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E d i t o r ’ S N OT E

THE SON ALSO RISES It’s getting close to midnight on Tuesday, May 22. Junior (my wife’s been pregnant for 37 weeks) is due June 6, which leaves plenty of time to finish editing this magazine (due at the printer tomorrow morning), buy 12 dozen diapers and contemplate my next move. “Are you ready?” Everyone’s been asking the same question. How the eff should I know if I’m ready? Nothing that big has come out of my wife before— not at my house, anyway. Am I ready? Let’s see… when I’m awake, I’m pretty much working or eating or doing something to facilitate those primary objectives. There hasn’t been a lot of—any—free time these days. So, no, I ain’t ready. I need to get a few things organized here. Straighten out my life a little bit. Gimme six months. “Honey, I think we should go to the hospital,” Simone says. Ha! Nice try. I keep typing. “I’m not kidding.” “Wait...what? Are you friggin’ serious?” “I’m leaking.” Holy shit. We jump in the car (sans video camera and toothbrush, because we’ll be home in an hour) and head to Kaiser Permanente near Mission Gorge. It’s 11:52 p.m. We roll up to the hospital at 12:08 a.m. Just 16 minutes door-to-door: good news for when the baby comes out in a couple weeks. I’m still banking on a false alarm. “You aren’t dilated,” the nurse says from between Simone’s knees. “I don’t think it’s happening, yet.”

“Can we go home?” Nope. The nurse instructs us to walk around the hospital for an hour, and then return to the exam room for a follow-up. Millions of dollars’ of cuttingedge equipment sitting there unused, and the high-tech diagnostic methodology of the day is walking around the parking lot. Nice. We walk. “If the liquid on this slide crystallizes when I look at it under the microscope,” the nurse says after swabbing Simone anew, “it means you’re having a baby.” Simple solution: don’t look at it under the microscope. I got a magazine to proofread. The nurse returns at 1:47. “You’re having a baby.” “When?” “Now.” Oh, my eff word. Simone’s mom is flying in from Brazil to help out for a couple months. The plan was for her to be here for two weeks, pre-baby. Her plane lands at 10:35 a.m. I’m trying to remain calm when I look over at Simone, who’s sobbing. Mom was supposed to be here, holding her hand. Reminded once again of my innate talent for being a selfish thoughtless prick, I manage to consider my wife’s feelings for a moment. After all, she’s the one who’s really got something significant to deal with here. I just have to watch (from north of the blue curtain, by the way. I’m somewhat clear on how birthing works, but I prefer to leave a shred to the imagination). Who should we call? Or is it “whom”? Holy crap. My phone

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battery is dying. I’m freaking out. It’s 3:58. At 6:05, they wheel Simone into the operating room. I’m going to faint or soil my 23cent disposable scrubs. “You can come in now, Mr. Perloff.” Bright lights. Half a dozen people hiding behind masks. Lots of beeps. Slurping sounds. Do I smell smoke? At 6:17 a.m., Alexander Vicente Perloff is born. Baby crying. Wife smiling. Please don’t let me pass out… Fingers, toes, something approximating a genital—hey, this kid’s got it all! I was terrified our child would pay the price for my lifetime of partying, but it looks like we’re in the clear. I’m already in love. Dude weighs six pounds, one ounce. I always knew he’d be born on magazine deadline day. It’s just luck. What I didn’t know is that that day would be May 23. Simone and I met on December 23, 1999, and got married on September 23, 2001. And now here’s baby Alexander, on May 23, 2012 (even 2012 has a 23 hiding in it), at 6:17 (6 plus 17 equals 23). I don’t really believe in luck, I’m just sayin’… You’re pretty much part of the family now, too, Dear Reader. Know how to change a diaper? And the clan keeps growing. PacificSD blind daters Suzannah and Ty (they met at The Shout! House; I presided over their wedding at Mission Bay Hilton) are set to have a baby girl July 12. My friends Michelle and Mike (co-owner of RMD

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Group and FLUXX nightclub) are having a boy this summer, too. Name: Alexander. If you’re downtown and see a pair of strollers parked outside FLUXX, pop in and join us for a drink(s). At six minutes old, my son grabs my finger, his entire fist covering just one of my joints. I think I’m crying, but I’m too much in shock to know for sure. A friend suggested teaching him sign language. Touch mouth for food, eyes for sleep, butt for diaper-change. I can see it now: he’s playing little league at age six, hits a line drive makes it to second base. I give him the sign to steal third, and he shits his pants. Just like daddy did 10 minutes ago. Welcome, my little prince. Meu principe encantado. Eu te amo. I love you from the bottom of my heart. You’re a Gemini star born in the Year of the Dragon to a quasi-Jewish father and the most beautiful woman in the world. I wasn’t born yesterday, but I have a lot to learn.

David Perloff Editor-in-Chief


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San Diego

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JUNE 2012

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF David Perloff

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Kenny Boyer MANAGING EDITOR Patricia B. Dwyer CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Brandon HernĂĄndez COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Brevin Blach CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jennifer “Dr. Jennâ€? Gunsaullus, PhD., Erin Goss, Ryan Hume, Leslie Marcus, Brandon Matzek, David Moye, David Nelson, Michelle Poveda, Tim Pyles, Cookie “Chainsawâ€? Randolph, Jim Ruland, Frank Sabatini Jr., Alex Zaragoza CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Lisa Kimberly Costigan, Nick Chill, Brian Doll, Bill Jones, John Mireless, Kristina Yamamoto EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Vanessa Byrne

PUBLISHERS David Perloff Simone Perloff DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Dana Schroedl (dana@pacificsandiego.com) PROMOTIONS + CLIENT SERVICES DIRECTOR Alyson C Baker (alyson@pacificsandiego.com) marketing + events manager Rob Corea (rob@pacificsandiego.com) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Jim Lucich (jim@pacificsandiego.com) Brad Weber (brad@pacificsandiego.com)

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contents

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pac i f i cs A N d I E G O . c o m 06.12

fea t u r es

COVER STORY

59 Animal Attraction

Cover model Joanna Krupa on puppy love and having a wild side

64 70

Street Seen

See who’s wearing what, and where

Go Jump in a Lake

Bait then switch from ocean to inland

ON THE COVER: Polish s u p e r m o d e l J oa n n a K r u pa wa s photographed at La Valencia Hotel by Brevin Blach. Styling b y B e r n a r d MARTINE Z . H a i r a n d makeup by Sarah Benjamin. M s . K r u pa i s w e a r i n g a b i k i n i by Have Faith-Swimgerie, havefaith.com; and leather vest by Doma, available at Tease Boutique, teaseboutique. com.

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th i s p a g e : n e e d t o c o o l o ff ? gear up and head east ( d e ta i l s pag e 7 0 ) . photo by nick chill


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D E PA RT M E N T S

WHAT’S NEW 25 Bands on the Run The Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon returns 26 Cow-abunga! Saddle up, it’s time to play Fair COOLTURE 28 A Real Stand-Up Guy Kevin Nealon returns to where he kicked off his comedy career 30 Just for Show June art gallery events 34 Science Friction A collision of arts OLD’S COOL 38 Our Father The real story behind San Diego’s original valley guy

pac i f i cs A N d I E G O . c o m 06.12

TASTE 75 Awww, Shucks! Buy-valves, because it’s not selfish to love shellfish

CHAINSAW 42 Uncorked Message in a bottle, a revelation SPORTS 44 Wake Up! The Finest City birth of a water sport

82 Investi-GATOR Looking deep into the belly of the beast 84 Something Fishy A simple recipe for ceviche, from “A” to “Sea”

STYLE 46 Butt, Of Course The bikini gets a facelift 50

88 Fruits of His Labor Raglan Public House juices up the traditional sangria

Seams like Summer Local designer makes a splash with new line of women’s wear

GROOVE 91 LOL to the Power of “F” LMFAO party-rocks San Diego

54 Woman on Top And top on woman

92 Air and See Radio waves and live concert events 98 Of Note June concert calendar 102 Pouring it On The barman will do anything to make a splash. LOVE 104 Blind Date: A Perfect 10 (comes only noe and then) A great night downtown, it all happened when… CALENDAR 110 SIX.TWELVE June event listings THINK 114 LAST GASP $250 caption contest

S a n C l e m e n t e c o m pa n y o u t f i t s surfing ladies with function and fashion (pg. 54)

AARON CHECKWOOD

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GIVING BACK

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F IR S T T H I N G S

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ON THE

BANDS

C o m p e t i t or G ro u p

RUN The Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon returns By Michelle Poveda

This will be the ninth year in a row that local classic rock band Loss of Control rocks out at the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon. “The reason we come back, first and foremost, is for the charities they support. And second, because it’s just a blast,” says Jason Lee, the band’s lead singer. He says the toughest part about performing for more than four hours at this legendary marathon (other than the 5 a.m. start time) is “keeping the energy up.” (continued on page 26) T wenty – F I V E

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F IR S T T H I N G S

(continued on page 25) Bands of various genres will perform on 26 stages along the 26.2-mile course, entertaining the more than 30,000 runners expected to compete in the race Sunday, June 3. “If they can do that, the least I can do is keep them motivated. All I gotta do is rock ‘n’ roll,” Lee says. For 15 years, the San Diego Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon has been making running fun. Event director Kari Logan calls the event a “26.2 mile block party” that draws participants and spectators from across the country and around the world. “People will combo this event with their vacations,” she says. “They’ll hang out in the Gaslamp and SeaWorld. It’s a great event for San Diego tourism.” Proceeds benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, for which the marathon helped to raise more than $100,000 last year. Logan hopes to improve on that number this year. Rock ‘n’ Roll, for body and soul. runrockroll.com

OF COURSE: The race begins at 6:15 a.m. at Sixth Avenue and Quince Street, circles Balboa Park and downtown, heads north to Friars Road and then turns west for a beach loop that ends at Sea World. BANDS ON THE RUN: Donavan Frankenreiter headlines scores of bands including Neverwonder, Bayou Brothers, Ryan Hiller, Clapton Hook, Jet West, Project Out of Bounds, OverTime, The Fabulous Rudies and Todo Mundo. SEE, SPOT, RUN: Check out the two-day Health & Fitness Expo at the San Diego Convention Center (Friday, June 1, 10 a.m. – 7 pm.; Saturday, June 2, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.) YOU’RE FINISHED: Nada Surf headlines the Finish Line Festival, with opening and closing sets by Flock of ’80s. This free event is open to the public, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Rose Marie Starns South Shores Park (and SeaWorld parking lot).

