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FALL 2018

ïƒ EXPERIENCE THE

P O S T- P A C E A STRATEGIC PATH

FORWARD FOR ALUMNI

ICGL THE YEAR OF ENERGY

IN ACTION

COMMUNITY OF CHANGE

S U M M E R STUDY TOURS BACK-TO-SCHOOL

HIGHLIGHTS

& HOMECOMING

T H E M A G A Z I N E O F PA C E A C A D E M Y


Sir Winsalot and faculty members PAULA PONTES, LEE WILSON and ELIZABETH KANN welcome retired English teacher RICKS CARSON back to Pace during Faculty & Staff Appreciation Night at a varsity football game.

FROM THE EDITOR

Follow Pace! facebook.com/ paceacademy

instagram.com/ paceacademy

twitter.com/ paceacademy

We’re in the midst of a baby boom in the Pace Academy Office of Communications! My husband, Wes, and I welcomed twins, Stella and Porter, in March, and I returned from maternity leave in mid-June. I’m incredibly grateful to Interim Director of Communications MELANIE POPE and Advancement Communications and Stewardship Manager DANA RAWLS for producing the summer issue of the KnightTimes. Thank you, friends! Not long after my return, Creative Services Manager RYAN VIHLEN and his wife, Byrd, welcomed daughter Penny. During Ryan’s leave, REBEKAH BAILEY, a former member of the Pace communications team, stepped in to design this issue of the magazine. I’m thankful for Rebekah’s knowledge of the Pace community and willingness to take on this monster project. The boom will continue in January when Digital Content Producer and photographer extraordinaire OMAR LÓPEZ THISMÓN and his wife, Grace, welcome their first child. We’ll muddle through and take blurry photos while Omar enjoys time with his family—and we’ll rely even more on Head of School FRED ASSAF and contributing photographer LAURA INMAN for their beautiful images. Needless to say, I’m thrilled to share these momentous, life-changing events with my colleagues, and to welcome new Knights to the Pace family. In that spirit, we’ve dedicated a portion of the Alumni Updates section of the KnightTimes to highlighting faculty and staff milestones, a feature we will continue going forward. Alumni, let us know what you’re up to so we can celebrate significant milestones in your lives—and colleagues, send your good news my way as well!

Caitlin Goodrich Jones ’00 DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

PACE CARES When our families and staff are in need, Pace Cares.

Contact us to deliver a meal: pacecares@paceacademy.org


TH E M A G A ZIN E OF PA C E A C A D EM Y

CONTRIBUTORS R E B E K A H

B A I L E Y

REBEKAH BAILEY is a graphic designer and photographer from Dallas. She worked in the Pace Office of Communications and advised the yearbook staff from 2007-2009. She and her husband, Kyle, have three children. In her admittedly spare free time, she enjoys working out and eating at new places.

S O P H I E

Z E L O N Y

’ 1 7

SOPHIE ZELONY ’17 is a sophomore at Vanderbilt University studying communications and law, history, and society. This past summer, Zelony enjoyed her internship with Pace’s Office of Advancement and worked closely with the Office of Communications. While at Pace, Zelony participated in varsity tennis and service learning. She was a member of the Cum Laude Society, National Honor Society and Orkin Honor Society. In her free time, she enjoys traveling and hanging out with friends.

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AROUND PACE A look at what's happening on campus 12 CASTLE CIRCLE PROFILE HILDA AND PAT PATRICK 16 WELCOME TO PACE Introducing the newest members of the Pace family 21 GEORGIA TAX CREDIT Reflecting on a decade of this impactful program 22 FACES OF PACE Meet CHACON FANNING, NIKKI POYER and PAM TISDALE

24 ICGL The Isdell Center for Global Leadership 24 SUMMER STUDY TOURS

966 W. Paces Ferry Road NW Atlanta, Georgia 30327 www.paceacademy.org

HEAD OF SCHOOL FRED ASSAF

DIVISION HEADS MICHAEL GANNON Head of Upper School GRAHAM ANTHONY Head of Middle School

CONTENTS 06 NEWS

KnightTimes

30 THE YEAR OF ENERGY Our 2018-2019 annual theme in action

SYREETA MOSELEY Head of Lower School

COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT

34 FACULTY PROFILE JOANNE BROWN

CAITLIN GOODRICH JONES ’00 Director of Communications, Editor

35 STUDENT LEADERS

OMAR LÓPEZ THISMÓN Digital Content Producer, Photographer

38 COMMUNITY OF CHANGE Life-changing conversations 40 ALUMNI STRATEGIC PLAN Looking back to move forward 44 ALUMNI UPDATES 50 HOMECOMING & REUNION WEEKEND 52 NEW ALUMNI BOARD MEMBERS Meet BRYAN CHITWOOD ’93, KRISTIN CHICK CARPENTER ’07, JASON COX ’92, ANDREW GUEST ’04, MEREDITH WINITT FORRESTER ’95 and JASON LEE ’96

RYAN VIHLEN Creative Services Manager, Graphic Designer LELA WALLACE Digital Communications Manager

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS FRED ASSAF GEMSHOTS PHOTOGRAPHIC www.gemshots.com LAURA INMAN

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS DANA RAWLS HAYLEY SHOJI ’12

OUR MISSION

CORRECTION: In our summer 2018 issue, the article The Academy Abroad: Conservation in Action incorrectly referred to the Isdell Center for Global Leadership partner company as PEMEX. In fact, Pace Academy partnered with CEMEX, a global leader in the building materials industry.

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KnightTimes | Fall 2018

To create prepared, confident citizens of the world who honor the values and legacy of Pace Academy. To contribute ideas for the KnightTimes, please email Caitlin Jones at caitlin.jones@paceacademy.org.


Dear Pace Family,

LETTER FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL

As I write this, Thanksgiving is fast approaching, and the start of school, although not long ago, is a distant memory. How time flies! Holidays in the Assaf household are always happy reunions. My eldest son, JACK ’13, now in his second year teaching high school math, will travel home from San Antonio; HANK ’15 and MICK ’16 will return to Atlanta from Notre Dame; SAM ’19 and TOMMY ’21 will take a break from the hustle and bustle of life at Pace Academy. As MARTHA and I watch our sons enter adulthood, we are reminded time and again of the value of a Pace education—now and in the future. As Pace alumni, our children will benefit from the connections they established here, relationships that will endure long after graduation, and from an alumni network that stretches around the globe. In recent years, alumni programming at Pace has grown exponentially, thanks to the efforts of our Office of Advancement and dedicated Pace graduates. Our new, five-year Alumni Strategic Plan, detailed on page 40, will further strengthen this community, advancing our school and the nearly 4,000 alumni who call Pace home. I’m grateful to those who lent their time and expertise to the development of the Alumni Strategic Plan, and I look forward to seeing where it takes us. In this issue of the KnightTimes, we also welcome new members to the Board of Trustees and Alumni Board, formally introduce the families who joined our school this fall, look back at summer study tours and beginning-of-the year activities, and dive into the Isdell Center for Global Leadership’s Year of Energy. Thank you for your partnership on this journey—now and in the future! Sincerely,

THIS PAGE In September, we welcomed alumni back to Pace during Homecoming & Reunion weekend, where we celebrated 10 years of the varsity football program with members of our first team.

FRED ASSAF HEAD OF SCHOOL

KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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NEWS

JORDAN RECEIVES PELHAM COMMENDATION 

Hirsch

Rawls

Weitzner

Zou

Each year during the National Speech and Debate Association’s national tournament, one coach is selected from high school coaches nationwide to receive The Pelham Commendation, an award given “in recognition of devotion to the forensic arts, which teach motivation, integrity and character.” The award was established by the will of Thomas Glenn Pelham and is endowed by the Barkley Forum of Emory University. Pace Academy debate coach SHUNTÁ JORDAN received the 2018 Pelham Commendation at this year’s tournament in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Jordan, now in her 16th year at Pace, led the 2017-2018 Upper School debate team to a 17th-place finish in the national tournament and a third-place finish at state.

AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL MONTHLY PUBLISHES PEARSON’S WORK  The October edition of American Mathematical Monthly, the Mathematical Association of America’s journal, included an article by Science Department Chair DR. JOHN PEARSON. The journal publishes approximately 10 percent of articles submitted and covers a wide range of mathematical topics. Pearson’s piece, Viète’s Formula, Knar’s Formula, and the Geometry of the Gamma Function, discusses the gamma function, originally discovered by Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler to solve an interpolation problem for the factorials. “However, [the gamma function’s] ubiquity cannot be due to its algebraic nature alone,” Pearson writes in the article’s abstract. The article presents “the close connection between the volumes of various spaces and the values of the gamma function in order to better understand its frequent appearance in many mathematical formulas. This connection produces a surprising similarity between [mathematician François] Viète’s formula for π and Knar’s formula.”

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KnightTimes | Fall 2018


NEWS

ON THEIR OWN MERITS The National Merit Scholarship Corporation annually recognizes outstanding high school seniors based on their performance on the PSAT. Seniors CHARLIE HIRSCH, JILL RAWLS, GILLIAN WEITZNER and AARON ZOU have been named National Merit Semifinalists, placing them among the highest-scoring test takers in Georgia.

AGOLLI, GREENE NAMED PREPVOLLEYBALL.COM CLUB ALL AMERICANS Junior ADA JANE AGOLLI (above) and sophomore KALISSA GREENE (left) played key roles in the Pace Academy varsity volleyball team’s journey to the 2017 and 2018 Georgia High School Association state titles. In recognition of outstanding performances for their respective club teams, Agolli and Greene were named PrepVolleyball.com Club All-Americans. Agolli received U16 Highest Honorable Mention recognition, while Greene was honored as a member of the U15 First Team. Look for coverage in our winter issue of the Knights' 2018 state-championship run.

KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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NEWS

LEADING T H E WAY The Board of Trustees welcomes new members.

STEVEN DEFRANCIS

DEFRANCIS

JOHNSON

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KnightTimes | Fall 2018

Native Atlantan STEVEN DEFRANCIS joins the Pace Academy Board of Trustees after serving as a member of the Properties Committee. The founder and CEO of Cortland Partners, a full-service, multifamily investment, management and development firm, DeFrancis brings more than 20 years of property development and business experience to Pace’s Board. DeFrancis and his wife, MARY ALICIA DEFRANCIS, are the parents of Pace fourth-grader KENNON DEFRANCIS and third-grader JACK DEFRANCIS. DeFrancis says that Pace “feels like an extension of our family and mirrors the type of citizens we would like our children to become. They’ve excelled here, thanks to great teachers and administrators. I’m grateful for their opportunities in and out of the classroom.” DeFrancis, a University of Georgia graduate, holds a bachelor’s degree in real estate. With real estate as a passion, he has particular interest in Pace’s Master Campus Plan, and will share his development and renovation knowledge with the Board as Pace’s campus continues to improve. DeFrancis is also passionate about Pace. “I hope that Pace will continue its amazing dedication to the kind of education that produces awesome students who are ready to go out and make their mark for the better,” he says. “I’m glad to be able to give back and hope to be of service.”

MICHELE JOHNSON

New Board member MICHELE JOHNSON says that she and her husband, ANTHONY BURNETT, find that volunteering at Pace “is a way to hang out with some of the most amazing people and have fun at the same time.” Parents of third-grader MARKUS BURNETT and first-grader MIKAH BURNETT, the couple finds it “inspiring to be around such accomplished individuals who put their families and children first and lend their time and expertise to the school.” Johnson, a neurosurgeon, is a partner at Atlanta Brain and Spine Care and the chair of the Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology at Piedmont Hospital. She started her career at Yale Medical School in 1996. After a residency at Emory University, she practiced in Texas until 2015, when she and Burnett returned to Atlanta with their family. “We were worried about the transition for our children,” she says. “Knowing our family and our core values well, numerous trusted friends and colleagues recommended Pace,” she adds. “One said, ‘If I had to do it all over again, Pace is the only school I would send my children to.’” Johnson trusted the advice—“They were right!” she says. “Now I would give the same advice to others.” Johnson and Burnett have consistently made time to volunteer at Pace: in the classroom, at the Fall Fair and on field day. Johnson hopes to tie her Pace volunteer service on the Board to her passion for diversity and inclusion.


NEWS

She explains, “There are few women in the country who do what I do, and the journey along the way has not always been smooth. I have learned much and am passionate about sharing this with others. I hope to encourage a new generation of women to follow their dreams.” By connecting her past experiences to Pace’s diversity and inclusion initiatives, Johnson also hopes to further a community where “differences are embraced, and [all] have a sense of belonging.”

JIM MASKE

Although new to the Board of Trustees, JIM MASKE is not new to volunteering at Pace. He and his wife, ALLYSON MASKE, quickly engaged as Lower School classroom volunteers when their daughter, freshman EMMA STEWART MASKE, began in Pre-First. The Maske’s son, JD MASKE, who also came to Pace in Pre-First, is in the seventh grade. Maske, a vice president in the Investment Management Group of Goldman Sachs, his employer for 20 years, soon took on additional volunteer roles—helping with the Aim High campaign for the Arthur M. Blank Family Upper School, and chairing both the Georgia Private School Tax Credit program and the campaign for uknight: The Pace Fund. Allyson Maske, a plastic surgeon, served as Pace’s Fall Fair co-chair in 2013 and remains an involved volunteer. “Our family has strong feelings for the school,” Maske says. He adds that they appreciate “the family atmosphere and close community” at Pace. When they were choosing a school for their children, Pace stood out because of “the emphasis on family; the attention paid to each child as an individual; and the strength of the academic, arts and athletics programs,” he explains. Maske, a native of Selma, Ala., received a bachelor’s in engineering and an MBA from Vanderbilt University. He sees his new Board position as an opportunity to continue his involvement and to directly impact the school community. “In the coming years, I hope we continue to strengthen all programming, complete the goals set for the next capital

campaign and continue to strive for excellence,” he says.

