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VOLUME 13 ISSUE 02

Contents

Entrepreneur 14 VC Hawaii Venture Capital Association annual awards gala celebrates 30 years of building Startup Paradise 16 AG Four leading women discuss the link between wellness and sustainability at Eat Think Drink

Leadership 18 LEARN Loretta Yajima, CEO & Chair of the Board of the Hawaii Children’s Discovery Center 24 WOMEN What success and great leadership look like for 10 women at the top of their game 36 NEWS Kristina Lockwood, President & General Manager of KHON

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38 FLY Jill Tokunaga, Senior Director of U.S. Sales & Community Relations at Hawaiian Airlines 40 HEAL Jessica Munoz, President & Co-founder of Ho‘ōla Nā Pua 42 DESIGN Lisa Rapp, Principal at AHL

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44 PLAY Kendra Murray, Senior Corporate Sales Manager at Dave & Buster’s

Islands 60 CONTACT Annual contemporary art exhibition sparks conversation on cultural exchange in Hawai‘i 62 CONNECTIONS Network, educate, celebrate

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On the Cover A hospitality executive turned convention center GM. A seasoned educator passionate about handson learning. CEO of the third-largest women-owned business in the state. Hardworking, tenacious and adept at building relationships, the leaders featured on the cover of our annual women issue—Teri Orton, Loretta Yajima and Wendy Shewalter—have more in common than their X chromosomes. Whether it’s providing unparalleled service, nurturing their employees or making Hawai‘i a better place to live, they don’t take no for an answer when it comes to the business they care about.

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ENTREPRENEUR

PHOTO: HVCA

VC

Celebrating Innovation HVCA recognizes Startup Paradise champions at annual awards gala by AVRY NEAL The air was thick with anticipation and enthusiasm at the 18th annual Hawaii Venture Capital Association Entrepreneur & Deal of the Year awards gala this past spring. The ballroom of the Waialae Country Club was packed with a record number of entrepreneurs, innovators, politicians and supporters of the individuals and companies driving our innovation economy forward. The event also marked the 30th anniversary of HVCA, with opening remarks on the state of Hawai‘i’s entrepreneurial landscape coming from several fixtures in Startup Paradise, including HVCA President Meli James; Robbie Melton, executive director and CEO of the Hawaii Technology Development Corporation; and Senator Will Espero. “Hawai‘i is more than military and tourism,” Espero says. “We need to invest in entrepreneurism to ensure our future is bright.” Melton’s picks for the top five events in the land of innovation this year? Hawai‘i native and notable Silicon Valley venture capitalist Guy Kawasaki—a former Apple employee involved in marketing the first Macintosh computer in 1984—came home to Hawai‘i to serve as keynote speaker for Blue Startups Demo Day in July 2017. This year also saw the launch of Hawai‘i’s first ag-tech hackathon, a multiday event bringing together computer programmers and entrepreneurs to develop software addressing invasive species and other hurtles in the ag-tech space in Hawai‘i. In what Melton calls a victory of brains over brawn, Impact Hub Honolulu took over Gold’s Gym in Kaka‘ako,

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unveiling its expansive new collaborative workspace in late January. Smart Yields arrived in Rome in August 2017 to participate in the Laudato Si’ Startup Challenge, the Vatican’s first tech accelerator program. The Honolulu-based startup presented in a demo day in Vatican City in December and was awarded $100,000 in funding to continue its progress building efficiencies in farming on a global scale. Finally, co-founders Meli James, Britney Heyd and Michael Cheski launched Hawai‘i-made product accelerator Mana Up to help grow the next generation of million-dollar companies in Hawai‘i. Former HVCA president Bill Spencer reminisced about his 15-year tenure with the association and shared with the crowd his personal breakdown of HVCA’s four guiding pillars. “H” for history, now that the association has spent the last 30 years laying the foundation for Startup Paradise alongside HTDC; “V” for the vision to educate and show venture capitalists that they can invest in their own backyard while bringing entrepreneurial opportunities to the community; “C” for community, because a thriving network is vital to growing the ecosystem fueling Hawai‘i’s innovation economy; and, lastly, “A” for action. Our work, Spencer says, is far from done. We need to continue to ramp up support for the entrepreneurs and investors paving the way for the next generation of innovators in Startup Paradise.

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


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ENTREPRENEUR | AG

Eat Think Drink

Building a greener Hawai‘i at the intersection of wellness and sustainability by LAUREN MCNALLY

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ollaboration was the theme of the hour at Eat Think Drink: Healthy People, Healthy Planet, a quarterly event series put on by the Hawai‘i Agricultural Foundation to address issues of agriculture and food in Hawai‘i. This quarter, an expert panel of women took to the stage at The Modern Honolulu to discuss the future of wellness and sustainability in the islands, sparking a dynamic conversation on the symbiotic relationship between the two industries and their shared interest in preserving Hawai‘i’s natural resources. The program kicked off with a talk led by keynote speaker Peggy Liu, chairperson of JUCCCE, an environmental nonprofit dedicated to building a greener China by accelerating societal-scale change in energy production, urban design and consumer behavior. “It’s inspiring to see Hawai‘i take the torch and pave the way for large-scale sustainability initiatives,” Liu says. “We’re working on stewarding our own communities in China through JUCCCE’s Food Heroes program, an educational offering that teaches young families how to make and share food that is good for them and the planet.” From there, national spearfishing champion Kimi Werner, a globally renowned advocate for sustainable food systems, moderated a panel that included Kim Johnson, co-founder of the

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Kökua Hawai‘i Foundation, and Noelani Kalipi, executive director of the Kohala Institute. Together, panelists evaluated avenues of collaboration and key opportunities to achieve long-term impact, asking where we can find intersections between wellness and sustainability initiatives and encourage systemic change. In what way can these two industries work together to act as catalysts for a healthier, greener Hawai‘i? How can global leaders leverage their power to influence a shift towards sustainable consumerism? At the conclusion of the panel, local chefs launched an interactive dine-around showcasing creative dishes crafted from local and sustainably sourced ingredients. Featured chefs included The Modern Honolulu’s own Keith Pajinag, Eric Oto of Hoku’s at The Kahala Hotel & Resort, Lawrence Nakamoto of Mariposa at Neiman Marcus and Troy Terorotua of Brew’d.

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


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LEADERSHIP LEARN

The Power of Play Hawaii Children’s Discovery Center CEO Loretta Yajima is on a mission to inspire lifelong learning through early education by LAUREN MCNALLY photos DAVE MIYAMOTO

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art of the appeal of the Hawaii Children’s Discovery Center is that, once inside, you can be anyone you want. Tiny fire coats hang from a line of hooks in the corner so kids can try on the role of firefighter for the day, each paired with a set of boots and coveralls ready to be pulled up and into action. They can shop in a supermarket, drive the public bus, pilot a flight on authentic seating from a defunct Aloha Airlines plane or play doctor in a veterinary or optometrist office. They can even channel a day at the carnival and ride the full-size carousel donated from E.K. Fernandez that’s lurking in a separate room reserved for birthdays and special events.

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The worlds are make believe, but the lessons learned within them are very real, says Loretta Yajima, the Discovery Center’s CEO and chair of the board. Packed with interactive exhibits designed to teach kids about themselves and the world around them, the Discovery Center encourages children to be self-starters by making learning fun. Besides the exhibit known as Your Town, there’s Fantastic You, which features a giant walk-in mouth and other immersive learning experiences

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


to help kids learn the inner workings of the human body. The center’s newest exhibit, Rainforest Adventures, occupies the building’s sunny west wing, where fishponds and tree canopies are the backdrop for lessons on native ecosystems, invasive species and environmental conservation. Though this kind of learning environment has yet to hit the mainstream, children’s museums aren’t a new concept. The first children’s

