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f e b r u a r y 2 1 - FEBURARY 2 7 , 2 0 14

Term limits…

… a fair transition of authority—or a sneaky way to circumvent elections? Quote of the week:

Even people in Novato have places to go on a date.

Upfront Runaway grand jury! 5

Marin Uncovered Who’s that inoculating at my door? 12

[ S e e pa g e 6 ]

Talking Pictures Brick house 19

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››LETTERS get fit in 2014

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Health Club & Pool in Marin and...

Of course, we’d gladly share Pulitzer with other nominees ...

Yes, Jason Walsh’s story should win the Pulitzer Prize [“The Kids Aren’t All Right,” Jan. 31]. Brilliant to you for getting Brent [Zeller] for the interview, and brilliant to Brent for his eye-opening philosophy.

Christian Rodas, Novato

A ‘yellow card’ for competition

“The Kids Aren’t All Right” is a great article! It is very true and [too-much competition is] a serious issue and concern in youth sports today. It is also something we at San Rafael Youth Soccer Club are trying very hard to change the culture.

Martin Arrington, San Rafael Youth Soccer Club

Kids need to deal with being losers at an early age!

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Self-esteem is built through achievement, not lax standards and false praise! Parental involvement is the difference here and “The Kids Aren’t All Right” brushes that off. Defeat and failure, especially as a child, provide some of the most valuable lessons in life. The game after the game is where parents talk to their kids about how they feel, how they played, what they learned and what they would do different. As our kids grow we need them to remember those feelings and lessons (some tougher than others). It is through challenge/adversity that we grow and through growth that we achieve success and through success comes self-esteem/confidence. “I tried really hard and am really nice” might keep you on a team but it won’t help you as an adult in your professional career nor in the college classroom. Understanding

how to throttle internal competition properly will position our children for success in adulthood. Parenting is the difference, not removing competition (the thrill of victory and agony of defeat) from sports. By the way, we need to stop giving trophies to every player for just playing. That’s more harmful than anything mentioned in this article.

MJ, Novato

Few Dems assembling for Levine ...

As the Pacific Sun reported [“No Consensus for State Dems in Assembly Race,” Feb. 20], one Marin-based officeholder—Assemblyman Marc Levine—came up empty last week when he tried to win pre-primary endorsement from local Democratic Party delegates. It’s very unusual for an incumbent Democrat to fall short of the 50 percent needed for party endorsement. But in Levine’s case, it’s not surprising. Sadly, Levine has carried water for corporate special interests in the legislature, as when last year he refused to vote for strengthening the California Coastal Commission and also refused to vote for an important farm-worker-rights bill (SB 25). No doubt the agribusiness interests that poured more than $250,000 into getting Levine elected to the Assembly in 2012—the big-ag trade groups Western Growers and California Citrus Mutual—have been gratified to see their investment pay off.

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Put your stamp on the letters to the editor at pacificsun.com


››upfront

The secret lives of grand jurors Pulling back the curtain on the nameless people who wield so much power by Ke lly O ’M ara

T

his week, the Marin County Civil Grand Jury issued the first of what is likely to be several investigative reports for 2014. No one, besides the 19 people on the jury and, presumably, the officials they investigated, knows what the reports will be about—or what their “findings” may be. And few outside the jury really know what goes into the making of those reports. The grand jury, which is charged with investigating county issues and which has the legal authority to interview any government employee and demand any record, is inherently a secretive body. But while grand jurors can’t talk about the specifics of investigations, they can talk about what the experience is like. For most of them, it’s exhausting—a 30to 40-hour week for which they are paid $20 per day for the days they work. “I found myself spending more than 40 hours a week on it. It’s a full-time job,” said Woody Weingarten, a retired journalist and San Anselmo resident who served one year on the jury. It may not come as a surprise, then, that most of the jurors are retired and can afford to spend that amount of time at what amounts to a volunteer position. Some businesses will allow partial-time off, said former grand juror Catherine McKown, who served two terms from 2004-06, one as a foreperson, and is a retired special-education worker with the county. But many employers don’t allow any time off for this type of voluntary civic duty. Because of this, there can be a lack of socio-economic diversity among those who serve on a grand jury.

In other words, there are a lot of retired and financially stable individuals who serve, and there are typically very few minorities. Especially in Marin. “But, I don’t know how you correct that,” said Rich Treadgold, a retired management consultant who was the grand jury foreperson in the 2012-13 session. “I couldn’t have done it before I was retired.” Since the jurors are just “regular” people—lawyers and accountants and teachers—many of them simply responded to an announcement in the newspaper and often didn’t even know what a civil grand jury was before volunteering. “It’s not a criminal grand jury, but a civil grand jury that’s a watchdog agency,” said Weingarten. Every county in the state has a civil grand jury, which is charged with overseeing the county government, officials and issues. Being selected to the jury begins with a multi-part process. Hopeful jurors are first interviewed by ex-grand jurors. Both Treadgold and McKown are now part of the Marin chapter of the California Grand Jurors’ Association, which helps conduct those interviews. That initial screening is to weed out people who might be woefully inept or who have an “ax to grind,” said Treadgold. It’s generally important that people don’t come in with their minds already made up about an issue. Then, the prospective jurors are interviewed by the presiding judges. The remaining 50-60 satisfactory candidates are entered into a lottery. Nineteen jurors and 11 alternates are picked from the lottery.

Once picked, Marin County grand jurors, unlike in most other California counties, undergo an intensive six-day training. That training includes introductions from each of the county department heads, who talk about how county government works; it also features “how-to’s” from previous jurors about conducting investigations, writing reports and organizing the jury. Once selected, the jury can organize itself however it chooses, led by the foreperson (who is picked by the presiding judge). Generally, though, the juries subdivide into committees that will cover specific topics—such as finance, education, or health and human services. Those committees are typically made up of about six people, with jurors serving on multiple committees. Each

committee brainstorms topics it wants to investigate. Those ideas can come from anywhere and everywhere: members’ personal experiences, public suggestions, previous grand jury reports, news stories. One report about the Marin court’s lack of public-defender representation came out of one juror’s experience with the courts and that juror’s own questions about how that process worked. Another report started as a follow-up to a previous jury’s report, but quickly morphed into a separate investigation. Each committee then creates its own investigation plan—listing who it wants to interview and why it wants to do the report—and takes that plan to the rest of the jury. The entire jury meets once 7> a week to vote on different issues.

››newsgrams

Grand jury recommends more ‘cop cameras’ Cops wearing cameras are in our best interest, according to the Marin Civil Grand Jury’s first report of 2014. Many Bay Area residents could be wearing their tech soon, from Google Glass to smart watches, and the jury contends that officers need to cost-effectively keep up with the times. Think cameras about the size of ‘90s-era beepers, perhaps strapped to officers’ shirts, or even mini-recorders attached to an officer’s hat, collar or eyeglasses. The grand jury, Marin’s prolific watchdog agency made up of 19 citizens who review local government [see the Upfront story on this page], recommends that all 10 of the county’s law enforcement agencies use officer body cameras. So far, only the Tiburon, Novato and Belvedere police departments do. These audio-visual cams offer “the pinnacle of transparency,” the report says, because both the public and the police are protected by having tech as their witness. The recordings could help keep citizens and officers in check, cut the time and cost of investigating complaints about officers, be used as evidence in a trial, or help identify suspects. Downsides include funding the devices, which can run $500 to $1,200 each; their limited eye- and earshot range; and, for officers, having to wear a camera at your job. Last July in Marin City, bystanders threw rocks at a Marin County Sheriff’s deputy who shot a suspicious driver in the arm when it was unclear if he was resisting arrest by driving away. Although the deputy was eventually cleared of wrongdoing, the jury report suggests that an audio-visual recording might have given investigators and community members peace of mind. In addition to seeking out public or private grants, the jury recommends that the sheriff’s office ask for camera money from the county Board of Supervisors, while San Rafael, Sausalito, Ross, Fairfax, Central Marin and Mill Valley police departments go to their respective city councils. Four San Rafael officers have been using body cams in a pilot project started in late January. The department will end and review the project in April. In a news release, San Rafael police chief Diana Bishop says, “The comprehensive use of the cameras has been shown to reduce the incidents in which force is used because people are less likely to resist officers when they know they are being recorded. “It is also an important tool to protect officers from baseless accusations.”—Mackenzie Mount Yellow-legged frog needs helping hands The Marin Municipal Water District is asking volunteers to “jump” forward to help protect the foothill yellow-legged frog. This species of frog—you know it as Rana boylii—is native to Little Carson Falls on Mt. Tamalpais, and is listed as a species of “special concern” in California. Little Carson Falls is one of the two remaining breeding sites on the watershed for the foothill yellow-legged frog. The frog has disappeared from more than 45 percent of its historic range in California and Oregon due to the introduction of nonnative creatures, such as the bullfrog and crayfish. The district is looking for volunteers from March to early June. Docent training will take place Saturday, Feb. 22, from 9am-2pm at the Sky Oaks Watershed Headquarters in Fairfax. The training will include an orientation and a three-mile, round-trip hike to Little Carson Falls. Docents in their duty will be asked to monitor the egg masses as they mature and speak with any hikers to avoid walking into the frogs’ breeding area. Frog docents must be over 18 years old and be available for a minimum of three 4-hour shifts between March and June, when the eggs and tadpoles are most vulnerable. No previous frog-protecting experience is required. To register or for more information about the docent opportunity call MMWD at 415/945-1128 or email volunteerprogram@ marinwater.org. —Stephanie Powell 7> february 21 - february 27, 2014 Pacific Sun 5


››Single in the SuburbS

We, we, we ... all the way home I need to find friends with better dating advice by n ik k i Silve r ste in

R

ick has just informed me that I should look for someone better than him— someone more attentive. We all know what that means, though you think he could come up with something better than that line after a decade with me. As a never-had-children, always-beensingle, sometimes-boyfriendless, almostmiddle-aged woman, I have grown used to the solicitous looks and clucking sounds from wedded women, which are typically followed by well-intentioned, less than helpful suggestions. With my new status, I’m now asking for their advice. “Have you tried Match.com, dear?” asks Greta, a friend from my writing group. “It worked for my cousin Sophie. She caught a chiropractor. Then again, she’s younger than you.” What a terrible fate. I’m too old to attract a chiropractor. Guess I’ll have to make an adjustment. (Actually, I have accepted that I’m aging. My moment of clarity struck when I was packing and purging before my condo remodel began. There, pushed to the back of the bathroom cabinet, I found a huge supply of unopened boxes of tampons. Like enough for a year. Denial or optimism, I’m not sure which. I gave the boxes to a young, unmarried friend, along with my now perfected lecture about freezing fresh eggs before you run out.) Michelle is another friend full of dating ideas for me. When I first moved to Marin, we used to get tipsy at Sam’s on Friday nights, dance on the bar and walk back to her apartment in Tiburon to raid the refrigerator. That was years ago, before she tied the knot. I forget what she looks like, because we never see each other anymore. She still phones frequently, usually while she’s driving her kids to every extra-curricular activity known to Marin. The calls are one-sided, consisting of her shouting over the din of her offspring to impart her latest tip. “Nikki,” Michelle yells. “Look at a dating site called How About We. It’s a good one for you.” I keep meaning to ask her who tells her this stuff. It’s almost always bad intel, but I still dutifully check it out. I Google the site and click. How About We For Couples pops up on my screen. It’s for couples. At first, I think it’s couples looking for dates, an upscale swingers’ website, but it’s even worse. It’s a service that plans dates for couples. Hey, their customers are already mated. How About We? Geez. How about me? What a terrible business. Couples don’t need your help. I need your help. Make me a we. At least I’m amused as I scroll through the pages. Members pay an annual fee of more than $200 to a site that tells you where to go 6 Pacific Sun february 21 - february 27, 2014

on a date. Then they pay for the activities, which range from the absurd to the obvious. For example, you and your loved one could do a three-day cleanse together by forking over $350. What’s next? How about colonoscopies for we? We live in Marin, surrounded by the ocean, bay and mountains. Even people in Novato have places to go on a date. Honestly, if you can’t figure it out on your own, send me an email. I’ll tell you where to go and it won’t cost you a dime. Once again, it’s clear that married women are completely out of touch with the needs of those in singledom. I did find out from Michelle later that there’s a sister site for single people, but it was slim pickings for my age range. My friend Sue is certain that I need to compete with younger women to find a man. Her husband pays for her cosmetic surgeries, because he says he wants her to be happy. Sue says it makes him happy that her breasts are perky. Yesterday, she forwarded an email from the Official Plastic Surgeon to the Miss Colorado pageant. Headline: Dr. Gregory Buford Helps Women Defy Gravity with a Breast Lift I call Sue. “It makes it sound like he’s going to perform a magic act,” I say. “Point his wand at my little knockers and they will miraculously stand at attention.” “Keep joking, Nikki,” Sue replies. “You need to keep men looking at your girls. It distracts them from the wrinkles on your face. Read the article.” I read it and offer you these tidbits, which, by the way, concern me greatly: Many women are distressed when their breasts succumb to the forces of gravity and begin to droop. The good news is there are proven surgical techniques to lift and reshape the breasts, restoring a pleasing, more youthful silhouette. A breast lift can provide a big confidence boost to women whose breasts no longer look as they did when they were young. First, I’d like to tell Dr. Buford that the only thing distressing is his fear-based marketing. If women lack confidence about their bodies, it’s because of this kind of dreck. I’m fine with Sue getting her nips and tucks. She looks great. However, I, for one, refuse to succumb to the knife of a plastic surgeon just to appease a man’s fantasy of how a 40ish woman should look. In the past few days, I’ve learned that I deserve an attentive boyfriend who is not a chiropractor and likes boobies that can’t perform magic. My profile will practically write itself with this newfound information. I’m joining J-Date again. Wish me luck. Y e-mail: nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com

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... and the benefits are for the entire community by Bob Heine n Last week, I asked readers to support our local businesses and, especially, our local advertisers. This week I am asking our local businesses to advertise in the Pacific Sun. We need your support. Without marketing dollars spent with the Pacific Sun—both online at PacificSun.com, in our Monday through Friday daily e-blast Pacific Sun Today, or in print—we cannot be paid to write about Marin. The Pacific Sun has always supported local, small-business owners. We are on the forefront of environmental protection and preserving our local town character and culture. Last week we pointed out that the Pacific Sun was the only independent locally owned media business serving Marin County. Your advertising dollar helps pay our writers like Peter Seidman, who writes about housing, drought issues or land use; Nikki Silverstein, who entertains us with her crazy life in Singles in the Suburbs; and Stephanie Powell, who informs us about our Marine Mammal Center or a weekend art festival. These writers are our independent voice for the community. If you are a local business owner, spend your dollars with the Pacific Sun. Don’t waste your dollars with companies headquartered outside Marin or produce their services outside Marin. Those dollars leave Marin. Our readers are smart and will support those businesses that support other local companies. Investing your ad dollars with the Pacific Sun is the best ROI (Return On Investment) you can make for your business and for Marin. If you are local, and you support local, then spend your marketing dollars with the Pacific Sun! By doing this, you are investing in the future of Marin, and the future of your business.Y Email Bob at bheinen@pacificsun.com.

