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Philip McBride Planning + Urban Design Portfolio


Table of Contents Public Realm Studio Fort Washington Planning Workshop Suitability Analysis GIS Data Visualization Ludlow Site Plan

1 7 9 13 15 17


RE-IMAGINING VACANCY Public Realm Studio

Concentration of Vacancy

Concentration of Vacancy

[Location] Philadelphia, PA [Advisor] Evan Rose [Partners] Shelly Zhu, Tali Cantor, Ida Qu, Ke Lin The City of Philadelphia struggles with a large amount of vacancy. Currently 6% of land in the city is vacant. The premise of this studio was to create a vision for Philadelphia, by using, absorbing, and re-purposing vacant land. The first phase of the project involved group work, where we created our initial vision. Our initial vision included strengthening the city’s east-west connections to the waterfronts, and the daylighting of historic streams. The daylighting of historic streams serves multiple purposes. The first, is that it can provide the opportunity for much needed quality green space and trail network. The second, is for environmental benefit. This can help fulfill the city’s goal to handle storm water runoff on-site using green infrastructure, to avoid an overflow of the aging combined-sewer system. Using the framework of our citywide vision, we worked individually at the neighborhood scale. My neighborhood scale site is located in eastern North Philadelphia, the Fairhill and Harrowgate neighborhoods. This once industrial area contains a lot of vacancy, both within the fabric of row-homes and large former industrial sites.  As with our initial citywide vision we looked to see how historic waterways aligned with current vacancy. Using vacancy to daylight historic waterways and the creation of green infrastructure on smaller sites, such as rain gardens or swales would, connect into a larger system.  The main waterway would occupy the inactive railway, the Lehigh Viaduct.  This would connect to the Delaware River Waterfront.  Another main intervention for the site would be the creation of a swale system along America Street.  This old industrial corridor is extra wide. This swale would collect storm-water and in wet weather, direct water towards the Lehigh Viaduct.

1

Planning + Urban Design

0

0.5

1

2

3 Miles

0

City-Wide Vision

6% of land in

Philadelphia is vacant

0.5

1

2

3 Miles

[


Aerial

Existing Buildings

Tioga St Allegheny

igh

Lehigh Ave

Rain Gardens

Ave

h Le

Vacancy

Neighborhood Scale

Swales

ct

du

Via

Historic Streams + Topography

Streams

Green Network

East-West Connections

Planning + Urban Design

2


RE-IMAGINING VACANCY

Hispanic Population

Tioga Street

Public Realm Studio The third portion of the project is a block level intervention from the neighborhood scale. The surrounding neighborhoods are predominately Latino and Puerto Rican. In the Puerto Rican community, urban agriculture in the form of “kitchen gardens” and community gardens can be found throughout American cities. The gardens often comprise of a casita, which is a small wooden structure which is used to store supplies and can even include a small kitchen.  In front of the casita is a small patio batey, which is an informal gathering space for small events such as a barbecue. This idea became the inspiration for my final design. The site comprises of vacant land and old industrial buildings.  As established in our citywide vision, there are two east-west connectors that go through the site, Alleghany Ave and Lehigh Ave.  This space allows for recreational, performative, and productive uses.  The agricultural area will be maintained by locals. At the main entrances of the park there will be small plazas with casitas and bateys, which can be informal gathering spaces, as well as supply stations for mulch and compost.  The old industrial building, which fronts Allegheny Avenue, can be transformed into a small-business incubator, for food production businesses, which requires commercial kitchen space. Food grown in the park can be used for this production.  Next to the incubator, a plaza along Allegheny Ave will serve as a weekly outdoor farmer’s market, where people can sell their produce to the public. The surrounding park serves as a place for play and recreation, with open space and play structures for kids.   The site also maintains two soccer fields, on a site that currently is a recreation center.  Between the soccer field area and the park there is a smaller plaza that will allow space for food vending, so that spectators can enjoy local food while their kids play in a soccer game on a Saturday afternoon.  What ties these elements together is an esplanade along the water, which allows people to go directly up to the water.  This esplanade also serves as the path of the trail system that connects to the Delaware River waterfront.   3

Planning + Urban Design

49 %

80 %

Harrowgate

Fairhill

Agriculture Casita Entrances

Casita

Soccer Fields Esplanade

Baytey

Food Trucks Playground

The Site Market

Incubator Allegheny Ave


Vision for Park and Market

Planning + Urban Design

4


RE-IMAGINING VACANCY Public Realm Studio Plaza, Incubator, and Market

Esplanade and Soccer

Casita Entrance and Agriculture

5

Planning + Urban Design


Vision for Esplanade and Soccer Area

Vision for Park “Casita” Entrances

Planning + Urban Design

6


FORT WASHINGTON

Fort Washington Today

Montgomery County Planning Commission

[Location] Fort Washington, PA [Advisor] Brian O’Leary + Scott France [Partners] Fort Washington is one of the first large suburban office parks in the Philadelphia region. However, the office park is heavily auto-dependent, lacks a mix of uses, and lies partially within a floodplain. In order to rectify these issues, the Montgomery County Planning Commission is working to create a Transfer of Development Rights (TDR), to redirect development away from the flood prone areas, to more suitable areas. This allows for an increase in density and mix of uses in Fort Washington. I was asked to create a conceptual rendering of what this more dense, mixed-use, Fort Washington development could look like.

