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$1.25 E.W. Peper Building a Legacy Page 7

Richard Fry Business of Boers Page 9

Allen Hales The Makings of a Profitable Market Page 19

Ryan Dean Youth in Agriculture Page 20

August 12, 2013 Volume 7, Number 8 • 28 Pages

In This Issue Rumors - Everyone’s Talking About It Just A Thought - Columnists & Editorials Jerry Crownover, Dusty Richards, Lynzee Glass 7-20 Meet Your Neighbors How They’re Doing Things Down the Road Eye on Agribusiness, Ozarks Roots, Town & Country, Agriculture’s Youth 14-15 Markets 22 Ag-Visors - Advice from the Professionals Farm Finance with Jessica Bailey 23-27 Farm Help - Making Farming a Little Easier What Do You Say, Farm Calendar and Auction Block 27 Classifieds 2

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Weekly Sale Every Wednesday at 11:00 a.m. starting with Goats, Calves & Yearlings, Stock Cows, Butcher Cows, then Bulls.

Advertising Pete Boaz, Display & Classfiied Ad Sales Kathy Myers, Production Sales Circulation Stan Coffman, Circulation Editorial Lynzee Glass, Managing Editor Dusty Richards, Columnist Jerry Crownover, Columnist Production Melissa Fuller, Production

RUMORS

Everyone’s talkin’ about it

Dairy Sale 3rd Wednesday of Each Month at 11:00 a.m. With the lowest commission rates in the area and the best buyers, getting you top dollar for your livestock is what we do!

Contributors Jessica Bailey, Gary Digiuseppe, Amanda Erichsen, Jack and Pam Fortner, Lynlee Franks, Sam Lewin, Bonnie Rausch, Sherry Leverich Tucker, Terry Ropp

China Blocks Arkansas Chicken Imports China has banned imports of poultry and poultry products from the state of Arkansas after a low-pathogenic strain of avian influenza was found in the state in June, U.S. government and industry officials said. Poultry experts hope China will quickly lift restrictions put in place after nine Arkansas chickens were exposed to a strain of avian flu on a Scott County farm. Other birds in the chicken house were destroyed as a precaution and all birds in a 6.2 mile radius are being tested regularly to ensure they weren’t exposed.

Finalists Named for Arkansas 4-H Governor’s Award

About the Cover

“The 4-H Governor’s Award is given to the 4-H’er who demonstrates excellence and embodies the ‘Making the Best Better’ motto of 4-H,” said Brian Helms, a 4-H youth development instructor for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture. The award will be given during the state O’Rama. The three finalist are Sarah Mills, Janee Shofner and Meredith Williams.

Scott McAfee took his passion for God and the cowboy lifestyle and established the Cowboy Up Cowboy Church. Read more on page 8. Photo by Bonnie Rausch Ozarks Farm & Neighbor accepts story suggestions from readers. Story information appears as gathered from interviewees. Ozarks Farm & Neighbor assumes no responsibility for the credibility of statements made by interviewees. © Copyright Ozarks Farm & Neighbor, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A..

Youth Awarded at the Charolais Junior Nationals Carlee Clark, of Romance, Ark., was awarded the Champion Showmanship award in the junior division during the 2013 American-International Junior Charolais Association Junior National show. Carlee also exhibited the Grand Champion Percentage Heifer and received the $1,000 Larry and Robbie Lehman scholarship.

2013 Arkansas 4-H State Horse Show

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Local 4-H members gathered to compete during the 2013 State Horse Show at the White County Fairgrounds in Searcy, Ark., on July 9-12. Individuals placing in the top 10 in horse judging junior division in our coverage area were: Megan Crawford, of Benton County, Jade Cantu , of Washington County, Delaney Blanchard, of Washington County, Laura Ogden, of Madison Or Visit County, Nathania McKenzie, of Benton County, Jessica Bookout, of Benton County, Cody Ogden, of Madison County ext.ozarksfn.com and Hillyn Vardeman. Individuals placing in the top 10 in horse judging senior division in our coverage area were: Maggie Fancher, of Washington County, Lensey Watson, of Benton County, Tanner Burks, of Madison County, Hannah Henderson, of Benton County, Emma Waymack, of White County, McKinzie Hummel, of Benton County, Lauren Cheevers, of Washington County and Hailey Henderson of Benton County. For complete event results visit ext.ozarksfn.com.

Correction In the 2013 Farm Hand Ag Resource Directory we listed the wrong company name for Preferred Poultry’s listing for the Lincoln, Ark., location in the Building & Construction and Poultry sections. The company name was listed as Reliable Poultry by mistake. The correct information should be: Preferred Poultry Supply, 479-824-4301, 2285 E. Pridemore Dr., Lincoln, AR 72744. Our apologies for the incorrect information.

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August 12, 2013


THOUGHT Just A

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Life is Simple By Jerry Crownover few years ago, I wrote a column about the sweetest smells on earth and it just happened that they all came from the farm; freshly plowed soil, newly mowed hay and cow manure on sale day. Well, a lady approached me after a recent speaking engagement and accused me of being biased toward farming and asked if I had any favorite odors that were not farm oriented. As it just so happens, I do have two more. I’ll have to admit a borderline addiction to the smell of a new automobile. I absolutely love it and only wish that when you purchase an air freshener labeled ‘new car scent,’ it actually smelled like a new car. It doesn’t. The other one is the aroma emanating from the breath of a new puppy. It doesn’t matter whether it rolls across the tongue of an expensive registered poodle or through the crooked teeth of the ugliest cur mutt in three states; the smell is sweet and innocent. I’ve gotten to enjoy both during the past few months. Last winter, I finally bit the bullet and traded in my old farm truck for a new model. I stepped down from a one-ton

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dually diesel to a 3/4 ton, regularwheeled, gas powered truck. I rationalized that I don’t pull the trailer to cattle shows every weekend anymore so I don’t need the added expense of all those extras. As a surprising bonus, the new-car smell that usually lasts just a couple of months has stayed with this new truck a lot longer. Judy and I had been without a dog since an unfortunate and fatal accident took the life of our last Australian Shepherd last year. Each of our last two dogs were registered Aussies that were loyal, lovable and fairly expensive to purchase. Grizz was a good cow dog and really earned his keep around the farm. He was my best buddy and went with me every time the truck or ATV started. After his passing, I bought Lucy and she left us just as she was growing out of the puppy stage and showing some real promise as a cow dog in her own right. I was convinced that I was just not meant to have a good cow dog, so I really was just looking for a good pet and companion when an ad caught my attention. “Need good home for 10-week old, lovable, Aussie-cross puppy. $10 rehoming fee.” Continued on Page 6

In This Section – Jerry Crownover – The sweetest smells on earth..................................Above – Dusty Richards – Are government regulations headed to your farm?............p. 4 – Lynzee Glass – Celebrating family this summer............................................p. 5

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overnment regulations are getting worse and even worse than that. Ozarks Electric Coop has standby generators at their main offices, as do many other coops, to keep them running 24/7. But in the future, companies using generators will face a stiff fine. The EPA has now issued a ruling that coops can’t run generators over eight hours a year due to their carbon footprint. No one that has a generator wants to run it any longer then they need to. The cost is prohibitive. But like in the case of that last big ice storm if power companies weren’t allowed to run their generators, they would have had to shut down the office the length of the outage. That makes as much sense as not being able to use a paddle in your boat when the motor quits. Several coops have these big units for supplemental power. I don’t know of any in Arkansas, but folks I’ve talked to in Georgia and Florida use them when they have big loads to supplement their power supply. These are under the same ruling and now they won’t be able to use them. This represents a large investment for those coops. Now the national association is busy trying to get the ruling set aside, but Congress is going on a six-week recess. It would still help if we all wrote our Congressional members and ask them to examine this ruling. There are more implications to this law than just emergency power to operate electric coop offices in tough times when outages would close them down. If EPA can stop us from using diesel engines for outages in my opinion this could lead to regulations on the number of hours you can use farm tractors. Now wouldn’t that be a fine kettle of fish?