››triviA cAfé

by Howard rachelson

1a. What creek runs through Muir Woods? 1b. This creek is home to what fish, native to San Francisco Bay, which attempts to return each season? (two-word name) 2. What company advertises with the slogan: “15 minutes can save you 15 percent”? 3. Nancy Pelosi currently holds what elevated posi5a tion in the U.S. government? 4. The World Wildlife Fund reported that fewer of these animals have made their yearly migration southward to Mexico in 2013 than any year since records have been kept. Give a two-word answer. 5a. Identify this actress, who played the role of Forrest Gump’s mother and Abraham Lincoln’s wife. 5b. Forrest’s mother said life is like a box of ... what? ... and why? 6. Steve Jobs used the phrase “magical and revolutionary” to describe what product, introduced in Feb. 2010? 7. In the past ten years, has the U.S. nationwide high school graduation rate gone up by 10 percent or gone down by 10 percent? 8. Give the nine-letter name for the snack food sold on the streets of Mexico, made from a corn tortilla dipped in chili sauce. 9. What sport involving animals was a demonstration sport at the 1932 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, NY and again at the 1952 Olympics in Oslo, but never gained official event status? 10. What two tunnels connect Manhattan with New Jersey, under what river? BONUS QUeStiON: What advanced civilization, almost 4,000 years ago, was the first to divide the day 10 into 24 hours, the hour into 60 minutes, and the minute into 60 seconds? Howard Rachelson invites you to a live team trivia contest on Tuesday, March 4, at the Terrapin Crossroads in San Rafael, at 6:30pm— and it’s free. Would you like to see your great question in this column? Send it along and if we use it, we’ll give you credit. E-mail Howard at howard1@triviacafe.com or visit www.triviacafe.com.

Answers on page 23


< 5 The secret lives of grand jurors It takes 11 jurors to approve a plan and decide to move ahead with a report. At that point, it goes back to the committee to do the investigation and a lead writer is chosen to head up the charge. Investigations can take weeks or months. They typically start with the committee interviewing the head of the department involved in the particular issue, reading background research and documents, and then asking who else they should talk to. The life experiences of the jury members can often be of value in the investigations. On Treadgoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jury, for instance, the many accountants and former CFOs in the group were able to advise everyone else about how to read financial documents. No one who is interviewed in the course of an investigation is allowed to talk about what they say and names are kept anonymous. Sometimes, though, investigations can include secret whistle-blowers and extra precautions have to be taken to maintain their privacy. After everyone is interviewed, the committee debates and debates. The lead writer will write a draft, bring it in for comment and make edit after edit. Often, the final result isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily what they started out with. And, as long

as everyone keeps their minds open, the end result is a product of a lot of change. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I must have flip-flopped my opinion half-a-dozen times,â&#x20AC;? said Weingarten. The final report has to also be voted on by the whole jury and approved by 11 members before it can be published. Once an investigation is over and a report is released, the question is: Does it have an impact? While the agencies investigated are legally required to respond, and often the reports generate news coverage (and sometimes even change within government), that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily mean that many people read all the nuanced findings. Some jurors have said they find it frustrating to feel like they put in so much work into reports that are often disregarded. But nearly all of them we spoke to feel that, for all the work and frustrations, it can be incredibly rewarding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was the most fun Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had in my career,â&#x20AC;? said Treadgoldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all in secret. One time McKown heard two women next to her at dinner vigorously debating a report the jury had just released. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Naturally, I was leaning in, eavesdropping,â&#x20AC;? said McKownâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but she never said who she was. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was excited to see people get worked up about something the grand jury found.â&#x20AC;? Y The juryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out at kellydomara@gmail.com.

Graywater ... itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the new black Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s raining, so the drought must be overâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;right?!

Not so fast, Marin ... A bit of drizzle the last couple of weekends has only made a small dent in the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drought problem, and at-home water conservation is still one of the best ways to save water. So beginning in March, county officials are sponsoring a series of free educational workshops as part of its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go Green With Gray Waterâ&#x20AC;? programâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public outreach about the importance of repurposing water from certain household appliances. The first workshop, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laundry-to-Landscape,â&#x20AC;? is primarily focused on irrigation systems for homeowners. The workshop takes place March 15, from 9:30am to noon in the Tamalpais Room at the San Rafael Corporate Center, 750 Lindaro St., San Rafael. For more information, call 415/473-6907. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jason Walsh

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â&#x2013;ź You do the crime; you do the time. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair. The next step is rehabilitation. Education. Vocational training. Here in Marin, approximately 15 San Quentin inmates receive on the job training as they write and produce the San Quentin News, a monthly newspaper distributed to 11,500 people in several California prisons. According to the blog Life of the Law, the newspaper has been suspended for 45 days due to a photograph that appeared in Decemberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue without proper review. We think the prison officials are a bit heavy-handed in this instance, considering the photo in question is similar to one reviewed and approved previously. Come on, San Quentin officials, keep the presses running and keep your inmates productive. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t suppress the freedom of the press without a substantial cause. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nikki Silverstein

ZERO

â&#x2013;˛ We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recommend shoving wadded up money in your pocket, because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard tell that sometimes it falls out and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even notice. Sayonara hard earned cash. Just ask Pat and Patty of Mill Valley. Regulars at Yu Shang in San Rafael, the couple enjoyed a delicious lunch, paid the tab and left the restaurant. Their gracious waiter, Bien, caught up with them in the parking lot and handed them the crumpled currency that Pat had dropped on the floor. Bien returned a Ben Franklin. A hundred-dollar bill lost and found before the couple realized it was missing. Patty says the good deed happened quickly and they forgot to tip their Hero. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry, Patty. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re tipping our hat to Bien for you.

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Got a Hero or a Zero? Please send submissions to e-mail nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com. Toss roses, hurl stones with more Heroes and Zeros at â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş pacificsun.com february 21 - february 27, 2014 Pacific Sun 7


8 Pacific Sun february 21 - february 27, 2014


W

ould term limits for seats on the county Board of Supervisors produce a better county government? Political activists circulating a petition to place term limits on the November ballot are certain it would produce positive results for unsatisfied voters. Opponents of the idea say it’s misguided. Voters will need to tap some heavy-duty critical thinking before putting their names on the dotted line. The knee-jerk reaction tends to favor signing the petition, but delving into the permutations of term limits yields a world of gray. The petition that the activists are circulating calls for an ordinance “providing that no person serve more than a total of (3) terms of four years each as a member of the Marin County Board of Supervisors, whether served consecutively or nonconsecutive, with a term defined as having served a 50 percent or greater portion of a term of four years, whether elected or appointed counting as a full term.” Thomas Montgomery, a San Rafael resident who is chairman of the Republican Central Committee, is head of the petition drive. He notes that the call for term limits is a bipartisan effort that has many Democrats on board. Toni Shroyer, a candidate for the supervisorial seat of Judy Arnold, is a notable Democrat favoring the petition. (County supervisor seats are nonpartisan.) Calls for term limits generally come from a party or a political group out of power. In Marin, Democrats have the upper hand based on demographics and political persuasions. The petition drive and the call for term limits do transcend traditional party politics.

Beyond the limits If you can’t vote ’em out—term ’em out, say term-limit proponents

is the most pressing reason to call for term A look at where the activists are focusing limits. He castigates the county and the their signature gathering efforts and their supervisors for failing to reform the way and reasons for gathering them explain their the amount the county pays employee goals. pension benefits. It’s an issue that “We’re focusing on four points,” virtually all cities and counties in says Montgomery. “The pension by issue, the community service the state are facing, as well as the Peter state itself. The county recently fund, the failed computer system, Seidman received a good-health seal reand the Plan Bay Area issue are garding its pension situation, but the four topics we feel that [superMontgomery says the good-health visors] haven’t been responsive to.” designation came simply because of a Montgomery says the pension issue

large amount of taxpayer money the county dumped into the system. Whether term limits could produce positive results on the pension issue is uncertain. Supervisors who favor a strategy that term-limit opponents oppose could be termed out of office, but supervisors who have positions similar to those deposed could be voted in to replace them—with no net gain for the term-limit proponents. The real question is: How would term limits benefit the county regarding the four key issues the activists are focusing upon? The term-limit move, as Montgomery and other proponents describe it, isn’t a philosophical tactic. It’s a political strategy they hope would yield specific results. “We want to establish a benchmark for success,” he says. “You get in office; you’ve got 12 years to make it happen. If you don’t, we put somebody else in there with fresh ideas and we go at it again. Right now, these guys stay in office for 15, 20, 25 years or more, and they become beholden to the special interests. You have a handful of people, like John Burton and the county employees’ PAC and sheriff’s PAC and the firefighters PAC who all contribute to their campaigns to keep them in office. They shouldn’t be taking money from any county employee PAC, period. They are voting on their labor contracts. It is wrong to accept large contributions from these PACs. If the members want to give them money individually, that’s fine. But they should not be accepting thousands of dollars from these PACs.” That’s a debate point worthy of consideration. But would term limits have any beneficial effects on it? Or would campaign finance reform be more targeted to the 10> february 21 - february 27, 2014 Pacific Sun 9


JULIE VADER

< 9 Beyond the limits

Critics of term limits have charged that the proposed initiative is a not-so-veiled attempt to unseat longstanding progressive board members Steve Kinsey, center, and Susan Adams, far left.

questions Montgomery raises? If, for instance, term limits call for mandatory retirement of supervisors who change the political contribution mechanisms to the liking of the term-limit proponents, what happens when the supervisors who bent to the will of the voters must leave office—even though they did the bidding of the people? In other words: term limits throw the babies out with the bathwater. That may be what voters want. But they should think hard about what they really are calling for when they call for term limits. When term limits expire, good legislators must go with the poor ones. Voters can lose legislative assets as easily as they can rid themselves of legislators they want to depose. The whole term limit debate begs the question of whether elections are term limits already built into the electoral system. When a term ends, be it city council, board of supervisor, state legislator or federal office, voters get to decide whether to keep the office holder or put a new one in place. If voters, especially at the local county level, become so unhappy with the way supervisors are legislating, they have an opportunity to change horses every time a supervisor’s term expires. If the majority of voters in Marin are so unhappy at an entrenched Board of Supervisors, why wouldn’t voters choose to support challengers? “You would have to ask the voters that,” says Montgomery. “I don’t know.” That’s the question voters answer in every election. Montgomery, however, notes that voter turnout for elections to the Board of Supervisors is routinely low. “These [supervisors] are being elected with less than 50 percent of the vote.” That’s true in part because elections for supervisorial seats occurs in even years, says Montgomery, when voter turnout for primaries is much less than in major general elections. How term limits could improve the lowturnout issue is uncertain. The problem of 10 Pacific Sun february 21 - february 27, 2014

low voter turnout rests with the responsibility—or lack of it—among voters, not with the election process, say opponents of term limits. The core conundrum in Marin remains: If voters become so unsatisfied with their elected representatives that they want to throw the rascals out, they could simply vote them out of office. But that hasn’t been happening. Montgomery and the proponents of term limits say that’s because the incumbents have the advantage. They also have the support of what Montgomery calls the special interests. But one person’s special interest is another person’s union sticking up for middle-class public employees. It’s clear that a segment of the Marin population, one which generally leans toward the conservative, opposes the current Board of Supervisors on many issues, including pension reform and allowing supervisors to spend a kitty of money in their own districts, the community service fund. The term-limit proponents also point to the failure of the county to install a new computer system on a timely and cost-effective basis. While those criticisms may be valid, how term limits would produce positive results is unclear. The “performance standard” that Montgomery says is the goal of term limits, “a benchmark of success,” would set up a dynamic so incumbents don’t just keep bumping along in office thinking they will get re-elected. “If they are successful, they will leave a legacy [as they are forced to leave office]; if they are not, we get a chance to put someone new in to pick up where they left off. That’s the bottom line.” That description is an accurate rendering of the intentions behind the term-limit initiative proponents hope will be on the November ballot. It’s specific. It’s also another tactic opponents of the current Board of Supervisors could use to gain power. The (mostly conservative) proponents of term limits have tried to take a run at seats for supervisor, but the attempts were unsuccessful. They also

have tried a recall effort aimed at Supervisor Susan Adams. Also unsuccessful. Opposition to Plan Bay Area is arguably the most powerful attack against the current holders of office in the county. The pension issue ranks high also. (Although virtually everyone agrees that pension reform is needed, proposals that would decimate benefits for public employees are where the schism is widest.) But it’s opposition to Plan Bay Area and increased-density affordable housing that could galvanize proponents of term limits to the largest extent—and produce the most signatures. “I have dozens of Democrat supporters from Strawberry and from Novato and from Marinwood who are helping us,” says Montgomery. Those are the same areas that are the centers of opposition to Plan Bay Area, priority development areas and higher-density transit-oriented affordable housing. That points to a conclusion not hard to make: The same opponents of Plan Bay Area are the proponents of term limits. The strategy they’re using is aimed at ousting supervisors whom they have not been able to depose through the normal electoral process—or, in the case of Adams, through a recall. The election is in June, before the termlimit initiative can get on the ballot. Elaine Ginnold, the county registrar of voters, says the signature gatherers have until June 2 to collect 11,418 signatures. Then the county has 30 days to check the validity of the signatures. The persons who signed must have been registered Marin voters when they signed. The county elections office will take a random sampling of signatures. If signatures representing 110 percent or more of the total are valid, the initiative qualifies. If between 95 percent and 110 percent are valid, the county must check all the signatures. If less than 95 percent are valid, the initiative fails to qualify. As of last week, signature gatherers were “a little behind” schedule, according to Montgomery. They had collected “a couple

of thousand.” Montgomery thinks the target is reachable, especially now that signature gatherers received permission from Safeway to gather signatures in front of Marin stores. If the initiative makes it through the elections office, it goes to the supervisors, who will place it on the ballot. If the timeline holds, the initiative could be on the November ballot. If for some reason, there’s a wrench in the works, it still could go on a successive ballot. Toni Shroyer, the Democrat prominently connected to the recall petition, is facing Supervisor Judy Arnold in the June election. Shroyer says simply and succinctly that she supports term limits, here and elsewhere. Arnold has much more to say. “I think handling politics at the voting booth or through recall” is the best way to produce effective politics. Arnold bases that assessment on a fact that opponents of term limits often cite: Term limits create a lack of institutional memory. “I saw what term limits did to the state Legislature.” Arnold worked for State Senator John Burton. “When he and [State Senator John Vasconcellos] finally were termed out, there was a real vacuum. I think that after that Sacramento has been run by lobbyists. First it was staff, now it’s lobbyists.” That’s because the lobbyists have the greatest knowledge of the real-world issues and legislative process and have made the longest-standing connections with legislators. That’s harder to do when a legislator gets term limited. As to the charge that incumbents have too much of an advantage, Arnold says that perhaps supervisors can develop political relationships during their tenures that aid them in fending off challengers. But, she adds, incumbents produce a voting record that they must defend. That’s the nature and intention of the unaltered political system, especially at the county level. Y Contact the writer at peter@pseidman.com.