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museum was founded in 1899 in Brooklyn, New York, and hundreds of others have opened throughout the U.S. mainland in the years since. “Children’s museums have been around for more than 100 years,” Yajima confirms. “But people today still don’t know what they are.” That’s especially true in Hawai‘i, where the Discovery Center stands as the first and only children’s museum in the state. The earliest iteration of the Hawaii Children’s Discovery Center was originally mobile, operating out of the Bishop Museum before Yajima helped open up shop in a 5,000-square-foot facility in the old pineapple cannery at Dole Cannery Square in 1989. “We were bursting at the seams,” Yajima says of the Discovery Center’s previous location. “We had thousands of children and school groups lining up to come to the museum.” The museum’s growing pains inspired then-Governor Waihee to offer up a bigger location on 30 acres of waterfront park that he was developing in Kaka‘ako. Yajima jumped at the chance to groom the property into a place of exploration and learning. She had her work cut out for her. Turns out, this choice piece of land was the site of the old city incinerator—not exactly a turn-key solution for the center’s team of volunteers. “The first time I walked into the building, I was stunned,” Yajima laughs. “I thought, ‘What have I done?’” But the waterfront location and potential for both indoor and outdoor programming was too good to pass up, so she went to work transforming the former industrial facility’s dim, cavernous rooms into miniature worlds where children are free to roam and interact with their environment. The smokestack jutting from the southeast corner of the facility was truncated and sealed prior to the center’s opening in 1998 and now serves as a visual landmark and symbol of the Kaka‘ako that predated the neighborhood’s recent resurgence. “Typically in museums, everything is behind glass,” Yajima says. “There are elaborate descriptions for everything, but kids can’t read! They learn by trial and error, by trying things and seeing what happens. We emphasize learning through the five senses, through interaction and collaboration. Here, we don’t test kids on what they’re learning or tell them what to learn. We let

them learn from each other.” Many elements in the exhibits were conceived from Yajima’s own experiences, including a replica of a wooden bridge she encountered while traveling in the Galápagos Islands. “Initially kids are afraid of it,” she says. “But when they cross it, they are so impressed with themselves and empowered.” According to Yajima, empowering children to take an active role in their own education is key to creating lifelong learners. Many of Hawai‘i’s keiki never get the chance to experience the world outside of the islands, but that doesn’t mean they can’t learn to be global citizens. The center’s Your Rainbow World exhibit exposes children to the rainbow of cultures that exist beyond Hawai‘i by bringing those worlds to them. Rather than focusing all of our efforts on attracting the leaders of tomorrow, Yajima believes more resources should be devoted to cultivating the future leaders already in Hawai‘i. “There’s all this focus on how to bring in outside talent to Hawai‘i,” she says. “That talent is already here.” An outspoken proponent of informal learning in early education, Yajima was approached by Mr. Niu Gensheng, one of China’s wealthiest entrepreneurs-turned-philanthropists. He knew Yajima would be an ideal partner in his initiative to bring more creative, informal education experiences to children in China. “He told me that what he sees in the United States is that children here use their creativity and their imagination, and that’s what he wanted to bring back,” Yajima says. “He said, ‘I’d like to build 100 children’s museums in 100 cities in China—will you help me?’ I thought he was joking.” It’s been six years now, and since then Yajima has been involved in building China’s first children’s museum, the Lao Niu Children’s Discovery Museum, in Beijing. A second children’s museum is slated to open later this year in Hohhat, Inner Mongolia. Though she is still committed to her work rallying for

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Loretta Yajima, CEO and chair of the board of the Hawaii Children’s Discovery Center, poses with her daughter Liane Usher, left. Usher returned to Hawai‘i to serve as the center’s director of exhibits and programs after earning a master’s degree in education from Harvard University and was appointed president of the Hawaii Children’s Discovery Center in 2013. the cause at home in Hawai‘i, Yajima is jetting back to China this summer to continue spreading the word about children’s museums and the value of learning through play. With 98 museums to go, she knows she doesn’t have a second to waste.

WHAT EXACTLY IS A CHILDREN’S MUSEUM AND WHAT PURPOSE DOES IT SERVE IN EARLY EDUCATION? What distinguishes a children’s museum from a school is that we really believe in the power of play. Many of us think of play as something frivolous, but play is the primary way that children learn about themselves, others and the world. We have technical terms to describe this process in a scientific setting—hypotheses, experimentation, analysis—but the bottom line is that they’re messing around and using their senses. They’re making discoveries by manipulating things in the world around them. Testing and academic measurement play a big role in our school system, but in actuality, children are learning every day all day. From taking nature walks to watching a butterfly come out of its chrysalis, learning takes place all of the time. That’s what’s so exciting about children’s museums. Here, children learn through play. Another thing that distinguishes us from a traditional school is the interaction between parent and child. Parents are their children’s first teachers and their most important teachers. Children are very excited about learning and exploring—our challenge is to get the parents in there because when that happens, and parents and children connect and learn and discover and grow together, it’s really inspiring.

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WOULD YOU SAY THAT CREATIVITY IS ESSENTIAL TO GROWING EARLY INNOVATORS? Whether it’s in a school or a children’s museum, I think educators are recognizing the importance of teaching children to be creative thinkers. Learning is about a lot more than rote memorization, and that’s why a lot of what we use in a children’s museum is also being used in the classroom. Children learn math and science by building things. Handson experience is so important in the learning process because it not only fosters creativity and imagination, but it allows children to problem solve in the context of real-world scenarios.

WHAT DID YOU DO PRIOR TO OPENING THE DISCOVERY CENTER? There were many people responsible for creating the children’s museum now known as the Hawaii Children’s Discovery Center. I was fortunate to be one of many who have been volunteering here. All my life, I’ve been an educator. I started teaching in Kuhio ParkTterrace for project Head Start, and that’s when I realized the vital importance of early education, starting with the tiniest children. Getting them excited about learning, and lifelong learning in particular, makes such a difference in their lives. After teaching at Head Start, I was asked to go and teach and the University of Hawai‘i Lab School, where we developed curriculum materials, and then I became the director at Hanaha‘oli School. It was there that a group of volunteers came and asked me to help them start a children’s museum. That was almost 30 years ago, so all this has been tied into education, which has really been my life’s work.

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


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Expert Edge Experts answers from leading professionals WILL RELOCATION OF THE OAKLAND RAIDERS FOOTBALL TEAM TO LAS VEGAS IMPACT REAL ESTATE ON THE NINTH ISLAND? As the owner/operator of a Las Vegas real estate company, I can firmly attest that this relocation has already played a major role in stimulating local real estate across the board. Since the initial announcement, there has been a frenzy of people acquiring real estate near the new stadium in Las Vegas as well as the practice field in Henderson. The luxury market has been on fire and most family-friendly homes with functional floor plans are selling overnight. Custom builders and developers have increased their pricing and are holding firm. They are willing to wait on the market until they get the prices they want. I have also witnessed an increase in luxury home sales to players and executives over the past year. It has been and continues to be an exciting time for sports and real estate in Las Vegas.

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Oral health is part of being well, and it’s the foundation for a healthy and active lifestyle. When our mouths, gums or teeth aren’t healthy, our bodies may not get proper nutrition and may be more susceptible to serious disease. About 40 percent of American adults experience some form of moderate to severe periodontal (gum) disease. Gum disease is caused by bacteria that form plaque on your teeth; left untreated, this bacteria can severely infect the gums and lead to tooth loss. Researchers have associated gum disease with many different health problems, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke. In order to prevent gum disease, there is no replacement for brushing your teeth for two minutes twice daily, flossing once a day, refraining from or quitting smoking and seeing your dentist regularly for annual cleanings and exams. For more information on how to keep your smile and body healthy, visit HawaiiDentalService.com.

Fully engaged employees are priceless. They bring an organization’s mission and vision to life. Your organization may need to be overhauled or recharged, and your employees are key to turning that vision into reality. A strategic plan may look and sound good, but it remains only an aspiration unless that plan can be successfully implemented. Creating a culture in which employees have a strong sense of ownership is key. Employees are willing to give their all when they feel their contributions are valued and are making a difference. This empowering environment inspires employees to be more flexible and more dedicated. They will work hard to see things through completion and own their respective areas. Ownership also means owning up to shortcomings. When everyone on a team recognizes we’re all learning and growing professionally, including the CEO, employees are more apt to freely share their lessons learned and explore potential solutions.

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THE WOMEN ISSUE

ELISIA FLORES Vice President & CFO L&L HAWAIIAN BARBECUE

WOMEN AT WORK From issues of gender

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diversity and workplace conduct to the infamous wage gap, there’s a lot to talk about when it comes the individuals now making up half of today’s work force. In the following pages, we speak to 10 executives at the top of their game about lessons learned, effective leadership and all the

“Often times you can get what you ask for, you just need to have the confidence to ask.”

things going right for women in business.

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hen did you decide to join the family business? What were your career plans prior to making that decision?

I really didn’t decide to rejoin the family business until I was getting my executive M.B.A. Prior to that I was working for General Electric doing corporate finance. I really enjoyed being at a large corporation, as I got exposure to different business units as well as traveled and worked in different parts of the country. While I was getting my M.B.A. I realized that I wanted to be at a company where I could use all the business skills I was learning, not just finance. I also wanted a job that I could be more passionate about. It was around that time that I realized coming home to work for L&L was the job that could provide that for me, and where I could make my greatest contribution.

