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Everybody knows you’re a West Coast dude, but you’ve been moving around a lot lately. Did you just need a change of scenery? As a whole, [artists] in the Bay Area are just content with where we are. That’s just my opinion. I fuck with a lot of different people around the world, and I’m out networking and trying to build my brand. Do you think living in different places affects your style of music? I don’t feel like I have a particular sound. You’re gonna hear a little South, a little Midwest, a little East, and you’re definitely going to hear the West cause that’s where I’m from. That’s the problem, man, everybody’s caught up in how you’re “supposed” to sound. I ain’t caught up in none of that shit, man. I’m me. I ain’t got nothing to prove. Every time I drop, I sell a substantial amount of units, so I’m good. How do you think you’re able to maintain that kind of fanbase without a major label behind you and without having that mainstream look? Because I’m out here networking. I built my worth. Are you going to get out and start doing more shows now? You don’t give the people too many opportunities to see you. And you’re in high demand because of that fact. I’m planning my 30-city tour right now. But before I do that, I’m building my online presence. I’m doing a radio show. I’m on Twitter, Facebook, and Myspace. I’m going to get out here and give the people what they’ve been waiting for. What’s going on with you and San Quinn? The beef was pretty ugly at one point but you recently mentioned on Twitter that you guys had squashed it. How were you able to get to that point? People have different opinions on everything. Quinn had an opinion on how he felt I should’ve handled some things, and I had my opinion on how I felt he should’ve handled some things. It escalated when the media and the people grabbed ahold of it. You know how that shit goes. But mutual friends of ours have been trying to squash it since day one. Me and Quinn ain’t even talked yet. Things take time. Whenever he comes around, or whenever I come around, we can sit down and talk. But for now we’re just going through our mutual friend from the turf and just putting it all behind us. But really, it wasn’t no beef - it was just two opinions being stated and just how two men felt at the particular time. Is there anything else that needs to be hashed out or are you just ready to move forward and forget the whole situation? I would like to do that, to just move forward and forget about the situation, but things take time. Wounds take time to heal, especially ones like these. So whenever we decide to come around and sit down, we will. Why did you feel like it was important to squash it? The beef didn’t affect me when it came to record sales or nothing like that. I do remarkable numbers independently anyway. It was just getting out of hand, and Quinn felt the same way. When shit like this happens, innocent people can get fucked up. So we’re coming together to let these kids know, and let the people know, we’re bigger than rap music. We’re gonna put our differences to the side and move forward like men. That doesn’t mean me and San Quinn are gonna hang out every day. You might not catch me at McDonald’s sitting down with the nigga eating no cheeseburger or nothing. But we’re definitely gonna put our differences to the side and squash this shit like men do and move forward with what you’re doing. Is it your ultimate goal to be on a major label with your video all over TV and your songs all over the radio? Or are you more comfortable being in theunderground position you’re in, still selling independent units? I’m a street nigga, so the hustle is in me. Independently, I feel like this is what I’ve got to do because this is what I know. Of course I wanna take it to another level as far as media, publications, and sales. But I’m not gonna just make commercial music and chase million-dollar dreams. I’ve had paperwork in my face for two million, three million. I turned those deals down just based on what they want to take from me and what I’ve built. What did they want to take from you? Publishing? Publishing. How many albums they want, what I’m limited to do, just [giving up] the freedom I have as an independent. They wanted to take that all away from me for that little amount of money. That few million is a little amount of money. I can make that in a year. Last year I released 100 songs. I don’t remember how many albums - five, I think. [I sold] over 50,000 at $6/ unit, so that deal didn’t look like shit to me. I definitely would like to further my career but I’m not gonna make commercial music tryin’ to chase this muthafuckin’ dream that might not even turn into reality. I’m gon’ keep this shit solid. I keep the people feeling like I’m one of them, because I am. That’s why I’ve been so successful. I’m one of the people they recognize and