TED MCMULLAN

TED MCMULLAN brings many Pace interests to his new position on the Board. He and his wife, CATHERINE MCMULLAN, have four children, all at Pace: seventh-grade twins MADELINE MCMULLAN and WILLIAM MCMULLAN, sixth-grader JACK MCMULLAN and second-grader BUCKLEY MCMULLAN. McMullan says, “Pace is a community school,” and he appreciates the “intimate feeling in the size of the school and the classes.” As an active parent volunteer, he believes the involvement of fathers at the school is important. “I am very interested in furthering specific activities for Pace fathers in hopes of engaging them in meaningful ways,” he says. McMullan, who holds an undergraduate degree in government from Georgetown University and an MBA from the University of Georgia, is the founder of Covington Investments LLC, which acquires and develops commercial real estate, including senior living communities. Since the McMullan children began attending Pace seven years ago, Catherine McMullan has served as a class representative, and the couple have been consistent boosters of the athletic program. When the McMullans are not busy supporting their children’s athletic interests (tennis, golf and baseball) or attending Pace’s cultural offerings, such as concerts and plays, McMullan says the couple “wants to give back wherever we can.” McMullan has been a member of the Board’s Properties Committee in the past. Serving as a Trustee provides him a new avenue for involvement, and he is enthusiastic. “Pace Academy is able to chart an exciting future because of our strong financial position and solid, consistent leadership for many years,” he says. “I am excited about the proposed capital improvements as well as opportunities to expand endowed programs in support of students and faculty. It is an honor to serve as a Pace Trustee.”

MASKE

MCMULLAN

KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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AROUND PACE

K N I G HT S C I RC LE C E LE B R ATE S

2 0 17 - 2 0 1 8 M E M B E R S Pace Academy celebrated members of the Knights Circle with a cocktail party at the home of CATHY and REID FUNSTON in September. The Knights Circle recognizes donors who give $5,000 or more to The Pace Fund during the year.

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KnightTimes | Fall 2018


AROUND PACE

P

ace Academy Life Trustee ED MENDEL

speaks passionately about the enduring value of an excellent education. “Education is the one thing that can never be taken from you,” he explains. “If you understand history, you understand the importance of education. Other things come and go; people have had to leave [their home countries] in a hurry—but you can take education across borders.” These firmly held beliefs about education led Mendel and his wife, BARBARA MENDEL, to seek an independent school environment for their three children, JENNIFER MENDEL, MEREDITH MENDEL YEHUDAI ’97 and BRETT MENDEL, who all attended Pace. In addition to the quality of a Pace education, they were attracted by Pace’s interfaith community, he says. He adds that their relationship with Pace, which began in 1981, expanded to include the role of Pace grandparents, in 2016. They now have two grandchildren at Pace, in Pre-First and second grade. While his own children were attending Pace, Mendel became involved as a volunteer and eventual Board member. He says, “I wanted Pace to be the best for my kids, and it was important for my kids to see that I was involved in their education. Children learn what they live.” Mendel, a Pace Trustee from 1987-1997, was an active member of the Governance Committee during his years of service. “Now my children are educated and on their way, and I’m very fortunate,” he adds. “I’m still supportive, and I’m there for the school.” Mendel says that he remains close to Head of School FRED ASSAF and regularly sends him “all kinds of information,” but “there comes a time when you hand things off to your children; it’s time for my kids to show their involvement to their kids.” Mendel, who grew up in Arkansas and attended the University of Texas-El Paso, was the co-founder of Davis, Mendel & Regenstein and the Ned Davis Research Group (NDR), which he sold in 2011. Before owning his own businesses, Mendel pursued his dream of being a stockbroker, propelled by childhood teachings from his grandfather. At age 22, he landed a job in Atlanta for the former brokerage firm J.C. Bradford, in which he found opportunities to meet philanthropic leaders in the community. Among these was Pace Life Trustee and former Trustee SANFORD ORKIN, whom Mendel describes as a mentor: “We met at a party in 1976 at his home,” he says. “He ‘adopted’ me and

L I F E T R U S T E E P R O F I L E

ED MENDEL encouraged Ned [Davis] and me to go into business.” “I was married to Barbara by then,” Mendel adds. “We’d met each other in 1972, when I knocked on a door to pick up my date and Barbara answered.” He explains that Barbara was his date’s neighbor and lived in the apartment across the hall. “The next night I went back and knocked on Barbara’s door. She said at first that she couldn’t go out with me,” but he convinced her otherwise. The couple, now married 44 years, remains friends with Barbara’s former neighbor. Although Mendel describes himself as retired, he has developed new pursuits to occupy most of his waking hours. Having been mentored, he now watches for opportunities where he can mentor young professionals. In these relationships, conversations often turn to education. “The number one thing is planning for your kids and your grandkids and providing the very best education you can give them,” he says. “That is the best legacy you can leave.” Beyond mentoring, Mendel takes time to coach young adults on what makes a successful interview. He adds that he finds personal reward in practicing “random acts of kindness” and making charitable gifts to help the very needy. He also enjoys passing on to others life lessons such as, “The more things you own, the more they own you.” He encour-

ages others to “always keep a list of written goals, even though they will change.” Mendel has kept a list of goals in his wallet, changing them from time to time, for nearly 30 years. In an interview for Real Vision, an ondemand video platform for finance and investing, with its co-founder Grant Williams, Mendel shares another interest. “I always had as one of my goals to own a professional football team. I’m not going to reach that goal of owning one completely because it’s gotten a little expensive.” He continues, “When the opportunity came up to become a minority owner of the Atlanta Falcons, I didn’t hesitate.” He acknowledges in Williams’ interview that playing in the Super Bowl offers teams “the highest highs and the lowest lows, but that’s part of the deal.” He says he reminds himself, “You need to remember what’s really important in life: your family, your health, your friends. It’s important to realize it’s just a game.” Nonetheless, while Mendel has few wants or needs at this stage of life, he admits, “I would like a Super Bowl ring.” As far as thoughts for Pace in the future, he encourages the school to continue striving for excellence. “I’m a believer that if you have something, make it excellent. If it’s not excellent, don’t do it.” Educational excellence for his grandchildren is paramount: “Giving them a great education is the number one priority,” he says.

KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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AROUND PACE

K C I R T A P T A P D AN

CA E TH

A D L I H

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KnightTimes | Fall 2018

ST

CIR E L

E CL

S

T PO

H LIG

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AROUND PACE

THE CASTLE CIRCLE FOUNDING MEMBERS ARE THE FIRST 60 MEMBERS, CELEBRATING 60 YEARS OF PACE.

D

ecatur natives HILDA and JOSEPH “PAT” PATRICK, married for 52 years, feel a deep connection to Pace Academy, thanks to a relationship that extends back to the fall of 1983, when their two daughters, HEATHER PATRICK MCCLOSKEY ’89 and BONNIE PATRICK HANNAH ’86, joined Pace’s seventh- and 10th-grade classes. To celebrate this connection and give back to the school, the Patricks have named Pace as a beneficiary in their charitable remainder trust. By sharing these arrangements with Pace, they have become members of The Castle Circle, which provides recognition to individuals and couples who’ve arranged for a planned gift to Pace. “We have many reasons to be delighted to support Pace in this way,” Hilda shares. In addition to being the parents of alumni, she explains, they are now Pace grandparents to Heather’s children, REBECCA MCCLOSKEY ’26 and CAL MCCLOSKEY ’29. There is one more connection: “Heather teaches math at Pace, so we are also Pace faculty parents.” The Patricks’ Pace story followed many other chapters in their years together. High school sweethearts, both attended Vanderbilt University. Hilda adds, “We married after college and lived in numerous locations while Pat served in the military and worked for John H. Harland Company.” Pat says that he was commissioned by the Army after graduation and left for service in 1967, “at the height of the war in Vietnam.” He continues, “I was fortunate to receive orders for the 4th Armored Division in Nuremberg, Germany,” which the couple counts as one the favorite places they’ve lived. Pat explains that it served as a base for “fantastic travel opportunities.” He adds, “Bonnie was born there, and even before her official papers were processed, we’d ‘smuggled’ her across borders in Western Europe on our travels.” The family eventually returned to Georgia, settling in Stone Mountain, where they built a new home and Pat launched a printing business, LabelAmerica. Pat says, “Hilda,

Bonnie and Heather worked with me on weekends to help keep the fledgling company alive.” During Bonnie’s ninth-grade year, Hilda and Pat began to explore independent school options for both daughters. “Pace impressed us as the best fit for our family,” Hilda recalls. “We were attracted to the small size of the school and the classes, and the strong probability of challenging and enjoyable preparation for competitive colleges. When we left the open house, Pat said that he thought the best thing we could do for our children would be to send them to Pace.”

“ WH AT A SPECIAL PRIVIL EGE IT IS TO GIVE BACK TO PACE A CADEM Y TH ROU GH OUR ES TATE PL AN A GIF T TO ATTEM PT T O REPAY PACE F OR A LL IT H AS M EANT AND CONTINU ES TO M EAN TO TH E PATRICK F AM IL Y.” Dedication from the entire family made a Pace education possible for the girls, according to Pat. “Hilda's, Bonnie's, and Heather's paper cuts and other assorted injuries from weekend work at LabelAmerica enabled us to become part of Pace Academy.” He adds, “Hilda also managed a retail store and taught at Christ the King School, all the time driving at least two, sometimes three, round-trips from the Stone Mountain home to Pace and back.” Pat has been convinced since the first

open house, decades ago, that many qualities, such as its family-oriented focus, differentiate Pace. He remarks, “We’ve never been disappointed in nearly 40 years.” He continues, “The foundation our daughters received at Pace enabled them both to be accepted to top-tier universities, graduate with honors and go on to pursue the highest level of graduate degrees. Bonnie graduated from Sewanee: The University of the South, enrolled at Emory

University School of Medicine for two years and received her M.D. degree from The University of Cincinnati. Heather graduated from Princeton, then returned to Atlanta and her Pace roots, teaching at Pace for two years before attending Georgia Tech for a Ph.D.” Hilda describes the paths their daughters have taken with pride. She says, “Heather taught at Emory and married MIKE [MCCLOSKEY], also a Princeton graduate. When their children began school, she returned to teaching math at Pace. Bonnie sandwiched raising two boys, William, 15, and Harry, 13, into her career as a hospitalist. Her husband [William “Bo” Hannah] has retired from service as an Air Force physician and both now practice medicine in Savannah.” The Patricks are also enjoying seeing Pace through a grandparent lens. “Rebecca and Cal love Pace and continually amaze me with the depth of their learning,” Hilda says. “It was wonderful when our children attended, but I believe it is even better and broader now. I am so impressed with the opportunities for student travel and with environmental education.” She adds, “When Pat and I discussed adding Pace as a beneficiary of our charitable remainder trust, we were simply expressing gratitude to a fine institution. The benefit to us is knowing that we will leave a small legacy to enhance the future for Pace students.”

For more information about membership in The Castle Circle, contact Dana Rawls at dana.rawls@ paceacademy.org or 404-262-3534.

KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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CLASS TRIPS,

AROUND PACE ORIENTATIONS,

CONVOCATIONS AND PACE TRADITIONS MADE THE FIRST WEEKS OF SCHOOL MEMORABLE.

6th-Grade Trip

Back-to-School Busy-ness 9th-Grade Trip

Upper School Convocation

Lower School Orientation

Lower School New Student Party Seniors' First Day

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KnightTimes || Fall Fall 2018 2018


AROUND PACE

AROUND PACE

7th-Grade Trip

Senior Class Retreat

Lower School Orientation

Middle School Convocation

KnightTimes KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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AROUND PACE

Welcome to Pace!

The following students joined the Pace family this year: PRE-FIRST Amiya Abel

Bella and Matt Abel

Noah Agami

Amy and Ronnie Agami

Mira Arora

Rosalia and Sal Arora

Maxwell Astrop

Jennifer and Doug Astrop

Veronika Avdyeyeva

Ella Avdyeyeva and Slava Avdyeyev

Leah Beauchamp

Jenny and Todd Beauchamp

Colin Bell

Krystal Zell and Oliver Bell

Rex Borenstein

Lindsay and Evan Borenstein

Rhys Brown

Taylor and Ronnie Brown

Elizabeth Brune

Carrie and Eric Brune

John Buehler

Rebecca and Tom Buehler

Liam Chenevey

Kim and John Chenevey

Kai Chin Yee

Marisa and David Chin Yee

Lila Clark-Abuabara Traci Clark Sabas Abuabara

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KnightTimes | Fall 2018

Beau Colquitt

Madison Kedme

Kinsey Crumley

Carter Keller

Thomas Curry

Chase Kothari

Drew Eachus

Maya Laddin

Shia Fletcher

Mason Lloyd

Madison France

Rowan Lockard

Mason Gavric

Grayson Lohr

Colin Gray

Lyla Lowery

Langley Hooper

Isabel McCall

KELLY COLQUITT and Dan Colquitt Stacy and Ken Crumley Amy and Ryan Curry Jessica and Christopher Eachus Amber and Christian Fletcher Jill and Todd France Grace and Nenad Gavric Kim and Chris Gray KIMBERLY TUCKER HOOPER ’97 and Brian Hooper

Hampton Howell

Ashley and Matthew Howell

Wade Hyman

Hillary Shaw and John Hyman

Brice Irons

Ciara and Eddie Irons

Brynn Johnson

Julie and Jeffrey Johnson

Coco Jorgeson

Laura and Brent Jorgeson

Olivia Kaufman

Julia and Dan Kaufman

Alissa Schor and Daniel Kedme Mary and Michael Keller Tanya and Raj Kothari Ellen and Darryl Laddin Dana and Marlon Lloyd Victoria and Skip Lockard Ali and Jon Lohr Ashley and JAKE LOWERY ’03 Stephanie and Mac McCall