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They are starting with the least used diesel engines at isolated places but what about your farm machinery and limiting the use of it? They really want us riding bikes or walking. Or what about restrictions against mowing your lawn? They have already taken on mower and chain saw exhaust. So they are far from being done and if you let them take a step they will go the next mile. They might also limit the hours you can run your outboard. Maybe bass fishermen should pay attention. This deal has many more implications than just using your generator when the lights go out. This generator issue needs to be addressed and Congress must hear our side of this encroachment into our lives. It isn’t only the electric coops that will face this ruling. Your personal use of a generator comes next including those handy units folks have on their RVs, use camping and for farm chores where the lines don’t reach. I am not a doom and gloom person but this ruling looks to me like only the tale of things to come. A few years ago the IRS told us we had to have logs in our vehicles and write down every mile we traveled and what for. Well Congress came back and they got enough mail they immediately voted that out. This is another case where we need their help. Good bless you, your family and America, Dusty Richards Western novelist Dusty Richards and his wife Pat live on Beaver Lake in northwest Arkansas. For more information about his books you can email Dusty by visiting ozarksfn.com and clicking on ‘Contact Us’ or call 1-866-532-1960.

August 12, 2013


JUST A THOUGHT

Your Animal Health Professionals

Keepin’ it

Mfg. & Sales

Country By Lynzee Glass

am the type of person who enjoys each season. Typically, I don’t favor one season over another and by the time one season ends and the other begins I am ready to embrace the change. My summer has been filled with family and friends, which to me is better than soaking up sunshine. My summer kicked off with wedding showers and wedding ceremonies. Both my cousin and my littler sister tied the knot. This gave our family extra opportunities to get together. Both ceremonies were absolutely beautiful and a wonderful time to celebrate. I must admit though, after helping my sister plan her big day for almost a year, I was slightly relieved when it was all over. It’s been months of flower shopping, cake tasting and dress fittings – the whole nine yards. But hey, when your baby sister asks you to help make her special day perfect you do what you’re told. But for summer to really feel like summer I must attend the traditional Dallas BREADS

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Send us your favorite summer recipes! Email them to: editor@ozarksfn.com, fax them to: 479-846-1003 or mail them to: PO Box 6, Prairie Grove, AR 72753 County social event of the year, the Louisburg Picnic put on by the Louisburg Lions Club. I have attended nearly every year since I was a little girl and here we are 20-some years later and the Picnic is practically the same. Tradition is what makes it so special. I know that each summer in July I will go to the Picnic to visit with old friends, hang out with my family, eat a fish sandwich and play a little bingo. If you ask me it’s the perfect summer celebration. Continued on Next Page

Another Zucchini Bread By: Tom Villines, Forum, Ark.

Ingredients:

Directions:

3/4 C. all purpose flour 1 1/2 tsp. salt 1 tsp. ground nutmeg 2 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 3 C. sugar 1 C. vegetable oil 4 eggs, beaten 1/3 C. water 1 tsp. lemon juice 2 C. grated zucchini

Mix first six ingredients in a bowl and set aside. Mix remaining ingredients in a separate bowl. Then mix both in a very large bowl. Preheat oven to 350°. Divide mixture into two loafs or bunt pans, oiled. Bake for 1 hour.

August 12, 2013

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Ozarks Farm & Neighbor

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JUST A THOUGHT

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Production Sale Issues

Fall

More than 24,000 copies are mailed primarily to farm families and producers in 60 counties across the Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma Ozarks. Research indicates you will reach more than an estimated 58,000 readers when you run your sale ad in Ozarks Farm & Neighbor. Ben Benton Miller Maries St. Clair Hickory

Camden Pu Pulaski

Vern Vernon

Phelps

Cedar Dallas

Polk Neosho

Missouri Publication Dates

eene Greene Labette ette

September 16, October 7 and October 28

September 2, September 23 and October 14

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Shannon uglas Douglas

ayes Mayes

De Delaware

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Ba y Barry

Ta y Taney

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Boo Boone Iz Izard

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gton Washington

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cy Searcy

Ston Stone

Adair Okmulgee

Muskogee h Sequoyah

Crawford Franklin

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Conway White

Let’s not forget all the local and state fairs that bring the state to life. Like me, I am sure many of you spend your hard-earned money at local fairs. Many of you may even travel from fair to fair as your children show livestock. As a teen I loved attending the fairs to see the projects the local FFA chapters had worked on. It was always exciting to see my friends’ projects on display or even just to see which projects took home the prize. To this day I still

swing through the FFA building at the Ozark Empire Fair to show my support. There are still many summer activities left for us to enjoy but fall has a lot of good things in store for it also. I encourage you to get out, enjoy the beautiful Ozarks and make some new memories with your family and friends. Best wishes,

Life is Simple

Morgan

Henry Bates

Arkansas/Oklahoma Publication Dates

Keepin’ it Country Continued from Previous Page

Continued from Page 3 I had no idea what a ‘rehoming’ fee meant, but it was within my budget and the address was only about 8 miles from the farm, so my wife and I loaded up and took off. The puppy was a female who was half Australian Shepherd and half Bernese Mountain Dog. Judy loved her immediately so I found out what ‘rehoming’ means, paid the lady and headed home. Bernie is what we named her and, among other positive attributes, she had the sweetest smelling breath of any puppy I had ever held. The three of us bonded immediately. Last week, I loaded her in the cab of my new truck and we headed off to my veterinarian’s office to get her puppy shots, dewormed and poured for fleas and ticks. Bernie was nervous at the travel, but she snuggled up close to me and worked her magic by blowing that wonderful breath of hers straight toward my awaiting nostrils. New-car smell and puppy’s breath in the same confined area. Heaven. Bernie didn’t appreciate the shots at her doctor’s office so she was more than

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ready to jump back in the truck and head toward home. The shots had not set well with the little puppy as she was much more subdued on the way home, curled up in the passenger’s seat as I stroked her head and tried to assure her that we were almost home. Then, about a mile from the house, Bernie jumped up, wheeled her head toward me, and spewed out everything in her stomach, like a fireman’s hose, onto the crevice dividing the two seats where it slowly oozed down onto the carpeting of the new truck. That new-car smell is gone. So is the puppy’s breath. Jerry Crownover is a farmer and former professor of Agriculture Education at Missouri State University. He is a native of Baxter County, Arkansas, and an author and professional speaker. To contact Jerry about his books, or to arrange speaking engagements, you may contact him by calling 1-866-532-1960 or visiting ozarksfn.com and clicking on ‘Contact Us.’