January 31, 2014 was an historic day for MCF. We’d like you to know why. Opening the doors. The Marin Community Foundation (MCF) was formed in 1987 with the assets of one donor fund, the Buck Trust. At that time, the California Superior Court established judicial oversight of the Trust, and appointed a Special Master. Why? Because the previous fiduciary of the Buck Trust had sought to alter one of its basic tenets, namely Dr. and Mrs. Buck’s stipulation that all grants from the Trust be made in and for Marin. For more than 25 years MCF has honored that intent. Throughout Marin, we’ve made grants from the Buck Trust of more than $750 million. These grants have gone for early education and college scholarships, for medical clinics and affordable homes, for protecting ranches and teaching art, for extending legal access and convening discussions, for welcoming newcomers and caring for elders, for the researchers and the innovators, for services to those who are struggling, and support to those who are dreaming. Concluding Court oversight. So it’s a great pleasure to report that on January 31, 2014, with the strong recommendation of the Special Master, the Court

terminated its jurisdiction of the Buck Trust. The Court’s reasoning: MCF had an unblemished record of care for the Trust and an unwavering commitment to donor intent. Unwavering commitment to donor intent. That statement makes me proudest of this moment. The recognition that we have honored a donor’s specific wishes for over two decades. And the trust that we will always continue to do so. Fashioning the future. A Foundation that started with the philanthropic wishes of one family now is home to more than 400 families, each with an individually-named fund at MCF. Grants from these funds are supporting charitable causes locally, nationally and globally. It’s my hope that 400 is just the beginning. Our doors are always open to welcome new donors who want to make a difference in the world. So if you want to develop a rewarding, meaningful giving strategy, enjoy the guidance of a personal philanthropic advisor, and network with your community, please give us a call. You can be assured your intentions will be honored, and your trust will be earned.

Dr. Tom Peters, President & CEO tpeters@marincf.org 415.464.2508

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can still picture it: my infant son in that sterile room at Kaiser San Rafael—small, helpless—with a needle in his chubby thigh. He looked at me, eyes welling with tears, and wailed. It was the first serious pain of his life. And I felt it, too. Vaccinating your child isn’t easy. It feels so counter-intuitive, stabbing a virus into that tiny, unsullied body. Add (generally discredited) fears about everything from mercury to autism—fueled by celebrities This’ll wipe the smirk off his face... like Jenny McCarthy and spun parent or guardian regarding the benefits endlessly in the social media echo chamber—and it’s no wonder fewer and risks of immunization, including and fewer parents are opting to immunize. the health risks to the student and the community resulting from declining the Particularly in Marin: according to recommended immunizations.” recent figures from the California DepartFor a vaccine to be effective, a signifiment of Public Health, nearly 8 percent of cant portion of the population, usually schoolage children in Marin haven’t had 85 percent or more, must be inoculated. all—or in some cases any—of their shots. This is referred to as “herd immunity.” If That’s nearly four times higher than the state average, and more than any other Bay too many people pull away from the herd, we’re all at risk. Area county. But there’s more to the equation than that. When parents refuse vaccines, against the best advice of their pediatrician, it can erode the trust that’s essential to the doctor/patient relationship. And some doctors are fighting back. According to a study published by the Wall Street Journal, a growing number of pediatricians are “firing” parents who don’t vaccinate their children—as many as 30 percent The mostly inoculated Hamilton Elementary student body. in some places. “There will be times when parents Some schools fare better than others. At and I may not see eye to eye, but not where Novato’s Hamilton Elementary, 97 percent I’m using the best evidence at hand to support my recommendations,” wrote an East of incoming kindergartners were fully Coast pediatrician, under the pseudonym vaccinated last school year. Meanwhile, Russell Saunders, in a piece for the Daily at Sausalito’s private New Village School, Beast that has been widely disseminated. only 5 percent were. “Maybe they’ll want a test I think is useNot surprisingly, Marin—along with less, or want to use a supplement shown to many parts of the country—has seen be harmful. Perhaps it will be a referral for an uptick in illnesses like pertussis and an intervention shown to have no benefit. measles. Pediatricians and public health officials go out of their way to promote the If I can’t hope to persuade them by making reference to the available research, what safety—and necessity—of vaccines, but can I expect to be for them other than a clearly the message isn’t getting through. rubber stamp for their ideas? If medical Unlike some states, parents in Califorscience can’t answer the meritless qualms nia can send their kids to school unvacthey have about vaccines, when can I use cinated if they sign a PBE, or Personal Beliefs Exemption, form. Starting this year, it at all?” Y the form must also be signed by a docJab Jacob at jacobsjottings@gmail.com. tor who has “provided information to the


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Simple tips to keep from ‘repelling’ your date ... by K at ie R ice Jone s

I

n the spirit of romantic love, most of us make great strides in presenting ourselves in a manner that is attractive and beguiling. Whether it is for the wife, the hubby or a potential love interest, we choose certain clothing and endure tortuous beauty and body procedures to guarantee ourselves a good showing. But what if those things you thought were attractive to the opposite sex were in fact repelling? Turns out both genders get it wrong in the game of love, often. Intriguingly, many of the reported turnoffs make the same bad impressions across gender lines (note the italicized items below). Even so, men and women still misconstrue what the other might find attractive. These kinds of miscalculations can screw-up an otherwise nice connection, so it is best to get familiar with the most offensive opposite-sex turnoffs and discontinue them forthwith. Women on men Most women want a man who is well-groomed and fashionably with-it. However never overly so in either department as a seemly vain man always appears to be more into himself than his date.

To remain attractive to the general female population, avoid: Beauty n Cheesy hairstyles include faux hawk, mohawk, the Bieber and the Caesar n Faux hair includes hair plugs and comb-overs n Untouchable hair includes excessively gelled, pomaded or hairsprayed n Highlighted and colored hair n High-buffed or polished nails n Plucked eyebrows n Profuse perfume or deodorant usage, or the wearing of common scents like Ralph Lauren Polo or Dakkar Noir Body n Abundant tattoos n Overly tanned skin (especially in the winter) Clothes and accessories n Tight or stretchy and sleeveless T-shirts n Copious jewelry Men on women Ask most men and they will say they want to be with a natural and low-maintenance kind of woman, yet women think that we need to pluck, preen and pick ourselves perfect in order to find and keep

Hair extensions are just the thing—to underscore your lack of confidence in your god-given locks. Bright red lipstick and fake nails create a similar effect.

judgmental: “Different strokes for different folks.” Thus, I must concede that there are people, like Kanye West and Nicole Kidman, who prefer an overly manicured mate and the above turnoffs could actually pose as turn-ons. For the rest of us, use the lists above as a guideline for making your next date (at least from your end) turnofffree. Y Katie Rice Jones is the Pacific Sun’s Lifestyle Editor-at-large and a Marin-based style consultant. Check her out at katiericejones. com or follow her @katiericejones.

Body n Abundant tattoos n Overly tanned skinned (especially in the winter) Clothing and accessories n Undergarment enhancements, including Spanx and the Wonderbra n Sky-high heels n Copious jewelry n Fake nails and cheesy designs n Hair extensions n Red lipstick With all this said about turnoffs, I am reminded of something my mother used to say to me when she thought I was being

Gelled hair, plucked eyebrows and tanned skin—she won’t know whether to date you, or try out your stylist.

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Greatest. Music. Ever. Marin Symphony put the ‘great’ in Beethoven’s Allegretto ...

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

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uintessential Beethoven. That’s On his blog A Tiny Revolution, culhow the Marin Symphony is billtural critic Bernard Chazelle, the Eugene ing its upcoming performances of Higgins professor of computer science at Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 in A major, Princeton University, echoes a popular Op. 92. And while Beethoven’s Symsentiment: “The Allegretto is the greatphony’s Nos. 3, 5 and 9 are better known, est piece of music in the Western canon. none of those masterworks can lay claim Schubert said so; Wagner agreed,” Chato the reputation of the Seventh’s proceszelle opined in his 2008 essay Greatest. sional Allegretto as the best ... music ... Music. Ever. ever. He mused: “The melody is catchy; the Two hundred years after its debut, harmony is simple; the boum-boum, in December 1813 in Vienna, the symboum-boum-boum rhythm is neat, prophony’s transcendent second movement cessional, and so pre-20th century. Yet, continues to captivate listeners. this music is deeply heartbreaking. Its Why is the music world so hooked? poignancy is almost physical. I’ve heard “I’m no music critic, not even a musiit hundreds of times over decades and it cian, but this music means something always feels fresh and enchanting.” special to me, with its theme of struggle Sir George Grove, the founding editor and progress, of adversity and ultimate of Grove’s Dictionary of Music and Musitriumph,” said radio host Robert Siegel, cians, likened the Allegretto’s striking during a 2003 broadcast commentary melodies to “a string of beauties hand-inon the Allegretto on NPR’s All Things hand.” Considered. In the background, you could Beethoven himself called the piece hear the seductive pulse of the music as “one of my best works.” Siegel recounted that he once kept the Count me among those that find the piece queued up on his car stereo for Allegretto to be a constant source of a solid year. He also had the opportuamazement. nity to hear the Allegretto performed And it’s not just the Allegretto. in Berlin on the day the Berlin Wall fell Composer Richard Wagner, impressed and to watch from his hotel room winby the lively rhythms that permeate the dow as newly freed East Berlin families Seventh Symphony, which was composed walked jubilantly through the streets of during a particularly turbulent time in democratic West Berlin while enjoying Beethoven’s life, famously called the work their first taste of freedom in nearly a half century. “For eight minutes, life and art were in perfect synch, mutual imitation, mutual validation,” Siegel said. He’s not alone in his admiration of the Allegretto. For two centuries, musicologists, psychologists, m at h e m at i c i ans , philosophers, composers (including French Romantic composer Hector Berlioz, who analyzed the symphony extensively), music nerds and, well, blogging computerscience professors have wondered why the Allegretto is so This portrait of Beethoven by Joseph Karl Stieler dates from 1820. damn moving.


You’d think the guy who wrote the ‘greatest music ever’ would sport a cheerier demeanor.

“the apotheosis of dance,” elevating it to divine status. Ah, but that Allegretto ... Berlioz marveled that the second movement’s heartbreaking sounds evoke “a transparent melody, pure, simple, gentle, sad and resigned, like patience smiling to suffering ... [t]o borrow yet another quotation from English poetry ëOne fatal remembrance, one sorrow, that throws its black shade alike o’er our joys and our woes.’” Heady stuff. And a perfect way to bid adieu to the winter. The Marin Symphony performs Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony on a program that also includes Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations (with cellist Austin Huntington) on Sunday, Feb. 23, at 3pm, and Tuesday, Feb. 25, at 7:30pm. $10-$70. 473-6800. Y Roll over Beethoven with Greg at cahill51@gmail.com

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Tucked inside a bait shop in Sausalito is no ordinary sandwich joint. Davey Jones Deli turns out some of the most creative, unusual, lip-smacking sandos in the county. Their menu says, “Featuring: Real Food,” and what that means is each day they roast whole turkeys, pork shoulders and beef brisket to perfection, make eight to 10 homemade sauces and condiments and stock produce, cheeses and breads from local (and some organic) purveyors. Classic combinations get crazy, with additions like raw almonds, beets, strawberries, potato salad and kale. For example, the “Holiday” has turkey, goat cheddar, almonds, arugula, housemade cranberry compote, pickles, pepperoncini, red onion, roasted garlic and red pepper sauces, mustard, mayo, tomato, cilantro, sesame salt and a squeeze of fresh lemon all on a Dutch crunch roll. Whew! Or try the Missouri Wrap with meatloaf, white people potato salad, pork gravy, pickles, jalapenos, cranberry, garlic and red pepper sauces and Dijon mustard in a spinach tortilla. Vegetarians and vegans are welcomed with a full array of stellar sandwich and wrap combinations featuring sprouts, fresh vegetables and more of those delectable spreads and sauces. Seasonal salads, mouthwatering soups and custom sandwiches are on offer as well. Next time you’re wondering what to do for lunch, head on down to Davey Jones Deli. —Brooke Jackson

›› SeCOND HelpiNGS

another bite of the county’s favorites Marinitas, 218 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Anselmo. 415/737-1849. www.marinitas.net.

As predicted when it first opened more than four years ago—Marinitas has become a popular destination for margaritas. Not only has the always-bustling bar (that used to be EAT and before that Ted’s) become a go-to spot for after-work meetups—the tacos and churros on the kids menu make it a draw for families too. Being a salad lover, my usual order includes the Marinita—a little gem salad with avocado, pumpkin seeds and a creamy lime vinaigrette that expertly combines all of my favorite flavors and ingredients—I could eat it every day. A close second to owner Heidi Krahling’s fattoush salad at her sister restaurant Insalatas is the Mexicana Salad. Jicama, radish and crunchy tortilla strips combine with shredded cabbage and queso fresco for a delightfully varied salad experience. Brisk lime flavors and cumin mingle with oregano and the addition of chicken easily makes this a meal unto itself. Both are especially good paired with a deluxe margarita—a tangy concoction of Chimayo Reposado tequila, Cointreau and a housemade sweet and sour. Of course there are also tacos, enchiladas and rotating daily specials, including tamales and all sparkle with a freshness and quality that can only be achieved by someone who knows this food. Marinitas offers a casual, convivial dining option that never forgets about the importance of showcasing ingredients in their very best light. Or, as the restaurant tag line reads, “Latin focused lusciousness.” —Tanya Henry

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PacificSun’s

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Aikido Kids of Tamailpais

Marin JCC Camp Kehillah

142 Redwood Ave. | Corte Madera | 415.264.0157 Aikido of Tamalpais Kids program teaches children ages 4-13. At Sumurai Summer Camps, Children have fun, make friends and learn peaceful resolutions to dynamic situations. Aikido is a deflective martial art that teaches self-confidence, emotional maturity and physical flexibility. Camps are July 7-11 and 14-18 in Corte Madera www.tam-aikido.org AIKIDO of

TAMALPAIS

Bay Area Discovery Museum Discovery Camps 557 McReynolds Rd | Sausalito | 415.339.3900

Our camps ignite creative thinking as children work to solve the problem of how build a solid fort, create their own sets and costumes for performances, experiment with art materials, or discover native plants and animals. On top of all that, kids have an absolute blast! www.BayKidsMuseum.org/camps

Camp Doodles

800 Belle Ave. | San Rafael | 415.388.4386 Camp Doodles offers several convenient summer camp locations in San Francisco & Marin. We are open Monday - Friday from 7:30am - 6:00pm. Come for a day, week or join our very large contingent of happy children who enjoy the entire fun summer with us. Camp is open June - August. Rates, site-dates and more info on our registration page. All local & international children are welcome to join us (for best results, children should be age 4.5 by the first day of camp). www.campdoodles.com

Marilyn Izdebski 2014 Summer Musical Theatre Camp 100 Shaw Dr. | San Rafael | 415.453.0199

The workshop program will include acting, singing, and dance training, rehearsal hours, production work and two dance class each week for all participants. Ages 8-18. www.marilynizdebskiproductions.com/2014-summer-musical-theatre-camp

200 North San Pedro Rd. | San Rafael | 415.444.8000 Camps for Pre-K through 10th Grade! Pre-K and Kindergarten camps also in Tiburon! Buy 4 weeks and get one more FREE! 2 week camps include field trips, overnights, swimming, sports, music, nature, dress-up days, PJ parties, astro jumps, and beach days! 1 week camps include Secret Agent, Jr. Superhero Engineering, Lego Ninjaneers, Lego Robotics, doodlebug Art Adventures, Sports Olympics, Junior Chefs, and more! One-week Adventure Travel camps in Tahoe, Santa Cruz and Whitewater Rafting! www.marinjcc.org/camp/summer-camp/

