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Holbrook Indian School

A Seventh-day Adventist Boarding Academy Serving Native American Youth Since 1946

Celebrating Culture

at Holbrook Indian School By Alyssa Williams and Kelly Williams

S

tarting in 1887, the federal government began its mission to “Westernize” Native Americans. The motto behind it was, “Kill the Indian, save the man.” They stripped their tribal culture from them by educating Native youth at boarding schools. By the early 1900s, thousands of Native Americans were attending boarding schools. They were forced to cut their long hair, wear Western clothes, no longer speak their native language, and take on an English name. Boarding schools were not a safe place for Native American youth.

A century later, Holbrook Indian School (HIS) seeks to reconnect students to their Native culture, while providing a safe place for Native American children and youth to become successful individuals who are proud of their culture. HIS provides opportunities for students

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to embrace their roots by offering Indigenous Arts and Sports, Navajo Language, and Navajo Government classes. Two annual events, the Native Game Day and the Cultural Festival, are organized for students, staff, and families to unite and celebrate

culture. These two events foster an atmosphere where cultural identity is claimed and celebrated. Native Game Day Ready... Set... Go! The ball race is on. Students, divided into two sides, knock their ball with a stick of wood

Pacific Union Recorder—July 2019  

A Hymn to God the Father Wilt thou forgive that sin where I begun, Which was my sin, though it were done before? Wilt thou forgive that sin...

Pacific Union Recorder—July 2019  

A Hymn to God the Father Wilt thou forgive that sin where I begun, Which was my sin, though it were done before? Wilt thou forgive that sin...