Alden McDonald

Stephanie and AUSTIN MCDONALD ’97

William Monroe

Carter and Bill Monroe

Brady Morris

Kathleen and Erik Morris

Emerson Newberg

Laura and Dan Newberg

Leena Nia

Azi and Farshid Nia

Lily Ann Nordin

Christina and Erik Nordin


AROUND PACE

Isabella O

Tatyana and Sean O

Adhrit Pathak

Deeptha Ganapathy and Pranavesh Pathak

Jack Penfold

Judy and Bill Penfold

Chai Perez

Chrishaunda Lee and Jason Perez

Windland Rice Z. and Billy Rice

Jackson Sapp

Kerri and Wes Sapp

Benjamin Segall

Leigh and Michael Segall

Brantley Shanley-Balyeat

Eddie and Doug Shanley-Balyeat

Jayme Share

Marissa and Paul Share

Sophie Skalla

FOURTH GRADE Henry Fletcher

Jena and Nick Fletcher

Charlie Jorgeson

Laura and Brent Jorgeson

Brian Kim

Sunkyung and Eugene Kim

Seb Langford

Emma and Andrew Langford

Ansley Vincent

Jennifer and J.P. Vincent

FIFTH GRADE Isaac Finn

Julie and Laurence Finn

Jack Govic

Ann Marie and Mario Govic

Greg Simmons

Laurie and Marc Skalla

MEREDITH BAILEY SIMMONS ’01 and MCKITTRICK SIMMONS ’94

Evie Thompson

Arianna Zalik

Liles and Charlie Thompson

William Timberlake

Allison and Brian Timberlake

Leah Yehudai

MEREDITH MENDEL YEHUDAI ’97 and Tavi Yehudai

Helen and David Zalik

SIXTH GRADE Chandler Bing

Tara and Calvin Bing

Marley Brooks

FIRST GRADE

Lisa and Dan Brooks

Mikah Burnett

Amy and Hardy Brumfield

Michele Johnson and Anthony Burnett

Leo Langford

Emma and Andrew Langford

Thomson Brumfield Allison Chitwood

Jodi and BRYAN CHITWOOD ’93

Quinn Culpepper

SECOND GRADE

Tricia Kinney and Gardner Culpepper

Barrett Colquitt

Mary Kelly and Jeff Cunningham

KELLY COLQUITT and Dan Colquitt

Annabelle Fransen

Katy and Robert Fransen

Helen Mitchell

Katherine and Greg Mitchell

Kate Cunningham Olivia Diaz

Barbarella and Rene Diaz

Stewart Favero

MELISSA COHEN FAVERO ’91 and David Favero

Talen Frett

THIRD GRADE

Chantel Runnels Katania and Lawrence Frett

Nik Kothari

Reed Gabriel

Tanya and Raj Kothari

Shervin Nia

Azi and Farshid Nia

Will Paulowsky

Whitney and Ryan Paulowsky

Sophia Zalik

Courtenay and Chris Gabriel

Julia Goode

ANNIE RICHARDSON GOODE ’98 and Jason Goode

Kate Grice

Campbell Highsmith

Kristi and Robert Highsmith

Watson Hight

Jane and Phillip Hight

Ledger Kincaid

Ann and Dave Kincaid

Sydney Lettes

Amy and Louis Lettes

Ella Lynch Livie Lynch

Sarah and Rob Lynch

Elsa Nagle Liam Nagle

ANN MCLEAN NAGLE ’87 and Tripp Nagle

Mary Kiley Paulowsky

Whitney and Ryan Paulowsky

Olivia Resnick

Stephanie and Stuart Resnick

Amelia Rucker

Phoebe and Thomas Rucker

Zachary Segall

Leigh and Michael Segall

Amelia Smith

Elizabeth and Boynton Smith

Akshay Tolmare

Mayura and Neeraj Tolmare

Davis Trimble

Melissa and Ed Trimble

Peter Webb

Lisa and Adam Webb

Dallis Welsh

Kaprice and Nigel Welsh

Julia Williams

Stephanie Blank and David Williams Laura Inman-Nolan

SEVENTH GRADE Grace Agolli

Ogerta and Artan Agolli

Aarav Kokane

Rajni Sinha and Avinash Kokane

Mia Williams

Melissa and KC Williams

EIGHTH GRADE Cayenne Davis

Vonnia and Glenn Davis

Belle Divine

Ty and Sam Divine

Ashley and David Grice

Helen and David Zalik

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AROUND PACE

NINTH GRADE Xavier Agostino Sherrell Duclos

Jeremy Avellaneda

Elsa Aguilar and Osiel Avellaneda

Allie Campbell

Ashley and Grier Campbell

Maryam Dandashly

Nada Muristani and Hasan Dandashly

Sydney Faux Melissa Faux

Juan Figueroa

Jessica Hernandez and Francisco Figueroa

Sammy Finkelstein

Jen and Eli Finkelstein

Jayden Gasque

Keryl and Anthony Gasque

Marissa Goodman

Michelle and Doug Trivers

Marissa Govic

Ann Marie and Mario Govic

Madeleine Hale

Melissa and Tim Hale

Gabriel Kadoori

Hunter Rocker

Rebecca Kann

Anna Rosenbloum

Margo Kaye

Pierce Smith

Emma Killian

Ryan Struckman

Henry Leusink

Saanika Tolmare

Norma Shohet and Robert Kadoori ELIZABETH KANN and Burt Kann Stacey and Steve Kaye

Richlynne and Jeff Rocker Debra and Bobby Rosenbloum Marlyn and Rodney Smith

Rachel and Lee Killian

Tammy and Michael Struckman

Erica and Andrew Cozewith Bart Leusink

Mayura and Neeraj Tolmare

Connor Vance

Michael Lynch

ALLISON HANDLEY LYNCH ’87 and Chris Lynch

Jonathan Merlin

Roxana Shershin and Patrick Vance

Jae Williams

Melissa and KC Williams

Caren and Michael Merlin

10TH GRADE

Mollie Meyerowitz

Jennifer and Adam Meyerowitz

Madison Durr

Sydney Middleton

Andrea and Jerry Middleton

Tonye Durr Madison Durr

Jermiah Polk

Quinn Korach

Shania Porter

Hannah Rowland

Jennifer and Randy Korach

Jasmin and Julius Polk

Kristen and Glenn Rowland

Chanelle and Jay Brown

Jeffrey Ramos

Rosi Ortiz and Hector Ramos

11TH GRADE

Paul Ramseur

Caroline Landis

Josh Reed

Sasha Ratliff

PARENTS CLUB

BOOSTER CLUB

ARTS ALLIANCE

President ALISON ARENTH

Co-Presidents MARGARET & BILL WARREN

Co-Presidents JENNIFER DEMBA & MARY KELLY CUNNINGHAM

Vice President COREY HIROKAWA

Vice Presidents LAURIE & HAMPTON MALLIS

Secretary JULIE CARSON

Secretary DIANE SAINI

Secretary AMY MININBERG

Treasurer LYNN LUND & JENNIFER ULLMAN

Treasurer TERRI JANKI

Treasurer KEITH PAYNE

Past President DANA RAY

Past President JULIE THOMPSON

Past Co-Presidents FRANCES & JIM ZOOK

Amalia Haviv

Miriam and Haim Haviv

Gabby Hudson

Lisa and Don Hudson

Deuce Jordan

Mezora Carr Lawrence Jordan

2018 – 2019

Julie and Mel Landis

C. Nicole and Paul Ramseur

Kristina and Theo Ratliff

Chenoa Reed Ron Reed

PAR ENT

LEA DERS H IP

N E W L E A D E R S FO R THE NE W YEA R 18

KnightTimes | Fall 2018


AROUND PACE

INSIDE THE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS PROCESS

PACE CAMPS OFFER SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE During the summer, Director of Auxiliary Programs BETH SINGLETON and the Pace Summer Programs team organized more than 20 sports, academic, art, theatre and specialty camps, in addition to four two-week sessions of Pace Camp, offered to students in kindergarten through fifth grade. With several hundred campers from Pre-First to 12th grade on campus each week, as well as Pace teachers and facilities team members, the SAGE Dining crew and other vendors, Pace saw no shortage of campus spirit and liveliness in the off-school season. Camp themes, which catered to the interests of campers from all over the Atlanta area, were brought to life with the help of numerous coaches, teachers and current Pace students. Among the camps in high demand was the ever-popular Danger Camp, led by teachers PATRICK CAMPBELL and SCOTT SARGENT. Campers also explored their artistic passions with art instructors at Abrakadoodle Art Camp, practiced for their Broadway debuts with Upper School Theatre Director SEAN BRYAN at In the Spotlight Camp, and honed debate skills at Public Speaking Camp with debate coaches SHUNTÁ JORDAN and ED WILLIAMS. Others learned what it takes to be a volleyball state champion at Volleyball Camp with coach ANNA BUSH. Summer on the Pace campus also provided students opportunities to learn and practice new skills in writing, STEAM, basketball, chess, lacrosse, cheerleading, engineering and more.

In September, members of the Class of 2021 and their parents kicked off the college process during the Office of College Counseling’s Sophomore Case Studies program. “Students and families who haven't yet entered the college process often have an idea of what that process looks like in theory, but in reality, it can look very different,” says Director of College Counseling JONATHAN FERRELL. “This program allows them to see that process firsthand from the vantage point of admissions officers who make these tough decisions every day." To that end, admissions representatives from 11 colleges and universities facilitated simulated admissions committee meetings in which groups of parents and students reviewed five mock applicants’ files with the goal of admitting three. “Hearing directly from admissions representatives is incredibly helpful as our sophomores imagine their futures beyond Pace Academy,” Ferrell says. “We’re grateful to enjoy such wonderful relationships with our college counterparts.” Admissions representatives from the following institutions shared their experiences and expertise: Boston College; Emory University; Furman University; Georgia Tech; Johns Hopkins University; Trinity University; Tulane University; the University of California, Berkeley; the University of California, Los Angeles; the University of Michigan; and the University of Pennsylvania.

- by SOPHIE ZELONY ’17

KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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AROUND PACE

a radiant

HOMECOMING

NEON

was the name of the game for Knights fans during Pace Academy Homecoming on Sept. 21. Students, faculty and staff—outfitted in Pace gear in blazing shades of yellow, orange, pink and blue—packed the Inman Center stands to kick off the weekend’s festivities with a school-wide Friday-morning pep rally. That evening, an equally enthusiastic and colorful crowd cheered on the varsity football team as the Knights took on Redan High School at Walsh Field and came away with a 35-14 victory (see Homecoming alumni coverage on page 50). The celebration continued at the Upper School Homecoming Dance, where the 2018 Homecoming Court assembled. The group included freshmen LEAH FAVERO, HOLLAND PROCTOR, PATRICK MARR and JEFFREY RAMOS; sophomores CAROLINE MCCULLOUGH, HANNA VINCENT, SEAN GLENNON and SAM SELIG; juniors NIKKI RUBIN, TANNER WALTON, ZACH HOWARD and JOHN O'BRIEN; and seniors HOLLAND CARLTON, KAYLA ROSS, GILLIAN WEITZNER, TYLER HENDERSON, JOSEPH HIRSCH and AARON PASCANER. At the end of the evening, Carlton and Pascaner were crowned 2018 Homecoming queen and king.

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KnightTimes | Fall 2018

THIS YEAR MARKS THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE GEORGIA PRIVATE SCHOOL TAX CREDIT PROGRAM. Under the program, taxpayers redirect dollars owed to the state (with set thresholds according to taxpayer category) to financial aid at the independent school(s) of their choice. In turn, they receive a dollarfor-dollar credit to their state taxes. The program is administered by state-approved Student Scholarship Organizations (SSOs). Pace has participated since the program’s inception; Pace’s program has been managed since 2013 by DEBRA MANN, who works in the Advancement Office as the parent organizations’ liaison and tax credit manager.


AROUND PACE

DEBRA MANN

Q&A

THE GEORGIA TAX CREDIT PROGRAM

What is your role with the Georgia Private School Tax Credit Program? I manage all aspects of the program, including marketing and solicitation, reporting and collecting payments. I also manage the relationship with Apogee Scholarship Fund, the SSO that Pace has chosen to help administer the program. Pace’s financial aid office is responsible for evaluating need and allocating the funds to students.

What impact has the program had on financial aid at Pace? Because of the program, Pace has been able to award over $6.8 million in need-based financial aid to Lower, Middle and Upper School students since 2008. In the past five years, our financial aid resources have more than doubled.

How has participation changed since the program began, and how has this benefited Pace? We’ve seen a 400-percent increase in participation since 2008—from 115 participants that first year to 447 this year. Submissions to Apogee for Pace have increased from $352,000 the first year to over $1.5 million in 2018. However, because of the immense competition among Georgia’s independent schools to claim a portion of the available funds (in recent years, capped at $58 million), the total funds applied for consistently exceed the amount available. As a result, participants ultimately pay to the SSO a prorated portion of their intended contribution, and similarly, the SSOs pay to the schools a proration of the total dollars applied for on their behalf. For example, the prorated

amount Pace received in 2018 was $810,000 (of the $1.5 million in submissions). We are excited that starting in 2019 the cap will be $100 million; however, the proration will likely continue. Pace appreciates the dedicated participants who continue to overwhelmingly support the program, knowing how much the school’s financial aid program has come to rely on these tax credit dollars.

Who participates—and who benefits? Our tax credit participants are parents, grandparents, alumni, faculty and staff, and many other friends of the school. Collectively, they understand the need to be good stewards of Pace by supporting students who otherwise would not have access to an exceptional Pace education and experience. Every Pace applicant goes through the same admissions process; each one must be academically qualified to be considered for enrollment. After an applicant is accepted, the family has the opportunity to demonstrate financial need and be considered for tuition assistance. Financial aid benefits these families as well as our entire school community—bringing to Pace students who enrich all aspects of school life by participating in the arts, athletics, global education, debate and community engagement—to mention just a few. In 2018-2019, 15 new students received tax credit tuition assistance.

Are there limits to eligibility and award sizes? Tax credit funds are available to students entering Pre-First or first grade, or matriculating from public schools at any grade. The

program currently limits the dollars a student can receive in tuition assistance each year—the amount this year was $9,817, the state’s 2018 estimate of the cost to educate a child in public school.