Marin Ranch Camp

1700 Marshall Petaluma Rd. | Petaluma | 415.388.4386 x17 Marin Ranch Camp is Marin County premier overnight adventure camp. We’re known for our core values of Friendship, Adventure, Community, Tradition & Safety. We offer a fun and engaging sleep-away camp program where kids ages 7 - 17 can hike, swim, boat, explore and play. A place where children can be themselves while participating in traditional, good old fashioned summer camp activities. Marin Ranch Camp is part of the Camp Doodles family. www.MarinRanchCamp.org

Marin Shakespeare Company

601 N. Hamilton Parkway | Novato | 415.499.4487 A variety of Shakespeare productions and acting lessons for different age groups. Story telling and theatre games for younger kids, acting swimming and tennis for older kids, and professional direction for teens. Ages 5-18. Marin Shakespeare Company’s two and three week summer camps provide fun learning experiences for students ages 5 through teenagers. www.marinshakespeare.org/pages/summercamps.php

Practical Martial Arts

5768 F Paradise Dr. | Corte Madera | 415.927.0899 Training in freestyle martial arts. Learning padded swords, nunchukas & ninja games. Rockin’ the Ninja Obstacle Courses. Absorbing martial arts messages of wisdom, kindness, altruism and goodwill. www.practicalmartialarts.net/camps/

Ross Academy Montessori School Mini Camp 2014 7 Thomas Dr. | Mill Valley | 415.383.5777

The Ross Academy Montessori School Summer Mini Camp is a continuing Montessori Environment with regular staff the entire summer and lots of outdoor fun, guest appearances and special events. Ages Toddler Program 3-5 years, Primary Program 3-6 years. June 16-August 8. Full Day 9 am-2:30pm, Half Day 9 am -noon, extended day care available 7am-6:15pm. Four-, six- and eight-week programs available. Three day programs (toddlers only), individual weeks OK. www.rossacademymontessorischool.com

Ross Recreation Summer Camps

800 College Ave. | Kentfield | 415.453.6020 Ross Recreation has provided a variety of camps for ages 3 to 15 for 29 funfilled years, with experienced, enthusiastic counselors and teachers, your child will have the best summer experience ever! Everything from Academic Camps to Sports Camps to Adventure Camps that go on awesome outings everyday (Ages 7-14). Camps for Pre-School, entering Kindergarten and grades 1-3 round out the fun. www.rossrecreation.org/

Super Summer Adventure Camp

150 Ross Ave. | San Anselmo | 415.453.3181 Super Summer Adventure Camp in San Anselmo offers field trips, swim lessons, art, science gymnastic activities and more for entering kindergarteners to third grade. Our experienced and adventurous staff will once again put on a summer that your child will not soon forget! Located on the spacious campus of Wade Thomas School. We are fully equipped and air-conditioned. Our staff is experienced most work with us year-round. www.supersummeradventurecamp.org

Funtastic Summer Adventure Camp 121 Ross Ave. | San Anselmo | 415.453.3181

Funtastic Preschool Summer Adventure Camp.Located on a beautiful campus on Ross Ave. in San Anselmo. Campers will experience a program enriched with Natural Science, Water Play, Creative Art, Special Day Activities and optional gymnastic/dance classes. Warm, nurturing, year round professional staff. Two, three and five half or full day schedules available. www.sananselmopreschool.org


›› talking pictures

Another brick in the wall ‘Lego Movie’ is true cultural treasure for Unknown Museum’s Mickey McGowan ... by David Te mp l e ton

Writer David Templeton takes interesting people to interesting movies in his ongoing quest for the ultimate post-film conversation. This is not a review; rather, it’s a freewheeling, tangential discussion of life, alternative ideas, and popular culture.

rambling two-story home, where every nook and cranny contains some object loaded with memories and instantly visceral associations. Upstairs, in a bedroom packed with toys, there is even an old set of Lego blocks. Which is why I invited McGowan to see The Lego Movie, the bjects, in their natural state, subject of our current discussion. A are wonderful storytellers,” monster worldwide hit, The Lego Movie says Mickey McGowan. The creates a world made entirely of Lego legendary San Rafael artist, collector and Unknown Museum curator is sitting blocks. Well, technically, it only looks like it was built of Legos. The stunning in his studio—he calls it his “culture cave”—where he’s surrounded by objects animation includes sprawling cities, plastic-cactus western towns, undulating from another time—old vinyl records, oceans, and a place called Cloud Cuckoo spaceman toys from the ’50s, monster Land, where some of the most iconic models from the ’60s. “Everything has a Lego characters have assembled to resist story,” McGowan says. “A doll. A bottle. the efforts of Lord Business (voiced by A basketball. A Slinky. And of course, a Will Farrell) to glue everything down plastic Lego block. They all have stories. with Crazy Glue. The film, which was And if they’re juxtaposed in a certain expected to be a modest hit, has made way, or piled up in a mass heap, then nearly $200 million in two weekends. all of the built-in memories we project Clearly, the thought of millions of Legos onto those objects, all of the memories all in one place has an appeal that only those objects stir up in us, all of that the filmmakers truly anticipated. can be triggered immediately. Art can McGowan, though quick to point out do the same thing, of course. Paintings the film’s frenetic pace and sugar-rush and sculptures can do that. But objects energy—“I should have gotten a large have an incredible natural power and soda at the food court before sitting strength to do that in ways that gets down to watch it,” he jokes—is not down to our very core.” surprised at the impact The Lego Movie McGowan’s Unknown Museum, is making on people. As the creator of once a fabled and magical fixture in a walk-through environment where downtown Mill Valley, has been althe mind is constantly triggered from most literally unknown for the last 20 all directions all at once, he has seen years. Closed to the general public, his firsthand the impact of familiar objects ingeniously displayed collections of arranged in creative ways, in the proper pop-cultural artifacts from the 1950s to proportions. the 1970s are seen only by rare private “It’s an epic story told with objects,” tourists and school groups visiting his he says of The Lego Movie. “So of course I find that appealing. I’m a storyteller with objects.” “Objects,” I point out, “would seem to have a limited flexibility. They are what they are. So how much of your own story can you tell by putting them together in various ways?” “Good question!” McGowan says. “As a display artist, a cura‘An epic story,’ is how McGowan describes the 101-minute Lego commercial.

“O

Smirk all you want, adults. As of press time, ‘The Lego Movie’ had received positive reviews from 96 percent of film critics, according to RottenTomatoes.com.

or may not be the “special” who was tor of exhibits, I first of all arrange and prophesied to arrive and save the world take care of the objects in my museum. A museum, of course, is a place for oddi- from Lord Business and his scheme to stop The Man Upstairs from mixing and ties, curiosities and works of art. But matching different Lego play sets, leadwhen working with objects, I certainly ing to confusion and chaos—and places want to get my two cents in, I want to like Cloud Cuckoo Land. twist the stories a little bit, though not “What’s more powerful,” I ask. “A set too much. I never want to make some of Legos built into an amazing city, with big decorative art statement so much as buildings and roads and cars and all let the objects tell the story of our lives. of these little Lego people doing Lego With just a touch of surrealism thrown things all over—or just a huge pile of in. unassembled Legos?” “Surrealism is just a touch below real“Well, for me it’s the pile,” he says. “I ism,” he adds, “or maybe a touch above. I love seeing pictures of all the amazing don’t really know.” things people have built out of Legos. “Why,” I ask McGowan, “do you think There’s a giant Ronald McDonald that’s the Lego has such a powerful nostalgia just extraordinary. But a pile of Legos is for so many people?” all about potential. Toys assembled into “It clearly does,” he says, “though it one particular shape define what can be doesn’t have so much nostalgia for me, built—but a pile of Legos, or Tinkertoys personally. Lego blocks are a toy that or dominoes, that speaks to the endless came in a bit late to have those childpossibilities of what might be achieved. hood associations, though I still wanted Both are very, very wonderful things. to have some of the original Legos in But I’m into the piles. the Unknown Museum. Drawing on my “On the other hand,” McGowan laughs, own childhood, I relate more strongly to “not everybody has the time to build Tinkertoys and Erector Sets, to Lincoln a city out of Legos. So if you get the Logs and dominoes, all of which could chance to see somebody else’s Lego city, be stacked up and assembled to create that can be a really wonderful thing.” Y all sorts of amazing things. I also had American Plastic Bricks, which were a Help David tidy the Legos from the floor of his bedroom at talkpix@earthlink.net. very close cousin of Lego. “Lego means what, in Danish?” he asks, rhetorically. “I think it means ‘Play well,’ or something,” he answers. “I believe it’s pronounced leg godt, but it became Lego. The very first Legos were made McGowan can hardly out of wood. They became plastic later. contain himself by the thought of a But isn’t that great, that the name means Lincoln Logs ‘play well’? That’s always a good movie... thing. To get people playing.” The Lego Movie, much to many film critics’ surprise, has some rather probing ideas about the power of creativity. On the surface, the film appears to be the story of Emmett (Chris Pratt), a generic Lego construction worker, who may february 21 - february 27, 2014 Pacific Sun 19


MOVies

F R I D AY febr u ary 2 1 — T H U R S D AY febr u ary 2 7 M ovie summaries by M at t hew St af fo r d About Last Night (1:40) Remake of the David Mamet sex farce about two strangers who keep hooking up despite their better judgment; Regina Hall and Kevin Hart star. l American Hustle (2:18) Docudramatic look at the Abscam scandal of the seventies stars Amy Adams and Christian Bale as grifters blackmailed by the FBI into taking down a New Jersey politico; Louis C.K. and Robert De Niro costar. l August: Osage County (1:59) Dysfunctional family shenanigans as acid-tongued, newly widowed cancer patient Meryl Streep takes on daughter Julia Roberts and sundry other wellmeaning types. l Dallas Buyers Club (1:57) Biopic of Ron Woodroof, the HIV-positive Texas cowboy who established a clearinghouse for alternative AIDS treatments from around the world. l Endless Love (1:45) Remake of the 1981 teen swoonfest about the forbidden love affair between a sheltered nice girl and a sexy bad boy. l Frozen (1:42) The kingdom of Arendelle is trapped in an eternal winter, so Anna sets off to find her sister Elsa, who has isolated herself to protect her family from her frosty powers. l Gloria (1:50) Acclaimed Chilean drama about a lonely woman’s dangerously intimate affair with a fellow singleton; Paulina Garcia stars. l Gravity (1:31) Venice Film Fest phenom about two astronauts who struggle to survive after they’re cast adrift in outer space; George Clooney and Sandra Bullock star. l The Great Beauty (2:22) Felliniesque satirical dramedy about an aging writer’s bittersweet adventures in beautiful, bizarre Rome. l Her (1:59) Lonesome social-network nerd Joaquin Phoenix falls truly, madly, deeply for his new computer operating system; Spike Jonze directs Amy Adams, Rooney Mara and Scarlett Johansson as Samantha the robot. l In Secret (1:42) Zola’s Thérèse Raquin hits the big screen with Elizabeth Olsen as a married, repressed Belle Époque Parisian and Oscar Isaac as the boulevardier who lights her fire. l Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (1:47) Prequel to Tom Clancy’s CIA thrillers stars Chris Pine as Ryan. Kenneth Branagh directs! l The Lego Movie (1:34) A Lego figurine and his peg-block posse take on an evil power-mad tyrant; Will Ferrell, Morgan Freeman, Alison Brie and Liam freakin’ Neeson supply the vocals. l Merrily We Roll Along (2:40) Direct from London’s West End it’s Stephen Sondheim’s poignant tribute to life in the show business. l The Monuments Men (1:58) Real-life WWII thriller about a band of art scholars on a mission to rescue stolen masterpieces from the Nazis; star George Clooney directs Matt Damon, Bill Murray, John Goodman and Cate Blanchett. l National Theatre London: 50 Years On Stage Join Britain’s greatest thespians (Judi Dench, Ralph Fiennes, Michael Gambon, Derek Jacobi, Helen Mirren, Maggie Smith l

20 Pacific Sun february 21 - february 27, 2014

and 94 others) at a 50th birthday party for the acclaimed National Theatre, featuring excerpts from “Antony and Cleopatra,” “Guys and Dolls” and everything in between. l National Theatre London: War Horse (3:00) Catch Nick Stafford’s dazzling, innovative WWI extravaganza (featuring life-sized marionettes from South Africa’s Handspring Puppet Co.) in big-screen high definition. l Nebraska (1:54) Alexander Payne dramedy follows a cantankerous old coot and his estranged son on a Midwestern road trip to claim a million-dollar grand prize; Bruce Dern and Will Forte star. l The Nut Job (1:26) Cartoon caper comedy about two rascally rodents and their plan to heist a nut store; Liam Neeson and Brendan Fraser vocalize. l Omar (1:38) Tensely paced thriller about a Palestinian partisan who may or may not be an informant for the Israeli secret service. l On the Waterfront (1:48) Marlon Brando dazzles as a conscience-stricken longshoreman on the Mob-controlled Hoboken docks; Elia Kazan directs. l Oscar-Nominated Animated Shorts Catch five cartoons from around the world up for this year’s Academy Awards. l Oscar-Nominated Documentary Shorts Program of five minimalist documentaries on a wide range of subjects with one thing in common: a shot at Academy bling. l Oscar-Nominated Live-Action Shorts The Academy’s picks for the year’s top five liveaction short subjects screen at the Rafael l Philomena (1:37) Stephen Frears docudrama about an unwed mother’s attempts to track down her long-lost son; Judi Dench stars. l Pompeii (1:45) Historical disaster epic about the slaves, senators and gladiators of the ancient Roman city and their spectacular lava-nation by volcanic Vesuvius. l Ride Along Action comedy follows two cops on an unexpectedly wild night cruising the mean streets of Atlanta; Ice Cube stars. l RoboCop (1:57) A disabled Detroit cop returns to the line as the half-man, half-robot concoction of unscrupulous arms dealers. l Son of God (2:18) Epic retelling of the story of Christ from birth to crucifixion to resurrection; Diogo Morgado stars. l 3 Days to Kill (1:57) Ailing secret agent Kevin Costner takes on one final mission (taking down the world’s top terrorist: a cinch) in exchange for a lifesaving drug. l Tim’s Vermeer (1:20) Documentary follows inventor Tim Jenison on his 10-year search for the secret of Johannes Vermeer’s photo-realistic artistry; R.J. Teller (of Penn & Teller) directs. l Winter’s Tale (2:09) Epic fantasy romance abut a burglar and an heiress with a gift for reincarnation; Colin Farrell, Jenifer Connelly, William Hurt and Eva Marie Saint star. l The Wolf of Wall Street (2:45) Leo DiCaprio stars as Jordan Belfort, the securitiesfraud king of the 1990s; Martin Scorsese directs Matthew McConaughey, Spike Jonze, Rob Reiner and Fran Lebowitz.

k New Movies This Week

About Last Night (R)

American Hustle (R) August: Osage County (R) The Dallas Buyer’s Club (R) Endless Love (PG-13) Frozen (PG) Gloria (R) Gravity (PG-13) The Great Beauty (Not Rated) Her (R) kIn Secret (R) Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (PG-13) The LEGO Movie (PG)

Merrily We Roll Along (Not Rated) The Monuments Men (PG-13)

