Page 1

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

IN EAST DURHAM


INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION LEADER has been able to support many projects in East Durham. This booklet provides a summary of each of the projects that have been delivered during the programme period of March 2008 to December 2013. We hope this booklet gives an insight into how communities work together and how the LEADER approach has been delivered in East Durham. Many of the individuals, businesses and community organisations supported by LEADER continue to grow and deliver significant benefits for the local economy and community. Some of the projects have not completed yet and therefore still have achievements and jobs to report. So far we have created 45 jobs, safeguarded 15.5 jobs and supported 267 businesses with direct intervention and many more benefitting from the ripple effect of our projects. We have intended that the summaries reflect the impacts of our interventions. The Local Action Group (LAG) and the wider partnership have been exceptionally active in engaging with the communities of East Durham to develop project ideas that best meet the current and future needs and aspirations of its residents. The East Durham LEADER Manager and support team has brought an expertise in economic and community development that, allied to a depth of knowledge in European funding, has led to a smooth project development, appraisal and delivery process that has brought forward the excellent projects you will read about in this publication. Many partners have supported this LEADER Programme but it is important to acknowledge in particular, the continued support of Durham County Council and Durham Community Action (formerly Durham Rural Community Council). Their support has been invaluable in helping to deliver this very successful programme.

Ian Bolton Chair, East Durham LEADER Programme

Durham Rural Community Council has hosted East Durham LEADER since its development in 2008, and will continue to support the LAG through the transition period and hopefully into the next phase of RDPE funding. Recently, as an organisation we have been looking ahead, and considering how we should and could be working in the future. We know that we need to work closely together with voluntary sector organisations and community groups, so that we can share issues and information, develop and share good practice and provide help and representation where it is needed. Durham Rural Community Council has changed its name, so that it serves as a more effective statement about what we do and promote. At the end of November, Durham Rural Community Council became Durham Community Action. We are the same organisation, with the same staff and the same principles and activities, but now with a name which describes a little more clearly what we are here for. We have a new logo, and a new website, which has more information and is easier to navigate. Contact us and we can tell you more about how you can get hold of the information you need, when you need it, and where and how you can get help and advice for your organisation or groups. www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

Jo Laverick Executive Director

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www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk


INTRODUCTION

LEADER is a bottom up Community led approach to delivering the Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE) funded jointly by Defra and the European Union, and managed locally by Durham County Council. The approach offered by LEADER has demonstrated that local community groups are best placed to identify local needs and opportunities. The approach uses the implementation of a Local Development Strategy (LDS); delivering a range of projects through local rural community business and networks. The LAG are responsible for its delivery; this engenders community enthusiasm and empowerment based on strong partnership working, building capacity in communities and individuals. For many this was their first experience of LEADER funding. It can be complex and bureaucratic but it also has a great flexibility with regard to the types of project that can be supported. Projects included funding for community action alongside business development and LAG members worked hard to support the development of a transnational co-operation project with Silmu LAG, Finland. We are pleased to announce that we have secured funding for the transition year 2014, during which we will look at the success of the projects supported, and meet with businesses and community representatives to identify local needs in preparation for the development of the LDS for 2014 – 2020. Please take the time to read the case studies carefully as they demonstrate that often small actions can make a big difference. We would urge you to be encouraged by what you read, and ask that you help us to take this forward, be inspired and understand that we have so much more to do in East Durham. Please contact us if you wish to become involved in the developments or would like to join the LAG at this exciting time.

Louise Johnson Email: louise.johnson@eastdurhamleader.org.uk Or visit the website:www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk/eastdurhamleader

East Durham LEADER would like to thank Niall Benson and the Durham Heritage Coast Partnership for allowing us to use their images in the creation of the document. www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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OUR UNIQUE RELATIONSHIP WITH SOUTH KOREA

OUR UNIQUE RELATIONSHIP WITH SOUTH KOREA When East Durham played host to a group of South Korean delegates, the headlines read, ‘Rural group hosts South Koreans looking for inspiration to ignite farmers’ passion’. Namgeun Song, Senior Deputy Director for Rural Affairs in the South Korean Government was a PhD student at Newcastle University and we were lucky enough to meet him at a local network event. He was very interested in the LEADER model and became a close friend, coming to our LAG meetings and events. He was particularly interested as we were a newly established LAG group, having no previous experience of LEADER funding in the East Durham area. He drew comparisons with the way in which farming has changed in the UK over the past 20 years and those changes that were now becoming evident in South Korea, with many young people leaving their traditional farming heritage for the city lights. Namgeun spent time understanding our structure and terms of reference, how our meetings were conducted and how decisions were made as he saw an opportunity to introduce the model into the South Korean Government. During February 2010 a delegation of Korean Ministers, Journalists and Rural Specialist Advisors visited the region to explore ways of encouraging farm diversification in order to keep younger generation farmers in the farming industry. The delegation visited Embleton Hall Dairies and A&E Thompson green waste composting services, a farm which had successfully diversified. The owner Andrew Thompson, at the time Chair of East Durham LEADER, supported the visit, “South Korea is going through similar issues that we are familiar with such as older farmers retiring and the younger generation choosing to progress a different career, we are keen to show him how our family has moved with the times”. Following the farm visit, the delegation attended an informative presentation at the Greenhill’s Centre, Wheatley Hill, introducing the LEADER model to the wider audience, and explaining how community decision making can be successfully implemented; this was followed by an informal discussion with LAG members. “Funding that is provided through LEADER and helps farms diversify and build a more successful business is something that we could take back to our colleagues and possibly implement, we have noticed a lot of similarities between the region’s farms and ours, the LEADER programme is delivered by people who have a real understanding of rural issues and it struck me as an innovative approach that I wanted to find out more about. We have all found the trip and discussions extremely worthwhile and are very appreciative of the warm reception we have experienced.” In 2012 Namgeun was awarded a PhD for his research and thesis ‘The Dynamics, process and pitfalls of Policy Transfer/Learning: Comparative Study of Partnerships based on LEADER Approach in the UK and South Korea.”

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www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk


CONTENTS

CONTENTS Introduction

Page 2

Our unique relationship with South Korea

Page 4

321 // BASIC SERVICES FOR THE ECONOMY AND RURAL POPULATION

1

The Cornforth Partnership: Cornforth Pathways to Achievement

Page 6

2

Future Leisure in Coxhoe: The Studio

Page 7

3

Future Leisure in Coxhoe: Virtual Cycling and Functional Fitness Project

Page 8

4

Durham Rural Community Council: Community Network Feasibility Study

Page 9

5

Durham Rural Community Counci: Community Building Advisor

Page 10

6

Shotton Partnership 2000 Ltd: Shotton IT Centre

Page 11

7

Addictions UK: The Recovery Route (AUK)

Page 12

8

Hett Village Hall Association: Capital Refurbishment

Page 13

9

Wheatley Hill Community Association: Catering Manager Project

Page 14

10

East Durham Partnership: Furniture Re-cycle Project

Page 15

11

South Hetton and District Community Association (SHDCA): Community Fitness for All

Page 16

12

Shotton Partnership 2000 Ltd: Oscars CafĂŠ

Page 17

13

Communicare: Social Business Development

Page 18

14

The Soil Association: Schools Farmers Markets

Page 19

15

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds: Farmland Bird Initiative

Page 20

16

Durham Wildlife Trust (DWT): Hawthorn Dene

Page 21

17

East Durham Business Service: Sustainable Businesses

Page22

18

East Durham Citizens Advice Bureau: Volunteer Outreach Project

Page 23

313 // ENCOURAGEMENT OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES

19

Durham County Council: Limestone LinX Cycle and Walkway

Page 24

20

Durham County Council: Report on the Equine Sector in East Durham

Page 25

21

Durham County Council: Quarries Live!

Page 26

22

West Rainton and Leamside Parish Council: Cycle Hub Feasibility

Page 27

23

Durham Heritage Coast Partnership: Transnational Co-operation with Finland

Page 28

312 // SUPPORT FOR THE CREATION & DEVELOPMENT OF MICRO ENTERPRISES

24

Plough Farm: Farm shop Development

Page 30

25

Durham Cow Cheese: New Cheese Vat

Page 31

26

Colin Teague: Training Yard Development

Page 32

27

Leamside Equestrian Ltd: Centre of Excellence

Page 33

323 // CONSERVATION AND UPGRADING LOCAL HERITAGE

28

Durham Wildlife Trust: East Durham Beef

Page 34

311 // DIVERSIFICATION INTO NON-FARMING ACTIVITIES

29

Mill House Riding Centre: Indoor Arena

Page 35

Facts and figures

Page 36

With thanks to LAG members past and present

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www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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PROJECT

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1

The Cornforth Partnership: Cornforth Pathways to Achievement

Village rurality causes isolation and residents are supported only by poor and expensive transport links; a problem compounded by low levels of car ownership. These contributing factors make access to the colleges in the bigger towns difficult.

Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 3

Jobs created 1

Individuals Benefiting 215

Number of Training Days Delivered 483

Participants Completing a Training Day 166

Participants Expected to Acquire a Skill 141

Set up in 1995 in the village of Cornforth a former mining village, the Cornforth Partnership supports social, environmental, recreational and economic regeneration within the village. LEADER funding was used to develop a comprehensive, community learning/job search scheme and a new drop in facility for the long term unemployed of the village. Cornforth features highly on the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) and is listed in the worst 10% for employment and health deprivation; only 6% have a level 4 qualification and 50% no qualification up to level 2. The project team developed an innovative all-inclusive approach to support individuals back to work with the provision of locally based education, tailor made support packages, vocational training opportunities and work experience, complemented by mentoring and one to one support. LEADER funding allowed the Centre to open 3 nights a week, open a drop-in facility and look at new ways of engaging with young people, particularly by offering specialised and outdoor education.

‘Not only was the project effective in getting people into work, in addition the support it offered increased confidence and built village cohesion, for example four women who undertook a range of training with us including Confidence Building and Domestic Violence Training, forged new friendships and moved on to get involved in The Partnership’s Healthy Challenge Project. They would not have got involved if they had not taken part in the Pathways scheme. They have achieved a huge amount personally and West Cornforth went on to win the Healthy Village Challenge. I believe the LEADER way has greatly helped; in that it has provided support to real grassroots organisations that are working in isolated and deprived communities. It has enabled us to tackle some long standing issues and provide the right support’ (Karen Lynn, Project Manager).