What if the funds are insufficient for a student? When a Pace family demonstrates additional need, funds come from the school’s regular financial aid budget. Additionally, tax credit dollars are banked to provide for each student recipient through graduation, so long as the family continues to demonstrate need.

What are your goals for the future of the program? Our goals each year are to retain the previous year’s tax credit participants, to educate new parents and grandparents about the program and to grow alumni participation. As families graduate from Pace, continued participation is a great way to stay connected—knowing what an impact their tax credit dollars will have on the lives of students at Pace. This program does not cost a donor anything—it is simply a redirection of taxes already owed to the state.

What have you enjoyed most about managing the program? I am so proud to be part of a school community that cares deeply about the education of all children, regardless of their families’ means. Each year at graduation, I see young men and women walk across the stage for whom a Pace education might not have been possible without the support of our tax credit participants.

How can I contribute to this program? Anyone who pays taxes in Georgia can participate. There are limits based on your tax filing status: $1,000 single; $2,500 married filing jointly; $1,250 married filing separately; $10,000 with pass-through income from an S-Corp, LLC or Partnership; up to 75 percent of a C-Corp's or eligible Trust's Georgia tax liability. For more information and to submit your form, visit www.paceacademy. org/taxcredit or contact the Pace Academy Advancement Office at 404-240-9103.

KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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AROUND PACE

G o i n g f o r w a r d, w e'l l i n t ro d u c e y o u to the i n d i vi d u a l s w h o wor k b ehind t h e s c e n e s to make Pace A c a d e m y a n i n s p ir ing p l ac e to li ve a n d l e a r n .

FACES OF PACE 1

W HA T IS YO U R ROL E A T P A C E ?

2

HOW DID YO U C OM E T O W O R K AT PACE?

3

W HA T D O YO U L OV E M O S T A BOUT YO U R JOB?

CHACON FANNING

Maintenance & Grounds Staff

“I am on the maintenance and grounds staff. I take mail and packages to different buildings on campus, move things around for parents and teachers, and do landscaping. I help wherever I am needed.

Before working for Pace, I worked for SAGE Dining [Pace’s dining services partner]. I worked in the Lower School, and I knew a lot of the parents and kids. When Pace offered me a job, I couldn’t refuse.

I love interacting with the people; I enjoy getting to know the students and seeing the whole interaction of the Pace community. Pace is welcoming—I get a smile and a ‘hello’ every day I come to work. You feel close to everyone in such a small community—almost like an extended family.”

NIKKI POYER

“My job is to keep the Business Office running

smoothly and efficiently. I talk to faculty and staff, parents, and sometimes students, and I answer questions and direct them to the appropriate person.

Prior to working at Pace, I was a paralegal at a law firm. Working at a law firm was not for me. Divine intervention happened, and I saw Pace's job listing for the Business Office administrative assistant. I applied and, thankfully, I got the job.

I love being able to interact with everyone on campus. Making connections with different people is special. The people I work with make coming to work fun and enjoyable—it’s nice being surrounded by so many amazing people.”

POYE

R

AL TISD

E

PAM TISDALE

Administrative Support Staff

“I do a variety of projects including annually revising the Pace Academy Handbook and family directory. I manage several parts of the website including the faculty/ staff directory and the website calendar. I provide support to the Pace Admissions team. I also organize the Upper School underclassmen and senior honors days.

Before coming to Pace I taught government and economics in a high school, and then I was a stay-athome mom for a period of time. In 1994 the opportunity opened for me to join the faculty/staff as assistant to [former] Head of Upper School DAVE WOOD.

-by SOPHIE ZELONY '17 KnightTimes | Fall 2018

ING

Administrative Assistant, Business Office

Besides working in the school where my children [CHARLIE TISDALE ’95 and JACK TISDALE ’99] grew up, I appreciate that my work is valued. Pace is a work environment in which faculty, staff and families work together to guide and support young people so they can become their best selves. I am lucky to be part of a team that does that.”

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FANN


AROUND PACE

KEEPING PACE STUDENTCOUNSELORS

K

P EE

I

TH I W

G N PI

UP G N

E E K

The summer of 2018 marked the 13th year of Keeping Pace, a six-week academic enrichment program hosted by Pace Academy for interested middle and high school students from underserved neighborhoods, primarily Atlanta’s Peoplestown and English Avenue/Vine City neighborhoods. With 64 Keeping Pace “Scholars,” 42 student-counselors, and numerous Pace faculty and staff members circulating between academic classes, enrichment courses and recreational activities, the Garcia Family Middle School and Pace Gardens were abuzz with energy throughout June and July. The program, for the first time, employed former Keeping Pace Scholars as full-time student-counselors. Two experienced Scholars were hired for the positions after having successfully completed the program’s two leadership training programs for high school students: Leaders-in-Training and Counselors-in-Training.

E C PA

“It was terrific to have these two students, both high school upperclassmen, join the counseling group, which had previously consisted only of Pace students,” says Keeping Pace Director MARTHA DOWNER-ASSAF, who has led the program since its inception. “The 40 Pace Upper School students who participated in Keeping Pace donated over 1,500 hours of service,” she adds. Among the summer’s highlights were a trip to see an Atlanta Braves baseball game at SunTrust Park; cooking instruction from a Local Three chef (whose recipes called for herbs and vegetables from the Keeping Pace raised-bed garden); and a speaker series that included Pace’s own WENDELL CARTER JR. ’17, former Duke student and basketball player, who had been recently drafted by the Chicago Bulls. Downer-Assaf notes, “A comment from one of our end-of-program surveys sums up how most of our Scholars feel about the Keeping Pace experience. The Scholar simply wrote: ‘This is a great place to be.’” She adds, “We are honored to work with these students and humbled to receive this feedback.”

ALEX ALLEN SAM ASSAF TOMMY ASSAF INDIA BEHL HUGH DOUGLAS ZOIE FREIER MATTHEW FRIESTAD WILL FUNSTON BEN GINSBERG CAMERON HAMILTON DEVAN JOHNSON JUSTIN JOHNSON MAYA KAPLAN EVAN KARETSOS AUSTIN KELLY KELLEE KINDLE LILY KOCH FINN LAMASTRA SOPHIE LETTES NOAH LEVENSON KATE MALLARD BLAKE MANER AMALIA MAXA ANDREW NEVILLE ROSS OGLESBY GEORGE ROBBINS BLAKE RODRIGUEZ JASON ROSENBLOUM MARC ROSENTHAL NEIL SASHTI EMMA SHELTON PARKER SPILLERS ALAN TAPPER BRIANNA THOMAS SYDNEY THOMAS TRIPP TRIMBLE DOMINIQUE TURNER DENZEL WELSH RAINA WILLIAMS

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ICGL A global education for every Student

ICGL

Summer study tours explore conservation, culture and the many challenges facing our world today.

ABROAD 24

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ICGL

ICGL

COSTA RICA Pace Academy’s partnership with World Leadership School continued as fifth-grade students traveled to the Chilamate region of Costa Rica for the fourth consecutive summer. Twenty students—led by Lower School teachers REBECCA RHODES, GREG BLYTHE, LYNN WILMOTH and SALLY FORB—engaged in cultural exchanges, service and conservation education with the goal of developing leadership capabilities and increasing global awareness. From painting projects at a local school and playtime with Costa Rican children to soccer games, conversations in Spanish and ziplining through the rainforest, the trip struck just the right balance of education, challenge and adventure.

SWITZERLAND Adventure was the name of the game as 16 Middle School students explored Switzerland’s breathtaking mountains, lakes and meadowlands with faculty advisers TARA HARRIS, STEWART TARVIN and KATE TORNUSCIOLO. In keeping with the Isdell Center for Global Leadership’s 20172018 theme of conservation, students focused on the country’s efforts to conserve its natural resources and employ sustainable solutions to climate-related issues while hiking, biking and kayaking. Visits to Switzerland’s German, French and Italian regions brought to life the country’s rich history and offered opportunities for exploring its diverse cuisine and culture.

“After this study tour, I’ve changed the way I do things here. I have more empathy for people, and I understand people more.” Freshman SARA ELIZABETH H AY D O N

| Fall KnightTimes KnightTimes | Fall 2018 2018

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ICGL

GUATEMALA

“In Guatemala, I learned that at our cores we’re all human, and we’re all so wonderfully similar.” Freshman GIANA KARAMANOLIS

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KnightTimes | Fall 2018

A partnership with the Alliance for International Reforestation (AIR), an organization committed to improving human and environmental health, took 11 Middle School students and faculty advisers EDNA-MAY HERMOSILLO, DR. KIRSTEN BOEHNER and LUCAS MORENO to Guatemala in June. There, students visited a Pacesponsored AIR tree nursery and planted saplings, built energy-efficient stoves for residents, and spent afternoons interacting with local schoolchildren. A visit to ARCAS Endangered Species Interpretive Center provided an in-depth look at the illegal pet trade, and students learned about Guatemala’s rich Maya culture in the cities of Antigua and Tikal. Hiking a volcano, kayaking beautiful lakes and biking through villages offered a closer look at the country’s many resources in need of conservation.


ICGL “Our time in Brazil truly changed my life and how I view the world. It is an amazing experience when all walks of life come together and learn from one another. I am grateful to the people I met and for the opportunity to learn from them and teach them about our language and culture.” S e n i o r D E VA N J O H N S O N

Cambridge

PERU Upper School teachers EMILY STEVENS and JASON SMITH led seven students on an in-depth journey into the language, archaeological heritage, lifestyle and values of Peru’s indigenous Quechua culture. Students explored Incan sites in the country’s Sacred Valley—including the famous citadel Machu Picchu—and enjoyed lessons on conversational Quechua and traditional farming methods. The group also met with archaeologists to discuss the area’s history and the challenges of balancing tourism and conservation. Later, the cities of Cusco and Lima offered students opportunities to observe the differences between life in Peru’s rural areas and its more modern, bustling cities.

CAMBRIDGE Upper School history department chair TIM HORNOR once again traveled with students to England to participate in Cambridge University’s Society of International Business Fellows (SIBF) summer program.

The annual program, led by global finance and business experts, encourages participants to discover the mathematics of money, the importance of philanthropy and entrepreneurialism, and the significance of financial planning. In addition, the group visited historic sites and enjoyed London’s many cultural offerings.

Brazil

BRAZIL Under the guidance of advisers KACY BRUBAKER, HEATHER WHITE and DEMETRIUS SMITH, 10 Upper School students interested in community engagement and development, education, and sustainability traveled to Brazil to work with PRECE (Program of Education in Cooperative Cells, in Portuguese). The educational movement, based on cooperative learning methodology, assists poor students who dream of attending college to achieve their goals. Pace students taught English classes in the rural Cipó area and assisted with maintenance at the PRECE headquarters before traveling to Rio de Janeiro to explore the history, politics, culture and art of the city.

Brazil

KnightTimes | Fall 2018

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ICGL

LONDON There was no shortage of drama as Upper School faculty members SEAN BRYAN, BAILEY PLAYER and EMILY WASHBURN crossed the pond with seven students for an immersive tour of London’s theatre scene. The group took in eight productions— from Hamlet and King Lear to Red and Peter Pan—over the course of the journey, participated in drama workshops and left no theatre-related site unvisited. Between tours of The Globe and Stratford-upon-Avon, the young thespians squeezed in a day entirely devoted to Harry Potter and shopped till they dropped on Oxford Street and in Camden Square. Trips to London’s not-to-be-missed historic landmarks completed this study tour worthy of a standing ovation.

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ICGL

INDIA Visual anthropology was the focus as seven Upper School students explored the juxtaposition of ancient and modern India with faculty advisers FRANCE DORMAN and RYANN SMITH. Cameras in hand, the group traveled to the cities of Delhi and Jaipur, the Ellora and Ajanta Caves, the Taj Mahal, and five national parks, where they photographed the exotic wildlife native to India’s mountains, hills and forests. Students showcased the photographic results of their adventures at a monthlong exhibit at Pace in November, a partnership with Atlanta Celebrates Photography.

GHANA & BOTSWANA The 11 Upper School students who traveled to Africa with advisers JOANNE BROWN, DR. TROY BAKER and TRISH ANDERSON explored the conservation of endangered species and ecosystems in Botswana, where, on the Mashatu Game Reserve, they learned about ethical behavior as related to natural environments, conservation management and practical survival skills. Later, in partnership with the SubSaharan Education Project in Ghana, students helped facilitate medical outreach and bead-making programs, designed to support women and children’s educational advancement. They also attempted to understand the impact of colonialism by visiting sites related to the transatlantic slave trade and speaking with local experts about the lingering impact of history on modern political, economic and environmental challenges.

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the year of

ENERGY We ’ v e l a u n c h e d t h i s y e a r ’s s t u d y o f

E N E R G Y, t h e I s d e l l C e n t e r f o r G l o b a l L e a d e r s h i p ’s ( I C G L ) a n n u a l t h e m e . From windmills and water wheels to s o l a r- p o w e r e d l a n t e r n s a n d v i s i t i n g s c h o l a r s , h e r e ’s h o w w e ’ r e l i g h t i n g fires of discovery and awareness w i t h i n t h e P a c e A c a d e m y c o m m u n i t y.

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ICGL

The Energy of a Space As students returned to school, they discovered a Lower School transformed to help them explore the theme of Energy. Guided tours of the building introduced our youngest learners to the many types and benefits of renewable energy—solar, wind, hydro and geothermal.

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ICGL

{11 }

Energy in Design Lower School students have put on their human-centered, hands-on thinking caps to tackle energy challenges with empathy and collaboration. Engineering water wheels (1) in Design Thinking and constructing seaworthy Viking ships (6) are a few of the activities that have kept our youngest energy experts busy.sy.

Join the Club To more fully incorporate the ICGL’s annual theme into the curriculum, the Middle School formalized an ICGL club period within its eight-day rotating schedule this year. Designed to introduce students to energy concepts and conundrums, ICGL clubs take part in interactive activities such as designing solar-powered lanterns (3) and creating functioning windmills (2, 4) to better understand the ways in which energy impacts everyday life.