How does your management style differ from that of your father’s? How is it similar?

My dad is, in my opinion, the epitome of an entrepreneur. I come from a very traditional business background—business undergrad, M.B.A., working for a large corporation—so there are a lot of times when we analyze and approach things in different ways. But I think because we have different viewpoints, it helps us come up with the best solution or idea in the end.

What is your company ethos and how do you ensure it’s maintained?

I think the L&L story is such a great one, and I’m so glad to be home and a part of it. Almost all of our 200 stores are franchised, with many of them being run by immigrants and families. It is so amazing to see the hard work and passion of our franchisees. It’s like being able to see the American Dream come to life every day. We have folks with us who came to the United States with nothing, not even the ability to speak English. Now they are business owners able to take care of their family and serve the community.

Is there a quote you live by, either personally or professionally? If so, what is it?

My parents always instilled in me that “if you don’t ask, you don’t get.” I have taken this mantra to heart in all aspects of my life and have found it to be generally true. You can find me asking for a discount when buying almost anything, as well as asking for a big raise when I think I deserve one. Often times you can get what you ask for, you just need to have the confidence to ask.

Do you feel that women have equality in the workplace? What could more women be doing to advance their careers?

I don’t feel that women have equality in the workplace. Every statistic about women in the workplace will tell you that inequality exists on almost all fronts. I do think it is getting better and will continue to get better. I believe that to continue to move the needle, we all need to keep pushing for change. It’s not going to happen by itself. It will require speaking up for ourselves and others when we see inequality and finding mentors and leaders who will advocate for us.

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PATR I C I A C A MERO Executive Director GOOD SAMARITAN SOCIETY POHAI NANI

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hat does it take to be an effective leader?

In this business—which is 100 percent about people—you have to love working with people and caring about them. It’s important to possess a passion for what you do, what you believe in and what’s important to you. Maintain a vision for the future while building and establishing that firm and lasting legacy today. Create a foundation with every decision, every interaction and conversation, bolstered by sound business practices. Surround yourself with good people—people with high integrity who are fully invested in you or in this work.

What’s the most valuable lesson you’ve learned over the course of your career?

To do everything I can to help those around me be successful, but recognize that I bear the responsibility if they fail.

The most difficult lesson?

Failure doesn’t have to be fatal. Turn those wounds into wisdom because, sooner or later, you will need it!

Describe yourself in three words.

According to my leadership team, I’m authentic, trustworthy and inspirational.

Is there a quote you live by, either personally or professionally? If so, what is it?

I have many, but I’ll share a quote from one of my favorite poets, Maya Angelou: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” I have also shared this one with many friends and coworkers: “When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.”

Do you think women lead differently than men?

“Turn your wounds into wisdom because, sooner or later, you will need it.”

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Perhaps I speak in reference only to the health care industry, but I believe we have evolved to a place in business where the lines have blurred between how men and women lead. Great leadership goes beyond gender. It lies in the heart of what makes that person, in that position, effective and successful: respect for those you lead, vision, communication, hard work, understanding what and who are important, being the first to listen, last to speak and first to act—then empowering and inspiring others to do the work! I am grateful for the amazing mentors on my journey, but I can look back and appreciate all the poor examples of leadership I have had as well, as it has helped define who I desire to be—and not be—as a leader.

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


W

hat strengths or vision do you bring to the table at Hawai‘i Gas?

As the state’s energy demands evolve, so must we. The energy marketplace is changing quickly, and we must move faster than we ever have before to meet the state’s and our customers’ energy needs. In my capacity as president and CEO, I am moving Hawai‘i Gas forward to become a leader in clean and renewable energy initiatives. We are excited to launch our first renewable natural gas (RNG) project later this year, where we will be capturing and processing the gas waste stream from the Honouliuli Wastewater Treatment Plant and blending it within our existing synthetic natural gas pipeline. Once the project is fully implemented, we expect to reduce the equivalent of 12,000 barrels per year of imported oil to the state. In order to get to scale with RNG, we are also investing in early-stage projects to test various energy crops for biogas. Beyond our core business, we launched a solar farm on O‘ahu in 2016 to support the state’s renewable energy vision, and we continue to explore new opportunities. I am grateful to lead the company during this dynamic time of change, and I am proud of the more than 300 dedicated engineers and energy professionals who are helping us build the future together.

What does it take to be an effective leader?

There are many traits that make an effective leader, but I have found that being able to articulate a clear vision in an authentic way, and being able to explain to stakeholders why it is important, is key. People whom you serve need to know why you care and why they should care.

Describe yourself in three words. Optimistic, resilient, driven.

Do you think women lead differently than men?

All leaders have different ways of leading, and leadership style also depends upon the culture of the

company and where it is in its lifecycle. I don’t believe that it’s fair to stereotype male vs. female leaders, especially during a time when leadership is being redefined. However, I do believe that there are characteristics of good leaders that are common in both men and women, and that’s where we should focus our attention Over the years, I have found that the foundation of good leadership is authenticity, and getting to this point often takes time and effort as well as deep reflection to truly know oneself. I wholeheartedly believe in Sheryl Sandberg’s prediction: “In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders.” I believe our world will be a better place for it.

AL I C I A M OY President & CEO HAWAI‘I GAS

“The foundation of good leadership is authenticity.”

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JASMIN RO DRIG UEZ Director of Marketing ADVENTIST HEALTH CASTLE

“Know who to trust, seek out mentors, be a mentor and celebrate your every achievement.”

W

hat role have you played during your company’s transition from Castle Medical Center to Adventist Health Castle?

My role has been to position and monitor our brand in the market by taking brand ownership and providing the vision, mission, goals and strategies for this transition. I also oversee our marketing and advertising activities to ensure consistency with our strategy.

What’s the most valuable lesson you’ve learned over the course of your career? There’s been many, but the most valuable to me is praise in public and correct in private.

Describe yourself in three words. Tenacious, innovative and competitive.

Is there a quote you live by, either personally or professionally? If so, what is it? You do you.

What is your favorite quality in a colleague or employee? Integrity and creativity.

Least-favorite?

Stagnant individuals.

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Do you think women lead differently than men?

Yes, I do. Women and men exhibit different behaviors in the work place, both fundamentally and biologically. In my personal and professional opinion, women do not need to lead with anything other than their strengths. In other words, behave and lead like a woman, not a man. I find it an asset to have women in senior-level positions, as they bring a diverse way of thinking and a different management style and approach to solving problems. A strong organization includes and values both a male and female perspective.

Do you feel that women have equality in the workplace?

I believe, for the most part, that women have achieved equality in the workplace. There aren’t too many jobs left that a woman can’t do or is perceived to be unable to do. Some may still think it, perhaps, but the reality is that women are more than capable. I’ve always said that if your place of work doesn’t allow you to contribute in a way that gives you credit, you need to leave and go where you will be evaluated on your skill set, not your gender.

What could more women be doing to advance their careers?

Make sure your passion aligns with your skill set. Be outspoken and don’t [be pressured to] act like a man. Finally, know who to trust, seek out mentors, be a mentor and celebrate your every achievement.  

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W

hat strengths do you bring to the table in your capacity as senior VP and director of business banking at Central Pacific Bank?

I bring a balance of analytical and people skills. I enjoy analyzing a financial statement as much as I enjoy talking story with a business owner about what inspired them to start their business. I also bring a passion for supporting small business in Hawai‘i. I have many years of experience working with small and mid-size businesses, which I thoroughly enjoy because I get to help people achieve their dreams. Having walked in the shoes of the business bankers I work with, I can empathize as well as hold them accountable. Central Pacific Bank gave me the opportunity to reestablish business banking as a standalone division, so as a new leader I was able to build and coach a team comprised of people who have become proficient in targeted industries and deliver great customer experiences.

What does it take to be an effective leader?

I believe it takes the ability to communicate well, collaborate well and execute well. It takes seeing the big picture and long-term view so that your decisions and actions will be effective and sustainable. Care about the people you lead, the people you work with and the people you serve. It’s not about you.

What is your company ethos and how do you ensure it’s maintained?