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Saddle up, it’s time to play Fair By Patricia B. Dwyer Just when San Diego’s arteries were beginning to unclog from last year’s great American celebration of deep-fryers, livestock and carnival rides, the San Diego County Fair returns to Del Mar June 8. Inspired by record-breaking attendance in the past three years—with 1.4 million fairgoers summer-izing Interstate 5 in 2011— the once 22-day event has tacked on an extra two days for this year’s anticipated crowd of 1.5 million people. “The San Diego County Fair is the sixth largest fair in the U.S.,” says our Fair Lady (aka Fair spokesperson), Linda Zweig. “It’s probably the best fair in the U.S., if not the world.” In accordance with being the best in the world, this year’s theme will be out of it, featuring an educational space exhibit, a science-fiction-inspired zone called Area FiftyFun and an alien mascot named Roswell. More earthly new attractions include traveling biological spectacle Our Body: The

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PAGE 96: SEE WHICHSET BANDS ARETHIS TO ROCKSan YEAR’S o Dieg County Fair

Universe Within, an exhibition of roughly 200 preserved human bodies and organs; as well as the first San Diego County Fair Commercial Wine Competition & Festival, featuring 35 local wineries. And not to leave its diehard heartburn-proof fans unfed, the Fair will once again flaunt its usual gastronomical mayhem. “It’s going to be interesting because we have some new fried things,” says Zweig. “But I think one of the big things this year is going to be the Bacon-A-Fair. It’s all about bacon, with things like a Caveman Turkey Club—a pound of bacon wrapped around an extra-large turkey leg.” With even more folks headed to Del Mar for the food and festivities this year, discounts will be offered to anyone who uses public transportation to arrive at the Fairgrounds. San Diego County Fair June 8 – July 4, Admission: $7-13 sdfair.com


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a real stand-up guy Kevin Nealon returns to where he kicked off his comedy career By Jim Ruland

C o u r t e s y of K e v i n N ea l on

When Kevin Nealon comes to town June 22, it will be his first time performing at the new American Comedy Company (which opened in the Gaslamp Quarter earlier this year), but he’s no stranger to San Diego. San Diego was the first place Nealon lived when he moved from Connecticut to California in the late 1970s. He landed in North Park, and one of his first jobs was performing as Santa Claus at the local Sears, which was located where the Uptown District stands today. “I was wearing this really lousy, unconvincing Santa Claus costume and beard,” Nealon says. “The parents were the ones who were really out of control. ‘Tell ‘em what you want, Tommy! Tell ’em about the big wheel!’” It was a less-than-glamorous introduction to show business. “A lot of the kids were so nervous they would pee on my lap,” Nealon says. “I guess this company had experience with that, because there was Scotchgard all over the pants.” From North Park, Nealon made his way to Pacific Beach. He performed at the Comedy Store in La Jolla before making his way to Los Angeles and ultimately to New York, where he joined the cast of Saturday Night Live for 10 seasons. One night, an SNL guest made a

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surprise announcement. “Eddie Vedder was performing with Pearl Jam and he came up to me. ‘Dude, I used to watch you down in San Diego. I’m a big fan.’ I think that was pretty cool.’” Not as cool as Nealon’s appearances in a string of Adam Sandler movies, including Happy Gilmore and Little Nicky, which led to more “serious” roles like his character Doug Wilson on the Showtime series Weeds. The premier episode of the show’s eighth season is scheduled for July 1. “Eight years. That’s a lot of pot.” This season, which is rumored to be Weeds’ last, is set in the fictional town of Old Sandwich, in the state of Connecticut, where Nealon began his long, strange journey into comedy. “I’ve had a couple of good runs. Some people come up to me and say, ‘Dude, I grew up watching you.’ It’s a compliment, but at the same time it makes me aware how long I’ve been doing this.” Later this summer, Showtime will air Nealon’s second stand-up comedy special. San Diegans can get a sneak peak this month at the American Comedy Company. “I’ve been doing stand up my whole career,” Nealon said. “It’s really my forte, my passion.”


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Isaias Crow’s Mother Nurture, spray paint and acrylic on panel, 36” x 84”

mother – nurture us Works by Isaias Crow 6/9 – 6/30 Cirello Gallery, North Park cirellogallery.com

Womanhood and maternity, not to mention the birth of the artist’s third child in 2011, inspired Isaias Crow’s recent collection, Mother – Nurture Us. With a background in graffiti, Crow creates vibrant, evocative portraits of women and feminine energies that incorporate abstraction and Picasso-esque subtleties. “It’s really going to focus on how we all view our mothers,” says Crow, “whether it’s our mother or Mother Earth, or even how males can be mothers to each other.”

blitz, works by James Verbicky onebyone, works by Matt Devin 5/30 – 6/30 Madison Gallery, La Jolla madisongalleries.com

Matt Devine’s On the Left Side, aluminum, 84” x 44” x 36”

Matt Devine is a metal sculptor whose nonrepresentational sculptures look like a flurry of shrapnel frozen in time, creating a sense of controlled chaos. Mixed-media painter James Verbicky’s work comprises (continued on page 32)

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A RT S LOWER LEFT: James Verbicky’s Citta Samtana Diptych 16, mixed media on panel, 60” x 80” BELOW: John Valadez’s Tony and Eddie, 1986, pastel on paper, 50” x 38”, Courtesy of the Robert Berman Collection © John Valadez

santa ana condition

Works by John Valadez 6/10 – 9/2 Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, La Jolla mcasd.org

(continued from page 30)

Best known for murals he created in Los Angeles in the ’70s and ’80s, John Valadez is a skilled photographer, painter and pastel artist whose work portrays Chicano culture in Southern California. “He shows the intersection of people living their regular lives, and then how those regular lives can be tinged with crazy, surreal qualities with hidden passions and energies,” says Musuem of Contemporary Art San Diego curator Kathryn Kanjo. The Santa Ana Condition will include 35 years’ of Valadez’s work, showcasing the artist’s growth and use of various mediums. —Patricia B. Dwyer

strips of paper cut from vintage publications that are bound together to create abstract representations of the “essence of human culture,” as the artist puts it. Both artists, who’ve sold and installed work around the world, will be showing simultaneously in this La Jolla gallery.

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CLOCKWISE (from top): Medusa’s Clockwork Remains, watercolor on bristol vellum, 18”x10”; Reign of the Speculist, watercolor on bristol vellum, 18 1/4”x12 3/8”; Planet Builders, watercolor on bristol vellum, 14”x9 1/4”

science friction A collision of arts By Jim Ruland

A layman’s dictionary of art criticism lacks the lingo to describe Julie Rauer’s work. It would take a book about botany. Maybe some abstracts on astrophysics. And possibly a study of Chinese calligraphy. Rauer draws parallels between multiple systems and makes use of them in playfully unexpected ways. Her paintings are riddled with secret meaning and hidden structures that invite investigation. Each piece comprises worlds within worlds. In some cases, it’s hard to know what kind of paintings they are. Are they portraits of composites? Landscapes of dreams? Still lifes that couldn’t exist in the real world? “I don’t do wall decorations,” Rauer says. “These are pieces to be studied. These are pieces to be contemplated. They don’t match people’s couches.” Her work may be difficult to classify, but it’s fascinating (continued on page 36)

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LEFT: Dark Matter (Portrait of a Cabinet Minister), watercolor on bristol vellum,18”x11”; ABOVE:The Mermaid (Self Portrait), bristol vellum, 18”x3” 5/8”

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(continued from page 34) to look at. Consider a butterfly enfolded into an ear, or an umbrella made out of mushrooms. “I like to draw parallels between many different types of structures.” Rauer’s credentials demonstrate how art and science are entwined in her work: solo exhibitions at Manhattan galleries, awards from the Natural Science Foundation, fine art shows throughout the East Coast and abroad, and publication in prestigious science magazines and journals. Ultimately, it was her fascination with nature that drove her to leave New York, where she was born and lived her entire life. “In terms of the spectrum of the art world, it was incredibly narrow. Whenever I talked about my work, which is sciencebased, people just didn’t want to hear it.” She chose San Diego because of its vast

ecological diversity, something that was sorely lacking in New York. “There was not a connection to the natural world in Manhattan,” she says. “There were rats. There were roaches and pigeons. And that’s it.” Exploring the natural world is vital to Rauer’s art-making process. Where others see a beautiful beach, Rauer sees an ecosystem teeming with life. Seashells, sand dollars and tufts of seaweed she collects on the beach in Coronado make their way into her work. Although Rauer hasn’t shown her work locally, she’s encouraged by the enthusiastic response she’s received from friends in the art and science communities. “I find people in San Diego are more open-minded.” New York’s loss is a Finest City gain.

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ABOVE: The artist in her studio; LEFT: Dr MacAlister Unhinged, watercolor on bristol vellum, 16”x8”


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our father

A statue of Father Junípero Serra stands in prayer at the Junípero Serra Museum in P r e s i d i o Pa r k

The real story behind San Diego’s original valley guy By David Moye / Photos by Kristina Yamamoto If anyone had a mission in life, it’s Junípero Serra. Born in Majorca, Spain, in 1713, Serra dedicated his life to becoming a Franciscan Friar. He went halfway across the world to build nine missions in California, including Mission San Diego de Alcalá, in 1769, above what is now known today as Mission Valley. In the process, Serra became the original San Diego Padre, laying both the groundwork and the ground floors for the settling of California by Europeans, a momentous feat with repercussions, both positive and negative, that are still being felt. But if you were to see Serra in real life, you might not recognize him as one of the most influential men of the last 300 years. “He was only five-foot-two and 110 pounds, but he was, for his time, very educated and charismatic,” says Janet Bartel, former official historian for Mission San Diego de Alcala. She says Serra’s assigned mission to start missions was, for Spain, as much political as it was religious. “Spain wanted to build settlements here because they feared the Russians were on their way down from the North, and unless they had settlements, they might lose the land,” Bartel says. “But Father Serra had a missionary ethic. He wanted to come for the church, not for political reasons.” At the time, California was not the center of culture it became in the 20th Century. “It was thought to be an island until the mid-17th century,” she says. “The native Americans who lived in the region had never seen cloth until Serra’s arrival.” Although many of the military officials and monks traveling with Serra thought the Kumeyaay (continued on page 40)

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The Junípero Serra Museum sits atop P r e s i d i o Pa r k , ov e r l o o k i n g m i s s i o n va l l e y a n d t h e c oa s t.

(continued from page 38) Indians were stone-age “primitives,” Bartel says Serra prohibited them from using such terms. “He just felt they were different from him and treated them like a father would treat his children,” she says. At that time, San Diego was a barren desert area, but Serra found beauty here. “He wrote about how he saw wild roses here that reminded him of Castile,” Bartel says. “However, they ran out of supplies that first year, and the military wanted to give up. Father Serra was stubborn and did a nine-day novena prayer in honor of the patron saint, St. Joseph. On the ninth day, the supply ship arrived.” While no one is denying Father Serra’s achievements, in recent years, his alleged treatment of the Native Americans has come under fire from critics such as Professor Richard Carrico, who teaches Native American Studies at San Diego State University. Carrico says that while the Vatican has beatified the Padre—a key step toward what could become sainthood—Serra’s role in the treatment of the native population wasn’t so godly. “He wasn’t a Hitler. He didn’t try and kill a whole group of people, but the Native Americans here in San Diego were worse off after he arrived in terms of their food supply and their view of the

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world physically. “Before Serra’s arrival, the Kumeyaay had as high a life expectancy as people living in Europe and a rich culture,” Carrico says. “They understood their land. Although the Spanish brought cattle and sheep, those animals drove off the food the Kumeyaay were used to eating.” Carrico says that rather than being a saint, Father Serra was truly human and had the contradictions we all share. “On one hand, the military thought he was too protective of the Indians, and they thought he demanded too much church service,” he says. “But his contemporaries admired his length of service, and he was very good with politicians and was able to get money when others were getting cut.” Bartel concedes that Serra did whip some of the Indians as punishment, but says he didn’t do anything to them he wouldn’t do to himself. “He would self-flagellate when he didn’t live up to his ideals,” she says. “But he was not cruel. In fact, when he was traveling up the tip of Baja, he wouldn’t even ride a mule, despite having a serious ulcerated leg from a mosquito bite. “As for the Indians, he had pure motives. He wasn’t trying to take their land, he was trying to make them stronger.”

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“I like the beach. I like to get there really early, before everyone else shows up, and take 30 bottles with notes in them and throw them into the water. Then I wait for everyone to come to the beach. And when someone goes to pick up one of the bottles, I go up behind them, because when they open it there’s a note saying, ‘I’m standing right behind you.’”