2

3

4

Letting Their Lights Shine Pace’s Woodruff Library continued the energy conversation by offering a lantern-making workshop (5) for Pace community members. Atlanta BeltLine Parade founder and artist Chantelle Rytter conducted the workshop, and participants were encouraged to carry their lanterns in the BeltLine’s annual event.

5

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6


ICGL

Visiting with

JEFF GOODELL In late September, award-winning author and Rolling Stone investigative journalist Jeff Goodell spent four days discussing all things energy with Pace students, parents and faculty. Goodell’s Big Coal: The Dirty Secret Behind America’s Energy Future and his newest book, The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Reshaping of the Civilized World, framed his conversations with audiences of all ages. “Mr. Goodell helped us see that we are currently in a transitional, and perhaps revolutionary, moment in time, when renewable energy has become comparable in cost to energy produced by fossil fuels,” this year’s Isdell Global Leaders, seniors MADELINE ARENTH and VERONICA SANDOVAL and juniors VIRGINIA HOBBS and SANDY LUM, wrote in a letter to the Pace community following Goodell’s visit. “However, because it is difficult to change current energy systems and infrastructure, most of us still obtain the majority of our energy and electricity from fossil fuels. The longer this transition takes, the more significant the issue of climate change becomes.” Goodell encouraged students to take small steps to promote change, including purchasing energy-efficient light bulbs, reducing the use of air conditioning, limiting hot water use, investing in solar panels at home, driving hybrid cars and voting for representatives who will support environmentally sound legislation. “What gives me hope the future?” Goodell tweeted following his visit to Pace. “Smart, engaged kids like those I met [at Pace Academy] today. So great to talk with them about energy, climate and, of course, flying cars.”

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GLOBAL LEADERS

F A C U L T Y

S P O T L I G H T

D

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ICGL A global education for every Student

irector of Diversity and Inclusion JOANNE BROWN has worn many hats—and a tiara or two— over the course of her career. A graduate of the University of Virginia, where she earned a degree in psychology, Brown went on to study law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She spent two decades practicing law in Georgia, first defending product liability cases with a firm in Atlanta and later taking on adoption and family law cases in her own firm. A new calling in independent school administration led Brown to a position as director of admissions at Heritage Preparatory School. Then, in 2014, she joined the Pace Academy admissions team. She took on her current role in 2017 and, in the midst of it all, managed to win the Mrs. International 2000 title and establish a business mentoring pageant hopefuls. Brown pulls from each of these experiences to lead Pace’s diversity and inclusion initiatives, a role that—fittingly— requires that she wear many hats. “My job is to make sure that our faculty and staff, students, and parents all feel like they belong in our community,” Brown says. Given the diversity of the Pace community, that’s no easy task, and it often means very different things to different people. “For faculty, it’s about being a resource and support to ensure that the curriculum reflects different perspectives,” Brown says. “For students and families it’s making sure that policies, practices and programs are in place so that all students and parents see themselves reflected in our community.” Those programs and practices vary greatly based on the division of the school in which they operate. “In the Lower School, we introduce students to basic concepts—what does it mean to include someone? What is empathy?” Brown explains. Through age-appropriate activities and conversations, Brown and her Lower School colleagues lay the foundation for the more sophisticated conversations and experiences students encounter in the Middle and Upper Schools.

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JOANNE BROWN

Brown with students in Ghana

“As our students get older, we talk in more detail about identity, including but not limited to race, religion, gender and cultural differences,” Brown says. “Our young people are eager and ready to have those conversations and dig into these issues, so my job is to create the spaces and opportunities for them to engage.” On any given day, one might find Brown reading to Lower Schoolers as part of the Anti-Defamation League’s Read4Respect program, facilitating dialogue around a poem in a Middle School English class, teaching a ninth-grade Transitions class, planning an event with the Upper School student group PABD (Pace Academy Board of Diversity) or troubleshooting a difficult issue with a parent or teacher. Regardless of the topic or task, Brown’s personal experiences inform her work and decision-making. The daughter of Haitian immigrants, Brown says she looks at life through two very different lenses: that of a first-generation American and that of a black woman. It makes her sensitive to differences and to what others might feel as members of a community in which they are among the minority. “That sensitivity helps me create an environment that feels welcoming and inviting to all families,” Brown says. And if the constant stream of smiling students in and out of Brown’s office is any indication, her efforts are working.

Brown’s background and interest in exploring cultural differences extend to her involvement with Pace’s Isdell Center for Global Leadership (ICGL). With Upper School students, she has explored the diverse ecosystem of Madagascar, religious and racial tensions in Ireland and, most recently, conservation and the impact of colonialism in Ghana and Botswana. “There is something powerful about watching students become aware of themselves in spaces that look nothing like what they’re used to. They become vulnerable in those moments, which opens them up tremendously to learning, and they come to understand how their prior perceptions about a place or people are inaccurate.” Brown says. “On ICGL study tours, I’m very intentional about creating opportunities for students to process and debrief so that they have ownership over what they’ve come to learn about themselves.” Those moments of realization and that broadening of perspectives inspire Brown in her day-to-day work. “I have a lot of hope,” she says. “Our students are eager to change things they don’t agree with. They’re brave and courageous in a way that I didn’t see as a middle or high school student. Even our littlest students—they just get it. We shouldn’t be afraid to allow them to voice their concerns and engage in tough conversations, because they want to do better than the generations before them. We just have to let them.”


GLOBAL LEADERS

TearingDown THE “Everyone’s opinions and stories are different,” says senior KENDALL WILLIS, “but even if someone doesn’t share your opinion on a certain topic, it doesn’t mean that their opinion is less valid than yours. That’s one of the things I learned at Tearing Down the Walls.” The two-day race and leadership conference welcomed Director of Diversity and Inclusion JOANNE BROWN, faculty members ERICA BARBAKOW and OMAR LÓPEZ THISMÓN, and seven Upper School students to Nashville’s Vanderbilt University in June. Tearing Down the Walls allows independent-school students from diverse racial and socio-economic backgrounds the opportunity to “become leaders and bridge builders in the arena of race relations” with the goal of “emboldening them to lead.” Participants heard from renowned

WALLS

speakers, including anti-racist writer and educator Tim Rice; engaged in break-out sessions and social activities; and took part in conversations with their peers about difficult topics. “Attending Tearing Down the Walls was very important to me,” says junior TAYLOR DOUCET. “It gave me a whole different outlook on life and taught me that no matter what color you are, we all have something to share to help someone out.” Broadening students’ perspectives is the goal, says Brown, who seeks out opportunities like Tearing Down the Walls for students and faculty alike. “Through Pace’s diversity and inclusion efforts, we want to expose young people to different experiences so they bring those experiences and knowledge back to Pace to create a more informed, welcoming community.”

An Education IN CIVIL & HUMAN RIGHTS As an Affiliate Partner of the National Center for Civil and Allen Human Rights, located in Atlanta, Pace Academy benefits from The Center’s extensive resources and educational opportunities. Under the leadership of Director of Diversity and Inclusion JOANNE BROWN, Pace community members engage with The Center in myriad ways—from guided museum tours and in-depth Hashim workshops to faculty development and guest speakers. Over the summer, The Center welcomed senior ALEX ALLEN and junior AMAN HASHIM to its cohort of Affiliate-Partner interns. “The internship program is designed to support and enrich the work of student activists and leaders by connecting them to organizations and individuals working in the human rights realm of Atlanta,” says Center Education and

Public Programs Coordinator Ted Ward. In addition, interns were charged with coordinating a student-led Human Rights Day. “I applied for this internship because racism, sexism and gender discrimination are things that all people deal with,” Hashim reports. “I have been a victim of racism and wanted to make a change [while] becoming better educated about how it originated. I plan to share my experience with my peers… and, hopefully, the Human Rights Day we put together will impact others.” For Allen, the highlight of the program was meeting one of her heroes, Reverend Jesse Jackson. That interaction, coupled with an in-depth look at Atlanta history, sparked something inside her. “I learned how passionate I am about civil rights across the U.S.,” Allen says. The experience also informed her words and actions: “The way I answer certain questions about being black is quite different now. I am more pa-

tient than I was before the internship, and I am eager to educate instead of being quick to be angry.” “We were fortunate to have Alex Allen and Aman Hashim from Pace Academy join us this year to help design and deliver a teen-centered human rights program at The Center, set for February 2019,” Ward says.

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GLOBAL LEADERS

The USA softball delegation to the International Maccabi Youth Games. Jamie Kornheiser is pictured front row center; Sydney Silverstein is back row, sixth from the left.

DIPLOMATS ON THE DIAMOND

BAKING

FOR BREAST CANCER At the conclusion of the 2017-2018 school year, the Upper School Baking for Breast Cancer club donated $838.88 to TurningPoint Breast Cancer Rehabilitation Center, a local nonprofit that provides evidence-based breast cancer rehabilitation and support. CoPresident and Treasurer BEN BERNSTEIN ’18 presented the club’s earnings to TurningPoint Executive Director Rebecca Cowens-Alvarado.

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Sophomores JAMIE KORNHEISER and SYDNEY SILVERSTEIN can officially add “International Gold Medalist” to their already impressive resumes. Over the summer, the softball standouts traveled to Haifa, Israel, to compete on behalf of the USA softball delegation in the inaugural International Maccabi Youth Games. The 10-day event brought together Jewish athletes representing seven sports and 12 countries, including Australia, Canada, South Africa, Brazil and the U.S. The tournament-style competition was paired with touring and experiential education with the goal of “encouraging Jewish pride, strengthening Jewish bonds and creating a heightened awareness of Israel and the Jewish community.” Silverstein became involved in the games when Team USA’s coach offered her a spot on the pitcher’s mound. “The idea of going to Israel and representing the U.S. was an opportunity I could not pass up,” she says. She then recruited Kornheiser, who had participated in the Maccabi Games in the U.S. In Israel, Silverstein pitched shutout softball throughout the tournament, and Kornheiser notched two home runs—one in the gold-medal game—to bring home the title. And while their

new hardware was certainly a highlight of the trip, the opportunity to interact and share experiences with teenagers from around the world was far more impactful. “It was amazing that, even though we came from 12 different countries, we could all come together and figure out ways to communicate with each other,” says Silverstein, who has remained in touch with many of her fellow softball players. Kornheiser agrees: “This experience changed my global perspective because I got to see teenagers from all over the world communicating and getting to know one another despite language and cultural barriers,” she says. “It was fascinating to learn how there are similarities between us despite our different upbringings and cultures.”

SINGING IN SWITZERLAND

Those who saw Pace Academy’s production of Beauty and the Beast will no doubt remember sophomore AUDREY HOLTON’S turn as Mrs. Potts—her lilting soprano is hard to forget (look for coverage of the show in our winter issue). This past summer, following a rigorous application and audition process, Holton’s voice carried her across the Atlantic to Geneva, Switzerland, where


GLOBAL LEADERS

Audrey Holton as Mrs. Potts in Beauty and the Beast

she was one of nine young women from seven countries selected to participate in the Summer Performing Arts with Juilliard’s Young Vocal Artist track. Over the course of the two-week program, Holton developed her technical singing skills through participation in one-on-one instruction, ensemble work, and music theory and master classes. “The highlight of the program was living in a dorm house with girls from all over the world—China, Singapore, Australia, Italy, Spain, Romania, Ireland and the U.S,” Holton says. “It was such a special experience to hear about how each lives her life. At first, I thought the girls were going to be really different from me, but when I met them, they immediately invited me in and were extremely nice. I had never really thought about living with people from other countries before, and it was such a fun experience.” In addition to broadening Holton’s global perspective, the program expanded her musical horizons. “I now want to explore learning more about opera and improving my skills in that area,” Holton says. “I hadn’t considered going to college strictly for voice, but now I might look into it. Overall this program really changed my idea of a professional singer—from someone who is talented to someone who has the skillset and experience to live the life of a singer.”

Pictured left to right: Matthew Quintana, Mae Shippen and Melody Walter

A SCIENCE-Y SUMMER

An interest in science and the opportunity to gain hands-on lab experience—as well as a nudge from Upper School science teacher MELODY WALTER—attracted juniors MATTHEW QUINTANA and MAE SHIPPEN to the University of Georgia’s Young Dawgs Program. The program, for high-achieving high school juniors and seniors (applicants must have a grade point average of at least 3.7), places students in six-week internships throughout the university with the goal of preparing them for post-secondary education and professional careers. Shippen found herself in an infectious disease and cellular biology lab, where she conducted research on Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite that causes Chagas disease, common in South and Central America and Mexico. Her work involved testing samples, collaborating with fellow researchers and learning the ins and outs of life in a lab. Across campus, Quintana worked in a physical chemistry lab using fiber-laser frequency combs to do ultrafast chemistry. “Understanding the language and complex words—even understanding what I was doing—was the most difficult part of the program,” Quintana reports. “Ultrafast cavity enhanced tran-

sient absorption spectroscopy is not very common.” Walter met with Shippen and Quintana throughout the summer to discuss how best to maximize their lab experiences and help them as they prepared for the culmination of their internships: their final presentations. “My biggest challenge was working through my presentation topic with my professor every week,” Shippen recalls. “I was presenting on something that he knew everything about and had spent 15-plus years of his life studying. I would perfect my PowerPoint just to have him tell me that it was all wrong, but it really was worth it because I learned an incredible amount from my time in his lab.” Shippen and Quintana, along with their fellow Young Dawgs participants, presented to a panel of three judges, and Quintana took home the top prize. “Both Mae and Matthew gave polished, informative presentations,” Walter says. “I was incredibly proud of them.” And while neither Shippen nor Quintana are sure they envision careers in scientific research, both were impressed by the dedication the field requires and grateful for the experience. “I cherished my time at UGA with the Young Dawgs program,” Shippen says. “I think all who are interested in some sort of science should look into it and learn more!”