The project was successful with many attendees working not only towards literacy and numeracy qualifications, but also NVQ, IT and vocational qualifications such as food hygiene, the construction skills certificate scheme (CSCS) cards, door supervision and fork lift truck qualifications.

35.62% 64.38%

LEADER

www.cornforthpartnership.co.uk PAGE 6

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£33,192

Match

£59,987


PROJECT

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2

Future Leisure in Coxhoe: The Studio

In February 2011, Durham County Council announced a proposal to close 6 under performing Leisure Centres in the County. This came as a huge blow and several local groups tried to establish ways in which they could keep the centres open and maintain services. Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 8

Individuals Benefiting 563

New Product Introduced 4

87.45%

The village of Coxhoe is supported by strong community partnerships and responded very quickly to the news. Discussions continued and a group of dedicated volunteers emerged to establish the Future Leisure in Coxhoe (FLiC) Partnership. The Partnership quickly set off to identify support for the Leisure Centre. IMD showed a very mixed picture with some of the worst levels of deprivation particularly in the health indicators, however further analysis highlighted an array of opportunities. The statistics confirmed that there was a need to develop the Leisure Centre and to bring it back into community use. Consultation with the community highlighted that the facilities were out dated, and as fitness trends had changed over recent years the leisure centre could not compete in delivering zumba, boot camp or any of the dance sessions that were increasing in popularity.

12.55%

LEADER

ÂŁ68,300

Match

The partnership approached LEADER to fund the refurbishment of a new dance studio and move the vast reception area which was underused. Windows and doors were moved and a new reception area identified, allowing the original reception area to be transformed into a new Studio with sprung timber floor and integrated sound system; new lighting and air conditioning complemented the facility and a ballet barre was installed. Upstairs a suspended ceiling was removed with the intention of renewing it, but it opened up a high ceiling creating a multi-function room with great acoustics and the ability to accommodate a big screen. The centre continues to be supported by a strong management team who are determined to develop the facilities. The new studio has changed the face of the Leisure Centre, making it much more appealing to new users. The fresh vibrant reception area can be utilised by local community groups to share information and ideas; business and new membership has increased and the Centre is going from strength to strength and in addition to the above outputs originally quoted a further 6 jobs have been safeguarded.

ÂŁ9,800

www.activelifecoxhoe.co.uk www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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PROJECT

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3

Future Leisure in Coxhoe: Virtual Cycling and Functional Fitness Project

Coxhoe now has an innovative new high tech virtual cycling studio which could be hired by local cycling and triathlon clubs as an indoor training venue in bad weather and used by members for a unique, fun fitness experience.

Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 8

Individuals Benefiting 312

New Products Introduced 4

’The X- bikes are similar to a spinning bike but are designed like a mountain bike and so incorporate different functions. The room was ideal for the installation of a big screen and surround sound which means we can show world-wide cycle routes, users can experience cycling through Spain, California or try the Tour de France routes, with the bikes simulating the gradient and angle of the road’ (Mel Adams, Centre Manager)

85.51% 14.49%

LEADER

£59,000

Match

The new dance studio successfully increased the interest in the centre and people were drawn to the new facilities. The Partnership were keen to keep the interest and momentum going and developed a new business plan listing developments as individual projects that could be worked through, sourcing funding as it became available and building on their success. Whilst looking at future sustainability plans the new multi-function room was soon identified as an opportunity to develop a second major project -The Project purchased 20 X-bikes and installed a big screen and surround sound to offer an innovative and exciting new fitness experience.

£10,000

The X-biking sessions were very popular and the Partnership received funding from the local Councillor to create a virtual cycling DVD of local routes. The Limestone LinX cycling and walking pathways surround the village

www.activelifecoxhoe.co.uk PAGE 8

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and have local significance. The video will be used in the new studio for people to cycle routes they are familiar with when the weather is poor or they are unable to cycle outside. A local film company Northern Angel Media were commissioned to film the route using club members, and the video was launched in the X-biking studio in September. This links very closely with and supports the Limestone LinX Partnership project also funded through LEADER. In addition to the X-biking, the Partnership was keen to purchase new equipment that would be easily accessible to disabled or less able individuals. They had identified a need to encourage and support the members of the community who would be most unlikely to visit the Centre, reasons could be diverse and very personal, maybe due to lack of motivation, confidence or ability and the Partnership wanted to remove any barriers to participation. It was hoped that purchasing medical treadmills and specialised fitness equipment would allow wider community involvement. They wanted to ensure the gym was an accessible and positive experience for those who had never ventured inside. The practical benefits of exercise for older or less able individuals have been well documented; walking slowly on a treadmill will increase stability and balance with an aim of preventing falls.


PROJECT

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4

Durham Rural Community Council: Community Network Feasibility Study

LEADER funding sought to undertake a feasibility study in respect of an East Durham Village Hall Network, providing a support mechanism for trustees and staff.

Funding Breakdown

Feasibility Study 1

100% 0%

LEADER

ÂŁ6,500

Match

The study was carried out over a series of telephone calls and face to face interviews, scoping the appetite for such a project and establishing a baseline contact with many of the Trustees and Managers. The project identified a positive need for support. In light of Governmental changes and austerity measures Durham County Council needed to make significant changes across the county, not only in the amount of funding available to community and village halls but also in the way support was given, making it a very changeable landscape. This study laid out the foundations for the creation of the network and the employment of a Community Buildings Advisor for East Durham, modelled on the Teesdale Village Hall Consortium.

ÂŁ0

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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PROJECT

321 // BASIC SERVICES FOR THE ECONOMY AND RURAL POPULATION

5

Durham Rural Community Counci: Community Building Advisor

A CBA was employed to provide practical support to committees and prepare a Community Buildings Toolkit as an easy reference handbook. The toolkit enabled trustees to enhance management skills in the running of their buildings by providing guidance on carrying out legal and charitable requirements. Funding Breakdown

Hallmark promotes the delivery of effective and well-managed village halls through a three tier quality standards scheme that is backed up by a system of peer visits. It proposes a formal structure for assessing quality within the organisation; six of the village halls in East Durham have now achieved Hallmark Level 1 and are working towards Hallmark Level 2, whilst Hett Village Hall has achieved Hallmark Level 3. One volunteer has been trained as a peer assessor and is now able to carry out Hallmark Level 1 assessments on other halls. This builds skills and increases capacity within the community to take responsibility for the future.

Businesses Supported 69

Individuals Benefiting 399

100% 0%

LEADER

ÂŁ29,259

Match

ÂŁ0

During the project, the officer worked with organisations to undertake a skills analysis and identify gaps where training courses could be delivered, particularly around business planning, website design, food safety and easy accounting. The officer built up a relationship with the Durham County Council Community Buildings team, and also attended the Area Action Partnerships (AAP) meetings to provide support for the Voluntary and Community Sector. The project was received with enthusiasm, and proved very timely; demand was high and positive feedback suggests that trustees and volunteers now feel more confident and organised in running their buildings.

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk PAGE 10

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The staff and trustees of Community Buildings are still facing an unpredictable future due to reduced funding and the impact of the Asset Transfer Programme (transferring ownership or management of community buildings to the Voluntary & Community Sector). Although this project has been completed, Durham Community Action (the new name for Durham Rural Community Council) will continue to offer support to vulnerable communities. Support will be offered through the development of training, newsletters, networking and the comprehensive Community Buildings Toolkit that will be regularly updated.


PROJECT

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6

Shotton Partnership 2000 Ltd: Shotton IT Centre

Shotton Colliery sits within one of the most deprived villages in East Durham, with a history of poor health, poor economy and low aspirational achievement; it is also a broadband blackspot with very poor coverage and low personal PC ownership. Funding Breakdown

Jobs Safeguarded 2

Individuals Benefiting 313

The economic down-turn meant some of their funding sources ceased thus affecting the delivery of courses. Redundancy notices were given to staff and the future was uncertain. The Centre applied to the Coalfields Regeneration Trust (CRT) for funding. This was close to approval but needed match funding to secure the grant. LEADER was approached and from early discussions the LAG was keen to support the project as vital to village sustainability.

17.22% 82.78%

LEADER

£19,569

Match

The Resource Centre was set up in June 2000 by Shotton Partnership 2000 Ltd. to give local people access to computers, the internet and IT training free of charge. It was established as a hub of the community but as the mainly low income users could not pay for services it relied heavily on public funding.

£94,064

In addition to delivering IT training courses such as NVQ’s and the European Computing Driving Licence (ECDL), the Centre ran youth courses, homeworking sessions, literacy, numeracy, photoshop and card creation sessions. Scanning and faxing services were provided and gave users free access to online government websites. Users could produce and submit CV’s, check Job Centre information, place online grocery orders or chat to family members who were abroad. Many users went on to successive courses; staff members were supportive of new members which increased the capacity of the organisation making it stronger. The use of IT equipment is monitored, chat sites, payday loans, gambling and other inappropriate internet use is prohibited.

The Centre’s services have improved. Staff have taken on development opportunities and extended the range of courses to include Emotional Wellbeing, British Sign Language and how to build computers along with integrated family learning initiatives. These additions increased the number of volunteers for the centre allowing delivery of a greater range of services to the community. There are many stories of individuals accessing training and progressing into work, or being provided with support to prepare CV’s. It has built individual confidence and community engagement. The welcome and support provided through the project has indeed enhancedthis Community Hub. ‘Clare is a single mum of 2 young children and wanted to return to work. During her time at the centre Clare has gained her Level 2 qualifications in both Adult Literacy and Numeracy; Level 2 ECDL, Level 2 IT, Level 2 Adult Support and a Level 3 qualification in Counselling and Theory which she has used to great effect in assisting to run the Centre’s youth sessions. Clare volunteers at the Centre 5 days a week and, as a qualified communicator for the Deaf, has run British Sign Language courses on behalf of the Centre. This has proved to be extremely popular and she now delivers training courses in British Sign Language (BSL), including IT courses throughout East Durham where demand has exceeded all expectations. Just one example of how the centre has changed lives and livelihoods’ (Partnership Manager, Rona Hardy).

www.shottonitcentre.co.uk www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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PROJECT

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7

Addictions UK: The Recovery Route (AUK)

‘There are higher than average suicide rates in rural areas especially among males. The economic climate continues to cause higher unemployment and reduction of services. It continues to increase pressure on individuals and families’ (AUKDirector, James King). Funding Breakdown

Individuals Supported 55

75% 25%

LEADER

£34,560

Match

£11,520

The Local Action Group (LAG) worked with Addictions Director to develop a project to meet the needs of rural East Durham. The LAG particularly wanted to ensure there was no duplication of service and that the project would not overlap with statutory provision. The project offered a telephone counselling service, to support individuals in East Durham who experienced difficulties such as addictions, self-esteem issues and worklessness. The advantages of this project was that it reduced the need for transport allowing access to the service for carers and those finding it difficult to leave the house. The project delivered sessions to 55 individuals with an average of 30 sessions per person, using a confidential telephone counselling service. There was also an option to conduct face to face sessions in exceptional circumstances, maybe where a carer would feel compromised in their own home. James went on to say ‘To offer a full service provision based only on using traditional face to face sessions is more expensive and difficult in rural areas. Telephone services have a better effect on the environment because appointments will be rarely missed and travel not required’. The project worked closely with local health providers, GP’s and other support networks to become established and aimed to get beneficiaries involved in volunteering and training opportunities as their mental health improved.