C H A I N S AW

uncorked

Message in a bottle, a revelation By Cookie “Chainsaw” Randolph In the movie Message in a Bottle, Robin Wright finds one at the beach, goes in search of its author, Kevin Costner, and as with all Jonathan Sparks creations (The Notebook, A Walk to Remember, et cetera) we’re dragged through a gauntlet of disease, despair, doom and death—a diabolical formula Mr. Sparks has mastered that makes us feel simultaneously shitty yet somehow life-affirmed; as in we’ve endured two hours and 11 minutes of emotional torture without killing ourselves. Personally, I prefer more cheerful films like Sophie’s Choice (Meryl Streep’s wacky homage to parenting) or Million Dollar Baby (Clint Eastwood’s side-splitting tribute to euthanasia). Do messages in bottles ever actually wash up at the beach? Well, for starters, recently a soccer ball belonging to a Japanese teenager, propelled across the Pacific by last year’s Fukajima tsunami, washed onto the shores of Alaska (sadly, the goal was disallowed because Hawaii used its hands). Like the soccer ball, most bottles you find at the beach these days qualify as debris, the byproducts of litterbug sailors and careless beachcombers. But there was a time when tossing bottles into the water was more socially acceptable. I submit to you a true “message in a bottle” story that even Jonathon Sparks couldn’t make up (mostly because it doesn’t involve quite enough death and despair—some, but not to his standard). On September 9, 1914, Private Thomas Hughes, 26, was crossing the English Channel to fight in World War I. He stuffed a message into a bottle and threw it overboard. Two days later, Hughes was killed in action, never to see his wife or two-year-old daughter Elizabeth again. Eighty-five years later, in March of 1999, fisherman Steve Gowan noticed something caught in his nets on the River Thames when he was fishing for cod off the Essex coast. It was a green ginger beer bottle with a screw-on rubber stopper.

—Demetri Martin

I can only assume before he opened it, Gowan looked around to make sure comedian Demetri Martin wasn’t standing right behind him, or Jonathon Sparks wasn’t lurking around to seize another sappy screenplay opportunity. Fortunately, it turns out Martin didn’t have a gig at the River Thames Improv that week, so he wasn’t anywhere nearby. And Sparks was presumably at one of Santa Monica’s 359 Starbucks at that moment with his laptop, inventing new, cruel ways to make chicks drag guys to the Cineplex. The coast being clear, Gowan opened the bottle and discovered Private Hughes’ letter. Blown away by its contents, he felt honorbound to seek out Hughes’ family. Correctly assuming Hughes’ wife had died by then, Gowan found his way to New Zealand, which is not only an incredibly long way to go for cod, but also where Hughes’ daughter Elizabeth resided. The joy for Elizabeth was difficult to describe. After all, it was a mind-blowing moment, plus her Kiwi accent was really thick and Gowan kept getting texts from his wife wondering where the f#ck he was (I might be projecting a little bit here). Suffice it to say, in her hands was a hand-written note from a man she had only heard stories about. Perhaps written in haste on choppy seas, Private Thomas Hughes’ message was simple, yet touching: “Dear Wife, I am writing this note on this boat and dropping it into the sea just to see if it will reach you. If it does…look after it well. Ta ta sweet, for the present. Your Hubby.” And to the eventual recipient, father. “I think he would be very proud it had been delivered. He was a very caring man,” Elizabeth said. A real-life tearjerker—Jonathan Sparks should stick a cork in it.

Cookie “Chainsaw” Randolph delivers messages weekday mornings on the Dave, Shelly & Chainsaw Show at 100.7 JACK-fm.

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wake up!

Tony Finn, wake surfing (riding a boat’s wake without a rope p u l l i n g h i m ) i n S a n D i e g o B ay.

The Finest City birth of a water sport By Ryan Hume

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t ran s wor l d b u s i ne s s

In 1985, Tony Finn, a surfer from San Diego, was studying marketing and film at San Diego State University. “I was not a good student…but I could still get up for a morning surf,” he says. That same year, he left SDSU and developed the Skurfer, a surfboard/water ski hybrid. Although he denies claims that he invented wakeboarding, he does acknowledge proelling it. “We were the first to really get the sport going and bring it to a wider audience,” he says. Before the introduction of the Skurfer, intrepid surfers tried riding their surfboards while clinging to water ski ropes pulled by motorboats or, in some cases, trucks driven on shore. With foot-straps adapted from windsurfing boards, the Skurfer allowed riders to tow more safely behind a boat—without falling down at every turn—and to use the boat’s wake like a ramp to launch into the air. A year after starting Skurfer, Finn landed on the cover of Water Ski Magazine, giving wakeboarding the dose of legitimacy it needed. A few years later, he met Jimmy Redmond, who Finn calls “the most prolific wakeboard designer of all time.” In ’93, Finn (with Redmond and friend Rob Hyatt) again revolutionized the young sport by introducing the Flight 69, the first ever twin-tip wakeboard. The new design enabled wakeboarders to ride and land switch (opposite foot forward) maneuvers, which led to wild new spins and grabs inspired by snowboarders and skateboarders. Riding that wave of success, Finn and Redmon founded Liquid Force, which has dominated the world of wake ever since. These days, Finn still judges the occasional wakeboard competition, wakesurfs in the San Diego Bay, attends trade shows, parties like he’s in Van Halen and is generally acknowledged as the charismatic, curly-haired icon/ambassador of modern wakeboarding. Not bad for a San Diegan just looking for some skurf.


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butt, of course

The bikini gets a facelift By Leslie Marcus / Photos by Steven Gomillion and Dennis Leupold No one knows the exact origin of the pucker-butt bikini, aka “the scrunch back.” Nevertheless, the pucker-back has singlehandedly revolutionized ladies’ swimwear, elevated self-confidence at Sunday pool parties across the globe and made the day of many men in the process. Sure, it’s just a gathered piece of Lycra on the outside, but it means that women everywhere no longer have to fear the dreaded diaper-look when exiting the water. “The scrunch-butt is a matter of form—it forms to your body in a way that makes your butt look more flattering,” says Lilly Ghalichi, co-founder of fashion brand Have Faith-Swimgerie (basically, lingerie you can swim in). Ghalichi and her co-pilot, Jennifer Stano, found a niche in the market, and now women and men can’t get enough of their sexy, figureenhancing designs and heart-shaped pucker-back bottoms. “It’s definitely not a trend. It’s a staple, a movement,” Ghalichi says. “It’s just like the bikini—it was done, it was incredible, it was revolutionary, it was needed. And it’s here forever. Scrunch-butt is the same way.” In the late ’90s, we started to see a revolution of sorts in swimsuit trends. (continued on page 48)

P UC K ER U P : H a v e F a i t h S w i m g e r i e o ff e r s a variety of scrunchbutt bikinis.

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(continued from page 46) Think Baywatch. The French-cut with the high sides was very popular. That went out, and along came the string bikini. And now, the scrunch-back is in. It used to be extremely difficult to find a pucker-back, so difficult that my friend used to buy regular bikinis and have a seamstress install an elastic strip into the butt crack. She was a pucker-back connoisseur. I witnessed the trend take form while living in Vegas. That’s where the Sunday pool party craze exploded. Bikinis also got an upgrade with high heels, club makeup and shimmer body lotion. It was standard uniform at places like Wet Republic, Tao Beach and Rehab. It took some journalistic research to find those pucker-backs. Discovery occurred at a store off the strip, where exotic dancers got their professional attire. There they were—pucker-back bikinis in every color of the rainbow. I had found the pot of gold and checked out with a canary yellow one. Six years and dozens of pucker-backs later, that O.P. (original pucker) still sits in my dresser drawer. Indeed, pucker-backs have become commonplace in San Diego, but it’s where you’d least expect to find them that proves the most interesting. There they were, as I lounged poolside at La Costa Resort and Spa: middle-aged women in pucker-backs, pregnant women in them, and moms wearing them while holding their toddlers. Who’d a thunk a piece of elastic could be such a game-changer? In hindsight, I see how pucker-backs may have reinvigorated the hackneyed phrase: “I hate to see you go, but I love to watch you leave.” So, this summer, liberate your cheeks, pucker up and flaunt those assets.

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seams like summer

Local designer makes a splash with new line of women’s wear By Alex Zaragoza / Photos by Aalia Osbourn It’s summertime, the time of year when we can at least dress like the living is easy. And whether you’re heading to a gorgeous tropical locale on holiday or planning staycations by the pool or beach, designer Kendall Zundel has your wardrobe covered with her line of clothing, Kendall K. Zundel’s Spring/Summer 2012 Collection offers hot-weather basics with a vintage vibe intended to carry women through the hot days and nights. Think tops and dresses in breathable natural fabrics spiced up with ethnic-inspired embroidery, bold colors and bright geometrical prints. For inspiration during the design process, Zundel drew heavily from a vacation she took in Costa Rica. “I left in awe of that country. When I got home, I still wanted to be there,” says Zundel, who builds her collections in Oceanside. “That’s when I referenced back to all the pictures I took. I missed it so much. It was the easiest collection to sketch. There’s relaxed, free-flowing silhouettes, but with that Kendall K aesthetic that’s feminine and girly.” Through this line, she gifts herself and other vacation-minded ladies with a non-stop Costa Rican getaway, working hard to create “something you can throw on but still look like you tried, but not too hard.” (continued on page 52)

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(continued from page 50) To capture that essence in print, Zundel teamed up with San Diego-based photographer Aalia Oursbourn. “Kendall’s clothing is really colorful,” says Oursbourn, a former model from the U.K. who has since stepped behind the camera. “We tried to keep it very tropical, so we went to Paradise Point to shoot. It’s a beautiful location with the palm trees and water.” Using the Mission Bay resort as the backdrop for the photo shoot lends what Zundel calls a “lush and exotic” feel, capturing the vacation lifestyle her collection exudes. All that’s missing is the passport. “Aalia is very talented,” Zundel says. “We bounced ideas. Her European background brought a more editorial look to the shoot, while my look is more vintage. That brought a nice combination.” Considering Zundel’s originally from Palm Springs, a mecca of midcentury modern design, it’s easy to see where that retro sensibility comes from. The Kendall K Spring/ Summer 2012 Collection can be found in about 30 stores along the West Coast. Find additional retailers or shop online at kendallk.com.

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woman on top

And top on woman By Patricia B. Dwyer The Pacific has a reputation for thievery, snatching bikinis from surfing women. Tired of Deep Blue’s turning her summer surfing sessions into peep shows, Italian designer Amanda Chinchelli Greer took the matter into her own hands. “I was going on a surf trip to Costa Rica last year and I was super tired of having bikinis fall off,” she says. “All the rash-guards [shirt-shaped surf garments that protect skin from chafing on surfboard wax] out there are so unflattering and uncomfortable, so I designed a couple of suits that worked out in the water.” (continued on page 56)

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(continued from page 54) A year later, Greer has a San Clemente-based brand of surf-oriented bathing suits, Seea (pronounced “seaah,” Greer’s Italian-infused feminization of the word “sea”) being sold on both American coasts as well as in Japan. In addition to freeing women to worry about nothing but the next wave, the line of bathing suits conjures the 1950s, drawing inspiration from the style of surfing performed on the era’s long, heavy surfboards. “I think women surfing and longboarding is so beautiful and so stylish,” Greer says. “I wanted to combine them and make a suit that would inspire.” theseea.com

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Joanna Krupa isn’t a household name in the U.S., yet. That’s about to change.

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brevin blach

STLYING BY Bernard MARTINEZ Hair and makeup by Sarah Benjamin fifty – nine

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f this Eastern European supermodel looks familiar, perhaps you’ve seen her curves on the covers of national magazines or watched her compete on Dancing with the Stars. She has also appeared on high-profile ad campaigns for PETA for the past seven years, supporting the animal rights charity since watching an undercover video of animals being skinned alive at fur farms in China. “I was traumatized,” Krupa says. “Even though I never wore fur, I had to do something to raise awareness and stand up for these defenseless animals and fight for them.” The result has been a series of memorable anti-fur and pro-petadoption campaigns, one of which showed a nude Krupa obscuring

her private parts with a crucifix in the shape of a sword. “Without shock value, no one will listen,” she says. “I don’t worry what people think. I am here to save animals and be a voice for the voiceless. I will do whatever it takes to have my voice heard.” When she was five years old, Krupa emigrated from Poland to Chicago with her mother, who had just $200 in her pocket at the time. “If you’re a strong person, you can overcome any obstacles. She was my role model growing up.” It was her mother who encouraged Krupa to move to Los Angeles to pursue her dream of becoming a professional model. Now, Krupa is a role model back in her homeland, where she’s the host of Poland’s Next Top Model, a reality show inspired by Tyra Banks’ America’s Next Top Model. (continued on page 63)

O N J O A N N A : B i k i n i b y S u gar F ree , s u garfree s w i m . co m .