Central Pacific Bank’s core values are teamwork, integrity and exceptional service. We strive to live this every day, starting at the top and aligned throughout the organization. Our core values are part of our expectations, performance measurements and how we are recognized and rewarded. CPB supports teamwork by providing a team-building fund for us to have fun together outside of work with our group and with other departments. We have a strong history and culture of supporting our community. Besides the many community events that we sponsor, CPB supports individual

service to community and nonprofit organizations, including offering paid time off to do community work. I am fortunate that CPB supports my service on the boards of Hale Kipa, the Patsy T. Mink Center for Business and Leadership and Ho‘ōla Nā Pua. I love the history of CPB’s founding by World War II veterans who started the bank to help others own their own home and grow their businesses, which we continue to do today. CPB is the top Small Business Administration loan lender in Hawai‘i.

What’s the most difficult lesson you’ve learned over the course of your career?

I’ve learned the valuable lesson of perseverance. Things will not always go well, sometimes reaching a point of crisis, but as long as the essence of what you’ve committed to is good, don’t give up on it. Challenging times provide the best and lasting lessons. You learn a lot about yourself and others by how you respond to hardship. The outcome will be blessings that you otherwise would have missed out on. And sometimes you get to see a miracle happen.

SU SA N U TSUG I Senior Vice President & Director of Business Banking CENTRAL PACIFIC BANK

“Challenging times provide the best and lasting lessons.”

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T E R I O RTO N General Manager HAWAI‘I CONVENTION CENTER

H

ow does your hospitality background inform your leadership at the Hawai‘i Convention Center?

I think my strength is that I’ve never managed a convention center before. I came from the hotel industry, so I come with strong service values and a fresh set of eyes. I tend to look at things from a different perspective. I am always looking at ways to evolve our business model to generate more offshore visitors and improve the service they receive once here.

What are some programs and initiatives you’ve spearheaded or a key accomplishment you’ve had either at the Convention Center or in a previous position?

One of the largest initiatives I spearheaded was the vision to use our venue to host offshore sporting events, like volleyball, basketball and futsal tournaments. I put a business plan together with two years of research and was given approval by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority to purchase $1.1 million in sporting equipment. This move put us on the map! I traveled for those two years soliciting sports directors to hold their tournaments at the Hawai‘i Convention Center. We now host five to seven different sporting events here annually and have paid off our initial investment a few times over. Not to mention we are helping stimulate our economy by bringing in visitors from the mainland, neighbor islands and internationally.

What does it take to be an effective leader?

Vision, communication, collaboration and, most importantly, evolution. It takes a village to make things happen and to make them happen with everyone’s buy-in. Our team here all shares the same vision for where we see our business and services evolving in the next five to 10 years. We all work together to ensure that we are constantly evolving and keeping relevant in our market. Our industry, product and customer evolve every day, and so should we.

What’s the most valuable lesson you’ve learned over the course of your career?

The most valuable lesson I’ve learned is to stick to your values and stay true to who you are, morally and ethically. I’ve never compromised that to get something or somewhere. I believe in always doing what’s right and treating others with the utmost respect. Live aloha!

Describe yourself in three words. Generous, kind, humble.

What is your favorite quality in a colleague or employee? Trustworthiness.

Least-favorite quality? Penchant for gossip.

“Our industry, product and customer evolve every day, and so should we.”

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THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


grow in a slower, more patient way. Gerri was very much a visionary and had much more urgency, which was needed in the early stages. We are similar in many ways, but I had the benefit of watching and learning from her mistakes and hopefully using that knowledge to guide my management style. Gerri had to do it pretty much on her own, without a role model. L: I think our vision is very similar because she instilled her morals in us. Taking care of our people is paramount, which means always fixing whatever mistakes we make and being honest with our customers, employees and business partners. Wendy and I are just a bit more laid back in our approach to people than Gerri was.                                                               

What’s the most valuable lesson you’ve learned over the course of your career?

W: That this too shall pass. I really try to remain calm in every situation and know that no matter how stressful something is, I probably won’t remember it in a year, so it isn’t worth getting worked up over. The most difficult lesson was learning how to treat people—that they are more important in the end than anything else. When I get too focused on the business part of it—the “results”—I can lose sight of the people. I work really hard to temper that.

Do you think women lead differently than men?

L E A N N E H ACHEY, WE N DY S H E WALTER Principals OFFICE PAVILION HAWAII

Y

our mother, Gerri Hayes, built Office Pavilion into the third-largest women-owned business in the state. What do you feel was her greatest asset to the company before you took over as owners in 2016?

L: Intelligence, tenacity and fairness. Our mom is one of the most intelligent people I know, and she is extremely fair in making sure people get what they earn. I think being a woman in business made her want to champion women because she saw how they were paid less and taken advantage of in other companies. It doesn’t mean she was easy to work for, but if you worked hard for her, she was very loyal to you. W: She was fearless in going after different types of business and exploring new territories. This and the great people we have in the company are what allowed us to grow into what we are today.

What strengths or vision do you bring to the table in your capacity as principals of the company and how are they similar or different from your mother’s? W: You really have to care about your employees, your customers and your community. My strength is in building relationships inside and outside the company and really working to nurture and grow the employees. I think I am able to maintain growth and encourage people within the company to

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W: I think women tend to question their abilities in leadership, and this holds them back. I also notice that many feel they have to change their leadership style to succeed. Overall I think women tend to be more nurturing, more empathetic to family commitments and more willing to slow down and listen. But I think everyone is changing their leadership style to adapt to the changing workplace.

Is there a quote you live by?

L: It will be all right in the end. If it’s not all right, it’s not the end.

“I think everyone is changing their leadership style to adapt to the changing workplace.” —Wendy Shewalter, CEO and Principal of Office Pavilion Hawaii

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S U SA N B A L L A RD Chief of Police HONOLULU POLICE DEPARTMENT

W

hat strengths or vision do you bring to the table in your capacity as police chief, and how are they similar or different from prior leadership?

Having worked at HPD for 32 years in a wide range of assignments, I have a strong knowledge and understanding of how the department’s different divisions and units can work together to best serve the community. I have worked with or interacted with most of the officers in the department at some point in my career, so they are familiar with my leadership style. I’m willing to listen and am open to suggestions and recommendations.  My vision for the department is similar to prior administrations in that we all want to make our communities a safe environment to raise our families and live our lives.  

What are some of the greatest challenges you’ve encountered in this position?

The biggest challenge is the public’s trust and perception of the HPD. What allegedly occurred during the prior administration does not reflect the values or views of our officers or the department. The allegations damaged the department and its reputation, and we now have the task of rebuilding a police department that the community and our officers can be proud of. Another challenge is recruiting and hiring qualified individuals. HPD, like other police departments, has a large number of officer vacancies. We recently transitioned to continuous or year-round recruiting to make it easier and quicker for people to apply online. In the past, people could only apply during certain periods. We hope that the new process will cut the application time in half, from one year to six months. Hiring more officers means more officers on the road to respond to calls from the public.   

What does it take to be an effective leader?

To be an effective chief, you should have a deep passion for this job and a genuine and real interest in making the department and the community better. You should devote equal amounts of energy to building external partnerships and community relations as you do with internal operations and employee relations. You also need to have a sense of humor, not take things personally and be self-aware. Everything you do or say is a reflection on the department, whether you’re on or off duty.  

Do you think women lead differently than men? Should we be calling attention to or downplaying these differences?

I don’t think that leadership skills are genderbased. When people make comments about a woman having strong leadership skills, it makes it seem unusual or rare, when it really isn’t. Every leader has her or his own way of working with people. Leaders who are inclusive and pull people together will be more successful than those who are autocratic.  

“Leaders who are inclusive and pull people together will be more successful than those who are autocratic.”

How has the law enforcement world changed over the course of your career? What gamechanging dynamics in your industry have you had to adjust to or navigate?

Law enforcement has gone through big changes since I became an officer. One of the biggest is the use of technology. There were no computers when I came in, and now much of police work is computerized. We didn’t even have portable police radios. And definitely no cell phones or camera phones! The use of technology in every aspect of policing will continue to grow, and the department must keep up or risk falling behind. 

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D

o you feel that women have equality in the workplace? What more could women be doing to advance their careers?

No question women have made progress towards equality. Women make up over half of the workforce, and we’re earning more college and graduate degrees than men. We’re closing the gap in middle-management jobs, but men continue to command higher salaries and historically get promotions faster. Women will advance their careers by believing in themselves and having the confidence to ask for what they want and deserve. When we hesitate or don’t ask, we hold ourselves back.

What advice would you give to either your younger self or someone looking to get ahead in their career?