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In a time of unrest, difficult discussions about race are shaping the Pace community for the better. Community of Change is a gathering of parents, alumni, faculty and staff who are committed to deepening relationships in the Pace community. Raising competent, capable, responsible global citizens begins with equipping adults with the tools to interact with diverse communities, form healthy relationships, and effectively and thoughtfully engage with new information or situations in our neighborhoods, state or world. Community of Change conversations help members of the Pace community intentionally engage with each other and develop greater understanding—the group is a think tank for individuals committed to developing global thinkers and leaders.

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On

Sept. 16, 2016, Terence Crutcher was shot to death by police after exiting his vehicle on a Tulsa, Okla., road. The 40-year-old black man, a student at Tulsa Community College, was the father of four children. For Pace Academy parent LORI BAKER, Crutcher’s death—another in a long list of black deaths at the hands of law enforcement—hit particularly close to home. Baker’s husband, Director of Athletics DR. TROY BAKER, had spent the previous three years commuting from the family’s home in Memphis to Nashville, Tenn., while he worked toward his doctorate at Vanderbilt University. The Bakers and their four children are black. In the wake of Crutcher’s death, Baker thought, not for the first time, “That could have been my husband.” The next day, she dropped off her son at school, sat in her car and wept. “I was heartbroken by what was happening in the world,” Baker says. “I remember thinking, ‘I can’t believe no one else feels this.’ People hadn’t said anything. It felt like no one cared.” Baker took to Facebook and penned a post challenging others to speak up against injustice, to voice their pain. “For

my friends who don’t know what to say,” she wrote, “Just say something.” “I was sitting at my computer, looking at the news, devastated,” recalls Pace parent JENY MATHIS, who is white. “I sent an email to friends and included Lori. I felt in my gut that we needed to talk about these events. Something needed to happen, so I suggested we get together.” The two women, both parents to volleyball players, had interacted while watching their daughters on the court but didn’t truly know each other. Nevertheless, they felt connected and together reached out to fellow members of the Pace community via Facebook and email to offer a space to talk about recent racerelated events. “We scheduled two gatherings on a Friday morning and hoped maybe five people would come,” Baker recalls. “We had no expectations. We just thought it would be a good opportunity to connect and share. The premise was simple: come, listen and respect someone else’s story.” Ten people attended the first session, and Upper School English teacher RICKS CARSON, now retired, asked if he could bring his class to the second. “Then, more and more people came,” Mathis


COMMUNITY OF CHANGE

Jeny Mathis and Lori Baker

says. “There were at least 100 people in the room—men, women, black, white— we couldn’t believe it.” For hours, participants sat and listened as others shared their fears and frustrations, questions, and confusion. Community of Change was born. “That first meeting was absolutely life-changing for both of us,” Mathis says. “We couldn’t believe people’s vulnerability and openness. It changed us forever.” Baker often talked about race with her friends of color, but rarely discussed her experiences with white people; for Mathis, race was never a frequent topic of conversation. “What happened in that room was uncomfortable and awesome all at the same time,” Mathis recalls. “We had to get through that, which made both of us grow in ways we weren’t expecting… but we both felt called to do it.” Prior to that initial meeting, Baker and Mathis had no intention of continuing the conversation, but the need for further dialogue quickly became clear. They scheduled additional gatherings, creating “open spaces” for individuals to reflect and share. They also collaborated with the Office of Diversity and Inclusion to coordinate two town hall meetings for the Pace community, entitled Modeling Authentic Conversations About Race. Nearly 250 students, faculty, staff and parents attended the first town hall, where Baker and Mathis once again shared their stories. Journalist Eric

Deggans, National Public Radio’s media critic, moderated the conversation, which posed the question, “How do recent events in our nation affect us as people, and in turn, affect our interactions at Pace each day?” While many different viewpoints and experiences were expressed at the event, it was clear that members of the Pace community care deeply about one another and are willing to engage in difficult discussions to ensure meaningful and positive change. “I remain in awe after participating in [Pace Academy’s] amazing event,” Deggans wrote following the town hall. “There are few communities where people are open and respectful enough to talk about tough issues involving race across racial lines. There’s been a lot of shouting and insults slung around about race issues elsewhere… but the parents and students at Pace set a wonderful example by speaking from the heart and listening closely to find common ground on a subject where it is often difficult to make progress.” As the school year progressed, Baker and Mathis introduced more structure to Community of Change meetings by asking specific questions to guide the conversation. They found that racial awareness—their own, and that of Community of Change participants—began to grow. “Over the course of those meetings, barriers were broken down,” Baker recalls. “I realized that breaking down those barriers takes practice—that was my ‘light-bulb moment.’ To move the larger conversation forward, you have to practice and continue to engage with people.” “Issues of race are so hard to talk about,” Mathis says. “But white people need to talk about them. We need to acknowledge the privilege we have, and recognize that so many of our successes come as a result of others’ disadvantages.” That awareness and acknowledgment goes both ways, Baker asserts. “The same way that Jeny wants to bring white people into the room to talk about race is the same way that black people need to

talk about race,” she says. “It’s a different conversation, but the end goal is similar.” At the final meeting of that first year, Baker and Mathis asked the diverse group gathered, “What does being part of Community of Change require of you?” Responses varied, but a central theme emerged: “We are a community,” Baker says. “And as a community, we should aspire to be a place where every single individual feels welcomed and included.” “This goes beyond race,” Mathis says. “We want to talk about religion, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation and other topics that affect our community. How do new families feel when they arrive at Pace? How can we make everyone feel welcome?” And so, now in its third year, Community of Change is working with Director of Diversity and Inclusion JOANNE BROWN to focus on that ideal of the truly inclusive community. They hope to bring new voices and viewpoints into the group, and to continue to practice the conversation skills needed to effectively and thoughtfully engage with their fellow Pace parents. They also hope to encourage awareness, sensitivity and conversations outside of Community of Change. “The work that Lori and Jeny do through the Community of Change exemplifies Pace’s core values,” says Brown. “It truly shines a light on the way Pace creates success through partnership with parents, as well as the emphasis we place on respect for others and their unique ideas and beliefs.” Baker and Mathis want Pace parents to know that all are welcome at Community of Change gatherings. Meeting dates, times and locations are published on the online school calendar and in the weekly School News e-newsletter. “I think this kind of conversation is unique to Pace,” Baker says. “It’s sticky and messy, but it speaks to the character of the people at this school. Our goal is to grow as people and make Pace an even better place. It’s exciting that there are parents who want to make changes in their homes, in our community, in our city and in the world. It’s hard work, but we are encouraged. There can never be too many ‘changers.’”

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Leadership Pace 2018 Chair MARK JOHNSON '94 introduces program participants to the Alumni Association's Strategic Plan.

Left to right: Alumni Relations Manager HAYLEY SHOJI '12 with Alumni Board President BRYAN CHITWOOD '93 and Subcommittee Chairs JASON LEE '96, FRANK WOODLING '05, CARTER INGLIS '89 and KRISTIN CHICK CARPENTER '07

LOOKING BACK TO

MOVE FORWARD INTRODUCING THE PACE ACADEMY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION’S FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN


ALUMNI STRATEGIC PLAN

OVER

the past 60 years, Pace Academy has graduated 3,759 students who now make up the Pace Academy Alumni Association. More recently, Pace has made significant strides in growing its alumni program, utilizing the Alumni Association Board to increase volunteer leadership and alumni involvement. Now, with an engaged Alumni Association Board and a variety of new leadership opportunities available to alumni, the program is poised for further growth. To guide that growth, the Alumni Association Board worked with the Alumni Office to undertake the development of a five-year strategic plan. The plan establishes the path forward and identifies five areas of focus for the Alumni Association, all intended to promote a deeper and mutually beneficial relationship between Pace and its alumni. The purpose of the Alumni Strategic Plan is to help all alumni discover the power of lifelong engagement. Pace graduates are a vital component of the school community, and Pace is committed to making all alumni feel supported, connected and inspired, regardless of when they received their diplomas. “We hope that over the coming years, using the Alumni Strategic Plan as a roadmap, we will foster an unwavering sense of belonging in the Pace community among our alumni,” says Alumni Relations Manager HAYLEY SHOJI ’12. “We recognize that our alumni represent diverse backgrounds and experiences, so we wanted to create a plan that reflects those myriad interests. We hope that some part of the Alumni

Strategic Plan speaks to each and every alumnus and inspires further involvement with the Alumni Association.” The Alumni Strategic Plan is structured to reflect the different relationships alumni have with the Alumni Association and other Pace alumni through different stages of their lives. “While Pace has given us countless life skills, the biggest lessons from our time at Pace have come as a result of relationships—our relationships with each other, our teachers and the school,” says Alumni Board President BRYAN CHITWOOD ‘93. “As life circumstances change, relationships remain and can be leveraged in different ways. We have young alumni taking their first steps into the professional world who are looking for a network to lean on. We have alumni who are now parents hoping to send their children to Pace. We have a student body of future alumni who could benefit from graduates’ expertise and involvement.” To support and execute the Alumni Strategic Plan, the Alumni Association Board has been restructured to include subcommittees to support four of the five priorities listed on the following page: Alumni to Alumni, Alumni to Young Alumni, Alumni to Future Alumni and Alumni to Pace. Each committee is made up of Alumni Association Board members and other interested alumni. The purpose of engaging nonAlumni Association Board members on these committees is to expand the number of voices at the table, thereby better representing the entire alumni community. Cheers to the next 60 years and future generations of Pace Knights!

PACE ACADEMY ALUMNI BOARD ANDREW ALEXANDER '04 JULIANNA RUE CAGLE '03 KRISTIN CHICK CARPENTER '07 Alumni to Future Alumni Committee Chair BRYAN CHITWOOD '93 President JASON COX '92 TRIP FOLEY '99 MEREDITH WINITT FORRESTER '95 ANDREW GUEST '04 BLYTHE O'BRIEN HOGAN '03 CARTER INGLIS '89 Alumni to Alumni Committee Chair CINDY GAY JACOBY '83 MARK JOHNSON '94 JASON LEE '96 Alumni to Young Alumni Committee Chair JUSTIN LEEF '08 TREY POPE '86 EVANS RAINER '04 FRANK WOODLING '05 Alumni to Pace Committee Chair STEVE WRAY '88

If you are interested in serving on a committee as a non-Board member, please contact HAYLEY SHOJI ’12 at hayley.shoji@paceacademy.org.

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STRATEGIC PRIORITIES

CONNECT ALUMNI SUPPORT NEW & BUILD A FARGENERATIONS OF REACHING NETWORK PACE ALUMNI ALUMNI - ALUMNI

ALUMNI - YOUNG ALUMNI

vibrant and flourishing alumni community benefits individual Pace alumni, as well as the alumni program and entire school community. We will evaluate existing alumni programming and strengthen future offerings to ensure relevant, meaningful opportunities that facilitate alumni-to-alumni connections and are available to all alumni. Additionally, we will utilize events and technology to support professional networking between alumni.

entoring connections between alumni and newer alumni provide benefits to both the mentor and mentee. We will foster alumni engagement with younger alumni by providing ample social and professional networking opportunities. We will advocate for an alumni culture that supports newer alumni, as well as those soon to be alumni, through opportunities such as career mentoring, internships and job placements. We will utilize shared interests between alumni, both at Pace and in the workplace, to create programming that promotes enthusiastic connections across generations.

A

GOALS •

• •

Broaden the scope of alumni cultivation efforts through online and regional outreach and networking. Utilize current alumni parents as a resource to prospective alumni parents. Develop and promote opportunities for alumni to use their Pace connections as catalysts for direct interaction with one another (for social events, career networking, service, diversity groups, etc.).

EVALUATION •

Evaluate all alumni events every two years to determine relevance and alumni interest. Create a feedback tool that allows alumni to assess their networking experiences and offer opinions on the best ways to build alumni relationships.

M

GOALS •

EVALUATION • • •

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Implement a LinkedIn platform to support a scalable mentoring program and career education opportunities. Create alumni networking opportunities and connections based on professional fields or industries. Collaborate with the Office of College Counseling to identify ways to connect young alumni in college with older alumni able to offer career opportunities, professional development, etc. Grow LinkedIn network by five percent each year. Establish a pipeline of opportunities for alumni. Create a feedback tool that allows young alumni to assess their networking experiences and offer opinions on the best ways to build alumni relationships.


ALUMNI STRATEGIC PLAN

PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME ENGAGED ALUMNI

CULTIVATE PACE PRIDE & A COMMITMENT TO GIVING BACK

COMMUNICATE FOR LIFELONG ENGAGEMENT

ALUMNI - FUTURE ALUMNI

ALUMNI - PACE

ALUMNI - ALUMNI OFFICE

onnecting current Pace students and faculty to alumni and the alumni program enriches the school community and showcases the benefits of ongoing alumni engagement. In partnership with Pace’s faculty and departments, we will explore and develop avenues for alumni to interact with Pace students of all ages, recognizing that student awareness is central to the future success of the program. We will stimulate alumni interest in and encourage alumni support of Pace priorities that include diversity and inclusion, arts, athletics and initiatives of the Isdell Center for Global Leadership. We will introduce graduating seniors to the concept of giving back to Pace, both through volunteerism and monetary support.

lumni with an enduring allegiance to Pace have the potential to be its greatest cheerleaders and most generous supporters; the broad-based and avid engagement of alumni benefits the Pace of today and of tomorrow. We will cultivate this level of engagement by providing attractive opportunities for alumni to participate in the life of the school and help further its mission. We will employ new and greater strategies to stimulate increased alumni giving, thereby increasing participation to levels on par with peer schools. We will utilize a variety of avenues to celebrate alumni supporters. We will recruit qualified alumni to serve on Pace advisory and leadership boards.

C

GOALS •

Promote and grow the fledgling Senior Giving Campaign to create a precedent of engaging with and giving back to Pace. Increase alumni exposure to students and faculty by utilizing alumni (or their contacts) for a variety of opportunities, both existing and new. Examples include guest speaking engagements, panelist positions, internship sponsors, etc. Connect alumni and students through affinity associations, for example, theatre, basketball, debate, etc.