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“If you’re a strong person, you can overcome any obstacles.”

ON J OANNA : B i k i n i b y S a u v a g e , s a u v a g e w e a r . c o m . BELOW , RIGHT : O n e o f J o a n n a K r u p a ’ s P ETA p o s t e r s , INTENDED t o p r o t e c t a n i m a l s WITH s h o c k a n d a w w w .

(continued from page 60) t reminds me of myself when I was younger and had the dream of growing up to be a model. You can see the hunger in their eyes, and it’s so inspiring. They’re so beautiful, but they don’t have the egos or the attitude that girls here in America do.” Just as Poland’s Next Top Model has provided opportunities for undiscovered models abroad, Krupa hopes it will open doors for her here in the United States. “I would love to pursue more hosting in America and follow the footsteps of Tyra and Heidi Klum, and transition from model to TV host and businesswoman.” Now, Krupa is rumored to be a cast member of the upcoming Real Housewives of Miami. “The opportunities are endless, but I’m trying to be very realistic about everything. Nothing happens in a snap. You have to work really hard at everything.” Such gumption must benefit not only Krupa’s career, but also the animals she champions. “You can’t beat Eastern European women,” she says.

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street Who’s wearing what, and where…

Photos by John Mireles On-street assist by Vanessa Byrne and Julieanne Aquino

“I’ve worn my jacket for years. I got it in Santa Rosa on sale 25 years ago for $25.” Rick, Bay Park S I X T Y – F O U R

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At the intersection of street and fashion, real San Diego style comes to life. Along Fifth Avenue in Hillcrest, and by Crystal Pier in Pacific Beach Beach, these Finest City folks were ready to strike a pose. And in a flash, their 15 minutes began…


hillcrest “I’m a store manager from Flashbacks, so I almost exclusively wear vintage.” Delila, Hillcrest S I X T Y – F I V E

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Shaun, Oceanside

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“I try to dress like a super-hero.”


hillcrest

“I just wanted to dress kind of punk today, but my style changes a lot. Mostly, I’m inspired by goth.” Cristella, Chula Vista

S I X T Y – seven

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Victor, Pacific Beach

“Casual, comfortable. I’m into recycled things.”

“Hanging out.” Chris, Riverside

pacific

Courtney, Pacific Beach

TULSI B R I O N E S

TULSI B R I O N E S

behind the

See more fashionable people pics at pacificsandiego.com

Photographer John Mireles set up mini fashion studios on the streets of North Park and Pacific Beach, and then invited passers-by to strike a pose. S I X T Y – eight

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“This Michael Kors watch survived a fire. I wore it when I was at work, and it came out looking as good as it does now. I’m a firefighter.”

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“Minimal tan lines. No shoes— it’s easier. These jean shorts and I have gotten into some trouble.”

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Monica, Pacific Beach

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L a k e M u r r ay, l o c at e d w i t h i n Mission Trails Regional Pa r k , g l ow s at s u n s e t.

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go jump

Lake in a

Bait, then switch from ocean to inland By Erin Goss When the motion of the ocean isn’t floating your boat, head east to dip your toes where almost anything goes: fishing, hiking, biking and boating. The county’s manmade lakes serve as impounding reservoirs for San Diego’s water supply system, but the public is encouraged to visit for fun in the sun. From concession stands offering live bait and boat rentals, to guided nature walks and luxury campsites, these bodies of water a refreshing break for any body. Surf ’s down? Thumbs up! It’s time to jump in.

Lake Murray Located within Mission Trails Regional Park, Lake Murray offers picturesque scenery along a paved road (3.2 miles in each direction). Relax at any of 10 public barbeque pits or more than 60 picnic tables. Hours: sunrise to sunset, daily 5540 Kiowa Dr., La Mesa (entrance) 619.668.2050, mtrp.org

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Lake Barrett Lake Barrett reels in fishing enthusiasts with one of the largest remaining populations of northernstrain largemouth black bass in the region. But don’t plan on having seafood for dinner—a catch-andrelease policy is strictly mandated. Lyons Valley Rd., Dulzura Hours: Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays, half hour before sunrise until half hour before sunset (reservations mandatory) 619.465.3474 (city lakes number, no concession) sandiego.gov/water


Lake Powa With 17 landscaped acres, a 300-foot boat dock and 75 picnic spots, Lake Poway is a popular destination for families. Visitors can join the hundreds of daily hikers on the Mt.

Woodson Trail, sign up for archery classes or just kick back and play with the quacks. “Lake Poway was voted one of the best places to feed ducks in San Diego…seriously,” says senior park ranger Doug Smith. Hours: Wednesday – Sunday, 7 a.m. – sunset 14644 Lake Poway Rd., Poway 858.668.4772 (ranger’s office), poway.org El Capitan Reservoir El Capitan is the only reservoir in San Diego County that invites guests to take to the water on Jet Skis and other personal motorized watercrafts. Don’t feel like getting wet and wild? The lake is heavily stocked with fish, so anyone casting a pole can count on getting a bite. Hours: Thursday – Monday,

S E V E N T Y – T W O

C i t y of San D i ego P u b l i c U t i l i t i e s D e p ar t m en t

Santee Lakes “The camping at Santee Lakes is world-class,” says Johnathan Skinner, director of park and recreation. Tents, 10 newly opened cabins (three floating and seven waterfront) and 300 campsites make campers of all experience levels feel right at home. Hours: Monday – Thursday, 8 a.m. until one half-hour before dusk; Friday – Sunday 6 a.m. until one half-hour before dusk 9310 Fanita Pkwy., Santee (entrance) 619.596.3141, santeelakes.com

half-hour before sunrise to half-hour before sunset 16852 El Monte Rd., Lakeside (entrance) 619.443.4110 (concession stand) sandiego.gov/water

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C i t y of San D i ego P u b l i c U t i l i t i e s D e p ar t m en t

N I C K C H ILL B u t ch Paddock .

Lake Cuyamaca Lake Cuyamaca offers a “mirrored image of a High Sierra alpine lake with panoramic views,” says general manager Butch Paddock. Here, visitors can spot abundant wildlife, from

bobcats to the bald eagles, or explore stunning landscape by boat or trail. “It’s the best kept secret in San Diego.” Hours: 6 a.m. – sunset 15027 Hwy. 79 Julian 760.765.0515, lakecuyamaca.org

S E V E N T Y – T H R E E

Lake Hodges With 27 miles of shoreline, Lake Hodges is a lush oasis nestled amongst the hills of Escondido. Known for its stunning scenery, the immense reservoir and surrounding San Diego River Park can make visitors forget San Diego is situated in a desert. Hike around the lake’s sevenmile perimeter or barbeque that largemouth bass you just reeled in. Hours: Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday, 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. 20175 Lake Drive, Escondido (entrance) 619.668.2050 (concession), sdrp.org

Lake Morena “Lake Morena boasts two previous world-record largemouth bass,” says public outreach coordinator Shannon Singler. The lake also hosts nature walks on certain Saturdays—free, one-hour hikes highlighting the lake’s natural vegetation and the role it played in the lives of Kumeyaay Indians. Hours: Day-use activities limited to sunrise to sunset; open 24 hours a day (due to camping) 2550 Lake Morena Dr., Campo (entrance) 619.579.4101 sdcounty.ca.gov/parks

c l o c k w i s e ( f r o m t o p l e f t ) : CALM WATERS a t S a n t e e L a k e s ; L a k e H o d g e s O F F ERS a l u s h o a s i s n e s t l e d a m o n g t h e hills of Escondido; wildlife lurks in the brush at Lake Cuyamaca; a bird’s-eye view of El Capitan Reservoir

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Brandon Ma t z ek Littleneck clams casino at B ro o k ly n G i r l

Awww, Shucks! Buy-valves, because it AIN’T Selfish to love shellfish By David Nelson

If the world has not been your oyster, go on a shellfish binge. It’s easy in San Diego, where the town’s pearly restaurant roster offers many options for scooping up scallops and muscling through mussels. And be sure not to clam up before tasting the live urchins at Baci and Gabardine. From ocean to table and Chula Vista to Carlsbad, enjoy these dozen ways (continued on page 76) to play the shell game and win.

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(continued from page 75) K R ISTI N A Y A M A M O T O

SCALLOPS

CLAMS

market cafe (at Loews Coronado Bay Resort) 4000 Loews Coronado Bay Rd., Coronado 619.424.4400, loewshotels.com/coronado-bay-resort Mark Leighton Ching slings a mean scallop. The new executive chef at Loews Coronado Bay Resort notes that, since the hotel is on the ocean, “Why wouldn’t we concentrate on seafood?” Ching answers his question with dishes like sizzling and sensational pan-seared scallops. Lightly gilded but creamy-textured, the top-grade shellfish wear jackets of tart-spicy, pineapple-chili ponzu sauce atop sautéed spinach and coconut-accented “forbidden” rice (named for Beijing’s Forbidden City). To finish: splashes of passion fruit butter and flying fish roe. Roe, roe, roe your boat over to Loews’ Market Cafe.

Brooklyn Girl 4033 Goldfinch St., Mission Hills 619.296.4600, brooklyngirleatery.com Wet your whistle with a Brooklyn (a Manhattan variant that outpours the original), then dive into a big bowl of wood-fired Littleneck clams “Casino” at Brooklyn Girl, Mike and Victoria McGeath’s chic new New Yorkery in Mission Hills. Chef Tyler Thrasher crows that his steamy broth has “all the classic ingredients,” like pancetta, red bell peppers, oregano, butter, white wine and shallots, in which tender clams simmer only until they open. Hunks of toast soak up the broth. China Max 4698 Convoy St., Kearny Mesa 858.650.3333, chinamaxsandiego.com Tiny cherrystone clams boast enormous flavor at China Max, the attractive Convoy Street eatery decreed San Diego’s best Chinese house by Zagat Survey and other sources. Saltwater-fresh, the clams sail in from the wok either adrift in black bean sauce, a bold and sexy prep enlivened with chunks of red and green bell peppers and spicy heat, or more subtly in a simple stir-fry with big bites of ginger (for flavor, not eating) and lots of scallion greens. Both are wonderful.

Ave 5 2760 5th Ave., Bankers Hill 619.542.0394, avenue5restaurant.com You won’t find scallops in the Dead Sea, but you may indeed relish Ave 5’s Dead Sea Potatoes: salty, roasted, marble-sized spuds that coowner Yo Kitazawa calls “the ultimate finger food.” Absolutely. And absolutely perfect before chef/co-owner Colin McLaggin’s knock’em-dead barley risotto crowned with a circlet of gilded diver scallops and enriched with grilled shrimp, cherry tomatoes, baby asparagus and smashingly fragrant thyme-brown butter sauce.

S E V E N T Y – six

Av e 5 ’ s b a r l e y risotto with scallops and shrimp

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Spaghetti with Clams, Mussels and Cannellini Beans (Yield: 6 servings ) Ingredients ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon chopped shallots Sea salt and black pepper 1 pound Littleneck clams, scrubbed 1 pound Prince Edward Island (or local black) mussels, scrubbed 1 cup white wine 1 pound spaghetti ¼ cup finely chopped Italian parsley ½ red onion 1 teaspoon saffron threads 3 basil leaves, chopped 1 spring thyme, chopped For Cannellini Sauce 1 cup dry cannellini beans 12 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced Soak beans in water for 12 hours, then cook in boiling water until soft. Drain beans, then blend with olive oil and rosemary until creamy. Add salt and pepper and keep warm, or refrigerate up to two days and reheat when needed.