Women often believe they need to do everything with perfection. This attitude holds us back from taking risks and stepping up for promotions. The truth is, we learn the most when we take on challenges out of our comfort zone. Women underestimate their abilities more so than men. I also strongly urge people to get involved in the community through volunteering with an organization that is meaningful to their values. It’s an avenue to meet people from other professions and expand your network while helping others.

What’s the most valuable lesson you’ve learned over the course of your career?

BARB A R A C A M P BELL Vice President Retail Development and Leasing OUTRIGGER ENTERPRISES GROUP

Treat everyone with respect, no matter where they come from. Through my career, I have met people from all walks of life. The values instilled in my youth of humility, respect and compassion for the underprivileged has served me well through my career and in the community.

What are your favorite qualities in a colleague?

“We learn the most when we take on challenges out of our comfort zone.”

A positive, can-do attitude is a must. I’m really fortunate to be surrounded by an outstanding group of people at Outrigger. Accountability is important, and if a colleague agrees to a task, it’s expected it will be completed.

Words to live by:

Respect, compassion, gratitude.

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W

hat are some of the most pressing or overlooked environmental issues you hope to see addressed by future EEx portfolio companies?

To me, one of the most pressing issues is rethinking the way we move around our islands. More than 60 percent of our fossil fuel use goes toward transportation. Elemental Excelerator is looking to fund startups with new mobility solutions, particularly in heavy freight, shipping and aviation as well as mobility for rural communities, shared mobility, last-mile solutions, fleet management and autonomous vehicle technology. An issue that requires a different kind of thinking is the equitable distribution of technology and innovation. The problem isn’t that people don’t understand the overarching benefits of clean technologies such as local food and energy-efficient appliances. The real hang-up is that most of these products and services tend to be geared towards those in higher income brackets. We are actively looking for companies that increase access to technology and innovation within low- to moderateincome communities.

What would you like to see on a policy level to further Elemental Excelerator’s holistic systems approach to making the world a better place to live?

We are intently focused on unlocking barriers to innovation, and we’re looking at this from two vantage points—how can policy enable companies with new solutions to accelerate their impact and how can policy actually spur new ideas? Data is one area that could use improvement and where we are trying new things. Elemental Excelerator has co-hosted two hackathons in agriculture and transportation with the Hawaii Technology Development Corporation and Hawaii Open Data and funded companies in our portfolio that help farmers, utility operators, transit authorities and small business owners make better decisions with easily accessible and digestible data.

How are we doing as a community in terms of transitioning to renewable energy? What could the general public be doing better?

One thing I’ve learned since starting Elemental Excelerator and working with more than 60 entrepreneurs is that it’s okay to make mistakes as long as you’re learning from them. Our goal isn’t to get it right on our first try. Rather, it’s accelerating the learning process so that we can get to the optimal solution faster. Thomas Edison’s invention of the lightbulb is the perfect example of this. He said, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” I’d encourage all of us to not let the fear of failure deter you from trying something new. Let’s start small and work our way up. 

DAW N L I P P E RT CEO ELEMENTAL EXCELERATOR

“Don’t let the fear of failure deter you from trying something new.”

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Sanj Sappal

Area VP – Hawaii/Guam

Lee Donohue

Gene Stoudt

Director of Security

Business Development Manager

Ray Romero Consultant

Spike Denis Consultant

Serving Oahu, Big Island, Maui, Kauai, Lanai, Molokai and Guam

Hawaii’s Security Leader Exceptionally Trained, Exceptionally Accountable. As Hawaii’s leading security provider, Securitas USA offers security solutions for all of the Hawaiian Islands and Guam. We have security solutions for ALL of your needs. Mobile patrols, temporary services and the latest in high technology solutions. Hotels  Retail  Shopping Malls  Commercial High Rises  Gated Communities Hawaii Convention Center  Hawaii’s Airports For more information on how Securitas USA can exceed your security needs, call today!

Securitas Security Services USA, Inc. 888 N. Nimitz Highway, Suite 105 Honolulu, HI 96817 808-539-5000 www.securitasinc.com www.securitasjobs.com


LEADERSHIP | NEWS

Working for Hawai‘i KRISTINA LOCKWOOD President & General Manager KHON

by LAUREN MCNALLY photos DAVE MIYAMOTO

A

mbitious but not yet ready to be away from home, Kristina Lockwood changed course after her first year of college on the mainland and instead dove headfirst into the professional world back in Hawai‘i. Landing a job in sales at MidWeek at only 19, she compensated for her lack of experience with an unwavering work ethic, strong communication skills and confidence beyond her years. It was there she met the first of several mentors Lockwood credits for what is approaching a successful 30-year career in media. Lockwood’s transition from print to broadcast came two years later when she was recruited by the CBS affiliate KGMB. She spent the next five years learning the ins and out of broadcast television before mining that knowledge at KITV, where she made the jump from account executive into her first leadership role as the station’s national sales manager. From there Lockwood continued her steady climb up the corporate ladder, first as national sales manager for KGMB and KHON when they were under common ownership, and then as general sales manager for KGMB after the two stations split. She joined Cox Media in San Diego for a number of years as its local sales manager and was promoted to director of sales, sinking her teeth into the California market before returning to Hawai‘i to assume her current role as president and general manager of KHON. “Having worked my way up in this industry, I’ve been

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KHON KRISTINA.LOCKWOOD@KHON2.COM

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


in the shoes of many of our employees here, so I understand the challenges they face,” Lockwood says. “And thanks to my time at Cox Media, I’ve also had a lot of training and development around building a great culture and creating a great work environment for employees, and that’s what I’ve tried to bring to KHON.” She now leads the station’s 96 employees in navigating the rapidly evolving world of news media. “The media landscape has changed dramatically in the five years I’ve been back,” Lockwood says. “People aren’t waiting to watch the news when they get home at 6 o’clock to find out what happened that day. They already know by the time they walk in the door—but they do want to hear an update or a solution.” With the rise of social media and the 24-hour news cycle, the public is hungry for information all day every day, and media providers are finding new ways to engage and inform viewers around the clock, from the moment they wake up to the time they set their phones aside and drift off to sleep at night. It’s a new dynamic confronting nearly all businesses in the digital age, and one that Lockwood is facing head on. The company has made several additions to its digital team, and the entire newsroom is involved in growing KHON’s online presence. “We consider KHON2 a fullservice media company because of all of the different products and services we offer,” she says. Lockwood has also been involved in expanding the station’s lineup of local programming over the past few years, adding an additional evening newscast, KHON2 News at 9, and launching the lifestyle show Living808 and the cooking program Sam Choy’s in the Kitchen. This past year, KHON debuted Take 2, a follow-up to the morning newscast Wake Up 2day, to provide viewers with

more in-depth coverage of stories covered during the main show. Whether growing KHON’s audiences on air or online, the goal is the same—working for Hawai‘i. “We have a different approach than other stations in the market,” Lockwood says. “When we choose what stories to tell, we’re also thinking about what that story means to the viewer at home. If it’s a problem, how do we find a solution? Who can fix it? What can we learn from it?” Working for Hawai‘i also includes working for each other, Lockwood says, and for her that means creating an environment ripe for creativity, collaboration and enterprise thinking. “At one time, there were a lot of walls between the different departments,” she says. “We’ve been looking to break down those barriers and really come together to accomplish mutually beneficial goals.” Though she’s quick to praise the work of KHON’s newest team members, Lockwood stresses the importance of employee retention in the evolution of a business. “Long-term employees are the heart of a company,” Lockwood says. “There are some incredibly talented people who have been added to KHON who are bringing new ideas and fresh approaches to what we do, but there’s something to be said for those who have been here and who believe in our mission and vision and want to continue to evolve with us.” The people skills that got Lockwood her first job in media are still instrumental in her work today. “I believe you are the sum of the five people you spend the most time with,” Lockwood says. “I really try to align myself with the right people, both in and out of my professional career—people who want to learn, who are open to new ideas and feedback. If you can find the right people to be a part of that, that’s the type of teamwork that helps an organization grow.”

“People aren’t waiting to watch the news when they get home at 6 o’clock to find out what happened that day. They already know by the time they walk in the door.” PACIFIC EDGE

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LEADERSHIP | FLY

“It’s about developing an amazing community. You surround yourself with tremendous souls who compliment each other with their unique skill sets, background and culture.”