Marin: Fri 4:30, 7:30, 9:55 Sat 1:15, 4:30, 7:30, 9:55 Sun 1:15, 4:30, 7:30 MonThu 4:30, 7:30 Northgate: 12:40, 3:55, 7, 10:05 Rowland: Fri-Wed 12:35, 3, 5:25, 7:55, 10:25 Larkspur Landing: Fri 6:45, 10 Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:35, 6:45, 10 Mon-Thu 6:30, 9:45 Northgate: 12:45, 3:55, 7, 10:10 Regency: Fri-Sat 4, 10:05 Mon-Thu 4 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:30, 3:40, 6:45, 9:35 Sun-Thu 12:30, 3:40, 6:45 Northgate: 11:40, 2:20, 5, 7:35, 10:20 Rowland: Fri-Wed 12:05, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50, 10:15 Northgate: 11:25, 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 10 Rafael: Fri 4:15, 6:45, 9:05 Sat-Sun 1:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:05 Mon-Thu 6:45, 9:05 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:45, 2:25, 4:45, 7:10, 9:40 Rafael: Fri-Sun 4 Regency: Fri-Sat, Mon-Wed 12:45, 7:10 Sun 7:10 Thu 12:45 Regency: Fri-Sat 11:35, 2:10, 4:45, 7:25, 10:10 Sun-Thu 11:35, 2:10, 4:45, 7:25 Northgate: 11:20, 1:55, 4:55, 7:40, 10:15 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:10, 3:15, 6:05, 8:45 Sun-Thu 12:10, 3:15, 6:05 Larkspur Landing: Fri 9:45; 3D showtime at 7:15 Sat-Sun 11, 4:30, 9:45; 3D showtimes at 1:45, 7:15 Mon-Thu 9:15; 3D showtime at 6:45 Northgate: 11:30, 2, 4:30, 7:05, 9:35; 3D showtimes at 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:20 Playhouse: Fri 3:50, 6:10, 8:30 Sat 1:10, 3:50, 6:10, 8:30 Sun 1:10, 3:50, 6:10 Mon-Thu 3:50, 6:10 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:30, 4:30, 7; 3D showtimes at 1:55, 9:30 Rafael: Sun 1 Cinema: Fri-Wed 1, 4, 7, 9:50 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:45, 3:55, 6:50, 9:40 Sun-Thu 12:45, 3:55, 6:50 Playhouse: Fri 3:40, 6:25, 9:10 Sat 1, 3:40, 6:25, 9:10 Sun 1, 3:40, 6:25 Mon-Thu 3:40, 6:25 Regency: Fri-Sat 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:20 SunThu 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:05, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 Sequoia: Fri 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 Sat 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 Sun 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 Mon-Thu 4:15, 7:15

National Theatre London (NTL): 50 Years On Stage (NR)

Lark: Sat 11 Lark: Thu 7:30 Regency: Thu 7 Nebraska (R) Northgate: Fri-Mon 1:30, 6:55 The Nut Job (PG) Northgate: Fri-Mon 12:25 Tue-Thu 1:30, 6:55 kOmar (Not Rated) Rafael: Fri 4:30, 7:15, 9:30 Sat-Sun 2, 4:30, 7:15, 9:30 Mon-Thu 7:15, 9:30 kOn the Waterfront (Not Rated) Regency: Sun 2 Wed 2, 7 Oscar-Nominated Animated Shorts (NR) Rafael: 7 daily Oscar-Nominated Documentary Shorts (NR) Rafael: Sat 1 Oscar-Nominated Live Action Shorts (NR) Rafael: 9:15 daily Philomena (PG-13) Marin: Fri 4:15, 7:15, 9:45 Sat 1, 4:15, 7:15, 9:45 Sun 1, 4:15, 7:15 Mon-Thu 4:15, 7:15 Northgate: Fri-Wed 10:45, 4:15, 9:45 Thu 10:45, 4:15 kPompeii (PG-13) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 3:50, 6:40; 3D showtimes at 12:50, 9:25 Sun-Thu 3:50, 6:40; 3D showtime at 12:50 Northgate: Fri-Sat 11:15, 4:40; 3D showtimes at 1:50, 7:30, 10:05 Sun-Thu 3:20, 8:30; 3D showtimes at 11:15, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:05 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:35, 4:45; 3D showtimes at 2:10, 7:20, 9:55 Ride Along (PG-13) Northgate: 11:50, 2:30, 5:10, 7:45, 10:30 RoboCop (PG-13) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 1, 4:10, 7, 9:45 Sun-Thu 1, 4:10, 7 Larkspur Landing: Fri 5, 7:45, 10:30 Sat-Sun 11:30, 2:15, 5, 7:45, 10:30 Mon-Thu 7, 9:45 Northgate: Fri-Mon 11, 1:45, 3:10, 4:35, 5:55, 7:20, 8:45, 10:10 Tue-Thu 11, 12:25, 1:45, 3:10, 4:35, 5:55, 7:20, 8:45, 10:10 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:10, 2, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30 kSon of God (PG-13) Northgate: Thu 10pm k3 Days to Kill (PG-13) Lark: Fri-Sat 3:30, 6:15, 9 Sun 2, 4:45, 7:30 Mon-Wed 4:45, 7:30 Thu 4:45 Northgate: Fri-Sat 10:50, 12:20, 1:40, 3:05, 4:25, 5:50, 7:15, 8:35, 10 Sun-Thu 10:50, 12:35, 1:40, 4:25, 5:50, 7:15, 10 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11, 1:40, 4:25, 7:10, 10 kTim’s Vermeer (PG-13) Regency: Fri-Sat 12:40, 3:05, 5:25, 7:40, 9:50 Sun-Thu 12:40, 3:05, 5:25, 7:40 Winter’s Tale (PG-13) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 1:15, 4:25, 7:10, 9:30 Sun-Thu 1:15, 4:25, 7:10 Larkspur Landing: Fri 6:30, 9:15 Sat-Sun 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Mon-Thu 7:15, 10 Playhouse: Fri 4, 6:45, 9:30 Sat 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30 Sun 1:15, 4, 6:45 Mon-Thu 4, 6:45 Regency: Fri-Sat 12:50, 3:50, 7, 9:55 Sun-Tue, Thu 12:50, 3:50, 7 Wed 12:50, 3:50 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:15, 2:05, 4:55, 7:45, 10:30 Sequoia: Fri 4:40, 7:40, 10:25 Sat 1:45, 4:40, 7:40, 10:25 Sun 1:45, 4:40, 7:40 Mon-Thu 4:40, 7:40 kNTL: War Horse (PG-13)

Showtimes can change after we go to press. Please call theater to confirm schedules. CinéArts at Marin 101 Caledonia St., Sausalito • 331-0255 | CinéArts at Sequoia 25 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley • 388-4862 | Cinema 41 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera • 924-6505 | Fairfax 9 Broadway, Fairfax • 453-5444 Lark 549 Magnolia Ave., Larkspur • 924-5111 | Larkspur Landing 500 Larkspur Landing Cir., Larkspur • 461-4849 Northgate 7000 Northgate Dr., San Rafael • 800-326-3264 | Playhouse 40 Main St., Tiburon • 435-1234 Rafael Film Center 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael • 454-1222 | Regency 80 Smith Ranch Rd., Terra Linda • 479-5050 Rowland 44 Rowland Way, Novato • 800-326-3264


sundial Video

F R I D A Y F ebr U A R Y 2 1 — F R I D A Y F ebr U A R Y 2 8 Pacific Sun‘s Community Calendar

Highlights from our online community calendar— great things to do this week in Marin

Check out our Online Community Calendar for more listings, spanning more weeks, with more event information »pacificsun.com/sundial

Live music 02/21: Acharya Mangalananda and Friends in Concert Kirtan interactive

musical presentation. 8pm. $15. Open Secret Bookstore, 923 C Street, San Rafael. 457-4191. opensecretbookstore.com/events. 02/21: Danny Click Rock, blues and Americana. 9:30pm. $10. The Sleeping Lady, 23 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 485-1182. sleepingladyfairfax.com.

02/21: David Hidalgo Trio (Los Lobos) with Casey Frazier 9pm. $30-34. Sweetwater, 19 Corte

Madera, Mill Valley. 388-3850. swmh.com.

02/21: Groovin with The Phillip Percy Pack Dinner and cocktails by the fire with live

jazz. Phillip Percy Williams, vocals; Marco Casasola, piano; Adam Lowdermilk, bass. 6:30pm. No cover. Rickey’s Restaurant, 250 Entrada Dr., Novato. 244-2665. rickeysrestaurant.com. 02/21: Jenny Kerr Band 8pm. No cover. Rancho Nicasio, 1 Old Rancheria Road, Nicasio. 662-2219. ranchonicasio.com. 02/21: La Mandanga Flameco/gypsy rock. 9:30pm. $8. Peri’s Silver Dollar, 29 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 459-9910. perisbar.com. 02/21: Modern Mandolin Quartet Performing works from their upcoming recording as well as their 2013 Grammy nominated CD. 8pm. Fenix Supper Club, 919 Fourth St., San Rafael. 813-5600. 02/21: Rick Estrin and the Nightcats Swing, rock. 9pm. $15. HopMonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 892-6200. hopmonk.com/novato. 02/21: Stephanie Teel Band Coastal rock. 8:30pm. $15. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St., San Rafael. 578-2707. georgesnightclub.com. 02/21: Tom Finch Group Acoustic, world, funk. 9pm. Smiley’s Saloon, 41 Wharf Road, Bolinas. 868-1311. smileyssaloon.com.

02/21: Zoo Station/Stung U2 and Police

tribute bands. 9pm. $10. 19 Broadway Night Club, 17 Broadway, Fairfax. 19broadway.com. 02/22: Audrey Moira Shimkas American and Brazilian jazz standards. 6:30pm. No cover. The Trident Restaurant, 558 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 847-8331. AudreyShimkas.com. 02/22: Black Water Gold Afro-funk. 9:30pm. $8. Peri’s Silver Dollar, 29 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 459-9910. perisbar.com. 02/22: Foxes in the Henhouse Folk/Bluegrass .8pm. No cover. Twin Oaks Tavern, 5745 Old Redwood Highway, Penngrove. 707-7955118. twinoakstavernpenngrove.com.

02/22: Greg Johnson and Glass Brick Boulevard Johnson, piano; Paul Hanson, bassoon; Rob Fordyce, bass; Celso Alberti, drums. 8pm. $15. Fenix Supper Club, 919 Fourth St., San Rafael. 385-0400. fenixlive.com.

02/22: Harmonia Presents: Saucy featuring Space Cowboys DJs Sol, Mancub and Tamo 9pm. $12. Harmonia, 2200 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 332-1342. spacecowboysharmonia. eventbrite.com.

02/22: Marty Balin—Music of My Life

Mill Valley’s 142 Throckmorton welcomes back rock and roll legend Marty Balin, founding member and lead vocalist of Jefferson Airplane, hit song maker of Jefferson Starship, Platinum and Gold status Solo Artist, and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee. He is also an artist, and his Mill Valley appearance features a unique showing of his artwork, followed by a concert with his band. Tickets include a meet and greet with the artist and viewing of his paintings, which include portraits of musicians that he worked with over the decades. Meet and greet the artist from 7:30-8:30pm and stay for the live show that starts at 9pm. $30-45. 142 Throckmorton, Mill Valley. 142throckmortontheatre.org.

Lost in space ... and in 3-D “You have to see it in 3-D,” cried the chorus as word of Alfonso Cuarón’s landmark GRAVITY swept the land in October, and they were right of course. Nothing done before could prepare for the sheer terror of that hurtling debris coming up the z-axis straight for Shuttle Explorer. But there’s a cost to be paid for the depth, and it’s the Finishing up maintenance on the Shuttle Explorer is the least of Dr. Ryan Stone’s worries. same one that’s beset 3-D films going back to those red-blue cardboard jobbers in the ’50s: Glasses desaturate and muddy the image, especially polarizers and especially it seems the color blue—resulting in a degradation of Cuarón’s breathtaking canvas. I’d argue you have to see it again, without the specs, on shimmering 2-D Blu-ray. Thrill to the stark whites of those tiny spacecraft set against the vastness of blue Earth below, the serenest of backdrops for the death and shredding to come. Marvel at the brilliance of a suspense setup that uses the full potential of its space and time to turn the screws. Sandra Bullock and George Clooney star. A favorite for the Oscars and winner of six BAFTA awards just this week, the film has spurred a mountain of speculation about its meaning and about Cuarón’s telling of some crucial story moments. One of my favorites is a roundtable-grok episode of Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project podcast.—Richard Gould 02/22: Monophonics Fenton Cool Foot and the Right Time open. 9pm. $20. 19 Broadway Night Club, 17 Broadway, Fairfax. 19broadway.com. 02/22: Rhythm Addicts African rhythms. 9:30pm. $7. The Sleeping Lady, 23 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. sleepingladyfairfax.com. 02/23: Angelo Moore (Fishbone) Brand New Day opens. 9pm. $12-15. 19 Broadway Night Club, 17 Broadway, Fairfax. 19broadway.com. 02/23: Bay Area Cabaret presents Chita Rivera: A Legendary Celebration 3 and

7:30pm. $48. Venetian Room, Fairmont Hotel, 950 Mason St., S.F. bayareacabaret.org. 02/23: Fred Eaglesmith With the Traveling Steam Show. 7:30pm. $25. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Court, Occidental. 707/542-7143. northbaylive.com. 02/23: Lady D and Karen Sudjian Jazz voaclists. With Alex Markels, guitar; Jack Prendergast, bass. 5:30pm. No cover. Rickey’s Restaurant, 250 Entrada, Novato. 497-2462. ladydanthetramps.com.

02/23: Ryan Schaeffer and Ian Mcardle

The Stephanie Teel Band takes the stage at George’s Nightclub Friday, Feb. 21, at 8:30pm.

Jazz standards, pop. 6pm. No cover. Panama Hotel, 4 Bayview St., San Rafael. 457-3993. panamahotel.com. 02/23: Tom Finch Student Showcase Youth showcase. 7pm. No cover. The Sleeping Lady, 23 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. sleepingladyfairfax.com.

02/25: Lorin Rowan Acoustic guitar and vocals. 7pm. No cover. Panama Hotel, 4 Bayview St., San Rafael. 457-3993. panamahotel.com.

02/25: Piano Bluesday w/ Fredrick Nighthawk 8pm. No cover. 19 Broadway Night

Club, 17 Broadway, Fairfax. 19broadway.com. 02/26: Migrant Pickers Folk rock. 9pm. No cover. Peri’s Silver Dollar, 29 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. perisbar.com. 02/26: Mike Lassiter Americana. 7pm. No cover. Panama Hotel, 4 Bayview St., San Rafael. 457-3993. panamahotel.com. 02/26: Rory McNamara Acoustic. 9pm. Free. The Sleeping Lady, 23 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. sleepingladyfairfax.com. 02/26: Sam Russell Blues. 6:30pm. No cover. True North Pizza and Beer, 638 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo. 419-5781. 02/26: Warrior King Roots, reggae. With Riddim Mystics. 9pm. $12-15. 19 Broadway Night Club, 17 Broadway, Fairfax. 19broadway.com. 02/27: Adrian Legg 8pm. $18-30. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Avenue, Mill Valley. 383-9600. 142throckmortontheatre.org. 02/27: C-Jam with Connie Ducey Eclectic song mix with a fresh jazzy punch. 7pm. No cover. Panama Hotel, 4 Bayview St., San Rafael. 457-3993. panamahotel.com. 02/27: Fruition With Emily Yates. Bluegrass 9pm. $10. 19 Broadway Night Club, 17 Broadway, Fairfax. 19broadway.com. February 21 - February 27, 2014 Pacific Sun 21


02/27: Tommy O’Mahoney Irish. 9pm.