EVALUATION •

Reach goal of 100-percent student participation in the Senior Giving Campaign. Survey participants to evaluate their understanding of the Senior Giving Campaign and its impact. Measure engagement between alumni volunteers and current students and track growth over time.

A

GOALS •

• •

Further develop the Leadership Pace program to engage future alumni leaders. Better communicate the impact of The Alumni Fund using vehicles such as The Alumni Challenge. Continue to grow the Knight Cap social event. Explore opportunities for regional fundraising and develop programs as appropriate. Identify and implement ways to best recognize and steward alumni volunteers and donors.

EVALUATION • • •

Increase Alumni Fund participation to 20 percent. Increase Knight Cap participation and proceeds from year to year. Increase number of alumni volunteers in leadership positions.

T

ransparent and relevant communications from the Pace Alumni Office clarify and enhance the value of membership in the Pace Alumni Association. The Alumni Office will identify and implement appropriate communications vehicles to educate alumni about the school’s current priorities. The Alumni Office, in partnership with other areas of the school, will expand alumni-directed programming and communications. The Alumni Office will reach more alumni by implementing thoughtfully targeted communications strategies based on geographic region, professional affiliation and other considerations.

GOALS •

Employ communications vehicles (existing and new) that effectively reach alumni, resulting in meaningful dialogue and increased alumni engagement. Present a cohesive identity in all print and web communications to improve brand recognition. Institute a class agents program to bridge communication between every class and the Alumni Office.

EVALUATION •

• •

Evaluate engagement on social media pages and raise followers on top platforms. Decrease lost alumni to less than five percent. Survey class agents about their experiences to evaluate effectiveness.

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WHERE ARE THEY

NOW? ALUMNI UPDATES

For the third consecutive year, Super Lawyers named JONATHAN LEVINE ’77 one of the top 10 attorneys in the state of Georgia. Jonathan is a founding partner of Buckhead family law firm Levine, Smith, Snider & Wilson LLC, which focuses on divorce, custody and other complex family law matters. LAUREN LINDER GRUNBERG ’00 was named to Savoy magazine’s 2018 Most Influential Black Lawyers list, recognizing the “best of the best” of black lawyers working as partners in leading national law firms or as corporate or general counsel in Fortune 1000 corporations. Lauren also made the Atlanta Business Chronicle’s 2018 “40 Under 40” list. Lauren is vice president and associate general counsel for The Weather Channel Television Network. COURTNEY FREER ’04 published Rentier Islamism: The Influence of the Muslim Brotherhood in Gulf Monarchies with Oxford University Press. The book traces the history of the Muslim Brotherhood in Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, and demonstrates how Islamist ideology retains appeal even in “rentier states” that benefit from vast hydrocarbon resources. The research, conducted during Courtney’s Ph.D. studies at the University of Oxford in England, is based on more

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than 100 field interviews of both Arabic and English sources and is the first Englishlanguage history of the Brotherhood in the Gulf. The book aims to undermine the notion that, in the so-called rentier states, the arrangement of no taxation, no representation is universally accepted by politically quiescent citizens; despite material provisions from the state, ideas and ideologies have power, including those of the Muslim Brotherhood. Courtney is a research fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science Middle East Centre, where she has worked for three years. GRACE ALEXANDER ’10 competed for Team USA at the ITU World Triathlon Championships in Australia’s Gold Coast, after qualifying at the National Championships in 2017. She placed fourth in her age group and eighth out of all female participants, and qualified to apply for her professional triathlon license. Grace lives in Atlanta, where she is the coordinating technician in the locomotor department at The Shepherd Center. “Besides that, I enjoy eating and napping,” she writes. 1. Lauren Linder Grunberg; 2. Grace Alexander 3. Katherine Merritt; 4. Sam Downey (back row, center) and the cast of Law of the Jungle; 5. Harrison Ray, photo credit: Photoboat; 6. Wendell Carter Jr.; 7. Alex Ross


ALUMNI

SAM DOWNEY ’14 wrote a play, Law of the Jungle, which premiered at Theatre Row as part of the New York New Works Festival. The play was selected as a finalist in the competition, designed for aspiring playwrights. “Law of the Jungle was my writing and directorial debut, and an especially weird way for someone to enter those worlds,” Sam writes. “The play itself was about the animals of the jungle discovering democracy and realizing the prejudices they carry around with them. Some are necessary for survival, and some are rather baseless biases against undeserving animals.” In the play, the actors portray the animals, making it as much an experimental dance piece as political satire. “Needless to say, this is not a genre that aspiring playwrights usually choose as their debut work,” Sam adds. Sam hopes to take the show to a New York theatre to “further attract attention from the producers who gave us glowing reviews!” he writes. “There is still a long grind ahead before the show reaches what I believe to be its full potential, but it's an exciting first step on the adventure!” KATHERINE MERRITT ’14 has started her coursework at the Dental College of Georgia. At the conclusion of the four-year program, she will receive a Doctor of Dental Medicine degree. “So far, I am really enjoying it!” writes Katherine. KENNY SELMON ’14 earned the title of national champion at the USATF Outdoor

Championships in the men’s 400-meter hurdles with a time of 48.21. His first-place finish secured a spot on Team USA, and he traveled to London in July to compete in the 2018 Athletics World Cup. There, Kenny brought home the 400-meter hurdles world championship with a time of 48.97 seconds. A recent graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kenny received the school’s Patterson Medal Award, its most prestigious athletics honor. Midshipman HARRISON RAY ’16 sported his Pace band beanie while part of the crew of the United States Naval Academy varsity offshore sailing team racing in the New York Yacht Club Annual Regatta, part of the 164th Newport to Bermuda Race. Harrison, a sophomore computer science major at the Academy, has made the Superintendent’s List each semester. Other than racing this summer, he trained on one of the newest Navy nuclear submarines.

recognizing plays, reacting to situations, coming from the weak side to help. We thought he’d be a plus defender because he’s got size, mobility and length.” Wendell started at center as the Bulls kicked off their 2018 season against the Washington 76ers. Davidson College golfer ALEX ROSS ’17 finished his freshman campaign for the Wildcats as the 2018 Atlantic 10 Most Outstanding Rookie and the 2018 Atlantic 10 Rookie of the Year, and led the men’s golf team to the Atlantic 10 men’s golf championship title. Over the summer, he finished second at the Georgia Amateur golf tournament at 5-under par 275 after closing with a 68. Alex started his sophomore season by leading the Wildcats to the title at the 2018 Dayton Invitational, where he was named Atlantic 10 Co-Golfer of the Week.

Following his freshman year at Duke University, WENDELL CARTER JR. ’17 was drafted by the Chicago Bulls as the No. 7 overall pick in the National Basketball Association 2018 Draft. He was named to the All-NBA Summer League first team after averaging 14.6 points, 9.4 rebounds and 2.6 blocks per game in the Summer League Tournament. “Wendell is a very instinctive player on both ends,” Bulls General Manager Gar Forman told the Chicago Tribune. “A lot of times you talk about instincts offensively. But he’s got really good defensive instincts—

T WHA U O Y ARE O? T UP

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MARRIAGES CAMILLE BARCHERS ’02 and Joseph Hansen were married on July 5, 2018, in Portsmouth, R.I., at the Glen Manor House. Pace attendees included Brother of Honor GUS BARCHERS ’07, Matron of Honor KATHLEEN MCNEILL TRESTRAIL ’02, and friends SAM CUNNINGHAM ’02, MAUREEN SAUNDERS ECKARD ’02, ANNA ZANE ’02 and COURTNEY FREER ’04. Camille, who finished her Ph.D. in city and regional planning at Georgia Tech, has

joined the university’s faculty, where she teaches in the School of Public Policy and for the Leadership, Education and Development program. Joseph is finishing his master's degree at the Warnell School of Forestry at the University of Georgia. They live in Atlanta and are happy to be surrounded by friends and family. MARTHA LEDBETTER SELLERS ’03 married Jonathon Sellers on July 14, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. They have two children, Tilly and Henry, as well as two dogs, Lucy and Doug.

Martha and Jonathon work in healthcare in Nashville. EMILY ALEXANDER BRUECK ’06 and Alexander Brueck were married on Nov. 4, 2017, in Beaver Creek, Colo. Pace attendees included ANDREW ALEXANDER ’04, JACQUI JAMES ’06, JULIE SCHAETZEL ’06, EVE WERTHEIM FRID ’06, TASNEEM AHMED ’06, KATHERINE RANKIN MADDUX ’06, MAGGIE REYNOLDS ’06, MARY HIPP ROGERS ’06, REID ROGERS ’07, EMILY HISHTA COHEN ’06, JOEL COHEN ’06, ERIC RIDDELL ’06 and DANNY LOWENTHAL ’06. Emily is a pharmaceutical sales representative for Celgene, and Alexander is a project engineer for The Ballard Group. They reside in Golden, Colo. MADISON GALLANT DAVIES ’10 and BRENDAN DAVIES ’09 were married at the Callanwolde Fine Arts Center in Atlanta on April 7, 2018. The couple celebrated with KAITLYN DINKINS ’11, GRACE SOUTHWORTH NADEAU ’10, SEAN GREATREX ’09, CHRIS WESTBROOK ’09, KATIE STUART ’09, LESLIE PEARD ’09, DAVID DARLAND ’09, CHRIS MERRITT ’10 and HANNAH COLETTA ’10.

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1. The Ledbetter/Sellers wedding 2. The Gallant/Davies wedding 3. The Barchers/Hansen wedding 4. The Alexander/Brueck wedding


ALUMNI

FACULTY & STAFF MILESTONES Fine Arts Center Assistant Technical Director RACHAEL HUNTER married Brett Rogers on Sept. 23, 2018, at Wild Heaven Brewery in Decatur, Ga. The high school sweethearts, reunited after 18 years, surprised guests, who believed they were attending an engagement party. Faculty members SEAN BRYAN, DONNA POTTORFF and SCOTT SARGENT helped the happy couple celebrate.

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First-grade associate teacher EMILY PITTS and her husband, WILL PITTS, a former member of Pace’s visual and performing arts department, welcomed daughter Lillian “Lilly” Marie on March 30, 2018. Lilly was 6 pounds, 11 ounces.

www.facebook.com/paceacademy alumniassociation

5. The Hunter/Rogers wedding 6. Lillian "Lilly" Marie Pitts

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BIRTHS SALIMA LAHDA FETTER ’94 and her husband, MATT FETTER, welcomed daughter Laila Noor-Ann on July 6, 2018. Big sisters Zia and SOPHIA FETTER ’29 are thrilled! Heather and ELLIOTT FRIEDMAN ’96 had a son, Ryder Marion, on June 14, 2018. Ryder was 8 pounds, 4 ounces and 20.5 inches long. He joins brother Davis, 3. TYEISE HUNTLEY JONES ’98 and her husband, Daryl, welcomed Chancellor David on July 3, 2018. His big brother, Justice, 2, is very excited. The family lives in Chicago, where Tyeise works for Chicago Public Schools. SHAYNA WALTER LEVY ’99, her husband, Adam, and new big sister Orly welcomed Talia Brielle on Aug. 19, 2018. The family lives in New York City, where Shayna joined Adam's family retail clothing business, Dave's New York, as director of marketing last year. KATIE DALY JOHNSON ’03 and her husband, Ben, had a daughter, Daly Carolyn, on April 25, 2018. Katie is a marketing manager for Comcast, and Ben is a commercial real estate broker. The family lives in Atlanta. BRIDGET LOWERY LADYMAN ’05 and her husband, Bo, had a daughter, Eve, in September 2017. They recently moved to Atlanta from New York. Bailey and SAM SABULIS ’05 welcomed Blair Ann on Feb. 26, 2018. Sam is an insurance litigation attorney at the Buckhead office of Lueder, Larkin & Hunter, and Bailey, a fellow Atlanta native, is also an attorney. MAGGIE MATHEWS WINGO ’05 and her husband, Justin, welcomed son Charles “Gaines” on Aug. 22, 2018. The family lives in Atlanta. Brianne and HARRISON KAUFMAN ’06 welcomed daughter Catherine Luca on Oct. 16, 2018. 1. Catherine Luca Kaufman 2. Laila Noor-Ann Fetter with big sisters Zia and Sophia 3. Chancellor David Jones 4. Ryder Marion Freidman 5. Talia Brielle Levy 6. Daly Carolyn Johnson 7. Blair Ann Sabulis 8. Eve Ladyman 9. Charles “Gaines” Wingo

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IN MEMORIAM

DIANNE BRIDGES HETZEL, the daughter of JULIA BRIDGES and former Pace Academy Board of Trustees Chair RUSSELL BRIDGES JR., passed away on Sept. 23, 2018. Dianne graduated from Northside High School, attended Randolph Macon Women’s College, completed her education at Emory University and was stationed in the Philippines as a Peace Corps volunteer. Upon returning to Atlanta, she became Delta Air Lines’ first female ticket agent and married ZANE HETZEL. Dianne was a dedicated Christian and an active member of the Methodist Church, most notably Northside United Methodist, which her parents helped found, and most recently Carrollton First United Methodist. Dianne was also an enthusiastic leader of water aerobics classes and swim lessons in her community of Fairfield Plantation in Villa Rica. “Dianne was a ‘mother’ to many: exchange students, summer

boarders and young neighbors all experienced her hospitality and generosity,” her family writes. “Family and friends often were the recipients of a ‘JBILY’ (‘Just Because I Love You’) gift or a ‘sack’ with something like a bag of treats picked up from a roadside fruit stand, a page ripped from her devotional and a just-finished book she wanted to pass on.” She is survived by her husband, Zane; siblings Terry Bridges (wife Reg Bridges), Bob Bridges (wife Linden Bridges), TOM BRIDGES ’67 (wife Anita Bridges), and DAVID BRIDGES ’72; children Maria Anette Roberts (husband James Roberts), ELAINE HETZEL MEYER ’88 (husband Christopher Meyer), RUSSELL HETZEL ’92 (wife Elizabeth Hetzel), Dorrie Elizabeth Moate (husband Lloyd Moate), and APRIL HETZEL JOHNSON ’96 (husband Kevin Johnson); 12 grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Pregnancy Resource Center of Carrollton, 514 Tanner Street, Carrollton, GA 30117.