HAWAIIAN AIRLINES JILL.TOKUNAGA@HAWAIIANAIR.COM

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High on Life JILL TOKUNAGA Senior Director of U.S. Sales & Community Relations HAWAIIAN AIRLINES

by NATALIE SCHACK photo DAVE MIYAMOTO

I

t’s early morning on a workday, and commuters still throng the roads in Honolulu’s bustling industrial airport district. Blue collar and corporate workers alike scuttle between warehouses, trying to get out of the pouring rain. It’s all thriving, capitalistic energy, the beating heart of the island’s economy, with all its unstoppable arteries. Step into Hawaiian Airlines headquarters, a massive building on a side street off Nimitz Highway, however, and all is calm and quiet. That is, until Jill Tokunaga bounds into the waiting room, a ball of energy and enthusiasm. Hawaiian Airlines’ passionate senior director of U.S. sales and community relations is in disbelief at what the her team has managed to do, both at home and abroad, for their employees and guests. The company’s success, she says, comes down to one thing: people. “It’s about developing an amazing community,” Tokunaga says. “You surround yourself with tremendous souls who compliment each other with their unique skill sets, background and culture.” Tokunaga works with the better part of 1,000 employees at Hawaiian Airlines headquarters, which the rapidly expanding company—last year alone they hired almost 1,000 employees worldwide—is quickly starting to outgrow. There, she works with folks from all backgrounds, from French to Japanese to locals like herself, who grew up in small-town Hilo. “You can’t get more homegrown than that,” she says with a laugh. Tokunaga’s team is the muscle in the machine that works to sell business accounts, fill the planes and get the company’s vendors and industry partners to sell Hawaiian. It’s a massive team effort that speaks to the efforts of all its diverse workers. “I’m just quarterbacking,” Tokunaga says. “Everyone has a role.” A huge part of that role is understanding people and culture, she explains. “If you don’t temporarily put yourself in the shoes of your passengers, you don’t know what they want or why they choose Hawaiian over everyone else,” Tokunaga says. “You got to know your product. You’ve got to know where your destinations are. Understand it, live it, feel it.” Employees are encouraged to travel the routes and visit the destinations, blurring the line between work and play. Tokunaga’s people-centric philosophy doesn’t only work on an outbound basis. Bringing people to the islands is a major part of the business, and one of her favorite projects involves collaborating with the Department of Education

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and Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism to share our unique island culture with the world. They’ve already partnered with groups in Beijing, sending local students to China and bringing Chinese students to Hawai‘i. “Edu-tourism—bringing students to Hawai‘i from the outside in,” Tokunaga says. “Hawai‘i is super diverse in culture. It’s amazing how much we can teach each other.” Again, Tokunaga goes back to people: bringing together the Hawai‘i community, our international neighbors, even the company’s own ‘ohana of workers. “You can see the tenure in this organization, people who have been here for over 50 years,” Tokunaga says. “But we all have one thing in common, and that is we believe in the organization and product. We all feel a sense of responsibility and obligation.” That means doing everything to contribute to its success: working hard but also playing hard, doing meaningful work for the community, maintaining a company culture that respects personal time and vacations, and giving your crew the space to nurture their other team—their family. “I get it,” she says. “I have two daughters: 11 and 15 going on 25. Things happen. That level of empathy runs pretty strong in the organization.” Whatever team Tokunaga is quarterbacking for at the moment, the possibilities are endless when you have top-notch people coming together in a group effort and with enthusiasm like hers. “I can honestly say I love my job,” she declares. “I love being here and working with the people I work with.”

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LEADERSHIP | HEAL

Leading the Cause JESSICA MUNOZ MSN, APRN-RX, FNP-BC

Co-founder & President HO‘ŌLA NĀ PUA

by CHRISTINA O’CONNOR photo DAVE MIYAMOTO

T

here have been many times over the last 10 years that Jessica Munoz has gotten off work at 2 a.m., only to get up again at 5 for another busy day. It was the only way that Munoz could juggle her two demanding roles as a nurse practitioner at Pali Momi Medical Center and as president of anti-sex trafficking nonprofit Ho‘o-la Na- Pua. “There were times when I would have meetings all day around our advocacy work, and then work in the evening at the hospital,” Munoz explains. “Those would be 20-hour days that were on a regular basis.” Over the years, Munoz has helped formulate an innovative triage system utilizing advanced practice providers at Pali Momi Medical Center, and Ho‘ola Na- Pua is growing every day. To achieve these successes, Munoz has had to navigate unfamiliar territory, maintain leadership positions in two different jobs and do it all at a pace that even she admits was crazy. But what’s kept her going is a desire to help those in need—her patients as well as the victims and families that Ho‘o-la Na- Pua serves. Long before she could really vocalize it, Munoz has wanted to help others and was drawn to medicine early on. “There is a picture of me when I was three years old with my doctor kit, and I was doctoring my Cabbage Patch dolls,” Munoz says with a laugh. While in graduate school at University of Hawai‘i at Ma-noa to become a nurse practitioner, Munoz was working on a capstone project on human trafficking and was shocked to learn the rate at which it happened to children—including children in the U.S., including Hawai‘i. “I couldn’t just walk away and pretend that it didn’t happen in our community,” she recalls. “It’s an abuse on human dignity. It’s a

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violation on you as an individual from a mental, spiritual, emotional, physical component.” Munoz realized that she was in a unique position to tackle the problem—a lot of her work as a nurse focused on pediatric trauma care and she had mentored high-risk youths—so she decided to begin educating people on the topic. Things started modestly, with Munoz and a friend discussing the issue in her living room; then they moved on to talking about it with others in the community, and eventually launched Ho‘o-la Na- Pua. “I have had to learn a lot—some of it through the school of hard knocks,” she says. “Have we done everything perfectly? No. Have we made a lot of mistakes? Absolutely. But we are not afraid to learn.” Today, Ho‘o-la Na- Pua (“new life for our children”) is comprised of a core team of about 15 staffers and volunteers—Munoz continues to work pro bono—along with an extended network of a couple hundred volunteers. There’s a mentorship program for high-risk youths and trafficked children, and a support group that works with families whose kids have been victimized. The organization also has a breadth of educational initiatives geared at engaging various stakeholders—social service providers, NGOs, law enforcement, educators—to ensure they can identify potential victims. Currently, Ho‘o-la Na- Pua is in the midst of a capital campaign for its largest undertaking yet— Pearl Haven, a residential treatment facility that will offer long-term, intensive care for adolescent female survivors to help them reintegrate into society. If such services had been available to Ho‘o-la NaPua fund development coordinator Tammy Bitanga when she was a teenager, it would have changed

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


“I couldn’t just walk away and pretend that it didn’t happen in our community.”

HO‘OLA NA PUA JESSICA.MUNOZ@HOOLANAPUA.ORG

PACIFICEDGEMAGAZINE.COM

her life. After being a victim of commercial exploitation when she was just 15, Bitanga struggled with depression and substance abuse for years. “That is why I feel it is so important to have wraparound services, to have a place for girls to heal,” Bitanga says. “If I had been given that opportunity, then I think I would have been able to get my life on track a lot sooner.” Bitanga credits the success they’ve had to Munoz’s ability to place survivors in the right type of programming for their needs. “She’s a great visionary,” Bitanga says. “She sees the big picture.” As she worked to establish Ho‘o-la Na- Pua, Munoz also was an advanced practice provider leader at US Acute Care Solutions, which runs emergency services at Pali Momi Medical Center. There, Munoz helped develop a team triage system facilitating the flow of patients. Although she recently stepped down from the leadership position in an official capacity, the system she created is still in place. “Instead of having wait times of two to three hours, we were getting patients seen in 30 minutes to an hour during high-volume times,” Munoz says. While her two roles are very different, Munoz sees crucial similarities between them. “They require a lot of compassion, humility and listening to people,” she says. “And, I think, empowering people, whether it’s to take control of their health or to empower the kids we serve to be who they were created to be.” Empowering others is a hallmark of Munoz’s leadership style. “She’s not the type of leader who’s going to stand over you and tell you how to do your job,” Bitanga says. Longtime volunteer Kaleo Schneider says that, over the years, Ho‘o-la Na- Pua has become “like a little machine,” with a strong team that’s extremely dedicated to the cause. And she credits Munoz with setting the tone for its cohesive, hard-working environment. Cultivating a solid team has not only helped Munoz juggle all of her responsibilities, it’s crucial to the long-term sustainability of Ho‘o-la Na- Pua. After all, Munoz says, none of this is about her; it’s about the girls and women she’s helping. “Our biggest impact is that we are reducing stigma around this issue,” she says. “We worked really hard at the beginning to get the conversation in the community going, and now the conversation is out there. There is press around the issue of trafficking and what it looks like in our state, and the number of kids who are being identified is increasing. I want to make sure that our work and mission and vision become sustainable and succeed beyond me.”

