Page 16

Born and raised in East Oakland, 21-year-old Bobby Brackins embarked on his music career at a young age as part of the group Go Dav. The years of work he put in finally started to pay off when he went solo. today, with his hit single “143” featuring Ray J climbing the charts and helping to land a him a deal with Young Tycoon/Universal Republic, he’s . How many years have you been doing the music thing? I’ve been making music for the past six years. When I got out of high school I was with a group called Go Dav. We had a really big record called “Ride Or Die Chick” that was playing on the radio; it was just a really big street record that buzzed all over the country. I was in a group for a while and then I got out of the group and started working on a solo project and linked up with T-Pain’s management. I’ve really been working on my solo stuff for about four and a half years now. How did you link up with T-Pain’s management? I put out a record called “Skinny Jeans,” which was a big street record. It was really big on YouTube and Myspace and getting millions of hits. A bunch of people were hollering at us, but we felt like T-Pain’s management would be the best situation because he had “Buy You A Drink” out at the time and it was a really big record. So we thought it would be a good fit to try to get something happening. [The business didn’t really work out] but I just talked to him the other day. We’re still cool, no hard feelings. He was busy with [T-Pain’s] project and couldn’t really focus on me. It was a learning experience, you know? You’re not going to win with every situation. It’s all good. I was young just trying to figure out the game. Basically, I learned that you’ve gotta be a priority wherever you sign, you know? What made you decide to move to Los Angeles? I moved to L.A. like two and a half years ago because my producer was out here going to school. I was working with different producers in the Bay, but I felt like my producer, Nic Nac, just had the best music for me. I moved out here to L.A. and ended up signing to [Young] Rell’s label. That was about a year ago and we’ve been working on my solo project ever since. I’ve been flying back and forth between L.A. and the Bay just networking and making music. The L.A. scene hasn’t always been real receptive to Bay Area artists. Has that been an issue for you? No, not at all, honestly. I guess some people’s personalities just don’t mesh well together. I have the type of personality where I can basically get along with anybody. I just got off the phone with [L.A. rapper] Nipsey Hussle a few minutes ago. He’s putting a verse on the “143” song so we can do an L.A. remix. And I just talked to [ ], he sings the hook to YG’s “Toot It and Boot It.” Me and him just made a really crazy record for my album. So, some people’s personalities might not mesh but I’m not really with all that drama, you know. If you’re cool people, you’re cool people and it doesn’t really matter where you’re from. How did the collaboration with Ray J come about for your current hit record, “143”? We were basically just working on my album. I had a different record in mind for Ray J but when I wrote “143” I thought he might fit better on that one. I really felt like it could be a big universal smash record. I played it for my managers and the label and everybody liked it, so I eventually convinced everybody that it was going to be the single we wanted to run with. We had Ray come to the studio and he blessed it, he did his thing on it. He went hard on the record so it sounds super crazy. A lot of people who hear the record think it’s Ray J’s new single. How do you plan to establish yourself as an artist and make sure they know who you are? Well, Ray J’s cool people and he sings on the record, of course. But whenever I perform the record I know when I can just pause and let the DJ drop the beat and the girls know all the lyrics to my verses. So I’m just gonna keep doing shows and interviews and let everybody know that I’m the voice behind the verses on the record. Do you have a second single picked out? Yeah, it’s called “She’s Ready.” It’s crazy; it’s gonna be another really, really big radio record. We’re gonna do a video for it and keep pushing my whole

16 // OZONE WEST

solo career. I wrote the whole “143” record and this record as well. I’m really trying to get in touch with the ladies because ladies are my primary fans. Whenever I go to the shows, it’s always the ladies who are screaming my lyrics. So I’m just gonna keep making great songs that both the ladies and the fellas can enjoy. “143” is still climbing up the charts. It’s climbing up the rhythmic radio charts and it’s on the Billboard Hot 100, so we’re gonna just keep letting “143” grow. It probably won’t peak for another couple months but we’re gonna just throw my next single out there in the next month or so. Is your album finished? I’m still working on it, but it’s gonna be crazy. It’s gonna be an album full of hits. There’s just a couple more songs I need to get features on. It features a whole bunch of new and upcoming talent; the people who are gonna really be on top for the next few years. My point of view is that I wanna work with artists who really want to leave a legacy and leave their mark. I’m not gonna have anybody on the album who doesn’t deserve to be on there. As far as production, are you producing as well or mostly working with Nic Nac? I’m writing everything as far as the hooks and verses, and my producer Nic Nac, who used to be in the group with me and produced “143,” produced most of the album. I was in the studio with Polow da Don a couple weeks ago and he said he wanted to do a record on the album, so if that happens, that’d be a real blessing. The album is gonna be a problem. There might be a couple outside beats on there but primarily it’s gonna be me and Nic Nac doing the majority of the work. Being from Oakland, how do you feel about the verdict that came down yesterday in the Oscar Grant trial? I feel like it’s crazy. It’s a real injustice. I don’t understand how you can be on video camera with your back to somebody in handcuffs and get killed and [the killer] gets away with involuntary manslaughter. It makes no sense to me and it just shows how corrupt the justice system can be. Oakland has been through a lot of hardships. I’m only 21 years old and a lot of my friends out there have [been killed]. You know the system is corrupt but you’ve just gotta try to be as positive and hopeful as possible. Hopefully, if more people around the world hear about the situation, the government and police officers will open their eyes and realize that they can’t get away with doing crimes like that. We hear a lot of people talking about this New West movement. Do you feel like you’re a part of that? Definitely. Last week, me, Nipsey Hussle, Ray J, and Warren G did a show together. Warren G is a real OG. When Nipsey went on stage and when me and Ray did the “143” song I felt like people started to recognize the new talent. We’re ready to step our foot in the door. The West Coast has a whole bunch of talented kids in their twenties and in their teens who are really just ready to take their talent to the next level. There’s a lot of kids in L.A. who are working hard to take their talent to the next level and I think within the next five years there will hopefully be more unity on the West Coast. Do you have a label deal yet or are you planning on putting this out independently through Rell’s label, Tycoon Status Ent.? We signed [a major deal] with Universal Republic a few months ago. They started playing my record in the bay on 94.9 and basically it’s been moving ever since. They were the first people to play it on the air and since then it’s been going crazy. There were offers from a whole bunch of different labels but Universal Republic offered me the best situation. It’s a good home, a good situation, and I feel very optimistic about the future. Is there anything else you want to say? Just look out for the next single “She Ready,” and you know, “143” is still climbing up the charts. Call your local radio station and request it as much as possible, go support it on iTunes, and when I’m in your city come out to a show and show me some love. When the album drops, get the album. I just want everybody to support as much as possible because the fans are keeping us alive right now. //

Ozone West #85  

Ozone West #85

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you