MUSSELS

Sp a g h e t t i w i t h c l a i m s , m u s s e l s a n d cannellini beans at Bice Ristorante

Saltbox (at Hotel Palomar) 1047 5th Ave., Gaslamp 619.515.3003, saltboxrestaurant.com According to Saltbox sous-chef Neil Ayers, chef Simon Dolinky “was definitely swinging for the fence” with this inspired preparation of hand-selected Carlsbad black mussels steamed in bitter Belgian ale. An amazingly aromatic, full-flavored dish, it features broth infused with fennel and orange zest (they “keep it nice and bright,” Ayers says). The mussels nearly melt like butter, and crisp sourdough toast (loaves are baked-on-premises) beats spoons for transporting suave broth to appreciative mouths. Bice Ristorante 425 Island Ave., Gaslamp 619.239.2423, bicesandiego.com A shellfish pasta not flavored with garlic? BICE Ristorante chef Mario Cassineri accomplishes the trick by infusing spaghetti with a breathy dose of saffron. Garlic wouldn’t stand a chance in Cassineri’s riveting assembly of sharply seasoned Littleneck clams, Prince Edward Island mussels, cannellini beans and spaghetti boiled in saffron broth. The flavors are so full and rounded— enchanting, really—that we requested the recipe (see column at right). It takes a little time, but is easy to make and won’t fail to impress anyone who shares your table. (continued on page 78)

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Directions Bring 6 quarts of water to a boil with saffron and 2 tablespoons salt. In a large sauté pan, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat, then add the shallots, red onion, thyme, basil, mussels and clams. Cook for 2 minutes, then add white wine. Cover and cook, stirring and tossing until all the mollusks have opened, about 8 minutes. Remove clams and mussels from shells (discard shells), and return meat to the pan juice. Discard any shellfish that have not opened. Cook spaghetti in the boiling water until tender but al dente, according to package directions. Drain and add to the pan with the sauce. Cook over high heat for 2 minutes, adding parsley and adjusting the seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. Pour some warm cannellini cream on each plate, top with spaghetti mixture and serve.


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(continued from page 77) The Ricci di Mare live urchin served with lemon and toast at Baci Ristorante

Brandon Ma t z ek

URCHINS Baci Ristorante 1955 W. Morena Blvd., Mission Bay / Bay Bark 619.275.2094, sandiegobaci.com It’s not widely known that urchins, more commonly encountered as “uni” at sushi bars, are plentiful in San Diego waters. At the long-popular Baci on Morena Blvd., the preparation is the ultimate in simplicity, as is so frequently true of sophisticated Italian cooking. The live “Ricci di Mare” (sea urchins) are simply presented with lemon and hot toast. Since Bice purchases urchins daily, the flavors are briny, clean and sparkling fresh. You could call them “oceany” and not get an argument from anyone.

S E V E N T Y – E I G H T

Garbardine 1005 Rosecrans St., Point Loma 619.398.9810, gabardineeats.com When chef Chad White takes a whirl with urchins at Point Loma’s trendy new Gabardine, a whirlwind of flavors results. “Live sea urchin speaks for itself and has a unique briny-ness,” says White, adding that touches of lemon and salt “make the dish more approachable.” Try urchin this way to see if you agree with White’s claim that the “taste and texture make me think of briny ocean butter.” Restlessly creative, the chef also churns a sea urchin ice cream that he recommends pairing with a glass of Ballast Point Schooner.

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IN THE RAW (AND NICELY DRESSED) Donovan’s Prime Seafood 333 5th Ave., Gaslamp 619.906.4850, donovansprimeseafood.com Luxury is the focus at Donovan’s Prime Seafood, a fairly new Gaslamp spot that has quickly become a top destination for fine dining. Donovan’s new raw bar beckons with rare oyster options like Beausoleils from East New Brunswick. For the ultimate extravagance, the Seafood Tower (it serves four; check your credit balance before ordering) blissfully builds an edifice of Canadian snow crab claws, Alaskan king crab, Australian cold-water lobster and ultrajumbo shrimp above a deep basin of ice. The shellfish doesn’t have to be raw: chef Kemar Durfield’s cooks are adept at assembling elegant oysters Rockefeller topped with piquant sauce bearnaise, and steaming delicate Manila clams in savory broth.

MARKET WATCH

Donovan’s Prime Seafood’s Seafood Tower with Canadian snow crab claws, Alaskan king crab, Australian coldw a t e r l o b s t e r a n d j u m b o s h r i m p.

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Point Loma Seafoods 2805 Emerson St., Point Loma 619.223.1109, pointlomaseafoods.com The newly rebuilt Point Loma Seafoods is as parking-challenged and jam-packed as ever, because it’s got the goods. Lobsters and Dungeness crabs jump and jive in oversized tanks; local rockfish are bug-eyed in icy repose; and in a case (and class) of their own, a selection of live shellfish begs to be taken home by the pound. Choices run from Carlsbad and Prince Edward Island mussels to greenlips and cockles from New Zealand, Pacific Creek oysters and Littleneck clams. Get out the cookbook and go to town. (continued on page 80)


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K r i s t i na Ya m a m o t o

(continued from page 78)

OYSTERS Karina’s Mexican Seafood 986 Broadway, Chula Vista 619.476.8648, karinasseafood.com If oysters seem passive, bear in mind that they must be pried from tightly-closed shells. They’re the big boys of the shellfish clan, highly prized and expensive. You can buy mussels by the bucket, but oysters cost. Plenty. They’re worth it. In Chula Vista, Karina’s Mexican Seafood creates fabulous shellfish cocktails infused with lime, onion, chili and other flavorings (a little all-American ketchup, too) that create bright, delicious savors. Brigantine Seafood Six San Diego locations brigantine.com Woo-hoo! Who knew an oyster could create such a rush? They’re not built to come on strong, but with a little imagination, like that shown at the Brigantine’s oyster bars, an oyster can shoot off like a rocket. An oyster shooter, that is, built in a shot glass with one freshly opened oyster du jour, a little cocktail sauce and about 3/4-ounce of house-infused pepper vodka. Knock back one of these bad boys for an instant reaction. Have a few, and somebody else better be driving. Brigantine offers a vodka-free shooter topped with fresh horseradish, and it’s zingy, too. Oysters on the half-shell also please with selections like Blue Points, Fanny Bays and Dabob Bays from Washington State. Brigantine Seafood’s oyster shooter E I G H T y

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Experience Asian Fusion in the Heart of North Park Daily Happy Hour 4pm - 7pm Cocktail Specials & $3 small plates

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investi-GATOR

Looking deep into the belly of the beast By David Nelson Four floors below the penthouse restaurant at the Porta Vista hotel, Little Italy melts into the bay—sailboats and grey Navy vessels, planes ascending from Lindbergh Field, the setting sun torching the ridge atop Point Loma. The scene sizzles inside Glass Door, too, where votive candles flicker inside edible cylinders of baked, honey-glazed phyllo dough arranged on a long, tall table set for 10. The guests stand around in small groups, occasionally breaking off pieces of phyllo to scoop up a relish of cheese and roasted peaches. Candle smoke adds an unusual nuance, magnified by the Dubonnet (sweet, wine-based aperitif ) beverage engineer Dean Powers invented to complement the dish. The invitation to Ten Tastes of Glass Door—a 10-course dinner for 10 hosted on the 10th day of the month—advised the menu would be “a bit outside the box.” “Chef Eric Smith and I like jumping off bridges,” announces general manager Christian Cardnuto. “We’re going for some shock and awe. There are no printed menus, because we don’t want to tip you off.” But Smith lets the cat—reptile, actually—out of the bag when he wheels up a cart on which a recently living alligator smiles in repose. One diner exclaims, “That’s waaay out of the box,” causing Smith to say, “Alligator’s pretty tasty, so don’t be scared.” While Smith describes the pending feast, guests dig into Martini glasses filled with “deconstructed hamachi cocktails” of skewered fish

with citrus soda, olive oil and crushed red pepper. For this, Powers concocted a spicy michelado of Pacifico beer, tomato, lime and salt. The idea: to pair the fish and beer in the mouth, like a bite of foie gras savored with a sip of Sauternes. Continuing to “break it down and build it back up,” as Cardnuto characterizes the event’s gastronomic approach, the menu continues with Fennellini cocktails (fennel syrup, AquaVit liqueur, prosecco) and fennel-flavored yeast pancakes with coriander-dusted sweetbreads, agave nectar, microgreens, cumin and egg foam. Then, a caprese salad: savory cheese ice cream wrapped in basil and paired with a cocktail of strawberries, balsamico, Sauvignon Blanc and whiskey. Given what’s come so far in this meal, it’s no surprise when lobster pastries show up with cocktails of pink cotton candy doused with white wine and butterscotch schnapps. Then the moment arrives: big square white dishes brimmed with an orange stew of alligator, escarole and black-eyed peas. “A lot of stuff ’s going on,” explains the chef before departing to prepare pheasant balls seasoned with minced gator, and a meatier entree termed “gator corn pudding.” Drinks crafted of beer and wine accompanied these, smoothing the way to a three-layer cake partially enriched with coconut ice cream. “It’s all fun,” concludes a diner as she hoists herself from the fourhour culinary safari. “It’s this, or doing something ordinary.” A to-go box of crocodile—would that be in the box or outside of it? Glass Door 1835 Columbia St., Fourth Floor, Little Italy 619.564.3755, glassdoorsd.com WHAT A CROC! Scan here to see a video of the alligator feast.

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Introducing 

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oas E NOT E CA & CU CI NA

TOAST Enoteca & Cucina is a one-of-a-kind, authentic Italian wine bar that brings a full dinner menu and the world’s premier wines to the charming East Village neighborhood of San Diego.

Toast Enoteca | 927 J Street | San Diego, CA | 92101 toastenoteca.com | 619.269.4267

Visit our sister restaurant Acqua al 2 in the Gaslamp.

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something fishy

A simple recipe for ceviche, from “A” to “Sea” Story and photos by Brandon Matzek

Ceviche Tostadas with Cilantro Cream serves 6 – 8 as an appetizer

Whether you’re looking for a quick appetizer for your summer kick-off or a simple meal during the workweek, these no-cook Ceviche Tostadas with Cilantro Cream are a must-have in your warm-weather repertoire. Tender chunks of lime-marinated white fish are tossed with a fresh mix of onion, jalapeño, tomato and cilantro, then piled high atop a cilantro cream-slathered tostada. The fish is “cooked” in the acid of the lime juice—no heat needed. Packed with bold, satisfying flavor, these ceviche tostadas are the epitome of freshness. I just love the contrast of the bright ceviche and the sweet, crunchy tostadas. The key to a delicious ceviche is the ingredients. Be sure to purchase the freshest white fish you can find and afford. Also, avoid bottled lime juice, dried cilantro and unripe produce. Your tomato should be soft to the touch without any cracks, bruises or blemishes. If you are preparing this ceviche for a party, I would recommend marinating and draining the fish the morning of the event (see details in recipe to to right). Cover and refrigerate until one hour before the party. Flavor the ceviche, then return to the refrigerator until guests arrive. Serve the ceviche in a bowl set in a larger bowl of ice (to keep the fish chilled). Have the tostadas, chopped cilantro, sliced avocado and cilantro cream nearby, so guests can easily build their own appetizers. For a large party, consider serving this ceviche with tortilla chips instead.