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The project was promoted online and leaflets were handed out in the local communities; as a result Addictions built relationships with support organisations to which they make referrals and took referrals in return. There was an enormous sense of achievement and pride in the project as the numbers of users achieving abstinence from drugs or alcohol were in excess of 50%. The project concluded that lives had been saved as a result of the counselling delivered and confirmed that they would continue to work with the individuals supported. Addictions confirmed that the project was a resounding success and proved that the needs of rural communities were not being met by statutory provision. They now have a proven model and evidence to show there is a need and will endeavour to maintain its sustainability, having formally agreed to continue to work with clients.


PROJECT

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8

Hett Village Hall Association: Capital Refurbishment

Hett Village Hall is the only community facility in a village of approximately 80 houses and about 242 residents. There were no shops and the pub and Post Office had recently closed; the bus service to Durham had been withdrawn leaving the village vulnerable. Funding Breakdown

The only meeting place was the village hall which was in poor repair and in need of renovation. The Hall is an ex-army World War 11 Nissen hut, second hand in 1958. It was now towards the end of its useable life and Hett Village Hall Association (HVHA) had received full planning permission for a replacement, but the economic downturn and a loss of many funding sources meant the plans had to be shelved.

Businesses Supported 1

100%

A survey had revealed some serious issues; there was no hot water system, minimal kitchen facilities, old and inadequate plumbing systems and the need for a full electrical rewire. In short unless those items could be replaced the Hall would have to close, current activities would cease and Hett would lose its only remaining facility.

0%

LEADER

£20,643

HVHA were also the first community association in County Durham and the North East of England to be awarded Hallmark 3, working in association with Durham Community Action’s ( DCA formerly DRCC) Community Building Advisor. They had achieved level 1 and 2 of the national quality standard scheme the previous year; level 3 being much more strategic and forward thinking, this was a position they could not have contemplated without the LEADER funding.

Match

£0

East Durham LEADER LAG could see how important the Hall was to the Community and there was a strong will to support its refurbishment. In addition to the LEADER funding residents contributed hours of their own labour to re-lay the floor, paint and decorate, and make curtains etc. Following the award of the grant Hett Village Hall reported a ‘remarkable and consistent rise in use’. By 2012 there had been an increase of 2018 people giving a total of 5712 users, this represented a 64.57% increase, 25 private functions and 12 HVHA organised community events.

www.hettvillagehall.co.uk www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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PROJECT

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9

Wheatley Hill Community Association: Catering Manager Project

WHCA approached LEADER with a 5 year development plan commencing with a project which identified a market need to develop a high quality, economic catering facility for a range of community and business customers.

Funding Breakdown

Their plan would see them seeking capital funds to renovate and improve their current kitchen facilities and employ a full time Catering Manager to develop the business and increase the opportunities for employment and training.

Businesses Supported 1

A much favoured ‘meals on wheels’ service ceased to exist in the locality; this had previously benefitted the elderly and disabled residents by providing healthy meals at affordable prices. Together with the opportunity to sell produce through local businesses and to increase the catering offer for functions and events, a comprehensive business plan was compiled.

Jobs created 1

100% 0%

LEADER

£33,499

Match

£0

Wheatley Hill community Association (WHCA) applied for a 2 year project and appointed a Catering Manager; unfortunately after a couple of months they found themselves having to re-appoint the position but after a false start the project was soon underway. Local garages and shops were approached to sell produce to their customers but after a trial period little growth potential was identified. New Catering menus were introduced in the café, a ‘meals on wheels’ service was developed, the range of corporate packages was increased as was the catering offer for weddings and private functions. Lunch clubs were held for elderly residents allowing social interaction, which for many would be their only company that week. Community transport was used for their safe delivery.

www.greenhillscentre.co.uk PAGE 14

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The meals on wheels element of the project was by far the most successful and as a result of the expansion the business is in a stronger, more viable position - maybe against the odds of the economic downturn and austerity measures. On conclusion of the project the Catering Manager left and the Board took a decision to replace this post with two part time cooks. It was felt that the development work had been achieved and that maybe not much more could be accomplished in the immediate future. Replacing one post with two part time posts has given the business security as they now have cover for sickness and leave entitlements. The catering facilities obtained a five star food hygiene rating, as a result of the intervention and appointment of the manager and the centre has a much improved reputation for delivering good q uality affordable catering to a wider community. They have also gone on to achieve Hallmark 1 with the help of the DCA Community Buildings Advisor.


PROJECT

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10

East Durham Partnership: Furniture Re-cycle Project

The Furniture recycling project at Horden was already creating apprenticeship schemes in retail and warehouse skills by recycling furniture and white goods, but the LEADER project would allow them to reach out into the rural communities. Funding Breakdown

Jobs created 2

Individuals Benefiting 4665

Training Days delivered 573

77.06% 22.94%

LEADER

£55,728

Match

£16,586

he project funded additional staff for eighteen months which would allow them greater organisational stability. This would enable them to increase their recycling capacity which in turn means they could support more families suffering poverty and hardship though debt, allowing these families an alternative way to purchase low cost goods. The project funded the post of a new Employability Training Manager and project worker;East Durham Partnership (EDP) provided technical skills support through offering work experience placements for unemployed clients across East Durham. Accredited qualifications were gained on the programme including IT, warehousing, customer services, joinery and administration; effectively increasing EDP’s workforce and therefore contributing to the expansion of the business. The business, based in Horden, collected quality second hand furniture from residents and also had business contracts with some of the bigger furniture suppliers to receive end of line stock and slight seconds which were then assembled in the warehouse and put out for display. They also stocked a selection of electrical appliances as EDP had a licence to dispose safely of white goods and were contracted by major companies to take their pre-used appliances. The rural focus of this project meant they could broaden their activity across the East Durham LEADER area, not only engaging beneficiaries on the work programme but also being able to increase delivery of quality furniture to

smaller outlying villages; coming at a time when demand for reused household furniture and white goods were on the increase. The warehouse is well stocked with a good choice of furniture and white goods, all goods are displayed with two prices, those being sold at a discounted rate to individuals in receipt of certain benefits. East Durham Partnership engaged with social housing providers across the area to create an innovative new scheme where first time tenants (eligibility being the receipt of certain benefits) could fully equip their homes; the cost being covered by low cost Credit Union loans paid in instalments. In all 750 families have benefitted from this service either by having used household goods removed or by acquiring items through the enterprise. All posts created by the project were maintained on completion and the organisation is much more resilient as a result of LEADER funding. ”Without funding the project may have proceeded but to a much lesser extent. The main difference is that the project targeted rural communities and without LEADER funding we would not have afforded to prioritise the RDPE areas. The staff recruited as a result of the project remain with us 3 years later and the organisational turnover has almost doubled” (Ellen Foxton, Chief Executive).

www.enterprisedurhampartnership.co.uk www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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321 // BASIC SERVICES FOR THE ECONOMY AND RURAL POPULATION

11

South Hetton and District Community Association (SHDCA): Community Fitness for All

SHDCA’s mission is to address health inequalities in East Durham by tackling obesity and providing physical activities for disabled people. To develop an inclusive health and fitness programme and empower the community by providing information and equipment to help them make better health choices. Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 6

Individuals Supported 34

63.68% 36.32%

LEADER

£55,417

PAGE 16

Match

£31,608

South Hetton Community Association have been serving the community since 1983, initially managing the old colliery buildings as a community facility for the benefit of the local community, managing in 2003 to secure funds for a new purpose built Centre. Presently the population of South Hetton is in the region of 3,600 and this is the only inclusive community building that caters for all ages and groups.

The plan submitted involved splitting the sports hall horizontally, effectively creating double the space to accommodate a new health and fitness suite, providing specialised equipment and securing Inclusive Fitness Initiative IFI accreditation, becoming the first of its type in East Durham. The design layout and specialised equipment were especially considered to allow access for wheelchair users.

The Centre offers many facilities and is well used; it includes a sports hall, small hall, training room, gym, study/library with internet access and a pool room. It provides considerable youth provision, playgroup sessions, lunch clubs and social evenings for elderly residents and is generally seen to serve the community well. Their Manager approached LEADER as they had a specific project idea to put their big sports hall to much better use. The hall had a very high ceiling and proved to be difficult to heat, and whilst it was equipped for team games, squash, badminton etc. the use was declining. Meanwhile the very small community gym located in a room along the corridor was struggling to meet the demand; at peak times a shortage of equipment meant people had to wait and queue for equipment. South Hetton is an area of high deprivation; statistics show high levels of incapacity, poor health and that obesity in younger children is on the increase.

A second and equally important aspect of the project was the purchase of a sensory wall and the development of a rehabilitation area, suitable for individuals with neurological disabilities such as autism and dyspraxia, improving brain/body co-ordination, concentration and spatial awareness. Young people can create fun, active games for a cardiovascular workout.

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

The project was successfully completed and the community have engaged well with the new facility; it being particularly popular with young people, several of whom have declared an interest in fitness as a possible career option.