August 12, 2013


NEIGHBORS Meet Your

How they’re doing things down the road

Building a Legacy E.W. and Shirley Peper were honored with the 2012 Mayes County Farm Family of the Year award By Sam Lewin t’s no surprise to the Peper family that the clan’s patriarch and matriarch, E.W. and Shirley, were named Mayes County Farm Family of the Year. “I know that my dad sure worked hard his whole life,” said Angela Root, the couple’s daughter. Over a half-century of hard work paid off publicly when the Mayes County Fair Board unanimously nominated and approved the Peper Adair, Okla. (pronounced pepper) family to receive its 2012 honor. “They bale all of the hay they use on the ranch and custom bale for a few others,” the

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board said in a proclamation. “The ranch has incorporated agriculture conservation practices in the spraying of fields and feeder rotation in order to improve the air and water quality of their land.” “It was exciting to know that we had been picked,” Shirley said. “Very humbling,” E.W. agreed. With just 120 acres and a handful of cattle E.W. and Shirley opened their first ranch near the northwestern Oklahoma town of Adair in 1960. From there it just grew. And grew. And grew some more. “Yeah, I guess we just added a little bit here and there,” E.W. said. Probably the largest expansion took place in 1989 when the Pepers acquired 800 acres. The property now consists of 2,100 acres spread out over two locations. The couple also operated a Newton

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Photo by Sam Lewin

Back row L to R: Ricky Peper, Jerod Peper, Heath Peper and Daylan Root. Front row L to R: Angela Root, Shirley Peper and E.W. Peper. side business, the Peper Grain Company, for 35 years before selling it in 1995. They also manage a 160-acre farm belonging to Ruth, Shirley’s mother, who lives in a home less than 30 feet from her daughter and son-in-law. In fact, a sense of family colors just about everything the Pepers do. In addition to daughter Angela there’s also son Rick and a total of four grandchildren. Twenty-one-year old Heath, one of Rick’s children currently attending

college, recalled his grandparents giving him a female calf when he was but a young’un, a tradition carried through to all the grandchildren. “We wanted to teach them to care for something,” E.W. said, “because you can’t teach responsibility too young.” “It definitely taught them responsibility – maybe before some of their peers even,” Rick said. “I started working on the farm when I was 6,” said Jerod, another of Rick’s Continued on Page 10

In This Section – The Pepers incorporate conservation practices into their operation. . . . .Above – Cowboy Up Cowboy Church welcomes everyone just as they are..............p. 8 – Richard and Cherrie Fry handle the genetics of their Boers carefully.........p. 9 – Eye on Agribusiness features Cattlemen’s Livestock Auction...................p. 11 – Kenneth Wilcox has been in the auction ring for 37 years.......................p. 12

August 12, 2013

– Town and Country features Phil and Dr. Susan Watkins..........................p. 13 – The Boone Country Extension thanks the community for its support. . . . .p. 16 – How the Ft. Smith Livestock Auction has changed in 83 years...............p. 19 – Youth in Agriculture spotlights Ryan Dean...............................................p. 20 – Livestock markets at a glance.....................................................................p. 21

Ozarks Farm & Neighbor

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OZARKS ROOTS

Photos by Bonnie Rausch

Cowboy Up Church uses Ranch Rodeos as a form of ministry By Bonnie Rausch cott McAfee is the pastor of the Cowboy Up Church located in Owasso, Okla. The church is a member of the Oklahoma Fellowship of Cowboy Churches. Cowboy Up Church is the 35th of 42 churches located in Arkansas, Kansas and Missouri. Scott and his wife planted the Owasso location two years ago. During the summer months the Sunday morning service is held at 9:30 a.m. instead of the normal 11 a.m. because of the extreme temperatures. The service is held in the arena on the property and is of Baptist denomination. The service is set up like an old-fashioned barn dance. Scott stated, “Come as you are – come cleaned up, come from the fields or come from the barn. We welcome anyone, just come as you are.” Cowboy church isn’t just for cowboy’s they’ve had heavy metal rockers, bikers, as well as city folks join the church. The Cowboy Up Church currently has 140 members in the congregation. The service on Sunday morning started out with the Cowboy band playing and even a fiddle player, while Scott waited on horseback to preach the sermon. Scott spoke of roping a bull to get it out of a pond and the experience of skidding off of his horse into the pond because the bull intended on going for a swim that day. Scott referred to this as a come to Jesus meeting with the bull at the pond and he and his horse because his best rope stayed at the bottom of the pond that day.

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While Scott held the service preaching from his horse named, Scooter, Sunday school was taking place in one corner of the arena with 12 students and a cowboy teaching them. Scott said during his service, “Hell is not a cuss word, it’s a real place and we’re a team – you, me and God. Get your rope out and get to work back on the trail where you were.”

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After the service a new member of the church was baptized in a stock tank. Cowboy up also holds a bible study on Thursday evenings with a chuckwagon barbecue. As a collective group Oklahoma Fellowship of Cowboy Churches participates in ranch rodeos competing amongst church members. Ranch rodeo series events consist of calf branding, sorting and ranch penning. Sorting is when a four-person team sorts out their numbered calf from the herd by driving it to an assigned pen, time stops when the calf is in a pen by itself. The team can bring an additional calf, but no other calves can cross the line at any time, they have a 90 second time-frame to get this accomplished. Doctoring is when a four-person team must head and heel the calf as it is released into the arena. The two riders who didn’t catch the calf must clear their rope from the horses and themselves. Then they dismount their horses and run to the calf and mark it and then run to a designated spot, which will stop the time, this is in a two and one half minute time frame. The Cowboy Church Ranch Rodeos provide an opportunity for the churches to minister demonstrating how cowboys celebrate church. The next event will be in Haskell Okla., at Bended Knee Cowboy Church on September 14. October 5, 2013, are statewide finals located at the Lightning C Arena in McAlester, Okla. Travis Cummings is the owner of the property where the arena and ranch are located. They breed and raise horses as well as cattle, it is a working farm with between 400 to 450 acres on site; they also own other farms in the area. They mostly crop hay for the horses and cattle. The horses they raise are used for cutting, sorting and roping.

August 12, 2013


NEIGHBORS

Business of Boers Richard and Cherrie Fry pay close attention to health and nutrition to turn a profit

1 TON OF

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By Terry Ropp rather common sight on the out skirts of Miami, Okla., is a herd of goats charging out of a pasture into the front and side yards of Richard and Cherrie Fry’s. No dog is outside to round up the goats and bring them back to the pasture. All that can be seen is a couple standing near the charging goats with long, flexible fiberglass poles in their hands. The goats soon stop and start munching on grass in the side yard. The couple then walks among them, petting them, talking to them and gently herding them to different parts of the yard. The goats never stray near the busy road in front. Richard and Sherry Fry own 14 acres and 58 Boer goats. Sherry grew up on a farm and wanted goats but Richard was very hesitant because he had sheep in his past and didn’t want to get back into all of that work. Cherrie, however, soon won out, and the couple bought six goats in 2006. Cherrie grinned and said, “Richard thought I’d give up, but he was wrong.” Richard then Miami, Okla. admitted he wasn’t the least bit sorry. He said he soon discov ered the goats were not at all like sheep and were more like pets because they were so social and easy to han-

