Ironbound Road, Suite 100 Williamsburg (757) 220-8383 6970 Fox Hunt Lane, Gloucester (804) 694-8111 7190 Chapman Drive Hayes (804) 642-3028 2007 Meade Pkwy. Suffolk (757) 539-6300

5231 John Tyler Highway Williamsburg (757) 220-8300

UROLOGY Riverside Hampton Roads Urology

120 Kings Way, Suite 3200 Williamsburg (757) 253-0051

VASCULAR SURGERY Riverside Peninsula Vascular Surgery

156-A Strawberry Plains Road Williamsburg (757) 229-7939

WEIGHT LOSS LWell - Longevity Wellness 301-A Village Ave. Yorktown (757) 585-3441

Riverside Weight Loss Specialists

850 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 1300 Hampton (757) 637-7637

204 Gumwood Drive Smithfield (757) 357-7762 2004 Sandbridge Road, Suite 102 Virginia Beach (757) 301-6316 100 Winters St., Ste. 106 West Point (757) 843-9033 1745 Camelot Drive, Ste. 100 Virginia Beach (757) 961-4800 4020 Raintree Road, Suite D Chesapeake (757) 484-4241 135 W. Hanbury Road, Suite B Chesapeake (757) 819-6512

160 Newtown Road Virginia Beach (757) 233-7111

thehealthjournals.com | 63


STAYING WELL | BRAIN TEASERS

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IN TEASERS BRA

The Health Journal 4808 Courthouse St., Ste. 204 Williamsburg, VA 23188

STRETCH YOUR MENTAL MUSCLES AND WIN!

Winner announced in our next issue in the Inbox. See bottom of page for submission deadlines and details.

CRYPTOGRAM

Clue: L=O, R=M, A=S, J =A

Use the above clues to uncover words and decipher the hidden quote. The clues have been filled in for you. Hint: No cypher character will represent the same letter. ie: A will not equal A.

M

M

S S

O

S

O

M

O

S

R E R V A A V L D V D M V P I V A D L G R I O I M E G L A B O U V U I, O

O

A

O

S O

S

M

A S S

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H B G G L G C O V U I; J D X G L X L A L F V G C A L R I N J A A V L D, S O

OM

AS S

O

S OM

O

A

S OM

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A L R I T L R N J A A V L D, A L R I C B R L O, J D X A L R I A G E M I. MA

A A

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—R J E J J D Q I M L B

SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH

*Entries must be received by the 17th of September. NAME: EMAIL: CITY:

PHONE:

Autumnal Equionox Backpack College Crayons Dorms

End of Summer Football Freshman Friends Grandparents Day

International Peace Labor Day Lunch box Notebook Sapphire

School bus Supplies Textbook Virgo World Trade Centers


Fall

BUCKET LIST Take a

Pick Apples

DON’T LET JOINT PROBLEMS GET IN THE WAY OF

YOUR BUCKET LIST THIS SEASON Let the specialists at Tidewater Orthopaedics get you ready for bonfires, picnics, and pumpkin carving!

hayride

Have a BONFIRE

Rake leaves and then jump in the pile!

Watch a Go on a scary picnic movie HHOAUUNSETED Go to a

or make a play

Carve a

pumpkin Decorate the po

one

take an autumn

nature walk

rch for this sea

son

Ankle Arthritis

Robotic Assisted Knee Replacements

Paul B. Maloof, MD

Michael E. Higgins, MD

September 15 at 6:30pm Legacy Hall 4301 New Town Ave. Williamsburg

September 22, at 6:30pm Williamsburg Library 515 Scotland Street Williamsburg

TIDEWATER ORTHOPAEDICS Serving all of your orthopaedic needs from hip & knee replacements to problems with spine, shoulders, hands, foot & ankle, and sports medicine.

Colin M. Kingston, MD Robert M. Campolattaro, MD Michael E. Higgins, MD Nicholas A. Smerlis, MD Nicholas K. Sablan, MD John J. McCarthy III, MD

Williamsburg | 5208 Monticello Avenue, Suite 180 | Williamsburg, VA 23188 Hampton | 901 Enterprise Parkway, Suite 900 | Hampton, VA 23666

Paul B. Maloof, MD Jonathan R. Mason, MD Loel Z. Payne, MD Amanda K. Watkins, PA-C Lindsey Townsend, PA-C Susan Walkley, FNP

757-637-7016

www.tidewaterortho.com


R I V E R S I D E D O C TO R S ’ H O S P I TA L W I L L I A M S B U R G

In Case of Stroke, You Want Fast, Effective Care

F ACE A RM Look for an uneven smile

Check if one arm is weak

S PEECH T IME Listen for slurred speech

Call 911 at the first sign

Know the signs and Act FAST. Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. “By knowing the signs and symptoms of stroke, and seeking treatment immediately, you greatly reduce your odds for permanent damage, such as paralysis,” says Dr. Shawke Soueidan, board-certified neurologist with Riverside Medical Group. The Stroke Program at Riverside Doctors’ Hospital Williamsburg has Primary Stroke Center Certification from the Joint Commission, the nation’s predominant standards setting and accreditation body for health care organizations and programs.

riversideonline.com/rdhw

The Health Journal - September 2015  
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