Out & About 1.

TRAVIS PECK ’92 and AMY HOFSTETTER ’92 recently won the annual Hanover West Bud Parker Tennis Tournament.

2.

KEVIN LINDER ’94 organized the first happy hour for the Pace Academy Black Alumni Association at JCT Kitchen in September.

3.

Chicago-area alumni gathered at Cindy’s Rooftop Bar for drinks with Head of School FRED ASSAF in June.

4.

While home for fall break, JADEN STEAGALL ’18 and BEN BERNSTEIN ’18 stopped by to say hello to visual arts faculty members DONICE BLOODWORTH and MARK KNOTT. 1

5.

6.

Football alumni and current college football players MICK ASSAF ’16 (Notre Dame), REALUS GEORGE ’18 (University of Miami), JAMAREE SALYER ’18 (University of Georgia), MARK SOMMERVILLE ’17 (Berry College), ANDREW THOMAS ’17 (University of Georgia) and TREY BLOUNT ’17 (University of Georgia) returned to Pace in October to cheer on the varsity football team against Cedar Grove High School. Charlotte, N.C.-area alumni gathered for a happy hour at Red Rocks Café in September before heading to Charlotte Christian School to cheer on the Pace varsity football team, visiting from Atlanta.

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KNIGHTS CELEBRATE

1978

Knights fans came together to show their Pace Academy spirit during Homecoming & Reunion Weekend on Sept. 21 and 22. Alumni festivities kicked off on Friday with a football tailgate at the Riverview Sports Complex. Afterward, the Knights cruised to a 35-14 victory over Redan High School. This year marked the 10th anniversary of the first varsity football program. Members of the first team, affectionately named Team One, were welcomed back, along with the Knights’ first varsity head coach, MATT HALL. Saturday morning kicked off with a community engagement event supporting the Perfect Love Foundation, founded by TAOS WYNN ’04. Students, alumni and their families gathered to make sack lunches for distribution to homeless individuals in Atlanta. Following the service project, alumni gathered in the Arthur M. Blank Family Upper School for brunch and a tour.

CLASSES REUNITE Class of 1978

The Class of 1978 celebrated its 40th reunion at the Brookwood Hills Community Club with food trucks and drinks. EMILY NEILL BAZZEL, BRIAN KAHN, LEE KING and KIM RIPLEY O’BRIEN helped coordinate the evening.

1983

Class of 1983

The Class of 1983 gathered at New York Prime for its 35th reunion. GREG GREENBAUM and CINDY GAY JACOBY planned the event.

Class of 1988

STEVE WRAY hosted the Class of 1988 for its 30th reunion. Classmates gathered over food and margaritas from bartaco, while JEFF GREENBAUM provided entertainment on the piano. The evening was coordinated by CHARLEY BRICKLEY, Jeff Greenbaum, CHARLES JONES, TRUDY BAKER KREMER, RHONDA PECK O’GORMAN, BETH REESE and Steve Wray.

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ALUMNI

1993

HOMECOMING & REUNION

WEEKEND Class of 1993

The Class of 1993 gathered at the Skyline at Ponce City Market to celebrate its 25th reunion. Classmates enjoyed mini golf, sweets from King of Pops and stellar views of the Atlanta BeltLine Lantern Parade. The evening was coordinated by DAVID BARRETT, BRYAN CHITWOOD, JAY HUTCHISON and MARY COTA REED.

Class of 1998

The Class of 1998 reunited at Fado Irish Pub for its 20th reunion. ALI TRAUNER BEBIAK, BRENT EDEN, ANNIE RICHARDSON GOODE, JUNE WELTNER LEHMAN and WHITNEY INGLIS SANDERS coordinated the event.

1998

Class of 2003

The Class of 2003 gathered at Howell’s Kitchen and Bar for its 15th reunion. The evening was planned by JULIANNA RUE CAGLE, BROOKS FICKE, BLYTHE O’BRIEN HOGAN and WILLIAM WATTERS.

SAVE THE DATE J A N U A R Y 1 2: Alumni Basketball Afternoon

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A L U M N I

B O A R D

welcomes new members CHITWOOD

CARPENTER

COX “I have reconnected with many Pace graduates, and those relationships have been tremendously rewarding, both personally and professionally.” – BRYAN CHITWOOD ’93

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BRYAN CHITWOOD ’93 President BRYAN CHITWOOD ’93 has a desire to lead and passion to contribute to Pace Academy that began when he was a student and continues in his new role as Alumni Board president. At Pace, Chitwood served as a peer leader and played soccer and tennis. Even though he was terrified every time he walked into HELEN SMITH’s classroom, her challenging history course quickly became his favorite. Teachers like Smith are the reason he “felt totally equipped for the academic challenges and workload of college,” he says. “Once I got into the workforce, I continued to rely on the skills I developed in the Pace classroom.” After graduating from Pace, Chitwood received his bachelor’s degree in business from Wake Forest University. He then worked on Wall Street before returning to Atlanta to attend Emory University’s Goizueta Business School. Since completing his MBA 15 years ago, Chitwood has worked as a private client manager with U.S. Trust, where he assists high net-worth families with their investment, credit and estate-planning needs. Chitwood joined the Alumni Board in 2015 after attending a Pace reunion. “I was shocked at how many of my classmates lived within 10 miles of me, yet I had completely lost touch with them since graduation,” he says. “I wanted to join the Alumni Board to help foster those connections between our alumni. Since then I have reconnected with many Pace graduates, and those relationships have been tremendously rewarding, both personally and professionally.” Chitwood is excited about the opportunities in Pace’s future and grateful to the Office of Alumni Relations and previous Alumni Board presidents for their guidance as he transitions into his new role. He

looks forward to serving as president as the Alumni Board rolls out its new Strategic Plan (see story on page 40). The five-year plan lays out the framework for further aligning alumni with the Pace community to work together and grow cohesively. The plan will utilize the current alumni network to support new generations of Pace alumni, while cultivating pride and commitment among older alumni through various communications platforms. Alumni Board members will play a pivotal role in this endeavor and serve as ambassadors to keep alumni apprised and engaged. Chitwood’s involvement with his alma mater doesn’t stop there. He added another Pace identifier to his resume this fall—Pace parent. Chitwood and his wife, JODI CHITWOOD, an internal medicine physician at Piedmont Hospital, enrolled their daughter, ALLISON CHITWOOD, in the sixth grade. They also have an 8-year-old son, Connor.

KRISTIN CHICK CARPENTER ’07 “Working in the education sector has given me an even greater appreciation for the education that Pace provided me,” says KRISTIN CHICK CARPENTER ’07. “After living in other cities, I am excited to call Atlanta home again and am thrilled that I have found a way to give back to an organization that gave so much to me.” After studying finance at Virginia Tech, Carpenter worked as a business consultant before joining Teach for America. She now works at Purpose Built Schools Atlanta, a nonprofit organization with the mission to “turn around failing schools and put all children on a trajectory for success through college and in their careers.” Purpose Built Schools accomplishes this mission by partnering with Atlanta Public Schools and investing in student support staff who offer a


ALUMNI

holistic approach to supporting students and the challenges they face outside of school. Carpenter manages students’ high school transitions and has maintained close ties to the Pace community to enrich the skills she offers her students. “From observing Upper School teacher KRISTA WILHELMSEN during my first year teaching to discussing how to foster a positive school culture with Head of Upper School MIKE GANNON to brainstorming a partnership between Pace and Purpose Built Schools Atlanta with Isdell Center for Global Leadership Director TRISH ANDERSON, I am grateful for the community, mentors and friends Pace has provided me,” says Carpenter. Carpenter, a Pace Lifer who is married to Danny Carpenter, hopes to continue to “foster Pace’s positive community” through her role on the Alumni Board. “I am excited to be part of an organization that is strategically thinking about the future in a community where I have so many great memories!”

JASON COX ’92 “Pace Academy provided excellent preparation for college and for lifelong learning,” says JASON COX ’92. “The teachers and

coaches at Pace instilled in me the importance of self-discipline, critical thinking, effective communication and hard work.” After graduating from Pace, where he was a member of the Cum Laude Society and played on the soccer team, Cox earned his bachelor’s degree in geology from Washington and Lee University and his JD/MBA from Georgia State University. He worked in marketing for several large corporations before transitioning to law and now serves as in-house counsel for a global technology services company. Benefiting from Pace’s tight-knit alumni network inspired Cox to join the Alumni Board. He attributes his increased desire to become involved to his participation in Leadership Pace, an annual program designed to foster the next generation of school leadership. “I had such a positive experience and felt so welcomed back, that there was no question that I wanted to join the Board,” Cox reports. “I want to see some of the initiatives and ideas we discussed come to fruition.” As an Alumni Board member, Cox hopes to increase alumni involvement and connection with Pace. He believes the new Alumni Strategic Plan approaches these initiatives

“Leadership Pace connected me back to the family and community I loved growing up with. It reminded me how unique our experiences were at Pace and how important it is to continue to foster the relationships we built during our time there.” – KRISTIN CHICK CARPENTER ’07 the right way, and he looks forward to driving the direction it sets. “I am very honored and excited to be part of the Board,” says Cox. “I plan to bring a lot of energy and effort to the role, and I hope I can leverage a variety of past professional and personal experiences to help move initiatives forward.” Cox and his wife, Abby Cox, have two daughters, Sarah Frances, 7, and Sallie, 5.

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ALUMNI

ANDREW GUEST ’04 As a Pace student, ANDREW GUEST ’04 developed a passion for the arts—photography, in particular. He remembers spending a great deal of time in FRANCE DORMAN’s photography lab perfecting his craft. Guest took that creative, inquisitive spirit with him to Georgia State University, where he received his bachelor’s degree in microbiology and minored in chemistry.

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After working as a microbiologist for SweetWater Brewing Company, Guest now serves as head microbiologist at FiberVisions, Inc., one of the world’s largest manufacturers of synthetic polyolefin fibers. Specifically, Guest focuses on creating bulk fiber in nonwoven materials such as baby wipes and diapers, and then testing those materials before they come in contact with human bodies. As an Alumni Board member, Guest looks forward to focusing on need-based financial aid, a program from which he benefited as a Pace student. “I am excited to see how the Alumni Board works and how everything contributes to the overall community at Pace,” he says. “And after participating in the Leadership Pace program, I am inspired to give back more and contribute more of my time to the Pace community.” Guest is married to Kezia Guest, and they have an 8-year-old daughter, Penelope.

MEREDITH WINITT FORRESTER ’95 MEREDITH WINITT FORRESTER ’95 has joined the Alumni Board because of her love for what has not changed about the school community since her time at Pace, as well as her admiration for what has—the addition of a football team, diversity initiatives and increased global awareness, to name a few. “I just really love Pace,” Forrester says. “I want to reconnect those who left Pace back to the school to show everyone what an amazing place it is, and I want to thank Pace for everything it gave me.” As a student, Forrester was a French peer tutor, an Atlanta Community Food Bank service leader, and a member of the National Honor and Cum Laude societies. The love for French she developed at Pace led Forrester to major in international business administration and minor in French at the University of Georgia. Also inspired by a love of math, instilled in her by former faculty member DR. MARTHA KASILUS, Forrester went on to receive her MBA in finance from Georgia State University. “Dr. Kasilus always had me laughing,” she recalls. “My love for math started in her

classroom and led me to a career in finance and banking.” Forrester has worked at SunTrust Bank for the past 18 years in finance, risk management, regulatory relations and internal audits. She decided to add involvement with the Alumni Board to her repertoire to show gratitude for the amazing education she received at Pace and the friendships formed here. “I am excited and open to any direction the Board goes,” says Forrester, who has two daughters, Brooke, 10, and Arden, 8. “I just think Pace is such a fantastic place.”

JASON LEE ’96 “My experiences at Pace helped prepare me for life beyond Pace, and the skills I learned there are still pertinent to my life today,” says JASON LEE ’96, when asked why he joined the Alumni Board. “I wanted to give back to Pace and to be a resource for current students, as well as recent and future alumni.” Lee had the quintessential Pace experience: he participated in soccer and track, captained the basketball team, and sang in the chorus and the Troubadours ensemble. His favorite subjects were math and history, and he especially enjoyed HELEN SMITH’s highly energetic ancient and medieval history lessons. After Pace, Lee received a bachelor’s degree in math from College of the Holy Cross and his master’s in chemical engineering from Tufts University. He owns Integral Municipal Services Corporation, a licensed underground utility construction company that works with municipalities such as the City of Atlanta, DeKalb County and Fulton County, as well as the Georgia Department of Transportation. Lee, who is married to Katie Lee and has an infant son, Jackson, understands deeply the value of the lessons, resources and expertise that alumni can offer one another; they have influenced his personal and professional growth and development. He looks forward to helping grow the Pace alumni network for future generations of graduates. - by SOPHIE ZELONY ’17


A DIA MOND KNIGHT CELEBRATING 60 YEARS

SAVE THE DATE PACE AUCTION & CELEBRATION

MARCH 30, 2019 MASON FINE ART


966 W. Paces Ferry Road NW Atlanta, Georgia 30327 www.paceacademy.org

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WE NEED YOU! Which area is most meaningful to you? Pace Academy is a vibrant community composed of many parts, and we treasure the diverse passions represented within our school family. To ensure that your Pace Fund gift aligns with your Pace priority, you may elect to support one of seven areas of need. In other words, uchoose. For more information or to make a gift, visit www.paceacademy.org/support/uknight-the-pace-fund.

KnightTimes Fall 2018  
KnightTimes Fall 2018