No cover. The Sleeping Lady, 23 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax. sleepingladyfairfax.com. 02/27: Vista Point Quintet Jazz. 6:30pm. No Cover. True North Pizza and Beer, 638 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo. 419-5781.

02/28: 23rd Anniversary Mardi Gras Mambofest by Rhythmtown-Jive w/ special guest Rahni Raines and Zydeco Flames New Orleans R&B, brass

band, zydeco, gospel, roots rock and boogie. 9pm. $18-20. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 388-1100. swmh.com. 02/28: Biambu’s Slow Burn Soul, jazz and rock. 9:30pm. $7. The Sleeping Lady, 23 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax. sleepingladyfairfax.com. 02/28: Rusty Evans’ Ring of Fire Rockabilly. 9:30pm. $8. Peri’s Silver Dollar, 29 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax. perisbar.com. 02/28: The 7th Sons Rock and blues. 8:30pm. $8. Presidio Yacht Club, Travis Marina, Ft. Baker, Sausalito. 847-2670. the7thsons.com. 02/28: Wonderbread 5 Dance. 9pm. $15. 19 Broadway Night Club, 17 Broadway, Fairfax. 19broadway.com.

Comedy 02/21: Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood Two Man Group Live and Dangerous Comedy 8pm. $29.50-59.50. Marin Veteran’s Memorial Auditorium,10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 473-6800. marincenter.org.

02/22: Improvised Downton Abbey 8pm. $17-20. Bayfront Theater , B350 Ft. Mason Center, S.F. 474-6776. improv.org.

02/23: Comedy Showcase Hosted by Griffin Daley Hosted by Griffin Daley and

Kaundinya, tabla; Rahul Joshi, sitar; Tim White and Christopher Ris, sarode; Michael Lewis, tabla. 7pm. $15. Ali Akbar College of Music, 215 West End Ave., San Rafael. 454-6372. aacm.org. 02/23-25: Marin Symphony “Quintessential Beethoven, Chic Tchaikovsky.” Alastair Neale conducts works by Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Elgar.Austin Huntington, cello. 3pm Feb. 23; 7:30pm Feb. 25. $10-70. Marin Veteran’s Memorial Auditorium,10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 473-6800. marinsymphony.org. 02/23 and 25: Escher Quartet Works by Schumann, Berg, Dvorak. 3pm Feb. 23; 7:30pm Feb. 25. $10-70. Mt. Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave., Mill Valley. 381-4453. chambermusicmillvalley.org.

02/24: Singer’s Choice: College of Marin Advanced Recital Art, gospel and musical

theater songs. 11:10am. Free. College of Marin Lefort Recital Hall, 835 College Avenue, Kentfield. 485-9460. marin.edu/performingarts/ music/music-calendar.html. 02/26: Noontime Concert Series Noon. Free. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. 383-9600. 142throckmortontheatre.org.

02/27: Musica Pacifica: Bach Family Concertos: the father, the sons and the godfather With Judith Linsenberg, recorders; Eliza-

beth Blumenstock, violin; Charles Sherman, harpsichord; Stephen Schultz, flute; Lisa Weiss and Anthony Martin, violins; David Wilson, viola; Lynn Tetenbaum, violone. Light refreshments available. 6:30pm. $13-15, under 18 free. Petaluma Woman’s Club, 518 B Street, Petaluma. 510-220-1195. barefootchamberconcerts.com.

Dance 02/22-23: Inside Out Contemporary Ballet If I Were You “If I Were You.” Community inspired dance collaboration. 7pm. $10-20. Marin Ballet, Phyllis Thelen Theater, 100 Elm St., San Rafael. 312-8912. insideoutballet.org.

featuring Myles Weber, Eloisa Bravo, Kevin Munroe and Dan Mires 7pm. $15. Fenix Supper Club, 919 Fourth St., San Rafael. 813-5600. fenixlive.com.

Art

Concerts

02/21-23: Marin Show: Art of the Americas Opening Night gala reception. 6:30 -9pm

02/21: Modern Mandolin Quartet

Chamber music/Americana. 8pm. $25-30. Fenix Supper Club, 919 Fourth St., San Rafael. 813-5600.

02/22: Ali Akbar College of Music Annual Winter Concert Series Indian classical. Rachel Unterseher, viola; Ram

Feb. 21; 10am -6pm. Feb. 22; 11am-5pm Feb. 23. $15-35. Marin Center Exhibit Hall,10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 473-6800. marinshow.com. Through 03/02: Volumes An exhibition of sculpture by Andrew Hayes. Free. Seager Gray Gallery, 23 Sunnyside Ave., Mill Valley. 384-8288. seagergray.com.

Join the Marin City Library and Marin Humane Society’s ‘Read to a Dog’ team in celebrating 17 years at the library’s current location.

Kids Events 02/21: History of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Join Ranger Bill to learn about the the diverse missions and objectives of the bay model. 2pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 332-3871. spn.usace. army.mil/Missions/Recreation/BayModelVisitorCenter.aspx.

02/23: Mill Valley Live: The Buddy Club

Comedic magician Timothy James. 11am. $8. Mill Valley Community Center, 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley. 383-1370. millvalleycenter.org.

Film 02/23 and 28: ‘Merrily We Roll Along’ Stephen Sondheim musical. Book by George Furth. Director: Maria Friedman. (UK 2013) 160 min. 1pm Feb. 23; 7pm Feb. 28. Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth Street, San Rafael . 454-1222. cafilm.org/rfc/ films/1963.html.

Outdoors 02/22: Creekwalks to Explore the Lagunitas Watershed and View Coho Salmon With the first rains in the watershed comes the beginning of spawning season for Coho salmon. SPAWN trained naturalists lead creek walks to explore the Lagunitas creek watershed. Learn about the ecology of our endangered native Coho salmon, native plants, the natural history of the watershed and more. Reservations required. Meet at San Geronimo Community Center. Saturdays, select Sundays and holiday weekdays at 10am and 1pm. Wear layers, rain gear, good walking shoes. Bring camera, binoculars, lunch and water. San Geronimo Valley Community Center, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Geronimo. spawnusa.org/creek-walks.

Readings

Join SPAWN trained naturalists on creek walk exploring the ecology of Marin’s native and endangered Coho salmon. 22 Pacific Sun February 21 - February 27, 2014

02/21: Karen Lynch Co-Sponsored by A Band of Women. “Good Cop, Bad Daughter: Memoirs of an Unlikely Police Officer.” 7pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com. 02/22: Natalie Baszile “Queen Sugar.” 4pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com.

02/22: Patti Breitman “Never Too Late to Go Vegan: The Over-50 Guide to Adopting and Thriving on a Plant-Based Diet.” 11am. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com. 02/23: Jennifer Vanderbes “The Secret of Raven Point.” 1pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com. 02/23: Melanie Young “Getting Things Off My Chest: A Survivor’s Guide to Staying Fearless and Fabulous in the Face of Breast Cancer.” 7pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com. 02/24: Jennifer Vanderbes “The Secret of Raven Point.” 7pm. Free. Copperfield’s Books San Rafael, 850 Fourth St., San Rafael. 524-2800. copperfieldsbooks.com.

02/24: It’s Simply Serendipity: Four Steps to Manifesting a Life of Bliss

Cali Gilbert, author, photographer and social entrepreneur will share her journey of transformation from homelessness to artist and creator of the “It’s Simply” series books. 7pm. Free. Sausalito City Hall-Edgewater Room, 420 Litho St., Sausalito. 289-4121. ci.sausalito.ca.us/index.aspx?page=992. 02/25: Daniel Suarez Bestselling cyber thriller author of “Daemon.” 7pm. Free. Copperfield’s Books San Rafael, 850 Fourth St., San Rafael. 524-2800. copperfieldsbooks.com. 02/25: Erin Lindsay McCabe “I Shall Be Near to You.” 7pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com. 02/26: Iris Krasnow “Sex After...” 7pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com. 02/27: Marcia Naomi Berger “Marriage Meetings for Lasting Love: 30 Minutes a Week to the Relationship You’ve Always Wanted.” 7pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com.

02/28: Michelle Tam and Chris Kresser “Nom Nom Paleo.” 5:30pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 927-0960. bookpassage.com.

Community Events (Misc.) 02/22: Frog Docent Training Docents monitor habitat conditions for and educate hikers about native foothill yellow-legged frogs. The required training begins at the Sky


Be Our Friend On

›› trivia café answers From page 6

1a. Redwood Creek 1b. Coho salmon; so named by the Russians. 2. Geico 3. Minority Leader of the House of Representatives 4. Monarch butterflies; population is lowest in 20 years 5a. Sally Field 5b. “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.” The Escher Quartet bring their strings instruments and their A-game to the Mt. Tamalpais United Methodist Chruch. Oaks Headquarters in Fairfax with a discussion of frog biology and population threats, radio training and methods for engaging the public. At noon we take a three-mile roundtrip hike to Little Carson Falls. Docents must be at least 18 years old. Rain will not cancel. Please RSVP. Their website provides information and maps. 9am-4pm. Free. Volunteer Program Sky Oaks Watershed Headquarters Marin Municipal Water District, Fairfax. 945-1128. marinwater.org.

02/22: Marin City Library 17th Anniversary and Remodel Celebration Celebrating 17 years in their current location. Life long Marin City resident and storyteller Lauretta Smith-Williams will talk local history as part of the celebration. The Read to a Dog teams from the Marin Humane Society will be available for kids to enjoy. 1pm. Free. Marin City Library, 164 Donahue St., Sausalito. 332-6159. marinlibrary.org.

02/22: Marin Young Professionals Network 2nd Annual Anniversary Gala Dinner Elegant and entertaining evening with dancing and casino style games. Benefitting Homeward Bound of Marin. Cocktail attire recommended, black tie optional. 6-11pm. $55-100. The Key Room, 1385 N. Hamilton Parkway, Novato. marinypn.com.

First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Road, San Rafael. 388-2821. mpjc.org.

02/25: Please Join S.F. Bay ACS for Kathi Koontz: Whale Disentanglement in Northern California One of the greatest threats to whales is entanglement in fishing gear and marine debris. The Whale Entanglement Team (WET) disentangles whales and conducts public outreach. Kathi Koontz, from WET, will discuss entanglements in Northern California and how you can get involved. She, and Pieter Folkens, will walk you through the disentanglement process of removing a tight wrap/line(s) on a free-swimming, and anchored, 50 foot, 50 ton whale from a 14-18 foot inflatable boat. 7pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 937-0641. acs-sfbay.org. 02/25: Debora Spar Speak to Me Lecture Series. As the president of Barnard College, Spar brings research, wisdom and insight to the heated debate about how women’s lives have and have not changed over the past 40 years. 5:30pm $69. 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley.

02/25: Thrive as a Wellness Practitioner

This class, will give you practical skills needed as

Join Corte Madera’s REI team on Wednesday, Feb. 26, for some expert camping tips and tricks.

6. iPad, 1/2 inch wide hand-held comput-

practitioner and help you develop a philosophy of success that can be used in all phases of life. 6pm. $60-120. Renaissance Marin, 1115 Third Street, San Rafael. 755-1115. marinrencenter.org. 02/26: REI Winter Camping Basics Learn how to plan, stay warm, select winter appropriate gear and what to expect when setting up camp and during your overnight. 7pm. Free. REI Corte Madera, Corte Madera Town Center Community Room, 770 Tamalpais Dr., Suite 201, Corte Madera. 927-1938. rei.com/ cortemadera.

to be a fan visit PacificSun.com 02/26: Talking About Money With Your

or search for Pacific Sun on FB

Honey Five experts will share their tips on

how you get on track and stay there with your life partner in talking about money. Speakers include J.R. Hastings, Ondina Nandine Hatvany, Jodi Klugman-Rabb, Kathleen Nemetz, Christina Sherman. Co-sponsored by the Women’s Collective of Marin. 5:30pm. $25. Blue Door Conference Room, offices of JR Hastings, Esq., 1003 Third St., San Rafael. 472.1445 ext. 306. womenscollectiveofmarin.com.

02/26: The Stargate Experience: An inter-dimensional doorway Awaken your

DNA to ignite the process of re-remembering. There will also be generous time for Q&A and shar-

02/22: The USACE: From the Sierra’s to the Sea In commemoration of Engineer

month, this story spans over 150 years of US Army Corps of Engineers service to the state of California balancing environmental stewardship with the need for economic and urban growth. Find out more from Ranger Linda. 1:30pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 332-3871. spn.usace.army.mil/missions/ recreation/baymodelvisitorcenter.aspx.

Away from Homelessness, which was created in 1994 in partnership with the National Park Service as a respite for homeless children living in shelters. Admission includes homemade pancakes, sausage, local organic fruit, coffee and juice. Show up anytime between 10:30am and 12:45pm.Tickets are only on line and must be bought before the event. 30 Ridge Ave., Mill Valley. 388-9987. touristclubsf.org/2014/01/ pancakes-for-kids-sunday-february-23 host an important forum on “Growth Issues in Marin and Housing Concerns.” 6:30pm. Free.

02/27: Free Civil Legal Advice and Referrals Clinic Legal Aid of Marin and BONUS ANSWER: The Babylonians

OneJustice’s Rural Justice Collaborative will provide a free civil legal advice and referral clinic on issues including housing, employment and consumer debt. The clinic is from 1-4pm. Free. San Geronimo Valley Community Center, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Geronimo. 492-0230.

02/27: Fresh Starts Chef Events: Fire Up with Firehouse Chef Marvin Blandon Learn how Chef Marv manages the kitchen to keep the crew fueled at Novato Station 63 and the evolution of the award-winning Novato Fire Chili Co. He and Chef Rachelle will share their tips for cooking around what’s in season and what’s on sale to put a personal spin on favorite recipes. 6:30pm. $55. The Key Room, 1385 N Hamilton Parkway, Novato. 382-3363 ext. 243. bit.ly/FSchefevents. 02/27: Spreadsheets for Business Don’t let the idea of spreadsheets scare you. Learn about these basic tools to help you manage your business more effectively. 5:30pm. $30. Renaissance Marin, 1115 Third St., San Rafael. 755-1115. marinrencenter.org.

02/28: Water Wise Edible Gardening

02/23: Pancake Breakfast Benefit for Kids at the Tourist Club Benefits A Home

02/24: Marin Growth Issues and Housing Marin Peace and Justice Coalition will

er 7pm. $25. Open Secret Bookstore, 923 C St., ing. San Rafael. 457-4191. opensecretbookstore.com. 7. Up Entrepreneurs Enabled From Sur02/27: vival to Sustainability: A Call to Action. Entrepreneurs Enabled an emerging coalition 8. Enchilada; theisword means “in chili” of organizations and people working to shift the away from business as usual to 9. paradigm Sled dog racing self-sustainability and an equalized economy. 9am. Free. Albert J. Boro Community Center 10. Lincoln Tunnel (shown in old photo) (Pickleweed Park), 50 Canal Rafael. and Holland Tunnel, underSt., theSan Hudson 755-1115 River ext. 1026. rencentermarin.org.