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Ingredients For the ceviche: 1 pound skinless white fish (halibut, tilapia, whitefish, snapper and bass are good options), cut into 1/2-inch cubes 1 small white onion, chopped into 1/4-inch pieces 1 1/2 cups freshly squeezed lime juice (from about 12 limes) 1 large jalapeño, stemmed, seeded and finely chopped 1 ripe, fat tomato, cored, seeded and cut into 1/4-inch pieces 1/4 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves, chopped 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon sugar Kosher salt (continued on page 86)

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Enjoy globally influenced seafood, paired with panoramic harbor views

HAPPY HOUR: Until 7 p.m. every day LATE-NIGHT HAPPY HOUR: 10 p.m. to midnight every day LATE-NIGHT KITCHEN: Thursday, Friday and Saturday, (25% off for service industry)

CIOPPINO BLANCO: lobster tail, mussels, lump crab, local fish, lentils, white wine herb reduction

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taste the world from our view

1 8 3 5 C O L U M B I A S T. , 4 T H F L O O R , L I T T L E I T A LY (619) 564-3755

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F R O M T O P : C h u nk s of l i m e m ar i na t ed wh i t e f i s h t o s s ed w i t h fre s h l y c u t on i on ; 1 / 4 c u p of c i l an t ro add s m ore f l a v or t o t he m i x ; a l l of t he i ngred i en t s , read y t o m i x .

• San Diego’s Original British Pub • Est. 1990 •

(continued from page 84) Ingredients For the cilantro cream: 3 cups loosely packed cilantro leaves 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice 1/2 cup mayonnaise Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper For serving: Tostadas 1 avocado, halved, pitted, peeled, and sliced Chopped cilantro Process “Cook” the fish. In a large glass or stainless steel bowl, combine fish, chopped onions and lime juice. If the lime juice doesn’t cover the fish, you may need to squeeze in a little more. Cover the bowl and refrigerate until fish reaches the desired doneness (about 1 hour for medium-rare). Pour mixture through a medium-mesh strainer to drain all of the lime juice. Transfer cooked fish and onions back to the bowl and discard lime juice. Flavor the ceviche. To the fish mixture, add jalapeño, tomato, 1/4 cup cilantro and olive oil, stirring to combine. Add sugar, then season to taste with kosher salt (I added just under 1 teaspoon). Refrigerate until ready to use (no longer than 2 hours). Prepare cilantro cream. Combine cilantro leaves, lime juice and mayonnaise in a food processor and puree until smooth. Season to taste with kosher salt and black pepper.

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Serve. Spread a thin layer of cilantro cream on each tostada. Top with ceviche, a slice or two of avocado, and a scattering of chopped cilantro.

Catch all the action here at the pub starting Friday June 8th through Sunday July 1st

For comprehensive information about the pub, including our menu, hours of operation, special offers and upcoming events, please visit our website listed at the top of this page 3701 INDIA ST • SAN DIEGO CA 92103 • (619) 299 0230

THE SHAKESPEARE CARES

We have partnered with New Leaf Biofuel in an effort to combat global warming and clean up the air in our community! 100% of our used fryer oil is donated to the local production of biodiesel fuel.

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Ocean Beach BARMAN juices up traditional sangria By Frank Sabatini Jr. / Photo by Kristina Yamamoto The pint-size servings of red sangria at Raglan Public House sparkle like a señorita clad in scarlet flamenco ruffles, but the recipe travels far outside of Spain. After researching numerous renditions of the fruity wine drink, which the Spaniards introduced to American taste buds at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York, bar manager Kyle Jaworski perfected a formula that blends New Zealand pinot noir with hard cider from Julian. In the absence of a full liquor license, the challenge was skirting around the brandy that traditionally gets tossed in. “There were missteps before we started rolling with it,” Jaworski says. “It was either

too much wine or too sweet. I learned that making sangria can go real bad, real quick.” Jaworski eventually scored unanimous approval from friends and neighbors over an invigorating mouth coolant recipe that includes judicious measures of orange juice and 7-Up, plus titillating pinches of ground allspice and cinnamon. Customers preferring a temporary retreat from Raglan’s stouts and lagers have since expressed their affection for the proprietary blend, too, as Jaworski now stirs up five-gallon batches three times a week. Served in beer mugs with apples, oranges and ice, the sangria sells for $6.50 a pint and half that during happy hours (3 to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.,

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Saturday and Sunday). Offering a New Zealand-inspired menu akin to those of their popular Bare Back Grill locations in Pacific Beach and downtown, owners P.J. Lamont and Matt Baker opened Raglan in Ocean Beach in February. The “bare lil lamb” burger with mint dressing and blue cheese remains a must-try inside their latest digs, adorned with a surf-break mural and tables crafted from wood pallets. As ocean breezes waft through the retractable doors from only a block away, Jaworski’s fruitembellished sangria washes it all down so easy. Raglan Public House 1851 Bacon St., Ocean Beach 619.794.2304, raglanpublichouse.com


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from the shoreline

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S H O W TI M E

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TO THE

POWEROF

The Sorry For Party Rocking Tour—featuring LMFAO (“I’m Sexy and I Know It”), with special guests Far East Movement, Sidney Samson, Eva Simons, Qwest Crew and Natalia—will get the Valley View Casino Center (aka Sports Arena) moving June 9. These dancefloor hooligans have taken the country by storm with their crazy antics and tongue-in-cheek dance songs, not to mention the brightly colored outfits. Redfoo (Stefan Gordy) and SkyBlu (Skyler Gordy) are the son and half nephew of Berry Gordy, founder of Motown. (Certainly doesn’t hurt to have Berry Gordy as your dad, just sayin’.) The artists performing will keep your ass shaking all night long, so don’t forget the 5-hour energy drink. —Tim Pyles

N eeno

LM F AO p l a y V a l l e y V i e w Casino Center June 9 N I N E T Y – O N E

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C o u r t e s y of 8 7 M u s i c

AIR AND

SEE FROM Radio waves TO live concert events By Carlos Gomez

Rebelution

91X helps kickoff summer once again with its annual X-Fest on Sunday, June 3. This year’s lineup pays homage to the alt-rock bands of yesteryear, while showcasing new up-and-comers. Those representing the old guard—you know, bands that had their heyday waaay back in the ’90s—include Lollapalooza originators, Jane’s Addiction; post-grungers Garbage; rap-metal mainstays P.O.D; and SoCal trio Eve 6. Adding some young blood to the mix are Angels and Airwaves, fronted by Blink-182’s Tom DeLonge; indierock quintet Grouplove; Salt Lake City powerhouses Neon Trees; Icelandic folk rockers Of Monsters and Men; Santa Barbara reggae band Rebelution; and poppy, art-rock quintet Walk the Moon. “We’ve delivered a lineup of 10 awesome bands, with a ticket price that starts at under 10 bucks,” says 91X program director and on-air personality Christy Taylor. “Nobody else is doing that.” Tickets to the festival, to be held at the Cricket Wireless Amphitheatre in Chula Vista, range from $9.91 for general admission to $55 for seating in the venue’s orchestral pit. No chairs will be provided or allowed for general admission ticketholders. 91X.com

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A u t u m n D e W i l de

X-Fest

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A aron F ar l e y

Bringing a taste of Old School, R&B, hip-hop and soul is Z90.3’s Fresh Music Festival, to be held Friday, June 1. Hosted by human beatbox and hip-hop pioneer Doug E. Fresh, the festival will also feature performances from some of today’s hottest comics. Headlining the show is crooner Keith Sweat, who innovated the New Jack Swing sound of the late-’80s and topped the charts with hits “I Want Her,” “Twisted” and “Nobody.” The rest of the bill features sibling duo and Tupac collaborators K-Ci and Jojo with their collection of power duets, Guy including their smash hit and Billboard chart-topper “All My Life”; New York trio and platinum-selling artists SWV (Sisters with Voices); and production/songwriting soul band, Guy. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. at the Valley View Casino Center in Sports Arena. Ticket prices range from $29 to $75. Find out how to win front row tickets at freshmusicfestival.com. z90.com (continued on page 94)

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Un i v er s a l M u s i c E n t er p r i s e s

Fresh Music Festival


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(continued from page 93) H ar p er S m i t h

AIR AND

SEE

imagine dragons V i c t or F rankow s k i

Sandy Parts Festival FM 94/9 takes the party to Oceanside Pier, Sunday, June 3 (same day as 91X’s X-Fest), for their annual Sandy Parts Festival. Inside joke or blunt warning, perhaps? This year’s lineup boasts an eclectic mix of contemporary electronic and alt-pop-leaning artists. Coming off of a U.S. tour with the Red Hot Chili Peppers and headlining the show is singer, songwriter and dub-pop darling Santigold. Throwing in some international appeal are New Zealander post-punk revivalists The Naked and Famous, joined by synthy alt-rockers Imagine Dragons and L.A.-based indie-pop band Electric Guest. “I’m excited about all of them,” says FM 94/9 program director Garrett Michaels. “The festival features artists on the rise, artists who we feel might be growing into something.” Tickets are sold out, but can be won through the radio station’s on-air contesting. With up to 4,500 concertgoers plus tons of food and beverage booths, SPF should prove to be more than just another Sunday in Oceanside. fm949sd.com

naked and famous SEAN THOMAS

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S H O W TI M E

A nd y Barron

FAIR Enough

Time: Warped The 18th edition of the Van’s Warped Tour rolls into Cricket Wireless Amphitheater parking lot June 27. And as always, I will be there. I have to say, by the looks of the line-up, there is no Old School stage this year—and that makes me sad. The first year, 1995, featured L7, My Bloody Valentine, No Doubt, Sublime, fluf, CIV and the Deftones. vanswarpedtour.com

Here’s the 2012 line-up: SWITCH F OOT

The San Diego County Fair runs June 8 through July 4 and features entertainment on several stages. It’s got something for everybody, really. Over the years, many legends have graced the Grandstand Stage. My personal favorites were seeing Johnny Cash in 1988 and Berlin in 1983— Berlin only because of the huge signs warning people of the language during tonight’s performance. Their song “Sex” was pretty risqué at the time. GRANDSTAND STAGE: Kenny Loggins, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Switchfoot, Everlcear, Lit, Sugar Ray, Grand Funk Railroad, Scotty McCreery, Credence Clearwater Revisited, KC and the Sunshine Band, Train, Gin Blossoms, Matisyahu, Weird Al, Cobra Starship, Cody Simpson, Hot Chelle Rae and Lonestar. (Some shows are free; some are paid.) PADDOCK STAGE: Eric Burdon and The Animals, John Tesh Big Band, Vanilla Fudge and Dickey Betts & Great Southern. (All shows on Paddock Stage are free.) See what I mean, so much to choose from—rock, country, big band, classic rock, disco, alternative and hopefully something for you. Don’t forget your deep-fried Twinkie. sdfair.com —Tim Pyles K a i R egan

A Loss For Words After The Burial All Time Low Anthony Raneri Anti Flag Ballyhoo! Bayside blessthefall Born Of Osiris Breathe Carolina Brian Marquis CatchingYourClouds Champagne Champagne Chelsea Grin Chunk! No Captain Chunk! Cold Forty Three Dead Sara Divided By Friday Echo Movement Every Time I Die Falling In Reverse Fireworks For Today Four Year Strong Funeral Party G-Eazy Hyro Da Hero I Am The Avalanche I Fight Dragons Impending Doom Into It. Over It. It Boys! iwrestledabearonce Koji Living With Lions Make Do And Mend Man Overboard Matt Toka Mayday Parade Memphis May Fire

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06/12

CALENDAR

June 2: Mickey Avalon

By Tim Pyles June 1: English Beat

@ Belly Up Tavern, bellyup.com Dave Wakeling, the only original member, has been playing the band’s hits all over SoCal for years now. Infectious and danceable sums it up. One of the original U.K. Two-Tone-era ska bands. June 2 (sold-out) and 4 (still tix): Donavan Frankenreiter

@ Belly Up Tavern, bellyup.com Surfer, musician and personal friend of Jack Johnson. Did you know he had a band when he was 18 called Peanut Butter and Jam?