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dle. He said, “They are trainable and like a lot of attention. Sherry has named them all and knows each one by sight. If you call a name, that goat looks at you.” Pets or not, the goats are still a business. The kids are born in November and December and sold in May so they are ready for livestock shows in the spring. Generally, goats have to win in a spring show to be eligible to show in the fall. The couple really enjoys when children come out to select kids for showing. Their customer base comes from word-of-mouth advertising and from people passing by who see the goats milling

Carroll

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August 12, 2013

Continued on Next Page

Ozarks Farm & Neighbor

Pg. 9


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in the yard every other day. Because of the size of the operation, genetics have to be handled carefully. Cherrie usually keeps a registered billy for three years and then changes to prevent inbreeding. When selecting a billy, Cherrie looks mainly for body structure. She then saves the nannies and sells the billies. Their current registered billy is from South Africa. Cherrie said her biggest challenge is finding a vet who understands goats. She said “I have to pretty much be my own vet. I have a water treatment plan four days in a row once a year, which I have learned through a lot of trial and error. I deworm the goats as needed, so they don’t become immune to the drugs. One of the advantages of goats is that they have such a high immune systems.” The last two years pasturing has been supplemented with hay because of the dry weather. The goats also get grain in

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Pg. 10

Continued from Page 7 sons. “I learned how to run all the equipment before high school.” As of late it’s gone the other way, too. Because of their children E.W. and Shirley were prompted to get involved with Future Farmers of America. FFA was a part of life for the third generation with the grandkids earning both State and American Farmer Degrees. The Peper’s cross Angus cattle with Herefords, a combination that yields “superior genetics,” Rick said. “When you cross an animal like that it’s just going to be better,” E.W. said. “When you are selling beef you want your steers to gain quickly so your feed pays.” The cattle are fed until they weigh 850 pounds then put on the market – recorded on videotape then bid on through an auction house in Vinita, Okla. E.W. and Shirley have been married 51 years, and while the couple is used to the trials and tribulations that are part and parcel of an agricultural lifestyle, the

Visit our website at ozarksfn.com

the winter with a custom mix of corn, oats, barley, molasses and sometimes minerals. A mineral block is also available to them. Cherrie said, “We can’t fatten them as much as we used to because of the price of feed, but they also have to be a certain weight for showing so we have to balance what we do.” Richard disagreed, “This is not a moneymaking proposition because she won’t take any shortcuts. They are fatter than dog ticks.” Cherrie was raised on a farm with older brothers so she was a tomboy. Richard, on the other hand, was from town. However, both enjoyed the outdoors and hunting and fishing though Richard won’t eat what he hunts and gives much of the meat away. Now they enjoy their goats together and helping on her family’s pecan farm. Richard works for Newell Coach which makes Class A motor homes that start at $1 million and are often built for NASCAR drivers.

past few years have been rough. Multiple years of drought culminated with 2012 becoming Oklahoma’s hottest year on record, and the driest May-throughDecember period ever, according to officials at Oklahoma State University. Scorching heat and bone-dry skies generated more than $1 billion in losses to the state’s agriculture industry. “During the last two years of drought we culled 60 from our herd, and we still have not replaced them,” Rick said, although a fairly wet spring has led to cautious optimism. “It’s not a glamorous life,” E.W. said. “You have to love it because there are lots of disappointments and lots of hard work, but it has its rewards. It’s nice to be able to look at something and say, ‘I built that.’” No matter what the future holds it’s clear the Peper family won’t lose the faith anytime soon. “I’m proud of them but we have always looked at them as the farm family of the year,” Heath said.

August 12, 2013


BUSINESS Eye On Agri-

Meeting farmers’ needs

Cattlemen’s Livestock Auction, Inc. Owner: Claude Smith Location: Harrison, Ark. History: Claude Smith has been involved with and around sale barns all his life, working in the barns in Mountain Home and Green Forest, Ark., prior to taking control of Cattlemen’s Livestock Auction in Harrison, Ark., six years ago. The auction building was relocated from downtown Harrison to this new location just outside of town about 20 years ago by George Wallace. Cattlemen’s Livestock Auction has the largest under-roof holding facility in northern Arkansas. The auction arena itself can hold over 200 people, but the usual group of around 100 includes buyers representing eight or nine different states.

Services: Cattlemen’s has a weekly sale on Wednesdays beginning at noon. Cattle to be sold can be brought in early and will be fed and watered at no charge to the seller. Special cow sales are also held periodically and the dates are advertised. There is also a monthly goat sale on the third Friday, starting at 6 p.m. Included in the services at the barn is an on-site vet. Cattlemen’s Restaurant inside the barn is open during every sale and manager Lee Harrison welcomes everyone to try his hamburgers.

Business Philosophy: Claude said, “Without farmers, this place wouldn’t be here.� He tries to keep that in mind all the time. “They trust me to market their cattle and get the best price possible, and that’s always my primary goal. Trust is a big thing with me. We also try to move the cattle in and out with as little stress as possible,� he said. Claude added that to reduce the stress, he intends to add more fans and a better sprinkler system so the cattle are more comfortable. He would like to keep improving and get the barn better and better. Claude would like to give credit where credit is due. He said, “The good Lord has blessed me. This business wouldn’t have went without Him.� Story and Photo by Jack and Pam Fortner

August 12, 2013

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Livestock Auction Inc. Serving the Tri-State Area

Owners: Chris Buffer, 479-531-2962 Shawn Sperry, 479-957-1387

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Chanting On Kenneth Wilcox’s auctioneering career lead him to the 1990 World Livestock Auctioneer Championship By Terry Ropp any farmers and ranchers depend upon sale barns to purchase and sell their livestock. At the center of that process is the auctioneer whose task is to present and sell each animal for the best price possible. The process is rapid and requires intense concentration from both the buyer and the auctioneer. Kenneth Wilcox of West Fork, Ark., began auctioneering in Photo by Terry Ropp 1976 and won World Livestock Kenneth Wilcox learned to master his chant from veteran Dittman Auctioneer Championship in Mitchell nearly 37 years ago. 1990. He is one of the few auctioneers who makes his living auction- accident. He had an uncle who was eering rather than using it as a sec- infatuated with the process, and ondary income and currently auctions Kenneth began to learn the process from only cattle. During his career he has Dittman Mitchell, his uncle’s friend, lived in Kansas and Texas where he met only as a way to entertain his uncle. his wife, Claudette. He now travels to Dittman had an old, cursive typewriter Tulsa on Mondays, Checotah on and typed out two pages of instructions Tuesdays, and Apache, Okla., every on blue paper, which has since become other Thursday. one of Kenneth’s treasures. The instrucKenneth never attended auctioneering tions explained how to build a chant school and ended up in auc- made up of numbers and filler words and tioneering almost by advice on auctioneering. One critical element is that the auction chant must be in the form of a question. Another is speaking plainly enough so everyone understands with speed West Fork, Ark. being of secondary importance. Kenneth said, “Some may go off to auction school and think they’re going to start out as fast

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Pg. 12

Cleburne

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Visit our website at ozarksfn.com

Continued on Page 18

August 12, 2013


COUNTRY Town and

Stillwater Milling Co. for all your livestock needs

6’x1.25 T Post $ 79

3

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In the field and in the office

Phil and Dr. Susan Watkins In Town:

Phil Watkins has worked for South Western Electric Power Company (SWEPCO) since 1990. He has been the Energy Efficiency Program Manager for the last five years. Dr. Susan Watkins is a Professor of Poultry Science and Extension Specialist at the University of Arkansas. She has been Poultry Extension Specialist since 1996.