Get you garden on at the Civic Center Library and learn how edible gardening can help you conserve.

President of Barnard College, Debora Spar, debates the change, or lack of, in women’s lives and roles over the past 40 years.

Marin County is experiencing the driest year on record and Governor Brown has declared a drought emergency. Regardless of drought, water efficient edible gardens are always a wise practice. Reducing water usage in your edible garden will not only save you money, but conserve one of our most important natural resources. Hear UC Marin Master Gardener, Gael Perrin, talk about the most important things you could be doing now to save water and protect your established edible plantsand discuss how to plan your future edible gardens with strategies that will reduce water consumption this year and in the years to come. Noon. Free. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Drive, Room 427, San Rafael. 473-6058. ✹ february 21 - february 27, 2014 Pacific Sun 23


What's Your sign?

Week of february 21 – february 27, 2014

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Join Corte Madera’s REI team on Wednesday, Feb. 26, for some expert camping tips and tricks.

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practitioner and help you develop a philosophy of success that can be used in all phases of life. 6pm. $60-120. Renaissance Marin, 1115 Third Street, San Rafael. 755-1115. marinrencenter.org. 02/26: REI Winter Camping Basics Learn how to plan, stay warm, select winter appropriate gear and what to expect when setting up camp and during your overnight. 7pm. Free. REI Corte Madera, Corte Madera Town Center Community Room, 770 Tamalpais Dr., Suite 201, Corte Madera. 927-1938. rei.com/ cortemadera.

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02/26: Talking About Money With Your Honey Five experts will share their tips on

how you get on track and stay there with your life partner in talking about money. Speakers include J.R. Hastings, Ondina Nandine Hatvany, Jodi Klugman-Rabb, Kathleen Nemetz, Christina Sherman. Co-sponsored by the Women’s Collective of Marin. 5:30pm. $25. Blue Door Conference Room, offices of JR Hastings, Esq., 1003 Third St., San Rafael. 472.1445 ext. 306. womenscollectiveofmarin.com.

02/26: The Stargate Experience: An inter-dimensional doorway Awaken your

DNA to ignite the process of re-remembering. There will also be generous time for Q&A and shar-

ing. 7pm. $25. Open Secret Bookstore, 923 C St., San Rafael. 457-4191. opensecretbookstore.com. 02/27: Entrepreneurs Enabled From Survival to Sustainability: A Call to Action. Entrepreneurs Enabled is an emerging coalition of organizations and people working to shift the paradigm away from business as usual to self-sustainability and an equalized economy. 9am. Free. Albert J. Boro Community Center (Pickleweed Park), 50 Canal St., San Rafael. 755-1115 ext. 1026. rencentermarin.org.

02/27: Free Civil Legal Advice and Referrals Clinic Legal Aid of Marin and

OneJustice’s Rural Justice Collaborative will provide a free civil legal advice and referral clinic on issues including housing, employment and consumer debt. The clinic is from 1-4pm. Free. San Geronimo Valley Community Center, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Geronimo. 492-0230.

02/27: Fresh Starts Chef Events: Fire Up with Firehouse Chef Marvin Blandon Learn how Chef Marv manages the kitchen to keep the crew fueled at Novato Station 63 and the evolution of the award-winning Novato Fire Chili Co. He and Chef Rachelle will share their tips for cooking around what’s in season and what’s on sale to put a personal spin on favorite recipes. 6:30pm. $55. The Key Room, 1385 N Hamilton Parkway, Novato. 382-3363 ext. 243. bit.ly/FSchefevents. 02/27: Spreadsheets for Business Don’t let the idea of spreadsheets scare you. Learn about these basic tools to help you manage your business more effectively. 5:30pm. $30. Renaissance Marin, 1115 Third St., San Rafael. 755-1115. marinrencenter.org.

02/28: Water Wise Edible Gardening

President of Barnard College, Debora Spar, debates the change, or lack of, in women’s lives and roles over the past 40 years. 24 Pacific Sun february 21 - february 27, 2014

Marin County is experiencing the driest year on record and Governor Brown has declared a drought emergency. Regardless of drought, water efficient edible gardens are always a wise practice. Reducing water usage in your edible garden will not only save you money, but conserve one of our most important natural resources. Hear UC Marin Master Gardener, Gael Perrin, talk about the most important things you could be doing now to save water and protect your established edible plantsand discuss how to plan your future edible gardens with strategies that will reduce water consumption this year and in the years to come. Noon. Free. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Drive, Room 427, San Rafael. 473-6058. ✹

BY LEONA MOON

ARIES (March 21 - April 19) You’re all over the place Aries, work and your personal life are pulling you in different directions. You can’t please everyone and you can’t oversee every project. Add a little balance to your life to avoid spreading yourself too thin on Feb. 26; if you’re not happy—your clients won’t be happy. Slow down, a bundle of cash is headed your way at the beginning of next month. TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) Toxic patterns from your past will tempt you all day on Feb. 23. Whatever your vice may be avoid it at all costs—you’ve worked so hard to get here! What did the bottom of an ice cream pint ever bring you, or an extra shot of whiskey? The answer is trouble—be practical and steer clear! GEMINI (May 21 - June 20) On Feb. 22 Uranus sets up camp right between Jupiter and Pluto. In a similar fashion, a new friendship may leave your partner with a dose of extra jealousy. Have you been relying on the lifeline “call a friend” instead of “pay attention to your partner?” If you want to make it work, find a balance on Feb. 24 and spend time with your love. Otherwise, cut the cord. CANCER (June 21 - July 22) Stay centered and stay calm, Cancer! Professional changes and swirling ambitions create a frenzied atmosphere around you this week. Feb. 23 it will be hard to focus on nearly anything else besides your long-term goals. Where will you be in five years? You don’t need all the answers now; make a vision board on Feb. 27. LEO (July 23 - Aug. 22) The Wolf of Wall Street? More like the Lion of Wall Street. Is that your bank account, Leo? Those numbers put any broker to shame. This year you’re not paying the man, the man is paying you! You’ve been noticeably more financially responsible and your fiscal consciousness is paying off. Whether it be a tax refund, bonus or raise—you deserve a treat. VIRGO (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) Valentine’s Day may have come and gone this year, and that’s fine. Your day for true love and answers is Feb. 24. With Venus planted in compatible Capricorn, the stars are ready to take you on a speed date tour of possibilities. Take notice of everyone and don’t judge a book by its cover. If you’re coupled up, it’s likely a long-awaited conversation regarding a taboo subject will manifest. LIBRA (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) Has work been a little boring, Libra? Creative assignments are on their way! Don’t get caught up in the jargon-heavy paperwork that has flooded your desk lately, you’re about to take the right-side of your brain for a ride. Jot down any creative ideas that fill your brain on Feb. 27—they are sure to bring the bucks. Think Hunter S. Thompson meets Donald Trump. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) Who’s been annoying you this month, Scorpio? Your sixth house of health and details is ready for some reorganization— even if it means with a friend or a lover. On Feb. 23 you will finally meet the straw that broke the camel’s back. With mercury still in retrograde, it doesn’t look like this will be an easy conversation. Stay calm and bring patience to this meeting. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21) You’re looking for a little extra cash and some side work. Feb. 25 is the day to begin the hunt for an internship or additional freelance projects. You’ve been blessed with innate marketing skills and know how to sell yourself. Who have you done favors for lately? They will be more than happy to help ignite your passionate projects. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) Are you in a new role at work? You have leader in your Capricorn, but sometimes the best way to lead is by training. Although it may be tempting to Biggest Loser boot camp your staff into shape, if you’re looking for a response, try motivating through knowledge, not force. A shifted mindset in your leadership will pay off at work, in the classroom or at home on Feb. 26. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) Your wheels are turning and your world is shifting. What matters most to you? The way you see and shape your world is coming into focus and you’re ready to hike along a new path. Don’t be scared to delve a little deeper on Feb. 27, your next big adventure is waiting for you to pick the red pill or the blue pill. PISCES (Feb. 19 - March 20) Speak your mind, Pisces—Jupiter has got your back! With your fifth house of expression leading the way it’s no surprise you’ve stopped suppressing. Stand your ground and confidently welcome the sun into your sign on Feb. 21. Your boldness will continue to weed out friend or foe on Feb. 27. Y


to Place an ad: Log on to PacificSun.com and get the perfect combination: a print ad in the Pacific Sun and an online web posting. For text or display ads, please call our Classifieds Sales Department at 415/485-6700, ext. 331. Text ads must be placed by Monday Noon to make it into the Friday print edition.

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Nila - 1 year old Pit Bull/ Terrier mix Nila is a sweet dog, just the right size for a nice family. We can’t tell for sure, but her face looks like she has some Pit Bull in her and her sleek build calls to mind a medium sized terrier. She would do best with bigger, playful, experienced dogs as her playmates. While she is very tolerant in general, we saw some signs of Nila’s guarding her "valuables," so children should be mature enough to help her learn to enjoy sharing. She would love to attend training classes with you as she is smart and wants to please.Come meet this amber-eyed beauty today. Meet Nila at the Marin Humane Society or call the Adoption Department at 415.506.6225

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Handyman/repairs

Got Rot? Removal & Repair of Structural Damage

real estate Homes/Condos for Sale AFFORDABLE MARIN? I can show you 40 homes under $400,000. Call Cindy @ 415-902-2729. Christine Champion, Broker.

Retail/Office Space for Rent Office Space sublet Option to rent 1150 sq feet retail/ office space in downtown San Rafael. Prime location on Cijos between Fourth and Third Street. Near transit. 415 485-6700 x315

Storage Space for Rent Storage Space in Corte Madera for Rent. Corte Madera $325 Storage 500 sq ft. Close to Freeway. Private. Call El 415-924-1529 ENGLISH HOUSESITTER Will love your pets, pamper your plants, ease your mind, while you’re out of town. Rates negotiable. References available upon request. Pls Call Jill @ 415-927-1454

Decks • Bathrooms Car Decks Termite Damage

415-235-5656 Lic.# 696235

Landscape & Gardening Services Yard Work Tree Trimming Maintenance & Hauling Concrete, Brick & Stonework Fencing & Decking Irrigation & Drainage

View Video on YouTube: “Landscaper in Marin County” youtu.be/ukzGo0iLwXg 415-927-3510

General Contracting HOME MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR Carpentry • Painting Plumbing • Electrical Honest, Reliable, Quality Work 20 years of experience

Rendell Bower 457-9204 Lic. #742697

peT CARE House sitting, good with big dogs, small dogs and Every thing in between. Also very fond of cats. Many fine references. 415-300-7345. dawnwalker2009@Yahoo.com

plumbing

Abracadabra Plumbing

We offer professional service at fair prices. We will exceed your expectations.

Lic. #787583

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Need IT Help?

415-990-6178 MarinProPlumbing.com

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LoCation LoCation LoCation Pacific Sun Classififeds is the place to post your apartment or home for sale or rent.

Call 415.485.6700

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Call: (415) 883-1428 Email: info@ewastecollective.org DO THE RIGHT THING: a BAN-certified e-collector Basel Action Network

Say You Saw it in the Sun

(search for PacificSun.com)

twitter.com/Pacific_Sun February 21-February 27, 2014 Pacific Sun 25


seminars

and

workshops

SINGLE WOMEN WANTED

Single & dissatisfied? Tired of spending weekends and holidays alone? Join with single men to explore what's blocking you from creating a successful relationship. Nine-week coed Single's Group, coed Intimacy Group or Women's Group, starting week of February 24, 2014. Mon, Tues, or Thur. nights. Space limited. Also, Individual and Couples counseling. Central San Rafael. For more information, call Renee Owen, LMFT#35255 at 415/453-8117. A Safe, successful MOTHERLESS DAUGHTERS SUPPORT GROUP meets every other Tuesday evening in San Anselmo for women who have lost their mothers in childhood, adolescence or adulthood through death, separation, illness, or estrangement. In a supportive environment, women address and explore relevant issues in their lives, current and past, including the many consequence of mother loss. The group provides opportunities for healing and integrating the loss, gaining self-empowerment, and learning successful coping strategies. Facilitated & developed since 1997 by Colleen Russell, LMFT (MFC29249), CGP (41715), whose mother’s death in adolescence was a pivotal event in her life. Individual, Couple, and Family Sessions also available. Contact Colleen:crussellmft@earthlink.net or 415-785-3513.

HypnoBirthing® Childbirth Classes A rewarding, relaxing and stress free method for birthing your baby. Experience the joy of birthing your baby in an easier and more comfortable manner. You will learn how to achieve a safer, easier and more comfortable birth. Five- 2-1/2 hour classes in which you learn how, through the power of your own mind, to create your body’s own natural relaxant and, with your birth companion, create a calm, serene and joyful birthing environment, whether at home, birth center or hospital. You CAN be relaxed during your labor and birth and give the gift of a gentle birth to your baby. SPACE LIMITED – SIGN UP SOON. www.norcalhypno.com- Click on HypnoBirthing and then Class Registration & Information. New Abundance Class Starts Feb. 6th- March 27th—Thursday Evenings 6-9 PM— Work with Passion & Health in Midlife and Beyond—make the money you need doing the work you love. Tired of putting your time and energy into work that doesn't thrill you? Nervous about what is coming as you age? Take the steps now to set yourself up for success and security with expert guidance. Facilitated by Karl Sniady Exec. Coach, Senior Bus. Advisor and Gwendolyn Grace RN, CPCC. Includes dinner, Work With Passion Textbook by Nancy Anderson and 2 individual coaching sessions. $297. First class is free. Limited to 8. Call 415-686-6197 to register. MAKE YOUR EYES STRONGER NOT YOUR GLASSES "8 Essentials for healthy eyes and better vision" Ortho K Vision Shaping and Eye Training Tuesday, February 25, 2014 for $49.00 from 7-8:30pm Dr. Larry A. Jebrock's office • 1702 Novato Blvd, Novato, CA 94947 For reservations call 415-897-9691 drlaj@eyeexercises.com www.eyeexercises.com Travel Bargain Secrets Do you dream about Bangkok, Beijing, Paris, London or perhaps a trip to New Orleans or New York? Whether adventure, shopping or relaxing is your goal, in this engaging, fast-paced workshop you will learn a combination of Travel Bargain Secrets to turn your dream of a faraway getaway into reality! Learn the difference between Traveler –vs- Tourist, and for a lot less then you probably would have ever thought! Group tours vs independent travel and how to utilize them . Terri Thornton, along with her husband, Jeffery Roloff have traveled to five continents and countless countries all by using Terri’s Travel Bargain Secrets! Please note: This workshop does NOT cover cruises Workshop allows for ½ hour after class for questions and answers and destination ideas. www.TravelBargainSecrets.com CALLING IN THE ONE Classes Are you longing to share your life with a Partner? Uncover your barriers to love, relax into intimacy, and open your heart to truly receive. In a circle where you are seen, heard and appreciated, you’ll discover how lovable you really are! Deborah and Lloyd bring their own loving relationship to "Calling in the One", based on Katherine Woodward Thomas’ popular book. In this ritual based co-ed class you’ll hear your own voice and discover the love that lives in you right now! Couples are also welcome. Deborah Wilder, M.A., psychotherapist and Lloyd Barde have led groups on gender issues and disarmament for over 30 years. Eight weekly sessions begin Monday, March 3 in San Anselmo; 7-9 pm. Contact Lloyd@well.com to register or call 415.233.8482 To include your seminar or workshop, call 415/485-6700 x 303. 26 Pacific Sun February 21-February 27, 2014