PROJECT

BASIC SERVICES FOR THE ECONOMY AND RURAL POPULATION // 321

12

Shotton Partnership 2000 Ltd: Oscars Café

It was very popular with elderly residents popping in to buy a hot meal to have in the comfort of their own home. Staff became accustomed to the routines of these clients and if they had not used the cafe for a few days they would pay a visit and make sure they were well. Funding Breakdown

Oscars Café in Shotton was part of the Primary Care Trust’s Food Co-operative Pilot Scheme, meaning in addition to serving affordable hot food and snacks it sold fresh fruit and vegetables one day a week. The café was run by one paid member of staff supported by volunteers, but was in need of new leadership and expertise. The Partnership approached LEADER to support the funding of a Catering Manager, the expectation being that bringing in a professional with experience of running a catering business would create a new vibrant energy and bring a host of new ideas that would enhance and sustain the business.

Jobs created 1

Businesses Supported 1

Individuals Supported 106

The Catering Manager post was funded for 25 hours per week, during which time the menus were extended to include breakfast options for ‘early birds’ heading to work and young people heading off to school, and an extended range of hot lunches and snacks offered as either an ‘eat in’ or ‘take away’ option. The café also took part in East Durham Trust’s Snow Squad Project and were able to deliver 80 free meals to elderly residents over the winter months. This project also helped to compile a database of the most vulnerable in the village. One elderly resident summed up by saying “Before I started to come to Oscar’s I used to sit in my pyjamas all day”.

100% 0%

LEADER

£12,645

Match

£0

With the experiences gained from the Food Co-operative, the Partnership created a new service offering fresh fruit and vegetables at affordable prices available on a daily basis. This was a benefit to the community, as there was no greengrocer in the village and the only place to buy fresh produce was expensive and of limited variety.

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

The Catering Manager also engaged with community groups and the local college to offer volunteer and work placement opportunities. Volunteers gained experience in customer service, working in a functional kitchen, time management and communication skills; all of which are very transferable in the workplace and would enhance their CV’s. The inclusive nature of the Partnership project meant that volunteers could easily access other projects such as the IT Centre where they could gain skills in numeracy, literacy, IT or go on to do NVQ accredited courses. The café soon became a popular meeting place for people, and an information hub developed where people could be kept updated about what was going on in their community. They delivered a number of cookery courses and taster sessions, hoping to further engage with residents and promote the benefits of a healthy diet as well as sourcing tasty recipes the sessions included price comparison so everyone knew where to buy the cheapest produce. On completion of the project, the café closed due to a 50% increase in rent. The long term future, however, has always been that it would be relocated to the Community Centre because the Partnership is taking over Shotton Community Centre as part of the County Council’s Asset Transfer Programme and will relocate some of its services in due course. The fruit and vegetable stall is already located there and they hope to expand the lunch club by offering more days per week and open a café where people can drop in.

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13

Communicare: Social Business Development

The organisation suffered heavily from cuts to the County Council budget when the austerity measures kicked in, with the Management Committee taking the decision to create a social enterprise through which they could develop business opportunities. Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 2

Jobs Safeguarded 6.5

Individual Supported 3494

Communicare is a registered Charity based in Peterlee; it has a proven track record of providing community transport to socially excluded users and their carers across the East Durham LEADER area. The operation benefitted from 24 dedicated volunteers and a strong Management Committee of 12 who all pulled together under the supervision of a full time salaried Manager whose main aim was to ensure the most effective use of their 8 fully accessible vehicles. They approached LEADER to fund the key objectives of their new strategy and business plan including: • Safeguarding the position of Project Manager • Creation of a part time Admin post

61.91%

• Safeguard 6 paid driver posts,

38.09%

• Train 6 paid and 2 volunteers to Public Service Vehicle(PSV) standard • Set up a Social Enterprise

LEADER

£32,698

Match

£20,116

Rural transport has always been an issue in East Durham with Communicare providing so much more that than just transport. It was a lifeline for many elderly and disabled customers, allowing individuals to remain independent, giving them a means to get to hospital or doctors and tackling social inclusion agendas. They helped reduce isolation by taking groups of elderly or disabled individuals to social events, lunch clubs and providing a shopper bus service.

www. communicare-peterlee.co.uk PAGE 18

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

The service was available to individuals as well as groups and residential homes and whilst a contribution was paid the full cost of the service would be out of their reach. Setting up a Ltd company would allow them to trade and manage their sustainable growth in a more effective manner. Communicare drivers were all qualified to the Minibus Driver Awareness Scheme (MiDAS) as standard but Durham County Council would only tender with organisations whose drivers held a Public Service Vehicle Licence (PSV); effectively meaning that Communicare could not tender for any of the longer journeys through East Durham that could potentially provide them with a regular income. The Management Committee agreed that training their 8 current drivers would not only help them as an organisation to tender for better contracts, but the PSV licenses would belong to the individuals, in turn making them more employable in their own right. Communicare still wanted to deliver the social contracts it had always been recognised for, but knew that it had to secure some large contracts in order to sustain the activity. The drivers all passed their PSV licences and Communicare still benefits the residents of East Durham. The company has made links with Langley Park Travel and the two companies work together to reduce administration costs and provide a wider service.


PROJECT

BASIC SERVICES FOR THE ECONOMY AND RURAL POPULATION // 321

14

The Soil Association: Schools Farmers Markets

The project would set up farmers markets in schools, providing a community hub in areas where many services have disappeared, children will participate fully, building links between local business and members of the community.

Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 20

Jobs Created 1

Individuals Supported 1582

83.59%

The Soil Association approached LEADER with a model that had been piloted in Shropshire Hills and the Northern Marches LEADER areas. The LAG funded the post of a Co-ordinator and initial set up costs. The project worked with 9 schools engaging children in workshops around the principles of local food, what a farmers market entails, the importance of food miles and why eating local seasonal foods is healthier. The children learned about running a market, how to be a producer for a day, what to make, and how to cost and work out profit margins. Each member of the group was given a job role for the day, be it marketing manager, stall staff, finance manager or parking attendants. Each school visited Durham City farmers market to get ideas of how they would like their market to look and feel; also providing network opportunities to invite local producers to come along to their markets.

16.41%

LEADER

£34,560

Match

Increasing health and wellbeing is a key theme within primary and secondary level education and is reflected across the curriculum, making the practical and theoretical activities of setting up and running the farmers markets an attractive option for many teachers. The close working relationship necessitates staff, pupils and local community to work in partnership. The schools have integrated the farmers markets into their curriculum. The Soil Association supported the implementation by developing materials for their website and producing a toolkit with step by step guidance. The project was judged to be very successful, the schools now have the skills and experience to continue running the markets. A total of 12 markets were run during the project and all schools engaged have expressed a desire to continue in the future. Rupert Aker, of the Soil Association concluded,

£6,786

Nine schools participated in the project with a total of 2092 children being involved in the markets, 6 schools grew produce to sell and all 9 cooked and prepared food for sale. Volunteers from the schools and local community contributed a total of 1021 hours to the project and from across the LEADER area 53 producers attended the markets where sales amounting to £9,489 were generated.

“When planning the project and visiting the area in preparation of the project I was concerned that the school farmer’s market project might be difficult to get off the ground due to the disadvantaged nature of the area. However it has turned out to be one of the most successful projects that we have undertaken throughout the country.”

www.soilassociation.org www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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321 // BASIC SERVICES FOR THE ECONOMY AND RURAL POPULATION

15

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds: Farmland Bird Initiative

The aim of the project was to stabilise and increase the declining population of lowland farmland birds, founded on information, experience and conclusions drawn from RSPB conservation work.

Funding Breakdown

Business Supported 16

Jobs Created 0.5

Individuals Supported 47

New Techniques Introduced 16

Number of Training Days Delivered 5

This project was technically a Co-operation project (a project run in Co-operation between two LAG areas) with the Northumberland Coast and Lowlands LEADER area as both projects were funded 50% from their respective areas; however they were submitted to each LAG as separate projects.

was estimated that 10 of the 11 targeted birds featured in the project were also indicated in the Durham Biodiversity Action Plan; the plans complementing each other to aid the survival of the Corn Bunting, Curlew, Reed Bunting, Tree Sparrow, Skylark, Redshank, Linnet, Snipe, Yellow Wagtail and Lapwing.

The project had four elements, to be carried out simultaneously, in order to develop a more targeted and tailor made approach to benefit several critical species. The elements are to:

The project worked directly with farmers and landowners to help them integrate bird friendly environmental techniques into their farm business. In addition the RSPB worked to assist farmers in gaining access to new agri-environment grants which could bring up to £1,350,000 into the farming economies of East Durham over the next 10 years.

• Identify and target core farmland bird “hotspots” for conservation action. • Work in partnership to target agrienvironment spending to these hotspots and to ensure the right management on the ground to benefit these species. • Provide face to face advice to farmers and land managers. • Train farmers and farm advisors on new conservation management developments and farmland bird conservation issues.

100%

LEADER

The project would create or restore wet grassland habitats and it was understood that the target areas within East Durham would ensure a range of other ‘at risk’ species particularly lowland breeding waders which would also benefit from the interventions. It

£10,612

www.rspb.org.uk/ourwork/farming/advice/conservation/ PAGE 20

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

Through the project around 16 farmers received face to face and in depth consultations. They have all adopted new techniques which will contribute towards encouraging some of the most threatened birds and insects back into our farmland, effectively going another step closer to improving the local environment. The project has now concluded but its existence allowed the provision of a sustainable network of trained advisors and farmers who can pass on their knowledge to others regarding new sustainable environmentally friendly farming techniques; this leaves a legacy of trained local individuals to share best practice throughout East Durham.


PROJECT

BASIC SERVICES FOR THE ECONOMY AND RURAL POPULATION // 321

16

Durham Wildlife Trust (DWT): Hawthorn Dene

“The education visits enhanced pupils’ learning through the National Curriculum and the feedback was very positive. It has been a fantastic opportunity to bring over 150 children into the reserve; many for the first time.” (Kirsty Pollard, DWT). Funding Breakdown

Individuals Supported 185

DWT approached east Durham LEADER to fund a project focusing on Hawthorn Dene, a nature reserve located to the north of Easington, currently managed by the Trust but not particularly well known. It provides a fantastic opportunity to see East Durham at its best. Hawthorn Dene is the second largest coastal dene in the county and cuts through internationally significant Magnesian Limestone; it is of the highest quality in terms of both landscape and biodiversity being designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).