Wire Panels 50”x16’ $

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In the Country: Phil and Susan have a 55-acre farm located in Huntsville, Ark., near the King’s River. They usually run 15 head of Simmental/Angus cross cows, but have cut down to 12 due to the recent drought. The herd runs on a mix of fescue and bermudagrass. They also provide salt and loose mineral for the herd. “The Simmental/Angus cross makes it possible to reach that sweet spot of a 5month-old calf weighing 400-500 pounds. Some of the momma cows also have a little Holstein mixed in, which helps too. Most of our calves are now 50 to 75 percent Simmental. We will sell several calves probably in a month or so since they are already weighing it out. We are not planning on keeping any heifers this time around. Our herd is already pretty young.” The couple plan on expanding the herd some day and leasing more land for pasture.

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The success of the farm can be contributed to team work and excellent communication. “Someone is out here every day making sure the herd gets what they need. We both travel occasionally for our jobs, Susan more than I, so we have gotten really good at coordinating.”

Advice for others: “If you look around,

Two Locations To Serve You in Huntsville Hwy. 412 Bypass 312 W. Main

you will notice that we don’t have a chute or really good working pens. We spend time making our cattle gentle enough to work with. It makes things easier when it is time to load them up.”

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Pg. 13


Market Sale

Slaughter Cows 50.00-85.50 † 59.00-98.50 † 5 55.00-87.50 † Not Reported† 50.00-93.00 † 55.00-89.00 † 5 Not Reported† 61.00-97.50 † 60.00+91.50 † 6 65.00-90.00 † Not Reported† 63.00-101.00 † 67.00-91.50 † 6 63.00-95.00 * 6 Not Reported * Not Reported * 77.00-91.00 * 69.00-90.00 * Not Reported * 68.00-90.00 * 6

130

Slaughter Bulls 78.00-103.00 † 86.50-105.00† 84.00-104.50 † Not Reported† 95.00-109.50 † 992.00-108.00 † Not Reported † † 8 85.50-114.00 80.00-106.00† 90.00-104.00 † Not Reported † 887.50-117.00 † 885.00-107.50 † 886.00-105.00* Not Reported * Not Reported * 92.00-103.00* 89.00-102.00* Not Reported* 994.00-110.00*

Decatur Livestock Auction Farmers & Ranchers - Vinita, Okla. Mo-Ark - Exeter Poor Boy Livestock Auction Stilwell Livestock Auction

30

50

70

90

110

130

Ash Flat

El Reno

Ft. Smith

Green Forest

Koshkonong, Mo. • Oregon Co. Goat & Sheep • 7/28/13

Receipts: 363

Heber Springs

Joplin

Ouachita

Ozark

Ratcliff

Siloam Springs

Springdale

STEERS

Week of 7/7/13

STEERS

134.44 137.53 131.89 144.03 136.88 134.60 131.28 136.03 135.39 137.16 139.63

132.50

*

***

*

HEIFERS

153.19 152.93 146.59

143.67 151.39 148.19 155.75 151.25 146.15 147.75

142.39

Markets 147.47

Farmer’s Livestock - Springdale Ft. Smith Livestock Auction I-40 Livestock Auction - Ozark Joplin Regional Stockyards North Arkansas Livestock OKC West - El Reno, Okla. Ouachita Livestock Auction - Ola Ozarks Regional Stockyard - West Plains Tulsa Stockyards, Inc. Cattlemen’s Livestock Auction Clinton Livestock Auction

*** * **

Independently Reported

USDA Verified & Reported

(Week of 7/28/13 to 8/3/13) Ash Flat Livestock Benton County Sale Barn - Siloam Springs Cleburne County Livestock Auction County Line Sale Barn - Ratcliff

134.17

110

136.44 138.07

90

***

70

** ** **

50

Receipts: 1235 Supply and demand were moderate. The supply included 30 percent slaughter and feeder lambs; 1 percent slaughter ewes and bucks; 3 percent replacement ewes; 46 percent kid goats; 18 percent slaughter nannies and billies; 2 percent replacement nannies and billies. All prices per hundred weight unless noted otherwise. Sheep Slaughter Lambs: Choice 2-3 wooled and shorn nontraditional 70-80 lbs 87.50-100.00; 80-100 lbs 90.00-95.00; traditional 105-130 lbs 77.50-100.00; Hair 80-90 lbs 90.00107.50; 90-100 lbs 95.00-100.00.

137.55 131.97 139.15

30

Diamond, Mo. • TS Whites Sheep & Goat Sale • 8/1/13

134.91

10

Sheep & Goat Markets

* **

Stilwell Livestock Auction

5 Area (Tx-Ok, Ks, Neb, Ia, Colo) Live Basis Sales - Over 80% Choice Steers: 120.50-123.00; wtd. avg. price 121.78. Heifers: 119.00-123.00; wtd. avg. price 121.43. Dressed Basis Sales - Over 80% Choice Steers: 192.00-197.00; wtd. avg. price 194.33. Heifers: 190.00-195.00; wtd. avg. price 194.28.

151.56 153.89 156.27 148.96

Mo-Ark - Exeter Poor Boy Livestock Auction

Midwest - High Plains Direct Slaughter Cattle • 8/4/13

154.88

Decatur Livestock Auction Farmers & Ranchers - Vinita, Okla.

Feeder/Stocker Lambs: Medium and Large 1-2 wooled 30-60 lbs 125.00; 60-70 lbs; 115.00-132.50; hair: 40-60 lbs 120.00-137.50; 60-80 lbs 100.00-127.50. Replacement Ewes: Medium and Large 1-2 hair 70-131 lbs 45.00-60.00. Goats Slaughter Classes Kids Selection: 1 50-60 lbs 165.00-175.00; 60-70 lbs 160.00-175.00; 70-80 lbs 150.00-175.00; 90-100 lbs 160.00170.00. Selection 2 50-60 lbs 152.50-160.00; 60-70 lbs 152.50-165.00; 70-90 lbs 140.00-145.00. Selection 3 60-70 lbs 105.00-140.00. Does/Nannies: Selection 1 120-150 lbs 55.00-80.00. Selection 2 73-125 lbs 65.00-95.50. Selection 3 58-88 lbs 70.00-77.50; Dairy 50-110 lbs 60.00-80.00. Billies: Selection 1-2 78-140 lbs 112.50-120.00. Selection 2-3 aged wethers 65-140 lbs 115.00-120.00. Selection 3 70115 lbs 80.00-117.50 cwt. Replacement Classes Nannies: Selection 3 Dairy 125.00 per head. Billies: Selection 1 80-90 lbs kids billies 210.00-230.00 cwt. Stocker/Feeder Kids: Selection 1 40-50 lbs 165.00177.50; Selection 2 20-30 lbs 140.00-150.00; 30-40 lbs 150.00-165.00; 40-50 lbs 142.50-167.50; Selection 3 20-30 lbs 100.00-110.00; 30-40 lbs 100.00-140.00; 40-50 lbs 100.00-120.00; 50-60 lbs 120.00-140.00 cwt; bottle kids 25.00-35.00 per head.