@ Stingaree, stingsandiego.com Mickey’s new record is called “Loaded,” as he has been many times in his life. This is Hollywood street rap about hookers and heroin and life on the streets—not South Central, but the Sunset Strip.

calendar

June 7: Aly & Fila

@ FLUXX, fluxxsd.com A couple of Egyptian DJs who spin their own special brand of uplifting trance. Get lost in the music.

June 2: Supersuckers

June 11: Pinback

@ Casbah, casbahmusic.com They are the self-proclaimed “Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band In the World,” and you better believe it!

@ Casbah, casbahmusic.com Incredible local band with an international following. Look for a new record later this year.

June 14: Motion City Soundtrack

@ Casbah, casbahmusic.com Alternative rock band from Minneapolis that writes catchy, pop punk songs. Mark Hoppus of Blink 182 loves them and produced their second record. June 14: New Edition

June 3: Mogwai

June 13: The Temper Trap & Crocodiles

@ Belly Up Tavern, bellyup.com Amazing Scottish post-rock band that goes from soft and sweet to loud and bombastic. It’s awesome! The band takes its name from the film The Gremlins.

@ House Of Blues, hob.com You’ve probably heard and sung along with “Sweet Disposition” from The Temper Trap numerous times. Locals who tour non-stop, the Crocodiles, open the night.

S u b u r b an N o i z e R ecord s

L i q i u i d Ta m b o u r i ne R ecord s

DONA V AN F RAN K ENREITER

@ San Diego Civic Theater, sandiegotheatres.org Hear “Candy Girl” and “Cool It Now” from the fellas that did it when they were kids. Hard to believe it’s been 30 years! Think of what this band launched, from Bobby Brown to Bel Biv Devoe.

MIC K EY A V ALON Un i v er s a l M u s i c E n t er p r i s e s

NEW EDITION ninety – E I G H T

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CALENDAR

June 20: Scorpions

June 14: Van Halen

June 15: Switchfoot

@ Viejas Arena, viejasarena.com The little old band from Pasadena reunites with their only lead singer that ever mattered: David Lee Roth. Sammy was okay, but Gary Cherone? Really? I mean, really?!  Bassist Michael Anthony is out though, replaced by Eddie Van Halen’s son, Wolfgang.

@ Del Mar Grandstand Stage, sdfair.com Local band that has reached the pinnacle of the rock ‘n’ roll, and always with a great attitude. Some of the nicest guys in the game. June 17: The Jesus and Mary Chain

@ House Of Blues, hob.com Scottish noise rockers who formed in 1983. Think The Velvet Underground, The Shangri-Las and the Beach Boys, with lots of fuzz and reverb.

June 15: Rhett Miller & the Serial Lady Killers

@ Casbah, casbahmusic.com Rhett used to front the band The Old 97’s. The ladies love him.

@ Valley View Center Casino Center, valleyviewcasinocenter.com Hard to believe this band actually started in 1965, but it’s true. One of the best of the ’80s Hair Metal bands, maybe cause they are German. So play “Rock you Like A Hurricane” loud, and turn it up to 11, please.

calendar June 29: The Soft Pack and Heavy Hawaii

@ Belly Up Tavern, bellyup.com Once known as The Muslims, June 22: Common Sense this band has gone well beyond @ Belly Up Tavern, bellyup.com just playing the local venues. This These SoCal reggae rockers have band tours, and a lot. They always been at it for a long time. Did you make a point to swing through know the rapper Common was their old hometown, though, once known as “Common Sense” and we love them for that. Arrive and had to drop the “Sense” due to early for Heavy Hawaii and their this band? psychedelic beach pop.

rh i no record s

ROBERT YAGER

V AN HALEN THE J ESUS AND MARY CHAIN

Tim Pyles... M A R K S E LI G E R

was born in Minnesota, grew up in La Jolla and is now San Diego’s unofficial Mayor of Local Music. He hosts FM94/9’s FTP show (Sundays at 7 p.m.), a weekly radio broadcast dedicated to new music and the latest releases. He also hosts The Local 94/9 (Sundays at 8 p.m.), showcasing some of San Diego’s finest musical talent. Pyles is a blogger/ host for NBC’s SoundDiego music blog, books shows for the Casbah, hosts the monthly Maryjane’s Underground (Hard Rock Hotel San Diego) and writes about music for PacificSD. Cool dude, indeed.

RHETT MILLER O N E

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POURING ON it

This barTENDER will do anything to make a splash By Patricia B. Dwyer / Photo by Kristina Yamamoto PacificSD asked Alex Cunningham to make us a drink. Instead, he made himself a drink, literally. Now, this 31-year-old bartender from Ocean Beach’s new Raglan Public House has something to get off his chest, and it’s not just the sangria (the recipe for which can be found on page 88 and does not include chest hair). PacificSD: Why should someone order a drink from you? Because I really, really, really want to be friends with you. What makes you special? I don’t have a Facebook account and I help old ladies cross the street. For whom would you most like to make a drink? A nice-smelling girl with a good attitude would be awesome. What embarrasses you? My loud-ass car and going Number Two in a public bathroom. Admit something that you never have before. The first time I saw The Lion King, I cried when Mufasa died. That was sad, man. If you were a drink, what would you be? A shot of Fireball [fiery cinnamon whiskey], pretty darn tasty stuff. What’s the craziest thing you’ll do this summer? Maybe a little sex on the beach. Sorry Mom—ear muffs! If you could do just three more things in life, what would they be? Get all of my family to go on a trip somewhere tropical with good waves, trick Cindy Crawford into being my sugar momma and look at Earth from the moon. Share a deep thought. Make sure you are happy with what you’re doing. Life is short and can end at any second. Smile as much as possible. Be nice to others. And last but not least, don’t lie to yourself; don’t lie to your friends. raglanpublichouse.com

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Photography: Tom Stoddart © MMVI Copyrights and Likeness of La Dolce Vita © International Media Films


LOVE

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B L I N D D AT E

A PERFECT

10

comes only now and then

THIS great night downtown, it all happened when…

By David Perloff / Photos by Cali Griebel It’s 6:55—comin’ atcha live. Tonight’s about dating, not finding wives. The sun will set at a quarter to eight. One dater is here. The other one’s late. Love is poetry, this story proves it. Shakespeare’s rhythm—we’re just gonna use it. Iambic pentameter’s always a 10. But blind dates blossom just now and again. Summer romance, it can move pretty fast. More often than not, it just doesn’t last. Last week’s fling has become yesterday’s news. Quick, let’s review the pre-date interviews. PacificSD: Where are you from? GINA: I’m from Marin County, right north of San Francisco. I currently live in Pacific Beach. BRIAN: Born and raised in Michigan. Now, I travel back and forth between Vegas and San Diego. What do you do for a living? GINA: I’m an executive assistant at Bridgepoint Education. BRIAN: Entrepreneur. I own a hotel, apartments and a mortgage company in Las Vegas; consult and looking for the right spot to open a lounge in downtown San Diego. What do you do for fun? GINA: I enjoy the beach, trying new restaurants, spending time with my loved ones and spending time outdoors. BRIAN: I enjoy traveling, boating, reading and anything involving wine.

What are you best at? GINA: Making people laugh and smile. And cooking. BRIAN: I’m very creative both personally and professionally.

What do you like least about yourself? GINA: My lack of patience BRIAN: That there’s not two of me.

What are you looking for in a date? GINA: Someone with a lot of personality, confidence and a sense of humor, great smile, friendly/approachable demeanor. I’m really quirky, so they need to be able to handle that. BRIAN: Physically, I usually go for brunettes with a curvy body. I’m pretty tall, so she can’t be short. But more importantly, I look for a good sense of humor, ambitious, with a good set of morals.

What is your biggest fear? GINA: Failure, losing my parents. BRIAN: Regrets and losing the people I love.

What is the sexiest thing about you? GINA: I can only choose one? People say my eyes. I would say my wit and sense of humor. BRIAN: Just one?

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What’s your sign, religion or spiritual belief system, if any? GINA: Aquarius. I’m spiritual. Everything is made of energy in the universe, so positive energy breeds positive outcomes. Everything has a flow and a balance. BRIAN: I’m a Pisces, and I think the characteristics do match up pretty well. I go to church for a positive message, and pretty much just believe in doing the right thing. Fill in the blanks: In general, the people I date are “blank”

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and “blank.” GINA: Intelligent and charmingslash-witty. BRIAN: Pretty and outgoing. Fill in the blanks: I want my date to be “blank” and “blank.” GINA: Easygoing and easy to look at. BRIAN: Fun and able to hold a conversation. What’s the worst thing that could happen during the date? GINA: One of us drinks too much, or we are bored stiff. BRIAN: She could be on her phone. I can’t stand when a girl is always on her phone; it’s a dealbreaker. What will most likely happen? GINA: We will have a good time and not want the date to end. BRIAN: She’ll fall in love with me. (Continued on page 106)


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(Continued from page 104)

DUSK IN THE WIND (okay, that sounds cheesy) The date begins, all easy and breezy

Serenity Lounge is where they first meet. It’s a hot new place, downtown on J Street. Brian and Gina toast drinks at sunset. Dirty martinis. We having fun yet? Appetizers come; it’s crab cakes for all. So far it seems that they’re having a ball. Laughing and talking and drinking a lot. The date going well? More likely than not. They jump in a cab, neither one lingers. Next is dinner…but first drinks at ginger’s. The place just opened a couple weeks’ past, Beneath the Verant Group’s new barleymash. Before the waiter delivers their meal, It’s time to determine what’s up for real. So grab a seat, have a drink at the bar. And let’s find out how it’s going so far. PacificSD: How’s it going so far? GINA: It’s going really well. He’s interesting, very nice. He has his shit together. There’s a lot going on; he’s busy. I like that in a person. BRIAN: Good, we’re having a great date. I think we have a lot in common. What were your first impressions? GINA: I liked him a lot, great handshake, good eye contact. Great, pretty eyes, good smile, just good demeanor. Without sounding too spiritual or weird, I get a good vibe from somebody on their first handshake. You feel it or you don’t. Friendship-wise, relationshipwise…yeah, good vibe. BRIAN: Very nice, sweet girl, kind of girl I’d usually date: brunette and pretty. Really bubbly personality and kind of quirky. I think we have

a lot in common. We were having great conversation.

and talk to her if we weren’t set up on a blind date.

What have you been talking about? GINA: Everything. He told me a couple stories. He’s like, “I’ve never told anybody this, but…” And they were really cool stories. BRIAN: She is very fun and interesting. She has a lot of great stories, a lot of great experiences. We’ve talked about a little bit of everything.

How was Serenity? GINA: I loved it, actually. I absolutely loved it. We watched the cooks for a while and the way they plated everything. The crab cake was great, and the drinks were great; and just the set-up, the location. BRIAN: It’s awesome. For sure, I would definitely take a girl there. Great lobster and crab appetizer. The cocktails were amazing. Great place to watch the sunset.

Is this the type of person you would normally date? GINA: Yes, but I don’t have a type. Good family background, he has drive and ambition, he knows what he wants. We’re similar in weird quirks. BRIAN: Yeah, she’s the type of girl I’d normally date: brunette, very pretty girl. I would go up

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Rate your date on a scale from one to 10 in terms of looks. GINA: Nine. BRIAN: Eight. And for personality? GINA: Ten. BRIAN: Ten.