100%

LEADER

£7,574

The Woodland Trail, involved the installation and creation of a ten point waymarker nature trail through the reserve. Ten unique brass rubbing disks were designed to inform visitors of the wildlife they may see and hear as they venture through the habitats of the Dene. An audio guide was also produced to provide more information about the history, ecology, geology and management of the Dene, which dates back to the Mesolithic period (8,000 to 4,000 BC). The guide lasts 12 minutes and can be downloaded from the Durham Wildlife Trust website.

The project would support visits from 6 local schools to the Dene. Funding was made available to create an education pack specific to Hawthorn Dene, which will equip groups for education visits for many years to come. The project would increase visitor numbers to the dene and the wider Durham Coast by providing a woodland trail and downloadable audio guide; in addition a community event will engage local individuals and families, motivating local people to enjoy their surrounding environment. The funding also paid a transport allowance for 6 local schools and a Durham Wildlife Trust Education Leader to deliver a full day of activities with each school. The schools would not be charged for the education sessions.

www.durhamwt.co.uk/pdfs/Reserves%20pdf/HAWTHORN%20DENE.pdf www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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17

East Durham Business Service: Sustainable Businesses

The project would deliver across the LEADER area where many of the rural villages demonstrate high levels of deprivation, high street after high street of boarded up shops paint a sad picture of what used to be.

Funding Breakdown

Business Supported 84

Jobs Safeguarded 1

Indivisuals Supported 103

About 18 months later East Durham Business Service (EDBS) approached LEADER to fund a business support project in the rural villages, and the LAG were keen to involve the original steering group as they hoped it would give the group an avenue through which they could develop their ideas. EDBS held conversations with the traders and the Sustainable Business Project was developed.

62.99% 37.01%

LEADER

£41,525

Match

The seed of the Sustainable Business project was germinated through the Farmers Markets at Dalton Park, a small group of businesses and producers met with LEADER staff to develop a ‘Buy Local’ project. The group had strong ideas about how they wanted to operate; a website for members, search options for local businesses and a network whereby they could support each other. Unfortunately progress was slow; questions remained unanswered as to who was going to take the lead on financial responsibility, managing the network, the website, and retrospective payments for a project with no cash flow as such.

£24,401

The project hopes to revitalise many of the local village businesses and support local producers, through the creation of new routes to market, (both on line and on the high street). Increasing the public’s awareness to access high quality locally produced goods and services create new opportunities, and develop skills leading to sustainability for the micro business. Traders identified a need for professional advice to help with promotion, marketing, raising consumer awareness and to facilitating a network. By the nature of the micro enterprise often one

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www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

person has to cover all of these roles, in addition to moving the business forward. The project came at a time when EDBS had secured European Funding to support new businesses, but at the same time public funding had been cut and Business Link provision had been withdrawn. The LAG were satisfied there would be no duplication and could see the benefits of providing assistance to existing businesses. The project worked with a range of small business to identify skills gaps and mentor on a one to one basis. In addition they identified a series of free half day workshops aimed at providing key information; the sessions included marketing skills, PC skills, eBay workshop, website design, employment law, the use of Social media and recruitment advice. The project supported businesses by showing different routes to market; they created an e-portal for businesses to promote their products and services and provide a ‘one stop hub’ enabling the public to access traders within their local community. The network served well to encourage inter trading between local business, with one particularly good example where a business in Seaham are joining forces with a company in Easington to open an new venture in South Hetton. ‘The project has been very successful, LEADER funding had been extremely important in reaching out to smaller pockets and outlying villages within the local community and 6 jobs have been created indirectly throughout the network.’ (Greame Tinkler, Business Advisor EDBS.)


PROJECT

BASIC SERVICES FOR THE ECONOMY AND RURAL POPULATION // 321

18

East Durham Citizens Advice Bureau: Volunteer Outreach Project

The CAB came to LEADER with a project to develop services in the rural communities, demand was exceeding provision, as austerity measures and welfare reform impacted on local communities the need for such a service was increasing. Funding Breakdown

Jobs created 3

Individuals Benefiting 1549

New Techniques Introduced 1

64.62% 35.38%

LEADER

£91,000

Match

£49,865

The revenue project would pay salary and office costs for the employment of a rural outreach worker to provide additional drop in sessions in the villages of Murton, Trimdon, Haswell, Thornley, Easington Colliery and South Hetton. The project would also implement a programme of recruiting volunteers, aiming to develop a more sustainable service for vulnerable communities. The CAB training is renowned for being well structured and thorough; on average it can take 4 to 6 months to complete. Training encompasses several modules and includes self-study packs and a certified external course, followed by supervised interviews and preparation of case studies. In line with the increased number of volunteers, the rural outreach worker will work in partnership with new volunteers in the additional localities. The project will focus on providing 20 volunteers, with recognised qualifications in advice and guidance; this can increases the confidence and employability of the individual, often leading to employment. East Durham hosts some of the most deprived communities in the country, worklessness, low aspirational achievements, poor educational standards and poor health all compounded by low car ownership and rural isolation. Many villages fall within the worst 10 % for one or more of the categories.

The CAB has long been recognised for helping clients to maximise benefits, indirectly increasing the local economy and supporting many out of difficulty and hardship. The LAG saw this as an exceptional project and was keen to support its approval. In the period that this project delivered East Durham CAB engaged with over 6,800 new cases, advising on 26,421 issues. They continued to see high numbers of benefit and debt cases, 40% of all cases could be attributed to changes in benefit legislation. They helped clients gain over £2 million worth of financial gains. The number of debt cases accounted for 38.5% of all work undertaken and helped clients deal with over £9 million of unpaid debt. The LAG agreed this was a vital service for the community and were keen to see its continued success.

www.citizensadvice.org.uk www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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19

Durham County Council: Limestone LinX Cycle and Walkway

As village schools closed, doctor’s surgeries merged and local authority services were reduced residents found they had to travel to neighbouring villages to access amenities, the development of the cycle routes and walkways increased access. Funding Breakdown

Individuals Benefiting 22

New Tourism Activities Supported 3

100%

LEADER

£61,200

The Limestone LinX Partnership was established when the 7 rural communities of Bowburn, Cassop, Coxhoe, Kelloe, Old Quarrington, Park Hill and Quarrington Hill were united in the development of three circular cycle and walk ways which interlink to provide a choice of seven routes of varying distance and difficulty. The fact that the routes were sited on the limestone escarpment gives the area significance as a natural resource, the habitat being home to many unique species, and what was borne out of need became a local treasure. The Partnership worked for several years to develop the routes, the project team worked with local authority members but the main thrust was from grass roots representatives of the local communities who worked together. When the Partnership approached LEADER, a new section had been identified joining the village of Coxhoe with the industrial estate at Bowburn. Although a relatively short stretch it was an integral link alongside a busy road which was in very poor condition, the need for lights and traffic management made the upgrading expensive. However the LAG liked the idea of an improved safer, green route to the industrial estate. It was timely in relation to the launch of the Government’s ‘Cycle to Work Scheme’ and they were happy to support the project. The project was £61,200 of LEADER funds, a cash flow which would be virtually impossible for the Partnership to manage through their bank account. After long discussions with partners in Durham County Council (DCC) it was suggested DCC could submit the

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application on behalf of the Partnership. This made the whole project possible, without the assistance of DCC the project would not have been able to proceed. It is a good example of partnership working. The LEADER funding was targeted towards engineering works, signage, interpretation and information panels and as well as access to work, leisure and local nature reserves it was hoped that additional benefits would come from attracting tourists to the area’s natural environment. The routes have proven to be very popular for runners and cyclists and the Primary Care Trust use the wider routes for delivering their health agenda objectives particularly promoting bike rides for older or less able people; owning a bike is not a requirement as they can be hired from the nearby leisure centre. The route is also very popular in the summer with families and individuals using disability scooters. The Partnership continues to grow; the most recent development is the recording of a video of the entire route by a local enthusiast. This is now available as a virtual tour through the facilities of the X- biking project in the leisure centre, (see virtual cycling project). Additionally it provides a promotional tool for all of the partners involved in showcasing the unique landscape. Coxhoe is a shining example of a community working together and a great example of how LEADER can work in and with communities.


PROJECT

ENCOURAGEMENT OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES // 313

20

Durham County Council: Report on the Equine Sector in East Durham

‘This has been an incredibly valuable and useful piece of work for the LAG to commission; we should make sure that we use it to secure our existing commitment to the equine sector in the future LDS’. Jeff Corrighan, Vice Chair East Durham LEADER. Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 6

100%

LEADER

The LAG believes the strengths of this sector are rarely explicitly acknowledged and potential contributions to social cohesion, environmental and economic well-being are not fully understood. This study will provide robust factual information about the industry at a national, regional and local level, informing the current and prospective contribution to the economic development and tourism offer. The LAG have a vision that sees East Durham as a Centre of Excellence for horse tourism in the UK but it was felt there were barriers to be overcome before such a vision could be accomplished. These include:

to endorse its vision for East Durham operating as a Centre of Excellence for horse tourism in the UK, by:

Little or no apparent cohesion between operators currently within the sector.

An existing bridleway infrastructure that is fractured leading to forced access and conflict.

Sector developments which are ad hoc and uncoordinated (putting additional pressures on bridleway network).

• •

£15,000

Distributing the study to key stakeholders with a view to creating a steering group.

Publicise and promote findings through appropriate media.

Adopt the draft Action Plan as a framework for future development of the sector.

Support the establishment of an Equine Sector Business Support Group and Marketing plan.

Establish and maintain contact with Visit County Durham to develop a tourism product, secure their support and have a clear position within the County Durham Destination Management Plan.

A lack of any relevant formal education/ training to improve the situation.

Secure funds to fully survey and cost proposed, trails, loops, routes and requirements in respect of parking facilities (car/horse box, watering holes etc.)

A lack of understanding of the benefits (economic, social and health) that the sector can bring.

Develop a future LEADER project to include specific reference to equine sector development and business support.

The LAG are very keen to take this forward.

The Consultation involved a cross section of representatives, relevant DCC staff including Rights of Way Officer, Heritage Coast Partnership, British Horse Society and a number of local equestrian and livery businesses. Key findings would suggest that the LAG continue

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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21

Durham County Council: Quarries Live!