Beef Cattle

** ** **

Farmer’s Livestock Ft. Smith Livestock Auction I-40 Livestock Auction - Ozark Joplin Regional Stockyards North Arkansas Livestock OKC West - El Reno, Okla. Ouachita Livestock Auction - Ola Ozarks Regional Stockyard Tulsa Stockyards, Inc. Cattlemen’s Livestock Auction Clinton Livestock Auction

* Independently reporte

***

Independently Reported

USDA Verified & Reported

(Week of 7/28/13 to 8/3/13) Ash Flat Livestock Benton County Sale Barn Cleburne County Livestock County Line Sale Barn - Ratcliff

Week of 7/14/13

HEIFERS

Prices Based on Weighted Average for Steers and Heifers 550-600 lbs.

Stocker & Fe

150

Sale Date Receipts Trend Steers, Medium and Large 1 300-400 400-500 500-600 600-700 700-800

lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs.

Bulls, Medium and Large 1 300-400 400-500 500-600 600-700 700-800

lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs.

Heifers,Medium & Large 1 300-400 400-500 500-600 600-700 700-800

lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs. lbs.

Pg. Pg. 14 14

ASH FLAT  LIVESTOCK

BENTON CO. SILOAM SPRINGS

CLEBURNE CO. LIVESTOCK HEBER SPRINGS

COUNTY LINE  RATCLIFF

8/2/13

8/1/13

7/29/13

868

1305

331

Steady-10 Higher

2-6 Higher

Steady-4 Higher

165.00-185.00 157.00-167.00 153.00-160.00 145.00-158.00 136.50-151.00

184.00-217.00 168.00-178.00 145.00-162.00 140.00-158.50 135.00-138.50

170.00-180.00 150.00-170.00 142.00-155.00 141.00-143.00 –––––

––––– 150.00-161.00 148.00-154.00 ––––– –––––

185.00-217.00 164.00-174.00 138.00-161.00 130.00-140.00 125.00-126.00

––––– 145.00-158.00 135.00-155.00 131.00-138.00 –––––

––––– 145.00-154.00 142.00-147.00 133.00-144.00 132.00-144.00

155.00-185.00 150.00-164.50 134.00-151.00 129.00-142.50 122.00

150.00-155.00 140.00-150.00 132.00-144.00 120.00-135.00 125.00-128.00

FARMERS LIVESTOCK  SPRINGDALE

N. ARK. LIVESTOCK  GREEN FOREST

FT. SMITH  LIVESTOCK

I-40 LIVESTOCK OZARK

JOPLIN  REGIONAL

Not Reported

AUCTION BARN

Not Reported

USDA Verified and Reported

-----

7/29/13

7/31/13

-----

4011

690

-----

Steady-4 Higher

1-8 Higher

2-7 Hi

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

––––– 170.00-185.00 157.00-177.00 144.00-162.00 140.00-151.00

186.00-214.00 164.00-177.50 147.00-164.00 142.00-157.00 140.00-147.00

198.00-2 182.00-1 163.50-1 149.00-1 148.50-1

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

210.00 170.00-180.00 156.00-160.00 135.00-149.00 135.00-140.00

171.00-186.00 157.00-183.00 142.50-158.00 134.00-141.00 125.00-127.00

–––– –––– –––– –––– 136.

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

162.00-165.00 146.00-161.00 138.00-152.00 131.50-146.00 130.00-140.00

154.00-188.00 145.00-161.00 138.00-153.50 130.00-144.00 125.00-137.00

181.0 157.00-1 149.00-1 140.00-1 138.50-1

-----

8/2/13

7/29/13

-----

608

733

-----

3-10 Higher

3-7 Higher

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

190.00-227.50 170.00-186.00 151.00-171.00 149.00-154.00 135.00-141.00

185.00-200.00 163.00-191.00 153.00-166.00 138.00-145.00 133.00-137.25

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

185.00-210.00 167.00-181.00 145.00-172.00 129.00-144.00 122.00-126.00

170.00-173.00 156.00-161.00 140.00-153.00 130.00-139.00 125.00-128.00

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

162.00-179.00 145.00-162.00 133.00-153.00 132.00-139.00 125.00-132.00

160.00-179.00 149.00-170.00 135.00-148.00 124.00-137.00 122.00-138.50

Visit our website at ozarksfn.com Ozarks Farm & Neighbor

OKC W EL RENO 7/31/ 466

August Market 12, 2013 Bringing


Avg. Grain Prices 16

8 4

Cheese: 40 lb. blocks closed at $1.7750 with a weekly average of $1.7705 (+.0160).

11.92

11.87

7.57

7.57

8.46

4.40

4.37

e

eola

Osc

4.12

usta

Aug

Pine

Bluf

f

00 173.00 182.00 149.85 144.75

Stilwell StilwellLivestock LivestockAuction Auction

-----

7/30/13

7/29/13

7/31/13

-----

2501

1905

1077

-----

2-10 Higher

2-7 Higher

Steady-10 Higher

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

180.00-216.00 169.00-190.00 155.00-168.00 129.00-156.00 142.50-147.00

192.00-217.00 179.50-188.00 155.50-175.00 143.00-154.00 145.00-150.50

165.00-205.00 150.00-185.00 145.00-171.00 140.00-155.00 135.00-146.00

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

––––– 163.00-170.00 ––––– 134.00-145.00 130.00-140.50

140.00-190.00 130.00-175.00 135.00-158.00 120.00-145.00 115.00-133.00

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

166.00-177.50 150.00-166.00 143.00-153.00 132.00-149.00 132.50-140.00

169.00-178.00 155.50-168.00 141.50-156.00 129.00-141.00 130.50-134.00

140.00-172.50 135.00-159.00 125.00-145.00 120.00-144.00 115.00-133.00

CATTLEMEN’S * LIVESTOCK

5000

830.00-1290.00 † 65.00-99.00 † Prices reported per cwt. Not Reported† 825.00-1550.00 † † 840.00-1150.00 † 925.00-1890.00 † Not Reported † 1075.00-1575.00† 10 † 900.00-1150.00 825.00-1510.00 † 8825 740.00-1250.00 7770.00-1420.00 * Not Reported * Not Reported * 1000.00-1350.00 * 8850.00-1500.00 840.00-1510.00* * Not Reported * 11000.00-1250.00 *

500 1000 Independently Reported

1500

MO-ARK * EXETER

CLINTON LIVESTOCK * AUCTION

DECATUR* LIVESTOCK

FARMERS & RANCHERS* VINITA, OK

-----

-----

7/31/13

8/3/13

-----

466

------

-----

2-4 Higher

-----

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

185.00-205.00 169.00-185.00 159.00-169.00 149.00-159.00 144.00-149.00

177.00-132.00 164.00-184.00 143.00-170.00 144.00-158.00 140.00-145.00

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

175.00-199.00 153.00-172.00 ––––– 141.00-143.00 –––––

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

165.00-174.00 157.00-165.00 142.00-157.00 132.00-142.00 124.00-132.00

145.00-179.00 140.00-164.00 135.00-150.00 134.00 –––––

---------

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

Not Reported

–– –– –– –– .00

TULSA STOCKYARDS TULSA, OK

Not Reported

214.00 196.00 188.00 167.00 158.00

OZARKS REG.  WEST PLAINS

Not Reported

igher

Decatur Livestock Auction Farmers&&Ranchers Ranchers--Vinita Vinita Farmers Mo-Ark Mo-Ark--Exeter Exeter, Mo. Poor PoorBoy BoyLivestock LivestockAuction Auction