Current Street Conditions

7

Planning + Urban Design


Proposed Development

With New Development

Planning + Urban Design

8


NORRISTOWN

Map of Interventions

Regional Context

Planning Workshop

[Location] Norristown, PA [Advisor] Ben Bryant + Adam Tecza [Partners] Daniel Suh, Emily Hosek, Simona Uzaite, Hao Sun, Zhen Qin The Planning Workshop is a studio that introduces first year planning students to the planning process. In coordination with DVRPC, the theme of this studio was Philadelphia’s first ring suburbs. Norristown Pennsylvania, located northwest of Philadelphia, is a historic and diverse town. However, in recent years it has experienced a decline. It is the county seat of Montgomery County, however Norristown’s median household income is nearly half of the county. Likewise, Norristown has a concentration of poverty and subsidized housing. This unique character for a suburb is an enriching case study for planning America’s older Publication Book Cover suburbs. Markley Street was a major intervention proposed in the project. Markley Street, which is a segment of the highway, U.S. 202, is a major thoroughfare that bisects Norristown. It is a barrier that disconnects Norristown’s neighborhoods. It is currently not pedestrian friendly. It is difficult for pedestrians to cross and lacks adequate sidewalks and medians. The intervention for Markley Street includes new sidewalks in areas where there were non before, curb bump-outs at major intersections, and extended medians. The curb bump-outs and extended medians help shorted the distance pedestrians have to cross the street, and help calm traffic.

NORRISTOWN: A Unifying Plan for the Revitalization of Norristown

9

Planning + Urban Design

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL OF DESIGN

|

DEPARTMENT OF CITY & REGIONAL PLANNING

|

CPLN 600 WORKSHOP

|

SPRING 2013


wn feel. While there are vacant storefronts, there has been some opment. Much of the commercial activity, however, is lower-end awnshops and check Some socialcorridors services are The cashing two mostservices. active commercial are Corridors: Norristown Main Street. and West Marshall Street. Main Street, which is only a few blocks

Main Street, Norristown Main Street

ll River in the southern portion of Norristown, has a pedestrian eet is aWhile product of Norristown’s relatively new Latino population. wn feel. there are vacant storefronts, there has been some Latino commercial activity is located in this corridor, west of Maropment. Much of the commercial activity, however, is lower-end are a number Mexican restaurants, asSome well associal cornerservices stores and awnshops andofcheck cashing services. are res. This corridor is particularly vibrant and pedestrian friendly. Main Street.

ns south separating theserelatively two corridors. As a population. state road, eetnorth is a product of Norristown’s new Latino periences heavy traffic. Railroad tracks also run along Latino commercial activity is located in this corridor, westthe of west Mar.are While there is a pedestrian bridge on Airy Street that crosses a number of Mexican restaurants, as well as corner stores and ge is underutilized the other intersections along Markley res. This corridor isand particularly vibrant and pedestrian friendly.are edestrians to cross. Train tracks running along the west side of e width the crossing. This makes inconvenient, at times ns northofsouth separating these twoit corridors. As aand state road, ve from one commercial corridor to the other despite the relatively periences heavy traffic. Railroad tracks also run along the west mity. Thusthere Markley acts as a barrier thethat Main Street . While is a Street pedestrian bridge on between Airy Street crosses West corridor. ge is Marshall underutilized and the other intersections along Markley are

edestrians to cross. Train tracks running along the west side of c: Norristown’s urban fabric atypical for Montgomery County. e width of the crossing. This is makes it inconvenient, and at times own is much more dense than atotypical suburb, highlighting its ve from one commercial corridor the other despite the relatively trial Thus factory and mill town. In as thea western portion the of the city, the mity. Markley Street acts barrier between Main Street nsistsMarshall of singlecorridor. and two-family detached houses as well as small West s and services are within walking distance. In the northern neighare more single-family housesfor mixed with someCounty. twins. c: Norristown’s urban detached fabric is atypical Montgomery ave thedense bus, orthan walka atypical distance to reach stores and owntoisdrive, muchtake more suburb, highlighting its ments. In the center core, the downtown is densely developed trial factory and mill town. In the western portion of the city, the nt offices, the Main Street corridor, and the Arts Hill Most nsists of single and two-family detached houses as District. well as small eitherare single-family or multifamily. of neighbuildsattached, and services within walking distance. In A thenumber northern are more also mixed-use, with office orhouses retail on the ground floortwins. and are single-family detached mixed with some . to drive, take the bus, or walk a distance to reach stores and ave

ments. In the center core, the downtown is densely developed nt offices, the Main Street corridor, and the Arts Hill District. Most attached, either single-family or multifamily. A number of build-

W Marshall Street, Norristown

West Marshall Street

W Marshall Street, Norristown

Planning + Urban Design

10


Markley Street

Markley Street Section

Markley Street Before

11

Planning + Urban Design


Markley Street After

Planning + Urban Design

12


Community Garden Suitability GIS Suitability Analysis

Pittsburgh G Floodplains

Residentail Landuse

[Location] Pittsburgh, PA [Advisor] Katie Nelson

This exercise uses the Raster Calculator in ArcGIS to determine the most suitable sites for community gardens in Pittsburgh. The criteria used are, whether the area is a residential land use, in a floodplain, vacant land, sun exposure, and topography. Each criteria is assigned values of “0” or “1”. “0” means the criteria is not met, while “1” means that the criteria is met. Using the Raster Calculator to add together the criteria, a map is produced showing which areas met the most criteria, ranking from 0 to 5. The areas that met 4 or 5 of the criteria were determined to be the most Suitable for community gardens.