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LEADERSHIP | DESIGN

Spirit of Collaboration LISA RAPP Principal AHL

by LINDSEY KESEL photo DAVE MIYAMOTO

G

rowing up in Hawai‘i, Lisa Rapp always thought she’d be a doctor one day. But when it came time to jump into career-focused studies at the University of Hawai‘i, the medical prerequisites just didn’t pique her interest. Disciplines that encouraged creative thinking, like art and philosophy, were more her speed. She had always been good with numbers and sought a path that would let her combine the definitive nature of math with the power of imagination. A summer internship at an architecture firm confirmed her suspicions—the rush of intense deadlines, the reward of contributing to a team effort and the satisfaction of building something from scratch was undeniably gratifying. Rapp transferred to MIT for the final two years of her bachelor’s degree, then headed to UCLA to complete a master’s degree in architecture, planning and design. Her first pick out in the field was a small Hawai‘i firm, Roy K. Yamamoto Architect, where she was able to learn on the fly in a wide range of roles. In the late 1990s, she relocated to San Francisco and had a lot of fun working on massive builds in the hospitality sector with Hornberger + Worstell—projects like the Shanghai Urban Business Hotel in

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“When you’re pulling people from different backgrounds together to share what they’ve learned, the results are incredible.”

China and the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge Resort & Spa in Arizona, a one-million-square-foot build that she guided from concept to completion. In 2004, Rapp returned to the islands as a project architect for AHL (formerly known as Architects Hawaii Ltd)—an 80-plus team of designers with broad expertise, diverse projects and impressive large-scale capabilities—and in 2010, she became the second female principal in the firm’s history. Today she oversees multiple projects at a time, assembling design teams, exchanging ideas with project managers and architects and researching the history and culture of properties to inform each building’s design. “We attract so much diverse talent, and having that mix of perspectives and experiences in one firm is so advantageous,” Rapp says. “When you’re pulling people from different backgrounds together to share what they’ve learned, the results are incredible.” Known as the one to call if there’s an issue that demands a team strategy, she’s an expert at finding the right designers and facilitating collaborative problem solving. “The best ideas come when you are open and brainstorming,”

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


AHL LRAPP@AHL.DESIGN

she says. “I encourage everyone to contribute, which leads to better solutions—and that dynamic is much more exciting and fun.” Her mantra of “never assume” works well when bringing together professionals with unique strengths. “Always approach a new project from the same side of the table,” she says. “We’re all working toward the same goal of a successful project, and it works out so much better with this mindset.” With twin nine-year-old boys and a number of challenging builds in the pipeline, Rapp is always striving for a good worklife balance, including making community service a top priority. She’s on the Real Property Board for the nonprofit Child & Family Service, an organization dedicated to strengthening families and fostering the healthy development of children. Through fundraising and its 1 percent pro bono program, AHL continuously donates design services to nonprofit projects like the Aloha United Way headquarters renovation and the Ho’ōla Nā Pua residential treatment facility for victims of sex trafficking. Though architecture has traditionally been a male-dominated field, Rapp says she has felt at home in her career from the very beginning. “I’d be leading meetings or out in the field and it wouldn’t really dawn on me until later that I was the only woman there,” she says. “It was just all of us working together as a team.” Over the course of her 27 years as a professional, she’s noticed more women choosing architecture as a career path. “When I was in school, that wasn’t the case. I’m glad to be a part of that workforce shift and encouraging it.” Rapp is also very passionate about ensuring that her legacy projects—from concept to construction to interior design— respect traditional Hawaiian values, like sustainability and caring for the ‘aina. One of the pivotal moments of her career, Rapp says, was taking ‘Aulani, A Disney Resort & Spa from an idea on paper to a reality and working with the Walt Disney Imagineers to get every detail just right. “Telling the story respectfully and creating a design that honors our host culture was important, and Disney really strived to do just that,” she says. “I try to see every project through that lens and make sure we’re doing right by our local culture.”

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LEADERSHIP PLAY

Game On KENDRA MURRAY Senior Corporate Sales Manager DAVE & BUSTER’S

by NATALIE SCHACK photo DAVE MIYAMOTO

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I

t was July of 2001 and Kendra Murray was starting a new sales manager gig on a new island at a new dining and entertainment joint called Dave & Buster’s, opening in the new Ward Shopping Center. It was a lot of “new” for Murray, who was still fairly new herself to the restaurant business, having spent most of her career working in sales for the hotel industry. Furthermore, this new site, the brainchild of an arcadeowning entrepreneur and a restauranteur, was, well, different. In fact, there was—and still is, Murray believes—no place quite like it in the islands, a festive, unconventional mix between a game room, restaurant, bar and event space. Then, September 11 happened. “It was a little nerve wracking,” admits Murray, who was pregnant with her first daughter at the time and had taken the leap to an entirely

THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


“I’ve seen a lot of change since becoming a publicly traded company, but Dave & Buster’s still has that family feel.”

DAVE & BUSTER’S KENDRA_MURRAY@DAVEANDBUSTERS.COM

different island for the position. How would this bold new concept perform in a time of strife? As it turns out, well. “We broke every record in the company for highest sales,” Murray says. “It was quite a shock. We didn’t know quite what to expect. It’s been one of the top stores in the company ever since.” Seventeen years later, Murray is still helming the sales ship as corporate sales manager, leading her team of four to put on daily events—about 3,000 a year and sometimes 30 a day— from dinners and birthday parties to corporate events and charity fundraisers. As an employee of the Honolulu location since day one, she’s had a front-row seat to the company’s growth and change over the years, and her life has seen its fair share of change alongside it. Technology has, of course, been responsible for some of the transformation. The days of paper tickets are long gone, and there’s been a shift in emphasis to sports, with the addition of a new sports room and televisions broadcasting the latest games. And the company transitioned from being privately owned by its original owners, Dave Corriveau and James “Buster” Corley, to being corporatized. “It was neat to see it start from an entrepreneurial vision between two businessmen and

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grow into this billion-dollar company,” Murray says. “I’ve seen a lot of change since becoming a publicly traded company with a lot of different efficiencies put in the place. But Dave & Buster’s still has that family feel. That still is portrayed here.” It’s especially salient for Murray, whose own family has practically grown up at Dave & Buster’s. Now the mother of two teenage daughters, she remembers her girls spending school holidays camped out underneath her desk or spirited upstairs to the arcade by her coworkers and returning with bundles of giant teddy bears. “They are very flexible and family oriented,” Murray says of the company. “They give you all the tools to be remote if you need to. As long as you’re getting your job done, of course!” Murray has never missed a school field trip and makes it a point to attend as many of her daughter’s volleyball games as possible. The company’s family dynamic extends far beyond Murray’s own tribe. Not only does Dave & Buster’s participate heavily in charitable causes, including working with Make-A-Wish Foundation, the company has a slew of loyal customers who return time and again for fun, food and gatherings. Murray works with business groups, church congregations and countless others who have been coming to the restaurant since the beginning. International tours favor the sunset views from the rooftop bar and event space, while school groups often opt for a night in the arcade. Murray has hired employees who had their Project Grads at Dave & Buster’s and organized sweet sixteens for kids who had their first birthday party there. She remembers one instance in particular. “A guest who met his girlfriend at Dave & Buster’s wanted to propose to her here, so he asked if we could put the ring in these little glass shelving units we used to have to display all of the different prizes,” Murray recalls. The whole staff was in on the surprise, and when the bride-to-be got her tickets and headed over to collect her winnings, she was in for quite the prize. “There are stories that I think will forever be memories for a lot of people who have grown up here,” says Murray. She can certainly say the same for herself.

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SAVE THE DATE 38TH ANNUAL HAWAII INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL PRESENTED BY HALEKULANI

NOVEMBER 8–18, 2018


CORPORATE EVENTS & WEDDINGS

2018/2019

Memories in the Making


Q&A spotlight

Why choose Watanabe Floral for your wedding?