0

Not Reported

/13 64

Farmer’s Livestock Ft. Smith Livestock Auction I-40 Livestock Auction - Ozark Joplin Regional Stockyards North Arkansas Livestock North Arkansas Livestock OKC West - El Reno, Okla. Ouachita Livestock Auction - Ola Ouachita Livestock Auction - Ola Ozarks Regional Stockyard Ozarks Regional Stockyard Tulsa Stockyards, Inc. Cattlemen’s Livestock Clinton Livestock Auction

Independently Reported

138.25 138.71 145.95 146.45

HEIFERS

eeder Prices OUACHITA LIVESTOCK  OLA, AR

4000

Ash Flat Livestock 875.00-1400.00 † 11000.00-1575.00 † Benton County Sale Barn Cleburne County Livestock Auction - Heber Springs 77.00-101.00 †Prices reported per cwt. Not Reported† County Line Sale Barn - Ratcliff

4.47

* No Sale - Weather/Holiday **USDA Failed To Report *** No Price in Weight Bracket

WEST  O, OK

3000

Replacement Cows

** ** **

Week of 7/28/13

2000

(Week of 7/28/13 to 8/3/13)

4.34

** ** ** STEERS

HEIFERS

1000

6.58

Elain

11400.00-1700.00*

Stilwell Livestock

8.13

7.04

Markets

154.98 165.67 156.78 158.73 150.22 159.85

142.21 136.00 137.05 132.00 135.96 138.45 139.03 143.79 **

136.05 149.66 133.00 137.45

157.41 161.52 ***

Week of 7/21/13

Not Reported * Decatur Livestock Auction 1250.00-1600.00 * Farmers & Ranchers Mo-Ark 875.00-1600.00 * Poor Boy Livestock Auction Not Reported *

0

11.94

11.36

STEERS & HEIFERS 550-600 LBS.

155.63 151.00 149.07 151.00 149.52 **

Sorghum

11.87

4.42

le na hevil Hele Blyt

West Plains

161.50 149.00 150.21

Corn

6.35

0

Fluid Milk: Cooler temperatures across most of the country have helped moderate the downward trend in milk production. Any bounce backs in production have been marginal at best.

144.51

11.87

12

National Dairy Market at a Glance • 8/2/13

STEERS

Day’s End 8/6/13

20

Dairy Sales

Tulsa

Soft Wheat

1120.00-1490.00 Farmer’s 1275.00-1400.00 † Ft. Smith Livestock Not Reported † I-40 Livestock - Ozark † 1 1100.00-2000.00 Joplin Regional None Reported † North Arkansas Livestock - Green Forest 1250.00-1900.00 † OKC West - El Reno Not Reported† Ouachita Livestock Auction - Ola Ozarks Regional 1225.00-2050.00† None Reported † Tulsa Stockyards, Inc. Cattlemen’s 900.00-1475.00 * Clinton Livestock Auction Not Reported *

August Ozarks Farm & Neighbor Reports12, to 2013 Northwest Arkansas and Eastern Oklahoma

2000

2500

POOR BOY* LIVESTOCK

STILWELL LIVESTOCK * STILWELL, OK

-----

7/31/13

Not Reported

Soybeans

USDA Verified & Reported

Milk components remain at reduced levels and are affecting yields at processing plants. School start-ups across the southern portion of the nation are expected to limit manufacturing milk supplies in some areas as early as next week. Cream markets continue to firm as supplies are less available, due to lower milk production and butterfat levels. Cream multiples have increased, but the lower butter prices have taken some of the sting out of butterfat pricing. Spot Prices Of Class II Cream, $ Per Pound Butterfat F.O.B. producing plants: Upper Midwest - $1.8988-2.2297.

Independently Reported

All goats and sheep graded by MO Dept of Ag-USDA Graders and bought per cwt. based on in-weights at the buying station. Offerings were made up of 80 percent goats and 20 percent sheep. Slaughter Classes: Goats: Kids: Selection 1 45-60 lbs 170.00; 61-80 lbs 145.00. Selection 1-2 81 lbs and over 80.00. Selection 2 4560 lbs 150.00; 61-80 lbs 130.00. Selection 3 45-60 lbs 135.00. Feeder Kids: 20-44 lbs 80.00. Slaughter Does/Nannies: Selection 1-2 60.00-80.00. Selection 3 60.00. yearlings any grade 80.00. pygmy 75.00. Slaughter Bucks: Selection 1-2 90.00. yearling bucks any grade 95.00. Aged wethers 100 lbs and over 75.00. Sheep: Slaughter Lambs: Choice and Prime 2-3 hair 80 lbs and under 100.00-110.00; over 80 lbs 90.00. Slaughter Ewes: Utility and Good 1-3 35.00. Slaughter Rams: Aged rams 30.00.

1325.00 † Ash Flat Livestock 1025.00-1525.00 † Benton County Cleburne County Livestock - Heber Springs None Reported† Not Reported† County Line Sale Barn - Ratcliff

USDA Verified & Reported

R

† USDA Reported

(Week of 7/28/13 to 8/3/13)

155.03 155.81 157.26 159.06

ed

eports

143.49 153.11 140.88 142.85 137.24 142.87

es

Cow/Calf Pairs

------

1560

-----

3-6 Higher

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

180.00-222.00 168.00-190.00 148.00-168.00 145.00-158.00 138.00-154.00

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

175.00-218.00 163.00-182.00 140.00-159.00 138.00-148.00 110.00-138.00

––––– ––––– ––––– ––––– –––––

165.00-178.00 150.00-170.00 140.00-152.00 130.00-140.00 125.00-141.00

Pg. 15 Pg.


NEIGHBORS

Service for All The Boone County Extension Office welcomes new opportunity after Olvey Hereford Ranch donation

Mission.” The staff of this extension facility works hard to be part of their community and help share information gleaned from University testing and research in a useful manner to area farmers, ranchers and gardeners, as well as providing youth 4-H services. Last year Jo and Estelle Patty donated 40 acres of the “Olvey Hereford Ranch” that once was an icon of beef ranching in the area. Nita Cooper, staff chair of the Boone County Extension Office, is

By Sherry Leverich Tucker

COMMITTED TO AGRICULTURE Today’s farmers and ranchers have more challenges than ever before.

ith a focus on the future, but an admi ration for the past, the staff of the University of Arkansas Extension

W

Understanding you and your specific needs is the key to being an effective financial partner. We have a dedicated team of Agricultural Lenders to meet those needs. Local lenders and local decisions – Arvest Bank.

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Paul Patterson, NMLS #564494 (918) 253-4235 Jay, OK

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Dax Moreton, NMLS #564422 (479) 846-7015 Lincoln, AR

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Lynn Thomas, NMLS #564430 (479) 846-7422 Prairie Grove, AR

Photo by Sherry Leverich Tucker

The Boone County Extension Office provides information and support to the ag community through research, classes and seminars. L to R: Mike McClintock, Nita Cooper, Trudy McManus and Kathy Rawlingson. office of Boone County located in delighted with the donation, “It’s an Harrison, Ark., is excited about new amazing gift, and we have a wonderful opportunities that are helping them steering committee who is making our achieve their goal of staying hopes all become possible.” The donated true to the “Land Grant property came with a barn built in the 1950s that was state of the art for it’s time. The office was able to restore the barn, and has also completed building an extension Harrison, Ark. business office and is in the planning phases of building a covered arena. Mike McClintock, ag agent for Boone County, explained, “The arena will be phase 3, it will be a 160’ x 250’ covered arena made available for Craig

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August 12, 2013


NEIGHBORS

Benton County Sale Barn, Inc.