Much of the Durham Magnesian Limestone Escarpment sits within the LEADER area, this project will promote and champion the world class geology on our doorstep and to encourage individuals to appreciate the economic importance and significance of working quarries.

Funding Breakdown

Business Supported 5

Individuals Supported 34

100%

LEADER

£46,889

This was an ambitious project submitted by Durham County Council on behalf of the Limestone Landscape Partnership. The Durham Magnesian Limestone Plateau stretches from the Tyne to the Tees and inland as far as Newton Aycliffe; and includes the East Durham LEADER area. Four viewing platforms were created, one each at Thrislington, Raisby (Coxhoe), Quarrington Hill and Crime Rigg (Sherburn), at each location walling and fencing ensures the safety of visitors, and interpretation panels demonstrate the significance of the area. At the Environmental Centre at Cassop Primary School, a slate bunker was built to allow individuals to search for fossils, it was stock piled with Marl Slate from Thrislington, and visitors were encouraged to explore the natural resources. The project funded fossil hunting equipment, including hammers and eye protection to enable participation from a wider audience; interpretation boards and leaflets assisted with identification of species and provided a timeline. Community groups and school children will access the sites, either by being escorted by quarry owners, or by their teachers who have been trained by leaders of an aligned Limestone Landscape project ‘Learning through the Outside Classroom’. This was a challenging project in many ways; complications in the development phase resulted in significant delays, some due to complicated RDPE procurement requirements

www.limestonelandscapes.info/Pages/QuarriesLive.aspx PAGE 26

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and others because of the lengthy preparation of essential Partnership Agreements. Service Level Agreements had to be drawn up between the private quarry owners and Durham County Council demonstrating the roles and responsibilities of the Partners. Durham County Council secured a 10 year access to the sites and maintenance arrangements had to be drawn up before contracts could be issued. Ongoing activity promotes the development of learning and tourism opportunities as the geology of the area becomes more renowned. The Partnership is looking forward to welcoming tourists and visitors excited to see at first hand the extraction of limestone and understand its use, as well as the opportunity to hunt for 290 million year old fossils within the Marl slate rocks. In September ProGEO the European Association for the Conservation of the Geological Heritage held their 2013 Annual Conference advertised as “Geological heritage and geo-conservation at the north western edge of Europe“ in the north east of England. The five day event included half a day looking at the Permian geology of the Durham Magnesian Limestone. The Limestone Landscapes project took a group of geologists from across Europe to key sites in the area, including the Thrislington Quarry Viewing Platform; selected as an example of best practice of geological interpretation and a means of increasing public knowledge and awareness of geology.


PROJECT

ENCOURAGEMENT OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES // 313

22

West Rainton and Leamside Parish Council: Cycle Hub Feasibility

The proposal received from the West Rainton and Leamside Parish Council was to fund a scoping, mapping and feasibility exercise to test the viability of a new and exciting Cycle Hub for the village of West Rainton.

Funding Breakdown

Feasibility Study 1

54.54% 45.46%

LEADER

£5,999

Match

£5,000

The report would define a hub, informing of community and commercial benefits, undertake scoping to identify possible routes and assess the capital cost of development.

would increase provision and improvethe routes currently available.

After going out to tender, the selected contractor studied the literature and available data, drawing on a wealth of experience and knowledge of cycling tourism to map the study. Recreational Tourism Services held a consultation event during the West Rainton and Leamside (WR & L) Summer Fayre; during the wider consultation opinions were sought from the following groups;

That cycling is growing in popularity in villages and towns; not only in WR &L but across the UK and that demand is proven for being able to access good cycle routes from the doorstep.

Creating a Community cycling hub to the required standard is highly recommended to meet the needs of local cyclists.

Mountain biking is growing exponentially in popularity and communities should support its managed development (subject to local conditions and agreements)

There is a clear demand for shared-use traffic free routes.

There is a clear demand for high quality map/guide for the WR & L area and for high quality cycle route information.

Creating a community cycling hub is as complex as funds will allow but a simple model is not necessarily a costly exercise.

WR & L Parish Councillors The History Group Durham County Council The Green Group WR &L Youth Group St. Marys Church WR & L Primary School Landowners and local residents Durham Wildlife Trust Ramblers Association National Trust Limestone LinX Coxhoe British Horse Society Schools in Durham, Chester-le Street and Sunderland The Consultant asked whether people cycled, and if not why? He asked about their perception of available routes, barriers to use, and what they might like to see available to them. He studied the current routes and tracks available and suggested how engaging with landowners might allow access onto private land which

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

The study concluded the following:

WR & L Parish council were very pleased with the study as they now had the evidence to support funding applications, they continue to talk to Durham County Council about alternative transport plans, all of which improve the visibility of WR & L as a Cycle Hub. They were particularly pleased to build relationships with Limestone LinX Partnership and felt that learning and best practise could be shared.

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23

Durham Heritage Coast Partnership: Transnational Co-operation with Finland

The Nature Tourism project delivered with colleagues from Silmu LAG, Eastern Uusimaa in southern Finland was aimed at reducing visitor impact through environmental awareness and education.

Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 30

Individuals Benefiting 40

New Tourism Activities Supported 9

Additionsl Visitor Days 10,000

Additional Overnight Visitors 3,000

New Products Introduced 2

New Techniques Introduced 2

Participants Expected to Require a skill 20

Transnational Co-operation is an intrinsic part of LEADER with the sharing of best practise between Local Action Groups. East Durham LEADER funded a project with Silmu LAG, Eastern Uusimaa, 51 Km to the East of Helsinki and sitting on the Archipelago area of Porvoo. The project, hosted by the Durham Heritage Coast Partnership, would include lessons on interpretation and making best use of environmental assets. Our Finnish colleagues were particularly interested in the history of the Durham Coast and its regeneration following the environmental destruction caused by the coal mines. Silmu LAG works locally with Itä-Uudenmaan ja Porvoonjoen vesien – ja ilmansuojeluyhdistys, the Water and Air Association of Eastern Uusimaa who have a particular interest in water purification and the re-introduction of natural species. A scoping visit by Niall Benson, the Durham Heritage Coast Officer helped to establish a framework for the project and the sign off of a transnational agreement from which the project was developed. The first trip was undertaken by East Durham Partners in August 2012. This was not only a reconnaissance mission but an opportunity to further explore where the skills and experiences of partners could be most effectively utilised. Durham delegates shared a wealth of experiences; learning the Finnish culture and history that included a tour of Porvoo town; discovering the history of the tumultuous relationship with Russia and learning that Finland was approaching 100 years of independence in 2017. A visit to Loviisa City and a meeting with the Mayor

www.durhamheritagecoast.org PAGE 28

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

Sten Fronden allowed the group to determine how different community and government structures deal with the very similar problems of regeneration, closure of industries and social isolation. The Durham team consisted of the Vice Chair, LEADER Manager, and specialists in the fields of biodiversity and marine biology. They were accompanied by youth and community representatives, with all individuals taking responsibility for their own particular area of interest. Following a visit to the forest at Sipoo and the island of Sandö a dialogue began to formulate in respect of a Finnish project exploring eco-tourism, the best use of natural assets, access to the fruits of the forest, foraging and ‘Everymans Rights’ the Finnish right to access and collect certain material from the land. On the return trip Tero Myllyvirta and Juha Niemi of the Water and Air association worked on the project objectives. During project discussions, the partners saw an opportunity to share the writing of a song, celebrating coastal waters and thought it would be an excellent way to commemorate the partnership and leave a legacy of the project. They started to arrange the song, entitled ‘We all go back to the sea’ with Steve Percival, (East Durham LAG member) who would perform the song at the Low Tide Day Festival in Seaham the following May. Steve and Tero contributed to the song, working with a local choir and schoolchildren, with many versions being emailed across the waters, building the song layer by layer. The


ENCOURAGEMENT OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES // 313

Number of LAG’s supported 2

88.8% 11.2%

LEADER

£47,493

Match

£6,000

song included references to local birds and wildlife and contained sounds of nature mixed with traditional Finnish sounds. The project also began to engage with schoolchildren and provided an opportunity for our Finnish visitors to participate in the British education techniques. The weather for that first visit to Seaham was particularly harsh, with an unforgiving snowy wind blowing from the East but everyone was wrapped up warm for an introduction to rock pooling, a new experience for the Finns as the Gulf of Finland is non-tidal. An afternoon workshop compared learning techniques and opportunities and preparatory plans were drawn up for an interactive treasure map for Sandö, an uninhabited Island in the Porvoo Archipelago. Collaboration for an illustrative and informative map would use waypoints as seen in the Heritage Coast Partnerships adventure trail, but developed into a theme of Vikings or smugglers. Schedules were tight and the next day saw the team studying videos of the award winning environmental education project of Rönnskär Island in the outer archipelago and the group continued to work on the themes. The next exchange visit continued the themes in the work plan, and functional practices were emerging. This time the Durham delegates represented tourism and educational specialists and the bespoke work plan was starting to show results. The delegates met with schoolchildren to catch and dissect fish, linking the activity to science. The fish were then cooked on a

barbecue, to promote eating fish from the river and to show how easy it was to prepare healthy food. Meanwhile the song was close to being finalised with the first performance only weeks away. The Finnish approach to educations is very different from the UK and the UK has always shown an interest in their approach, formal learning starts at age 7, learning a second language by age 9 and usually a third by age 13. There are no mandatory exams until age 18. The Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA) results show Finland is consistently in the top 6 countries. The last assessment in 2013 ranked Finland 3 in reading, 6 in maths and 2 in science, whilst the UK ranked 26 in reading, 28 in maths and 16 in science. Janet Blackburn, a member of the East Durham LAG was particularly interested in the Finnish education system as she was an exhead teacher, key contacts were made for future collaboration. The following day the delegates were taken to Sandö Island where a draft of the treasure map was worked through, keeping ideas simple and reducing negative environmental impact was crucial to its success. Interpretative materials were jointly produced, worked through and evaluated producing useful tips for the next steps.

coast. This makes the coast accessible to those without transport and reduces the impact of car travel. Tourism business providers were made aware of its provision and they encouraged visitors to use the bus, this complemented a green tourism training course which was delivered as part of the project. Strong relationships have been forged with both the project partners and with members of both of the LAGs involved. Whilst in the UK the project completed at the end of June 2013, the Finnish project will continue until September 2015 in line with their programme funding. The Finns will continue to develop their interpretative elements with voluntary assistance from the Durham Heritage Coast Partnership. The overall experience provides a strong a foundation for the development of our future LDS, being open to the challenges of transnational co-operation, but also the rich benefits that accrue for all those involved. The project has led to the development of stronger education research links and brought attention to the collaboration and co-operation between the LAG’s with Niall Benson, the Heritage Coast Officer being presented to the Finish ambassador to the UK; who was formally presented with a CD of the celebratory song.