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Would you like to kiss your date now? GINA: Sure. BRIAN: We’ll see where the night goes. Does your date want to kiss you right now? GINA: I think so. BRIAN: I’m sure. Thank you! Serenity Restaurant & Lounge 201 J St., Gaslamp 619.450.4201, serenitysd.com barleymash & ginger’s 600 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp 619.255.7373, barleymash.com, gingerssandiego.com (Continued on page 108)


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LOVE

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B L I N D D AT E

(Continued from page 106)

FINAL SCORE and the daters reveal more IT STARTED WITH 10’S­—LET’S SEE WHERE IT ENDS

As dinner arrives, the daters get space, Without paparazzi all up in their face. The magazine crew leaves (after a drink). We call the next day to learn the wink-wink. PacificSD: How was ginger’s? GINA: I liked the atmosphere. Since Game Seven of the Lakers was on, it added to the experience. BRIAN: We had an amazing time. We started off trying some of their signature drinks downstairs, where it was a little more intimate and we were able to have a conversation. How was at dinner barleymash? GINA: We had a nice corner table that allowed for some privacy. It was pretty loud in there because of the game, but high-energy and a great vibe. We ordered the ceviche to start. It was really good. I had seared tuna; he had a grilled chicken salad of sorts. We ended the meal with dirty martinis with blue cheese-stuffed olives. BRIAN: We had a great time up there watching the final quarter of the Lakers game. Food was great—we had a full, fourcourse meal. And to finish it off, s’mores and bacon. We probably tried almost all of their signature cocktails, and their Patron was very good, too. What was the best part of the date? GINA: The best part of the date was Brian. It was a blind date—you never know how things are going to go or turn out, and he was the best date I could have asked for, very handsome, easygoing, interesting.

BRIAN: I really had a great time. Serenity and barleymash were great. Walking around the Gaslamp was a lot of fun. What happened after the magazine crew left you two alone? GINA: We ended up going to the Hard Rock for a drink, then made our way over to Noble Experiment inside The Neighborhood. We just kept the night going. It was an awesome night. BRIAN: We walked the Gaslamp area and stopped in the Hard Rock for my buddy’s birthday party. Then Gina introduced me to the underground speakeasy scene in downtown. Amazing! We had so much fun trying the unique cocktails and going through secret passages and fake walls. Was there a kiss or romantic exchange? GINA: I wouldn’t tell you one way or another. BRIAN: A gentlemen never tells. What did you learn about yourself last night? GINA: That I’m a little more shy than I thought. I was so nervous beforehand and didn’t expect to be. I also realized I do a lot of voices when I’m talking about certain topics. Ha! BRIAN: How much I really enjoy being in San Diego. Will there be a second date? GINA: Most definitely. At least, I’m hoping so. We both had a great time, and who

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wouldn’t want to hang out with either one of us? BRIAN: I have to spend the next two weeks in Vegas, but we had a great time. There’s a charity wine event first week in June we might try and meet up for. What’s one thing your date should really know before his/her next date? GINA: I don’t have any advice for him. He was honestly the perfect date. BRIAN: I just got out of a long relationship, so I’m taking everything very slow. Right from the get-go, ‘twas a perfect match. They both said the other was a great catch. Brian ranked Gina with one perfect 10. And she said that he’s a man among men. To learn if they kissed, we made a real bid. They said, “Can’t tell you,” which means that they did. But summer love’s fast, you just gotta know. There’s already talk ‘bout taking it slow. “I say it’s funny. Methinks they hooked up. When they said maybe, we all know what’s up. I’ll bet they smooched in the bar they were at. If not, he’s a puss…like Cat in the Hat.”

—Dr. Seuss “This is the stupidest story I’ve read. The writing, it makes me thrilled to be dead.”

—Bill Shakespeare

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B R E A K FA S T

LUNCH

DINNER

You’re drinking.

ALL NIGHT

Night or Day

San Diego

M

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G

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z

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is buying.

THE RESTAURANT THAT NEVER SLEEPS OPEN 2 HOU4R S

WE’RE COVERING THE beer, sliders, nachos & wings

YOU’RE INVITED:

PADRES BEERFEST AFTERPARTY Friday, June 1, 10 p.m. – Midnight

®

777 5th Ave., Gaslamp 619.232.6000 The Brian’s 24 Pancake Monster—five delicious buttermilk hot cakes, a halfpound each of ham and country-fried steak, four giant bacon strips and three fried eggs, all piled onto a pound of home fries. This $25 entrée is FREE for anyone who devours it in under an hour.

“OUR FOCUS HAS ALWAYS BEEN ON BIG COMFORT FOOD. THIS DISH TAKES IT TO THE EXTREME.” —BRIAN EPSTEIN, OWNER

Must RSVP to:

828 SIXTH AVENUE | GASLAMP QUARTER | 619.702.8410 | BRIANS24.COM

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maloneys@pacificsandiego.com nine

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pac i f i cs A N d I E G O . c o m 05.12

JUNE 2012

P ADRES P ITCHER CORY LUEB K E

C O U R T E SY S A N D I E G O P A D R E S

PADRES HOMES GAMES

6/2-3: Wings over Gillespie Air Show

6/1-3: vs. Arizona Diamondbacks 6/5-7: vs. New York Giants 6/18-20: vs. Texas Rangers 6/22-24: vs. Seattle Mariners 6/2: Eddie Griffin

Location: 4th & B, Downtown Admission: $40-50 Info: 4thandbevents.com Watch the Undercover Brother himself, rated 62nd on Comedy Central’s list of the top 100 comedians of all time, wax comedic on what is rumored to be his last tour. 6/2: Art Around Adams

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Location: Gillespie Field, El Cajon Admission: $20 Info: ag1caf.org See aviation wonders of the military’s yesteryear, including World War II bombers and other “flying museums,” soar in this airborne spectacle. 6/2-3, 9-10, 16: Camp Pendleton’s World Famous Mud Run

Location: Lake O’Neill, Camp Pendleton Admission: $58 Info: camppendletonraces.com Join a crowd of 6,000 at these almost-entirely-sold-out treks through 10 kilometers (that’s 6.2 miles, twice as long as the San Diego Mud Run in March) of mud, rivers, five-foot walls, tire obstacles, hills and more.

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Location: Del Mar Fairgrounds Admission: $7-13 Info: sdfair.com Pet animals and eat like one at the sixth largest fair in the country (details page 26).

HA V E A COW ( OR WHATE V ER THESE THINGS ARE ) AT THE SAN DIEGO COUNTY F AIR

D E L M A R FA I R G RO U N D S

Location: Adams Ave., Normal Heights Admission: Free Info: artaroundadams.org San Diego artists, musicians and entertainers get their time to shine as 75 local storefronts convert into art galleries and performance venues at this annual exhibition of creative talent.

6/8-7/4: San Diego County Fair

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TEAM OF THE MONTH: RED ZONE ASSASSINS Long time veterans of VAVi Flag Football, the Red Zone Assassins have 2 titles and light blue shirts. Despite their recent unlucky streak, and color confusion they’ve won Team of the Month through relentless pursuit of a third championship. A true inspiration that it doesn’t take a trophy to win a title!

SPORTS REPORT

San Diego’s place for co-ed sports leagues, happy hours and social events

CHAMPION’s CORNER: APRIL WINNERS! Softball in North Park - Hippy Hitting Machine Kickball in North Park - Polly & the Crackers Softball in Pacific Beach - R U Gonna Hit That? Volleyball in C. Valley - Skinit Volleyball in C. Valley - Everyday I'm Shufflin Flag Football in Crown Point - Blue Ballers Flag Football in Crown Point - Baggers (AFC) Soccer in Mira Mesa - Sterkly Soccer in Mira Mesa - Has Beens Basketball in Nobel Rec - Cereballers Softball in Park de la Cruz - Drunk Tank Softball in Park de la Cruz - Unbroken 8's Softball in Park de la Cruz - Cleveland Steamer Kickball in Pacific Beach - Red Balls & Vodka Softball in Old Town - KIW-SC Softball in Old Town - Run Tell That Kickball in Ocean Beach - The Honey Badgers Basketball in Serra Mesa - LINSANITY Water Polo at Wavehouse - Hot Ballz

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Get in the game at govavi.com

SUMMER SPORTS: STARTING SOON! 6/10 Coed Soccer in Pacific Beach 6/13 Coed Softball in Carmel Valley 6/14 Coed Kickball in North Park 6/15 Coed Softball in La Jolla 6/17 Men’s Soccer in Pacific Beach 6/18 Coed Soccer Downtown 6/18 Coed Kickball North Park 6/18 Coed Softball in North Park 6/21 Coed SICKBALL in North Park 6/24 Comp. Beach Volleyball in Ocean Beach 6/24 Social Beach Volleyball in Ocean Beach 6/25 Coed Kickball in Carmel Valley 6/25 Coed Softball in Ocean Beach 6/28 Coed Kickball in Ocean Beach

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pac i f i cs A N d I E G O . c o m 05.12

JUNE 2012

C o u r t e s y of Loew s C oronado Ba y R e s or t

6/15: Kevin Hart

Location: Viejas Arena, SDSU Admission: $79-246 Info: khartonline.com Comedian Kevin Hart performs stand-up as part of his nationwide tour. 6/16: Oysterfest

Location: Marina Embarcadero North, Downtown Admission: $25-100 Info: oysterfestsd.com Slurp down oysters and beer while listening to live music at this third annual festival. Don’t worry if bivalves aren’t you’re thing—local restaurants will be slinging less-aquatic offerings, too. surf dog competition

6/16: Loews Coronado Bay Resort Surf Dog Competition

C O U R T E SY O F L A J O LL A F E STIV A L O F T H E A R TS

Location: Dunes Park, Imperial Beach Admission: Free to watch, $50-55 to enter Info: loewssurfdog.blogspot.com Watch San Diego’s finest furry wave-riders hang 20 in this adorable canine surfing competition. 6/23: Ocean Beach Street Fair & Chili Cook-Off Festival

Location: Newport Ave., Ocean Beach Admission: Free Info: oceanbeachsandiego.com Embrace your inner Obetian while enjoying live music, art, rides, beer, chili and more at this 33rd annual celebration of the neighborhood’s unique spirit. 6/24: San Diego International Triathlon

Location: Spanish Landing Park, Downtown Admission: Free to watch, $130-220 to compete (sold out) Info: kozevents.com Run, bike and swim—or just watch one of the country’s longest-standing triathlons, benefitting Father Joe’s Villages.

LA J OLLA F ESTI V AL O F THE ARTS ( a r t b y f r e d s t o d d e r )

DAVE THOMAS

6/23-24: La Jolla Festival of Arts

Location: Warren Field, UCSD Admission: $12-14 Info: lajollaartfestival.org Nearly 200 award-winning artists will show their work at this juried exhibition alongside live chalk-art creations and live performances (and drinks). 6/30: Oceanside Independence Day Parade

Location: Coast Hwy., Oceanside Admission: Free Info: oceansideparade.com Watch this two-hour parade of Uncle Sam-approved bands, floats, cars and walking groups. o c e a n s i d e f r e e d o m day pa r a d e O N E

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THINK

S C O TT R A N D A LL

LASTGASP

Caption contest for $250 worth of loot and glory Write a caption that’s funnier than PacificSD’s staff attempts below to win $250 in gift certificates ($50 to each of Bar West, Firehouse, Azul La Jolla, barleymash and Broken Yolk).

“Johnny blew his way to the top.” “I guess you don’t need a dispensary to get high.” “Leaf blower? I don’t even know her!” E-mail your caption to captions@pacificsandiego.com by June 15. Funniest answers will be printed in the July issue. O N E

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Sparkling, subtly sweet, one-of-a-kind−Coco Brevé. A bubbly alcoholic beverage made with real coconut water so the fun always comes naturally. When you want something different, invite Coco Brevé.

© 2012 COCO BREVE TRADING COMPANY, ALBANY, GA PREMIUM MALT BEVERAGE WITH COCONUT WATER AND NATURAL FLAVORS

Pacific San Diego Magazine, June 2012 issue  

Pacific San Diego Magazine, June 2012 issue

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