Monty Pereira Watanabe Floral, Inc

1607 Hart Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 96817 Phone: 808.832.9360 Email: weddings@watanabefloral.com

VOTED HAWAI‘I’S BEST FLORIST FOR 14 YEARS, WATANABE FLORAL HAS BEEN SERVING OUR GUESTS SINCE 1945. Our legacy is established on our commitment to exceptional service and exquisite floral creations that exceed the expectations of every single guest. Whether it’s a rose bouquet to express love or a sympathy arrangement to extend condolences, our mission is to help our guests express their feelings through beautiful and fresh flowers. Equipped with the largest showroom in the state, we are a haven for floral enthusiasts and our line of floral offerings is unparalleled. Come visit us and you will understand why we are Hawai‘i’s number-one choice for floral arrangements for 71 years!

www.watanabefloral.com

Watanabe Floral offers the best of both worlds—personalized service backed by a team of floral experts to bring your floral vision to life at your wedding. Our experienced wedding consultants spend time understanding each couple’s vision, advising them and making that vision a reality. The consultant works closely with our procurement specialists to ensure that the desired flowers are sourced from the best vendors around the world. Our relationships with the world’s leading floral farms and vendors enable us to provide the freshest—and sometimes, the most rare—flowers. We also have an awardwinning design team of 10, who bring decades of floral design experience, versatile skill sets and competence to create a myriad of floral designs to make each wedding beautiful and unique. For adventurous brides who are into DIY, we are also happy to provide guidance and support to help you with your wedding floral needs. We relish the opportunity to work with brides and make their special day all it can possibly be, so reach out to us for a complimentary, non-obligatory consultation to find out how we can serve you! Schedule your consultation online at www.watanabefloral.com or call 1-808832-9360.


Smith's Tropical Paradise Experience local-style aloha on Kaua‘i! Tour the 30-acre garden prior to the start of an evening of indulgence with ‘ono food and drink. Immerse yourself in culture after dinner at the "Rhythm of Aloha" lu‘au show. Book online for a discount Local Hawai‘i residents, please call for kama‘aina pricing.

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ABIGAIL LANGLAS Cake Works

2820 S. King St. Honolulu, HI 96826 Phone: 808.946.4333

Cake Works, a full-service local bakery, has been turning every bride’s dream wedding cake into reality for the past nine years. Owned by Chef Abigail Langlas, whose culinary background is in French pastry, Cake Works offers flavors like strawberriesand-cream chiffon, haupia coconut cream, passionfruit cream and more, with buttercream, fondant or whipped cream frosting. All cakes can be made gluten-free upon request. Thanks to its diverse styles and high-end custom cakes, Cake Works won first place this year in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser’s “Hawaii’s Best” awards. Come in and order a cake at the retail location on South King Street, or make an appointment for cake tastings and consultations with Chef Langlas.

cakeworkshi.com


Hyatt® and Grand Hyatt® names, designs and related marks are trademarks of Hyatt Corporation. ©2018 Hyatt Corporation. All rights reserved.

Kendra Murray Dave & Buster’s

1030 Auahi Street, Honolulu, HI Phone: 808.589.2215 Email: kendra_murray@daveandbusters.com DAVE & BUSTER’S IS THE ONLY PLACE IN HAWAII TO EAT, DRINK, PLAY, WATCH AND PARTY! Eat the latest chef-crafted dishes, play the hottest interactive games and drink with friends at one of our bars or on our rooftop lanai. With our newly renovated event space, including private and semi private event areas including our D&B Sports Lounge equipped with a 120 inch HD screen and nine 42 inch screen, it is the perfect area for your next party, big or small. You can have it all under one roof!

daveandbusters.com/honolulu

Where should I plan my next company party? Companies need to keep their teams working well together and there’s no better place to get your group to collaborate, grow as a team, and rev up the company spirit than at Dave & Buster’s! Our event space accommodates groups ranging anywhere from 10 to 1,500, and we plan thousands of events in the space year round. Dave & Buster’s event planners will work with you from start to finish, making sure every detail is right. Best of all, when work is done and it’s time for fun, there are hundreds of state-ofthe-art games that everyone can play! If a company is celebrating, Dave & Buster’s is the place for Laugh-Out-Loud FUN. Contact Senior Corporate Sales Manager Kendra Murray today to plan your next event!


Hyatt® and Grand Hyatt® names, designs and related marks are trademarks of Hyatt Corporation. ©2018 Hyatt Corporation. All rights reserved.

GOOD IMPRESSES. GRAND INSPIRES. Set on the soothing white sands of Kauai’s sunny south shore, Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort & Spa beckons you to unwind in relaxed elegance. A water wonderland of pools begs you to celebrate the sun. Hit the links at Poipu Bay for fun and challenging play. And for a Hawaiian spa experience like no other, indulge as Anara Spa’s natural outdoor setting renews body, mind, and soul. Plan your getaway today, call 808.742.1234 or visit kauai.grand.hyatt.com. Kamaaina receive special pricing on rooms, golf and spa. grand hyatt kaua‘i resort & spa | 1571 poipu road | koloa, hi 96756 | kauai.grand.hyatt.com ta-207-370-2400-01


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ISLANDS | CONTACT

When Worlds Collide

Annual contemporary art exhibition sparks conversation on cultural exchange in Hawai‘i by LAUREN MCNALLY Bringing art exhibitions and free public programming to a wider audience this past spring, Contact Zone is the fifth installment of Contact, an annual exhibition of contemporary art produced by Hawai‘i artists. Launched in 2014 at the Honolulu Museum of Art School, Contact expanded its reach in 2018 to include additional exhibition venues in Waik k , Kaka‘ako and Kalihi throughout the month of April. The artwork featured in the exhibition explores the notion of “contact zones,” or spaces where cultures meet, clash and grapple with one another. Over the years, the partially juried show has supported numerous local artists and offered a platform for them to share their perspectives on the topic of cultural exchange in Hawai‘i. “Contact Zone offers a comprehensive survey of contemporary art in Hawai‘i, with a critical focus on what it means to live, coexist and be from and transplant to Hawai‘i,” says exhibition manager Josh Tengan. Curated and juried by Fitted Hawai‘i designer Keola Naka‘ahiki Rapozo and Michael Rooks, Wieland Family curator of modern and contemporary art at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia, Contact Zone included a suite of talks, screenings and other public programs to expand the conversation on cultural exchange beyond the medium of visual art. Joining the lineup this year were a number of site-specific art installations in Waik k , which is itself a notable contact zone on O‘ahu. Installations included a sand sculpture in the lobby of the Sheraton Waikiki by artists Jill Harris and Thomas Koet, artwork by Jan Becket and the art collective Paradise Cove both in store and in the window display at Saks Fifth Avenue, and a new photography series by Taiji Terasaki at T Galleria by DFS, Hawai‘i.

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THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


CONNECTIONS

Vision Without Limits Benefiting the Hawai‘i LGBT Legacy Foundation, Honolulu Pride and the LGBT Center, the LGBT Legacy Foundation’s Vision Without Limits gala featured singer Izik and honored hospitality executive Kelly Sanders with its Visionary Award for his contributions to the community. Photos: Dave Miyamoto

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THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


NETWORK. EDUCATE. CELEBRATE.

Wanderlust O‘ahu Wanderlust O‘ahu returned in March for four days of yoga classes, guided meditation, talk stories, live music and more, bringing together a lineup of leading yoga instructors, musical acts and thought leaders to the grounds of Turtle Bay Resort on the North Shore. Photos: Melissa Gayle, Diana Gerstacker, Connor Trimble

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CONNECTIONS

Green Drinks Honolulu Members of Hawai‘i’s sustainability community gathered at RevoluSun’s newly debuted showroom at SALT at Our Kaka‘ako for Green Drinks Honolulu in April. Green Magazine Hawai‘i launched its summer issue, and guests mingled over drinks and pupu made with farm-fresh ingredients supplied by Kualoa Ranch. Photos: Dave Livingston

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THE WOMEN ISSUE 2018


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take the walk Discover your journey to the very best Waikiki has to offer with one-of-a-kind boutique shops, weekly activities, live performances and award-winning restaurants.

Located on Lewers Street between Kalakaua Avenue & Kalia Road Open 365 Days | 10AM–10PM waikikibeachwalk.com | 1 (808) 931-3591 |

Profile for Pacific Edge Magazine

Pacific Edge Magazine  

Pacific Edge Magazine's 2018 summer issue celebrates Hawaii's Women in Business leaders, featuring Wendy Shewalter, Teri Orton and Loretta Y...

Pacific Edge Magazine  

Pacific Edge Magazine's 2018 summer issue celebrates Hawaii's Women in Business leaders, featuring Wendy Shewalter, Teri Orton and Loretta Y...

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