Back in the UK the project was also evolving and learning objectives were being implemented with the introduction of the Little Tern bus, which would transport passengers along the

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

PAGE 29


PROJECT

312 // SUPPORT FOR THE CREATION & DEVELOPMENT OF MICRO ENTERPRISES

24

Plough Farm: Farm shop Development

The proprietors could not accept the invitation to attend the local Farmers market as they did not have the equipment needed to make their produce compliant with health AND safety regulations.

Funding Breakdown

Businesses Supported 1

New Products Introduced 1

New Techniques Introduced 1

43.35% 56.65%

LEADER

PAGE 30

ÂŁ3,252

Match

The main activity at Plough Farm, a small family run business located at Haswell Plough on the outskirts of Shotton, was the grazing of cows and bulls with a view to selling the cows to dairy farms and the bulls for beef, but times were changing and the family opened a small shop on their land with a view to selling their own produce and making the business more sustainable. They had been given the opportunity to attend a new Farmers Market due to start at Dalton Park which was organised by DRCC. Unfortunately they found themselves having to decline as they could not pack and transport their fresh meat in a manner that would be compliant with Health and Safety requirements. They approached East Durham LEADER to help them fund a vacuum packer, a table top refrigeration unit and chiller cabinet. The LAG supported the project hoping it would allow them to increase their business opportunities. The shop now stocks a wider range of products, offering improved service to existing customers and encouraging new business. Customers can choose to have products vacuum packed if they wish. The farm shop now buys in dairy produce supporting other local farms.

ÂŁ4,250

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk


PROJECT

SUPPORT FOR THE CREATION & DEVELOPMENT OF MICRO ENTERPRISES // 312

25

Durham Cow Cheese: New Cheese Vat

The milk used was from local farms and the recipe was perfected in the home kitchen which almost became industrialised.

Funding Breakdown

Durham Cow Cheese Company was a new business established in East Durham producing soft blue cheese. Many months had been spent developing the cheese, using family and friends as tasters, the recipe would be adjusted time and time again until the product was just right. The garage was converted into a temperature controlled ‘cave’ where the cheese matured and in a short space of time it became a premium product.

Business Supported 1

50.00%

Local shops and high class restaurants were demanding the product and the modest 50 litre vat used was struggling to meet the market need. LEADER funding helped to purchase a 500 Litre vat; the cheese went on to win several awards including the Tesco Cheese Challenge, Waitrose made in Britain, and the British Cheese Awards.

50.00%

LEADER

£3,045

Match

£3,045

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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PROJECT

312 // SUPPORT FOR THE CREATION & DEVELOPMENT OF MICRO ENTERPRISES

26

Colin Teague: Training Yard Development

Colin came to LEADER with an ambitious plan to develop new facilities; the new site given to him by his parents was adjacent to the current yard and gave Colin the opportunity to create an independent business.

Funding Breakdown

Colin came to LEADER with an ambitious plan to develop new facilities; the new site given to him by his parents was adjacent to the current yard and gave Colin the opportunity to create an independent business.

Business Supported 1

Jobs Created 4

Colin had been riding since he was 2 years old and always knew he would work with horses and as a successful jockey he had an ambition to train thoroughbred horses. He studied with the British Horse Racing authority and was a licensed trainer; adhering to very strict rules and regimes.

35.09% 64.91%

LEADER

£50,000

PAGE 32

Match

Following increased demand for his training services, and a lack of adequate facilities, East Durham LEADER LAG has supported Colin Teague Racing to create a new thoroughbred race horse training yard.

£92,500

It was thought that bringing such a high calibre business to the village of Wingate would raise the profile of East Durham, would fit with the aims of the LDS to support equine business and the LAG’s aspiration to make East Durham more visible. Owners as prospective customers will often have a number of meetings prior to placing their horses with a trainer, personally assessing the suitability of premises and facilities. With many coming from London or overseas, an overnight stay is common as is an element of sightseeing. The North East is home to many racecourses, Thirsk, Sedgefield, Catterick, Newcastle, Hexham and Ripon which will all benefit from the growth of this business.

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

LEADER funding was used to create a new training yard, stable blocks, storage rooms, a staff room and two barns one for straw and one for storage of food and vitamin. The project would create 4 jobs including stable hands and a jockey; it would be a great opportunity for the right young person, it also offers placements for students attending Houghall College; it encourages workexperience placements to local school children, and is keen to take apprentices from the village. On completion of the project Colin told us “This is a prestigious project and villagers are keen to hear my success stories. As an ex mining village the training of winning racehorses raises esteem and people have a sense of ownership. I get good support from neighbours and feel that people genuinely want me to do well and work my way up the ranks.” It is envisaged that support from LEADER will not only allow for further expansion of the business, but will also benefit the East Durham area. Each horse that races both locally and nationally will give a platform of recognition to the business, and will also highlight East Durham.


PROJECT

SUPPORT FOR THE CREATION & DEVELOPMENT OF MICRO ENTERPRISES // 312

27

Leamside Equestrian Ltd: Centre of Excellence

This project was by far the biggest investment for East Durham LEADER and a strategic fit, not only with the LDS but also the LAG’s vision to develop a regional Centre of Excellence. The building and facilities which were developed, allow for all weather operations at the highest international level.

Funding Breakdown

Business Supported 3

49.93% 50.07%

LEADER

£119,161 Match £119,514

The proposal included modifications to the indoor arena to provide an area for viewing, isolation stables, an equine therapy centre, horse walker, lecture rooms and additional rooms to the administration block. New offices would be included to accommodate associated businesses and local vets would be encouraged to use the innovative, state of the art facilities, to give them access to the space and equipment required to treat their own patients, to the benefit of other horse owners.

The Centre will work with local schools and colleges to offer curriculum enhancement and the development of sports related skills. They are in the process of developing a pilot scheme for local secondary schools, looking to deliver a 6 week programme to introduce riding through the use of a horse simulator. Should the students wish to continue the experience, they will be encouraged to work in partnership with local riding schools to establish a riding programme to meet their individual needs.

There are a number of riding schools in the LEADER area offering a range of services and facilities; however the National Federations and organising bodies have no focal centre within the North East and Yorkshire regions to hold their high profile events, which causes a substantial loss of revenue to the local economy and businesses.

Leamside Equestrian Ltd. contributed to the East Durham LAG Equine study and as a result is already taking the lead with the development of a business cluster which will serve to increase participation in sport through collaboration with other equestrian businesses. The Centre of Excellence will develop as the hub to establish stronger working relationships and provide a network of support for other businesses, strengthening the equine sector and providing practical support. This will provide a platform for the next LDS to consider further development of the sector by widening the remit to look at bridleways and creating an infrastructure that will support horse tourism.

The new facilities will provide the opportunity to hold competitive events from entry level, to support regional, national and international rides, covering show jumping, dressage and all aspects of showing and eventing. Whilst it is recognised that other centres can host smaller events, Leamside Equestrian Ltd. would target larger events for which the other venues could perhaps run qualifiers, making East Durham a strong contender to host national events.

The project has not completed on outputs yet but it is on track to create 10 new jobs, including 5 apprenticeships. It will support 10 businesses directly and many ancillary businesses will benefit through the development of the business club and by bringing visitors to the region.

www.leamsideequestrian.co.uk www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

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PROJECT

323 // CONSERVATION AND UPGRADING LOCAL HERITAGE

28

Durham Wildlife Trust: East Durham Beef

For centuries farmers in County Durham bred cows for beef; they were of such a high quality that the ‘Durham Ox’ became famous all over the world. Cattle grazed along what is now Durham’s Heritage Coast; the farmers unknowingly contributing to its sustainability.

Funding Breakdown

This project was submitted by Durham Wildlife Trust on behalf of the Durham Coastal Grazing Group, a partnership between several organisations all sharing a common goal. The aim was to enhance the environment and improve the habitat of the Magnesian Limestone grasslands through the reintroduction of conservation grazing. LEADER funded a feasibility study to consider the viability of a new East Durham Beef product, looking at how the process of grazing cattle could once again sustain the internationally significant coastal habitat and help support local farmers.

Businesses Supported 7

Individuals Benefiting 1

94.05% 5.95%

LEADER

£20,480

PAGE 34

Match

£1,296

Jim Cokill, Durham Wildlife Trusts director explained “Grazing is a natural way to create and maintain important wildlife habitats, and the exceptional features of the Magnesian Limestone gives the beef a unique and distinctive taste, but conservation grazing must be carefully planned and monitored to protect and promote the growth of delicate grassland habitats. Many areas may require winter grazing, making modern continental breeds of cattle unsuitable, but native breeds of cows such as the English Longhorn or Highland Cattle are more robust and can graze outdoors throughout the winter, making them ideal for this traditional method of grassland management.”

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

This project was developed to test the feasibility of introducing such cattle and examine farming methods to determine the viability of such a product; there was an opportunity to test the market for the new products and scope the development of a brand. The project worked with local farmer Ron Colledge, to produce a suitable beast, raised free of fertilisers and pesticides with the beef matured for a minimum of 21 days. Celebrity and local Chefs attended a promotional taste-in day and the product was well supported. The rest of the beef was sold through a local farm shop; it sold very quickly and the study has proven that there is a market for the product. The brand is designed and ready to use, the land available for conservation grazing is increasing as is the capacity to deliver and the project will continue to develop.


PROJECT

DIVERSIFICATION INTO NON-FARMING ACTIVITIES // 311

29

Mill House Riding Centre: Indoor Arena

The harsh north east winters had a detrimental effect on the business, two years of excessive snow and ice meant that facilities could not be accessed for several months; training sessions had to be cancelled causing a huge loss in business.

Funding Breakdown

Sarah Richardson runs a riding centre from the family farm in Fishburn and her father had been an arable farmer for the previous 25 years but recently they had recognised the need for diversification into a more sustainable business. Sarah had opened the centre 2 years ago and offered riding lessons, livery and hacks to all ages and abilities within the community. The Centre had been very successful, employing 10 members of staff, but they had reached their full capacity and needed to expand to increase their offer.