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PUBLiC NOTiCEs

Fictitious Name Statement

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 133827 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. INTEGRITY CARE MANAGEMENT, 1537 S. NOVATO BLVD #2741, NOVATO, CA 94948: KIARA LEE, 44 JADE COURT #17, NOVATO, CA 94945. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant is renewing the business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on January 9, 2014. (Publication Dates: January 31; February 7, 14, 21 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 133960 The following individual(s) is (are) doing TRUMPET WINE, 11 LOCUST business. AVE, ROSS, CA, 94957: TRUMPET WINE LLC, 11 LOCUST AVE, ROSS, CA 94957. This business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant has not yet begun transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on January 27, 2014. (Publication Dates: January 31; February 7, 14, 21, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 133951 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. EUPORIA SPA, 1104 LINCOLN AVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: JINYING LIANG, 1208 BUENA VISTA, ALAMEDA, CA 94501. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant has been doing business transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein since January 25, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 24, 2014. (Publication Dates: January 31; February 7, 14, 21, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.133954 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. OSAKA MASSAGE THERAPY, 805 D STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: JERRY LE, 15812 LAS LUNAS STREET, WESTMINSTER, CA 92683. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant has not yet begun transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 24, 2014. (Publication Dates: January 31; February 7, 14, 21, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 133928 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. JOYERIA GUADALUPANA, 175 BELVEREDE STREET #2, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94904: MARIA CORADO, 63 CORTE MESA, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901, YENI CRUZ MARTINEZ, 1323 LINCOLN AVENUE. APARTMENT 5, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by CO-PARTNERS. Registrant has not yet began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on January 22, 2014. (Publication Dates: January 31; February 7, 14, 21, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2014-133905 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business ACTIVE LIFE EXAMINER SERVICES, 14 TERNERS DR., SUITE 23, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: JANE JUDE M. DE LEM-TESS, 14 TERNERS DR., SUITE 23, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. RAYMOND CHA DE LEM, 14 TERNERS DR., SUITE 23, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. JOHN M. ANASTACIO, 1791 PINE HOLLOW CIRCLE, SAN JOSE, CA 95133. This business is being conducted by A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on Febuary18, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 21, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 133853 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. JASMINE COTTAGE, 11559 SHORELINE HWY 1, PT. REYES, CA 94956: KAREN LYNN GRAY, 11559 SHORELINE HWY 1, PT. REYES, CA 94956. This business

is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant has been transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein since September of 1932. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 13, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2014133833 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. REHABILITATION & RECOVERY INSURANCE AGENCY, ERNEST BLOOMFIELD INSURANCE, ERNEST BLOOMFIELD & ASSOCIATES, 141F SEMINARY DR., MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: MARY FAHEY, 141F SEMINARY DR., MILL VALLEY, CA 94941 . This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 9, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 10, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2014133977 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. WOMEN2BOARDS, 89 VIA LA BRISA, LARKSPUR, CA 94939: NANCY E SHEPPARD, 89 VIA LA BRISA, LARKSPUR, CA 94939. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 6, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 28, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2014133948 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. WEIGL INSIGHTS, 17 REDWOOD DRIVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: KARL C WEIGL, 17 REDWOOD DRIVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 21, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 24, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014) BUSINESS NAME FICTITIOUS STATEMENT File No. 133805 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. HOME HELPERS, 21 GOLDEN GATE DRIVE, SUITE A, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: BAY AREA IN-HOME CARE INC., 21 GOLDEN GATE DRIVE, SUITE A, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant has not yet begun transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 7, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2014133959 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. GENET WESTERN BROKERAGE COMPANY, INC., AND, DOMINICAN DISTRIBUTORS, 31 SIENNA WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: GENET WESTERN, INC., 31 SIENNA WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant has been transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein since December 31, 2013. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 27, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 134073 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business CELTIC ENERGY HEALING, 295 BLACKSTONE DR, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: MONICA FEELY, 295 BLACKSTONE DR, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on February 10, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on February 10, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2014134037 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. THE BOSTON COLORED EASTER EGG, 260 SANTA MARGARITA DR, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: GARY H GUNSEL, 260 SANTA MARGARITA DR, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant has not yet begun transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on February 5, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 134058 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. AVALON NAILS, 530 THIRD STREET #D, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: TONY ZHANG, 355 SERRANO DR. #6F, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94132 . This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant has not yet begun transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on February 7, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 133971 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. O’REILLY AUTO PARTS #2641, 1400 SOUTH NOVATO BLVD, NOVATO, CA 94947: O’REILLY AUTO ENTERPRISES, LLC, 233 S. PATTERSON, SPRINGFIELD, MO 65801. This business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 1, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 28, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 133969 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. O’REILLY AUTO PARTS #3556, 1323 2ND STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: O’REILLY AUTO ENTERPRISES, LLC, 233 S. PATTERSON, SPRINGFIELD, MO 65801. This business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 1, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 27, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 133972 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. O’REILLY AUTO PARTS #3552, 75 NORTH BELLAM BLVD, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: O’REILLY AUTO ENTERPRISES, LLC, 233 S. PATTERSON, SPRINGFIELD, MO 65801. This business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 1, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on January 28, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2014134030 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. JOLLY GIRL’S KITCHEN, 28 PEACOCK CT, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: ELIZABETH CAROL, 28 P4EACOCK CT, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on February 4, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on February 4, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 134075 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. HOAGIES, 1109 4TH STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: FOOD BIZ LLC, 1109 4TH STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABLITY COMPANY. Registrant began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 30, 2014. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on February 10, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014)


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 2014134064 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business TAPIA PROPERTY SOLUTIONS, 490 EDGEWOOD AVE, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: TAPIA PROPERTY SOLUTIONS, INC. 490 EDGEWOOD AVE, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941. This business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 21, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on February 7, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 21, 28; March 7, 14, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 134085 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. MI CASA CAFÉ, 85 WOODLAND AVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: ALVARO VALLE HERNANDEZ, 1825 LINCOLN AVE, APT 104, SAN RAFAEL ,CA 94901, MARIO SANCHEZ GARCIA, 85 WOODLAND AVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP. Registrant will begin transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on March 1, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on February 12, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 21, 28; March 7, 14, 2014) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 134034 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business. HEALTHY WEALTHY WISE- EMEI QIGONG, 1044 LOS GAMOS ROAD, APT. D, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: TYRA FERLATTE, 1044 LOS GAMOS ROAD, APT. D, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903 . This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will began transacting under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on January 1, 2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on February 5, 2014. (Publication Dates: February 21, 28; March 7, 14, 2014)

Other Notices

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No. CIV 1400260. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MARIA CARRALERO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: MARIA CARRALERO to MARIA URIZ. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: MARCH 11, 2014, 9:00 AM, Dept. B, Room L, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date: JANUARY 22, 2014 /s/ LYNN DURYEE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT (Publication Dates: January 31; February 7, 14, 21, 2014) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 304530 The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of a fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the Marin County Clerk-Recorder's Office. Fictitious Business name(s): OSAKA MASSAGE THERAPY, 805 D. STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. Filed in Marin County on: JANUARY 27, 2014. Under File No: 2009-121590. Registrant’s Name(s): UYEN AI NGUYEN LE, 3021 GLYNIS DR, RICHMOND, CA 94806. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Marin County on JANUARY 27, 2014. (Publication Dates: JANUARY 31; FEBUARY 7,14, 21 2013)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No. CV 1400359. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner COLLEEN MCGUINN ON BEHALF OF MINOR CHILDREN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: ALAINA RYAN BLEDSOE to ALAINA RYAN MCGUINN, JACK MARTIN BLEDSOE to JACK MARTIN MCGUINN. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: March 17, 2014, 9:00 AM, Room. L, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 949134988. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date: JANUARY 24, 2014 /s/ LYNN DURYEE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT Publication Dates: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014) CITATION TO APPEAR, SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No. SMC 1310647. IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF PLAINTIFF: ERIC SEDIE to DEFENDANT: JORDAN KRITCHEVER. By order of this court you are hereby cited to appear before the judge: SHELLEY KRAMER presiding at 10:30 AM in department P of this court (Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903) on March 11, 2014. This Notice was filed with the courts: November 22, 2013; Kim Turner Court Executive Office. Publication dates (Pacific Sun: February 14, 21, 28; March 7, 2014) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MARIO SCHIANO DI COLA. Case No. PR-1400572. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MARIO SCHIANO DI COLA. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PIETRO G. SCHIANO DI COLA. in the Superior Court of California, County of MARIN. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that PIETRO G. SCHIANO DI COLA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court

should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: MARCH 17, 2014 at 8:30AM. in Dept: H, Room: H, of the Superior Court of California, Marin County, located at Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in section 9100 of the California Probate Code. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: PIETRO G. SCHIANO DI COLA, 16 ELEGANT TERN RD, NOVATO, CA 94949. (415) 302-1468. Publication Dates: FEBRUARY 21, 28; MARCH 7, 2014) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No. CV 1400611. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ARMELLE PARKER HART filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: ARMELLE PARKER HART to ARMELLE SONJA PARKER. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: April 3, 2014, 9:00 AM, Room. E, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913-4988. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date: FEBURARY 18, 2014 /s/ PAUL M. HAAKENSON, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT Publication Dates: February 21, 28; March 7, 14, 2014) CITATION TO APPEAR, SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No.FL 1205778. IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF: JEFFERY MATHEW PECK on behalf of a child THIPPHAWAN PINGKUN to DEFENDANT: UTHAI SAKRIN. By order of this court you are hereby cited to appear before the judge presiding at 9:00 AM in court room O (Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903) on April 21, 2014. This Notice was filed with the courts: February 13, 2014; Kim Turner Court Executive Office. Publication dates (Pacific Sun: February 21, 28; March 7, 14, 2014)

MCE Rate Change Disclosure for Newspaper Public Notice:

On February 6, 2014, the Marin Clean Energy (MCE) Board of Directors reviewed proposed rate changes. MCE provides customers with rate stability by typically adjusting rates only once per year to cover the costs of procuring 50% renewable energy. Proposed rates are comparable to current PG&E rates, and in some cases will continue to provide an overall cost savings for MCE customers. The proposed rates are scheduled for approval by the MCE Board of Directors at a public meeting on April 3, 2014 and will be implemented on April 4, 2014. MCE values community input. We invite you to review these rates and provide feedback. MCE’s proposed rates, and PG&E cost comparisons, are available for review at www.mceCleanEnergy.com or at 781 Lincoln Avenue, Suite 320, San Rafael, CA 94901. You may also contact us at 1 (888) 632-3674 Monday through Friday between 7 A.M. and 7 P.M., or by email at info@mceCleanEnergy.org.

››Advice goddess®

by

Q:

A my

A l ko n

I’m good friends with the woman next door, but she and her husband fight constantly in front of me and others. Recently, we were all in their car. She was driving, and he repeatedly told her everything she was doing wrong. Then he called to order a pizza, and she laid into him, saying he was ordering wrong. He yelled, “Why do you always complicate things?!” It was really unpleasant. Then, last week, they came to a dinner party at my house and started fighting right at the table! Is there any way to stop the tension and this rude behavior?—Uncomfortable

A:

It’s so sweet when you look at a couple and realize that their relationship reminds you of a classic romantic comedy—like Apocalypse Now. There are social conventions we all just know to adhere to, like that you don’t get to use other people’s ears as hampers for your relationship’s dirty laundry. Unfortunately, this couple seems to have reached the “winning is everything” point—the point at which social conventions get crumpled up and thrown out the car window and you and your guests are dismayed to find your dinner party doubling as a jury trial: She Never Listens v. He Orders Pizza Wrong. Well-meaning people will advise you to take the woman aside (embarrassing and uncomfortable!) or chirp “Yoo-hoo, I’m right here!” when they go from zero to “I hate you” right in front of you. But there’s a good chance these suggestions won’t work, thanks to our body’s sloppy and imprecise “fight or flight” system, which is seriously in need of an upgrade. It turns out that the adrenaline rush that would get triggered to help our ancestors escape a hungry tiger’s attack can also be triggered by a verbal attack by a wife when her husband fails to meet certain apparently essential takeout-ordering standards. Psychologist Daniel Goleman calls this an “emotional hijacking” because the brain’s reasoning center gets bypassed. He explains in his book Emotional Intelligence that the surge of adrenaline and other crisis hormones make a person’s emotions “so intense, their perspective so narrow, and their thinking so confused that there is no hope of taking the other’s viewpoint or settling things in a reasonable way.” In other words, the behavior you should have the best success modifying is your own. And no, the modification shouldn’t involve riding in the trunk when you go places with them or having the garden hose close at hand at your dinner parties so you can break up any snarling dogs or married couples. A couple whose party manners fall off faster than pants on a nude beach doesn’t deserve your company—much as they might like to have a witness in case one of them needs to claim “self-defense.” You may want to see the wife alone, but you should decline all future opportunities to be in the presence of this duo. Of course, on occasion, it may be worth it to you to make an exception, like when you want to see a big boxing match but can’t afford pay-per-view: “Hi ... I’m having a party next Saturday. Wanna come over so I can take bets on which one of you will end up biting off a piece of the other’s ear?”

Q:

My buddy’s wife never sets me up with her friends, and I’m starting to get offended. The guy she does set up is a total player who just sleeps with girls a few times and then dumps them. Clearly, he’s getting preferential matchmaker treatment because he’s better-looking. I’d like a chance with these girls before he burns through them. Should I bring this up to my buddy or his wife or just grin and bear it? —Annoyed

A:

Apparently, the telepathic messages you’ve been sending her were stopped by their neighbors’ chimney. (Just a guess, but do you also do poorly trying to tidy up your house by moving objects around with your mind?) Unbunch your panties. There’s a good chance that wifey’s true motivation isn’t fixing this guy up but fixing him. While many men enjoy taking apart and reassembling cars, many women enjoy taking apart and reassembling men. They like to believe that if they just find a bad boy the “right” woman, he’ll become the right man—settle down, get married and go so daddy-track that he stops just short of personally lactating. What you need to do (after you have that huge chip on your shoulder removed) is ask your buddy’s wife to make you her project—like a pound puppy in need of a good home. Before you know it, one of her girlfriends should be dressing you up in a bee costume and posting the photos to Instagram. (Sorry ... was that not what you meant when you were thinking “doggie-style”?) Y (c)Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@ aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com). Amy Alkon’s Advice Goddess Radio—listen live every Sunday—http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ amyalkon/—7-8pm, or listen or download at the link at iTunes or on Stitcher. And watch for her new book: “Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck.”

Worship the goddess—or sacrifice her at the altar at pacificsun.com February 21-February 27, 2014 Pacific Sun 27


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Pacific Sun February 21, 2014 -Section 1  

Section 1 of the February 21, 2014 edition of the Pacific Sun Weekly

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