Non-Residential

0

Floodplain

0

Residential

1

Not Floodplain

1

Suitable Vacant Land

Land Face between 135 and 225 Degrees

Legend

Source: PASDA

13

Planning + Urban Design

Legend

Legend

Non-Vacant

0

Vacant

1

Not Between 135-255 Degree Sun Exposure Between 135-255 Degree Sun Exposure

Legend 0 1


Final Suitability 4 and 5

Slope Between 4 and 15

sburgh Garden Suitability

Philip McBride

Final Suitability 4 and 5

Slope Between 4 and 15

Legend

nd

Legend

0

4-15 Grade Slope

0

1

Not 4-15 Grade Slope

1

s

nd

0

1

ÂŻ ÂŻ

Final Results

0 1

Suitability Suitability 1-51-5

0 Composite of inputs from least suitable to most suitable

1.25

2.5

5

7.5

2.5

5

Legend 0

0

1 2 3 4 5

Legend 0 1 2

1.25

10 Miles

7.5

Legend 4

10 5 Miles

Legend

Suitable

4

Most Suitable

5

3 4 5

Planning + Urban Design

14


GIS Data Visualization

Population Density

Mapping Densities [Location] Philadelphia, PA [Advisor] Katie Nelson

The first map (left), uses US Census data on population density. Census data is joined to the census block groups, using ArcGIS, to show the geographic distribution of population density. The second map (right), uses ArcGIS point density function, to display the density of vacant properties.

More Dense

Less Dense

N 0

0.5

1

miles

Source: PASDA, US Census 15

Planning + Urban Design


Concentration of Vacancy

More Vacancy

Less Vacancy

0

0.5

1

2

3 Miles

[

Source: PASDA 16


Ludlow Neighborhood Site Plan

Site Context

Site Planning

[Location] Philadelphia, PA [Advisor] Scott Page

1,192

Temple University

Residents SAME Age Composition as City 14,692 People Per Sq. Mile Density

LUDLOW

Philadelphia

Ludlow

65%

Center City

43%

African American

African American

0

2

3 Miles

MARSHALL

7TH

8TH

MARSHALL

7TH

8TH

FRANKLIN

JEFFERSON

FRANKLIN

JEFFERSON

6 TH

OXFORD

6 TH

OXFORD

150

300 Feet

THOMPSO

N

MARSHALL

7TH

N

FRANKLIN

8TH

THOMPSO MARSHALL

7TH

FRANKLIN

8TH

MASTER

0

Planning + Urban Design

1

Area of Intervention

MASTER

17

0.5

9 TH

Existing Vacancy 9 TH

The Ludlow Neighborhood is located in North Philadelphia, near Temple University. Though the neighborhood has seen decline, there has been some development in the area in the form of affordable and student housing. Given the limited market, the premise of this project is to make a five year plan for the neighborhood that will have the highest long-term impact. A market study determined that the neighborhood can support 50 affordable and 10 market-rate housing units. My design approach for the Ludlow Neighborhood is to focus development along the blocks surrounding Master Street, creating an anchor for the neighborhood. This portion of the neighborhood contains some of the larger swaths of vacancy. Absorbing these larger swaths is key to stabilizing the neighborhood over the long-term. The intersection of 7th and Master Streets contains some small corner stores, it also is where the most activity in the neighborhood occurs. Strengthening this node and is important because Master Street connects Ludlow to the burgeoning neighborhoods of Fishtown/Kensington to the East and Temple University to the west. Another emphasis of the site plan is the creation of community space, with the creation of a community garden.

0

150

300 Feet


Design Approach

JEFFERSON

MARSHALL

1

7TH

8TH

FRANKLIN

5

2

1

Community Garden

2

Absorb Largest Swaths of Vacancy

3

Strengthen Master Street Connection

4

Strengthen 7th Street Node

5

Strengthen Existing Assets

MASTER

3

4

150

0

JEFFERSON

Build-out Profile

MASTER

THO

MPSO1800 N SqFt Affordable Houses 50 Three-Story 41 Attached 9 Semi-Attached 47 Off-Street Parking Spaces MARSHAL L

FRANKLIN

7TH

FRANKLIN

8TH

108,000 SqFt of New Housing

8TH

Block Details

300 Feet

0

150

300 Feet

10 Three-Story 1800 SqFt Market Rate 10 Semi-Attached Houses 10 Off-Street Parking Spaces

0

150 Feet Planning + Urban Design

18


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