they’re like, “I’m just like that nigga.” That’s why my core fanbase won’t let me die. I ain’t did a show in three years, but I’m able to maintain my sales and my presence through the internet, the publications, and the media. That’s just a blessing. The fans won’t let me die. What project are you working on now? I just dropped Highly Aggressive Volume 2 yesterday. I’ve got a documentary and a soundtrack coming out called Gigantic, which is the untold Messy Marv story behind the rapper, the entertainer, the father, the gangster. There’s a lot of educational Bay Area history in there too. I shot and directed my reality show Mr. Ghetto Celebrity. I’ve got my clothing line coming soon. Right now I’m working on a new LP called The Cooking Channel. I’m working every day. You also seem to change your phone number every other day. It doesn’t seem like that’d be good for business. I got a 1-800 number that I keep steady for business. That’s on 24 hours so I don’t ever miss the networking and business call. But when you’re dealing with a personal line, you’ve got to keep the line clean and avoid the bullshit. Somebody’s negative energy can suck up all the positive energy out of you. I’ve got muthafuckers calling asking for Sprint bill money and telling me their bitch done ran off. I don’t wanna hear none of that shit, man. My business associates and my homies keep my line. But everybody else, once they wanna suck the positive energy out of a nigga with that bullshit, I change my number. When you go out on tour, who else from the Bay do you plan on performing with? What’s your take on the current Bay Area movement? I feel like everybody’s representing. Everybody’s got a part they play, whether it’s the old Bay or the new Bay. I just feel like we’re at a standstill because everybody feels like they can’t leave the Bay Area. So everybody ends up with the same production and the same graphic designer doing their cover. That means everybody looks and sounds the same. Then you get everybody putting each other on the album, so you’ve got the same features. Everybody’s fuckin’ with the same jeweler. Niggas are buying the same outfits from the same clothing store. Nobody knows who is who. It’s 400 muthafuckin’ rappers and they all look and sound the same. Do you think it’s lack of ambition or just being too comfortable? I guess everybody’s comfortable with it, and I ain’t knockin’ it. But I’ma tell the world a different story as far as the Bay Area. But I ain’t mad. Everybody’s playing a part. Everybody’s representing, and that’s what it is. Have you officially changed your name to The Boy Boy Mess or is that basically just an alias of Messy Marv? I officially changed my name to The Boy Boy Young Mess ‘cause I officially changed as a person, as a whole. I’m always gon’ be Messy Marv, but it’s the new Mess. It’s the Mess that got up out of that jail. It’s the Mess that moved out of those conditions. It’s the Mess that outgrew a lot of people in a lot of situations. It’s the Mess that couldn’t get rich in the Bay Area and had to move up out of that muthafucker to get his pennies. The new Mess. You’ve been pretty open in the past about your struggles with drug abuse. Have you moved past that? Yeah, I’ve been clean for two years now, no drugs. I didn’t go to rehab. Rehab is for weak people. I did mine based on discipline. I smoked the fuck out of some weed, though, and had a drink or two, but as far as the party drugs, I don’t fuck around. What prompted you to decide to quit? Just transitioning into The Boy Boy Young Mess and this new person. That came along with the transition. In retrospect, do you feel like your drug use was affecting your career? I mean, people have opinions. They say, “Aw don’t deal with him, he fuck with dope,” or they’re scared to fuck with me. I hate them putting out there like that, but it never affected my career. It affected me, just because I was indulging. But I had one of the biggest singles in the Bay Area, “Playing With My Nose,” just talking about addiction and having fun with it and letting everyone know that I’m not ashamed of being who I am. It was big. Snoop Dogg even quoted me on the new album from that song, so I know it reached a lot of people. I wasn’t trying to promote drugs, I was just having fun with my addiction. But that shit is behind me. I’ve been clean, I’m doing great, and I’m healthy. I’ve got my son full-time now, so I can’t fuck around. Is there anything else you wanted to add? Yeah, check me out at Twitter.com/TheBoyBoyMess, Facebook.com/TheBoyBoyMess, Myspace.com/MessyMarvOnline, and for any merchandise log onto ScalenLLC.com. // OZONE MAG // 15

Ozone West #84 - Oct 2010  

Ozone West #84 - Oct 2010

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