Business Supported 6

50% 50%

LEADER

£55,000

Match

The project funded an indoor arena with viewing gallery and judge’s box, with Sarah aiming to have a nationally recognised riding centre, attracting riders of all levels to their facilities and events.

£55,000

The new indoor arena would secure all year round work for her employees, and she would be able to double the number of staff employed and provide enough work to increase the hours of her freelance instructors. They would re-introduce sessions for disabled riders which in turn increases the ratio for staff and helpers. Sarah was keen to be involved with community groups and would hold open days for young people As well as providing livery facilities the family owned a number of horses which they encouraged young people to ride, meaning clients could enjoy riding without the need

of owning a horse. She would deliver stable management courses and specialist clinics and demonstrations including horse whispering, show jumping and dressage. The project included site clearance, laying a foundation and the erection of a steel framed arena, utilities and surface treatments. After suffering long delays to gain planning permission, it was further delayed by bad weather; high winds meant the steel frames could not be erected as expected. Sarah was at the mercy of the elements, with everything outside of her control, however after agreeing an extension of the time the project completed successfully. The project is still working towards achieving its outputs but has supported 6 selfemployed instructors; business has increased and Sarah is working with the British Horse Society (BHS) to promote riding and she is in contact with the British Dressage Society with a view to holding competitions. Sarah has been involved with the East Durham Equine Study and hopes to be involved with the business support network, her project puts Fishburn and East Durham on the map as the LAG had hoped.

www.millhouseridingcentre.com www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

PAGE 35


FACTS AND FIGURES

FACTS AND FIGURES Expressions of Interest (Eoi’s) received 100 86

90 80 70

59

60 50 40

31

30 20 10 0 EOI Received

EOI Invited

EOI Approved

The LAG received 86 Expressions of Interest, which they considered for approval; fit with LDS, evidence of need, value for money etc., 59 (68%) were then invited to submit a full application and supporting documents, 31 (53%) projects were successgully contracted with.

Projects by measure

Spend by measure

Match funding by measure

1

311 Farm Diversification

311 Farm Diversification £55,000

311 Farm Diversification £55,000

4

312 Business Creation and Development

312 Business Creation and Development £175,458

312 Business Creation and Development £219,309

5

313 Tourism

313 Tourism £171,178

313 Tourism £5,000

18

321 Basic Services

321 Basic Services £647,346

321 Basic Services £334,733

1

323 Conservation and upgrading of rural heritage

323 Conservation and upgrading of rural heritage £20,480

323 Conservation and upgrading of rural heritage £1,296

1

331 Training and Support

331 Training and Support £9,000

331 Training and Support £0

1

421 Implementing co-operation projects

421 Implementing co-operation projects £10,612

421 Implementing co-operation projects £10,000

PAGE 36

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk


Match funding 800,000

£625,338

700,000 600,000 500,000

£450,000

400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 £Delivery Plan targets

Actual

9707

Targets

Outputs against delivery plan

Actuals

924

280 267 88

Jobs Safeguarded

8

15.5

People Benefitting From Rural Services Supported

21

Skill Days Delivered

45

Jobs Created

Businesses Supported

51

East Durham LEADER area The East Durham LEADER area includes the ‘tier 2’ urban wards around Peterlee and Seaham and the more populated areas of Hetton and Copy Hill. It was agreed during the development stage that the urban wards offer increased service provision, are important for the viability and sustainability of the smaller areas and that their exclusions would fragment the cohesiveness of the area. The guidance documrnts state that activity can be funded in the urban wards as long as the primary beneficiaries are within the rural communities.

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

PAGE 37


WITH THANKS TO LAG MEMBERS PAST AND PRESENT For more information on LAG members please visit the Website www.Durhamcommunityaction.org.uk/ eastdurhamleader Niall Benson Niall represents the Durham Heritage Coast Partnership and is charged with delivering the adopted management plan. The objectives include the protection and enhancement of landscape quality, nature conservation, access and participation. He has a good knowledge of the special characteristics of the Magnesian Limestone area, and its cultural history and heritage.

Janet Blackburn Janet has a wealth of experience in education, and is currently Chair of Bowburn Infant and Nursery School. Over the last nine years she has been a committed secretary of the Bowburn & Parkhill Community Partnership. Janet has striven to gain the very best outcome for the local area and is a public representative for the East Durham Rural Corridor AAP

Ian Bolton (Chair) Ian is recently retired as the Head of Public Sector Fundraising for the Princes Trust in the North East region. He has extensive programme and project management experience, including project development and assessment, having previously worked for nine years at the Regional Development Agency in a variety of roles including the management of European and Single Programme funding, strategic planning and special initiatives.

Ken Bradshaw Ken is the Limestone Landscapes Development Officer, working on a one year ÂŁ1.9m Heritage Lottery Funded project, which aims to make a positive difference to the Durham Magnesian Limestone Natural Area through environmental actions. Whilst not working he likes to ride unicycles and tandems and is interested in how we become a low-carbon society.

Jeff Corrighan (Vice Chair)

Oliver Graham Oliver has worked for Groundwork North East since 1993 and is currently the Durham Area Programme Manager. Oliver manages the communities’ team within the Durham area. The team deliver a range of community led environmental regeneration projects across County Durham. Through this role, Oliver has gained experience of working with and supporting the voluntary sector, project management, fundraising and partnership working.

Barbara Hind Barbara is a Community Buildings Officer for Durham Community Action, joining us in April 2012 to deliver our East Durham LEADER project, now working full time supporting community buildings across County Durham. Barbara supports trustees in community buildings with training in Governance; she has been involved in the Voluntary and Community Sector in East Durham for over 20 years, and is currently a trustee of her local community association.

Rona Hardy Rona is the former chair and now the Secretary of Shotton Partnership 2000 Ltd which is run by volunteers living in the village. The aim of the Partnership is to improve the quality of life for the residents especially around health, vocational training, housing, the environment and community facilities. She is an active board member of East Durham Trust since it was founded and she is an active member of Shotton Festival, Shotton Health Forum and joint editor of the local newsletter Village Views.

David Hall David has been involved in various Community groups and projects of various sizes around the East Durham area for several years and was elected in May 2013 as a County Councillor for the Sherburn Division, which incorporates Sherburn Village, Sherburn Hill, West Rainton and Leamside, Shadforth, High and Low Pittington and Littletown. He is particularly interested in Environment and Sustainable Communities issues.

Colin Jackson Colin is the Funding Officer at East Durham Trust, his role is to support voluntary and community sector organisations within the East Durham area to secure funding. Previously he worked for 6 years at the Big Lottery Fund as a Grants Officer, working on a range of grant programmes.

Jeff was a Solicitor between 1977 and 2004 and from 2000 held the post of Chief Crown Prosecutor for County Durham before retiring. Until February 2013 he was a self- employed researcher into town planning related issues and was a trustee and chair of two local community groups in Newcastle and Durham.

PAGE 38

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk


Louise Johnson (Manager)

Mary Peel

Louise has had a diverse career history, including owning an antique shop and volunteering with the Citizens Advice Bureau, before completing her degree to become a Podiatrist (a career which she didn’t really ever have time to do!). Whilst completing her studies she became part of the European funding team within Government Office for the North East, working particularly with the target wards and deprived communities, before transferring to ONE North East to work on the current Programme, joining East Durham LEADER in 2009.

Mary has been in the floristry business for 49 years in the Easington Colliery area. In 1984 she started lecturing in floristry, which she did for 11 years before joining Houghall Agricultural College in 1995 as Team Leader. Mary Chaired the Association of Floristry Teachers for two years, a national organisation that supported and developed floristry teachers and their colleges. She was also an active member of Easington and District Chamber of Trade for many years, became vice chair and then chair.

Steve Percival

Jo Laverick Jo Laverick has been the Executive Director of Community Action Durham (previously DRCC) since 2004. She has worked both as practitioner and manager in community, economic and service development roles. Her experience spans over thirty five years. Jo has worked closely with individuals, families and communities in disadvantaged areas of the North East, and has also developed and managed large scale programmes and initiatives in both the public and voluntary sectors.

Les Oliver Les chairs a social and economic regeneration charity in Trimdon village called Trimdon 2000 Ltd. He is also a member of the Joint Trimdons Regeneration Trust, Vice-chair of governors at Trimdon Junior School, and has been clerk to the governors at Bishop Auckland College for 11 years. Les has worked in local government since leaving school, including 33 years with Durham County Council, and has 25 years’ experience as parish clerk in other areas of the county.

Shealagh Pearce Shealagh is Principal Area Action Partnership Coordinator (East Durham), she is employed by Durham County Council, with responsibility for East Durham AAP, Durham AAP, Spennymoor AAP and East Durham Rural Corridor AAP. AAPs were established in 2009 by the County Council and its partners to engage with local people and to help address issues within local communities. Shealagh has been able to bring her extensive experience of working in communities for over 30 years to the LEADER Board. She is also the Executive Director for Hartlepool People, a large resource centre, and has supported Community Buildings across the North East.

Steve is a qualified youth & community worker within a national charity, employed as a senior children’s advocate five years ago. This allows him to be both practitioner and manager; he is also vice chairman for his local parish council. Steve is also a professional musician with regular CD releases and gigs throughout the region and beyond.

Andrew Thompson Andrew is a farmer based near Trimdon, a member of the National Farmers Union and the spokesperson for the North East Region. He runs an operation at the family farm composting 18,000 tonnes of garden and vegetable material. In 2009 Andrew became a public representative for the East Durham Rural Corridor Area Action Partnership (AAP).

The LAG would like to thank previous members, many of whom were involved in the preliminary workshops and early stage developments, and who helped to make it all possible: Shaun Stewart, Kathryn Smith, Graham Black, Pauline Hopper, Tom Whellans, David Ritchie, Susan Brown, Michelle Morton, Debbie Lamb, Ken Payne, Adam White, Simon Campbell, Steven Armstrong, Louise Elliott, Christine Stoker, Gloria Hird, Denis Rooney, Janice Baker, Liz Charles.

www.durhamcommunityaction.org.uk

PAGE 39


The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development: Europe investing in rural areas.

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