Over 20 Years of Serving the Tri-State Area Boone County events, including equine, ers. Nita, Mike and Kathy also rotate dog shows, livestock, ATV training and through various topics on a weekly other group events.” Mike was also radio show broadcast locally. pleased to share that they have retained During last year’s devastating drought, a grant from the National Rifle the Extension coordinated an area wide Association to build a complete shooting Forage Conference to address many of range that, among other things, can be the concerns from area farmers. It was utilized for 4-H shooting sports activities. held in Harrison, with about 230 people Through this transition to the new site attending. “We coordinated speakers, a and projects for growth, the Extension meal, the facility and had specialists staff has been thrilled at the community from around Arkansas come to provide support. “The community is responsible producers with factual information to for our ability to provide these services help support them through the and move ahead with our building plans. drought,” said Mike about the event. We couldn’t do it without all the support, “We provided suggestions on what to and we want to give them a good return do now. We brought in a nutritionist, a on their investment,” shared Nita. Mike forage specialist, discussed production also added, “We are the strategies, even had a Extension Service, and CPA present to answer the main word is ‘serv- “The community is questions about ice.’” Along with Nita responsible for our ability to accounting and taxes and Mike, the office is provide these services and and discuss tax conmove ahead with our also staffed with Trudy building plans. We couldn’t sequences of selling out McManus, a family con- do it without all the support large lots of cattle.” sumer science specialist, and we want to give them a Mike also stated that, and Kathy Rawlingson, good return on their “We are suppose to be investment.” office secretary. a step ahead so that we - Nita Cooper, Boone can be advisors.” Mike A large part of the Extension’s purpose is Country Extension Staff Chair appreciates that farmto provide information ers work hard, “Farmers and support to the agriare outstanding at figcultural community. Mike McClintock uring out what makes money. offers help in a variety of areas, “We Regardless of what is going on in the make ourselves available to commercial country, they are going to do what they ag, commercial horticulture, landsca- need to do to make what they do work, pers, row croppers, farmers and ranch- and make money at it.” ers.” For farmers in the area, this can be The staff at the Boone County really helpful, “Our largest farm indus- Extension works to provide their servtry in Boone County is beef. The ices either free or as economically as county grossed $121 million in total possible. While Mike respects that Nita agriculture last year.” Mike continued, runs the office, “like a well-oiled “We offer free plant pathology. I can machine.” Nita is proud to share that it help balance feed rations, make rec- is all made possible through community ommendations for pasture production support and a strong volunteer base. and forage strategies, or help a farmer calibrate his sprayer. We also offer a variety of demonstrations and classes.” Classes that the extension either coordinates or facilitates include Master Gardener courses, and fruit tree and berry demonstrations that are helpful to home horticulturists and farmers market growers, as well as Arkansas beef improvement courses and grazing schools that appeal to large scale farm-

August 12, 2013

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Continued from Page 12 as a 20-year veteran, but learning auc- from appendicitis surgery, so I had a job tioneering is like riding a bike. You ride for four weeks. It went well and I slow and wobbly before you go speeding stayed.� Then he added, “The Lord down the street.� Learning to breathe at leads in mysterious ways and this must the right times and quickly filling lungs be what he wanted. It’s a hard business with air is critical. Kenneth told the to get into, but doors just kept opening story of one friend who choked because for me.� he wanted to keep his rhythm and went Kenneth said one of the interesting too long without breathing. A final ele- and entertaining things about being an ment of auctioning is knowing the auctioneer is never knowing what’s value of the product being auctioned. going to happen. One time he sold a This is important because the auction ladder he had bought earlier in the as a whole must keep moving and the week and had forgotten to take out of auctioneer needs to respond to a rea- the barn. It sold for five dollars more sonable maximum rather than persist- than the purchase price even though ing on to get more. Kenneth gave an the price tag was still attached. example. Auctioning a pickup only Another time a buyer found an old iron worth $3,500 but bed overgrown with grinding on to try to leaves behind the get $5,000 causes barn on the farm Some may go off to the audience to lose where a sale was auction school and think interest and focus taking place. they’re going to start which can then Kenneth said, “I dampen bids for was new at the job out as fast as a 20-year remaining items. and sold it at a dolveteran, but learning Kenneth’s first auclar a lick for $110. auctioneering is like tion was selling tack Now, of course I riding a bike. You ride before a horse sale at would know better slow and wobbly before Dittman’s insistence. and go from $1 to you go speeding down Kenneth said, “I $5 to $15 and get to the street. practiced and prac$100 in a hurry. ticed and then pracThat’s the thing ticed some more. I - Kenneth Wilcox, 1990 World about being an aucsold for 30 minutes Livestock Auctioneer Champion tioneer, you get and got a huge plenty of opportuniround of applause when I finished. I was ties to make a fool out of yourself and hooked.� Kenneth then began doing I’ve done well at that.� white elephant sales, pie suppers and What Claudette especially appreciates slave auctions as charity work while fin- about Kenneth’s career are the annual ishing high school. After graduating he trips to Wyoming where Kenneth aucworked detailing cars and charity auc- tions at a huge annual event and where tioning on the side. One day an auc- her family comes from. “Doubling up auctioneer got appendicitis and the seller tioning and visiting with friends and famneeded an auctioneer quickly and des- ily is a great way to go,� said Claudette. perately. He asked Kenneth who The one thing the words of the story explained he’d never really done an can’t convey is the haunting, musical auction before. The seller pressed say- quality of Kenneth’s voice when aucing all he needed was a chant and a tioning. The term “chant� truly achieves warm body. Kenneth smiled and said, its meaning when delivered by Kenneth. “Back then it took four weeks to heal

Visit our website at ozarksfn.com

August 12, 2013


NEIGHBORS

The Makings of a Profitable Market Fort Smith Livestock Auction provides a reliable livestock market for 83 years By Terry Ropp he Fort Smith Livestock Auction began as a sale barn in the 1930s when Louis Beland and Leon Williams selected the site because of its proximity to the river and its rail connection. They hauled timber, cut it and built the sale barn themselves. Even though the facility was in Oklahoma, it was named after Fort Smith because it was just across the Garrison Avenue Bridge from Fort Smith. They are still a regional market for both states. In 1945, the business sold for $105,000. Forty-one years later in 1986, the 300-acre site was sold for $1.2 million to the present owners: Allen Hales who bought out partner Floyd Barringer, and other owners Brooks and Stewart Godwin and the Fox family with Jim Fox being the current family representative. The company employs about 40 people with 10 full-time people who weld, repair, clean up and wash pens or whatever else needs to be done. They are governed by the Packers and Stockyards Act of the USDA. The livestock business in Fort Smith has changed significantly since the 1930s. One of the big changes is that hogs are no longer sold. At one point the business sold 200,000 hogs per year with most of these animals arriving by rail because the trucking industry had not yet developed. Now hogs are almost exclusively vertically integrated through companies like Tyson or Cargill and not sold in private facilities like this one. Few independent producers remain and these are for small, niche markets. Another change is that Fort Smith Livestock Auction used to be the world’s largest site for mule and horse sales but that market too has dried up.

T

August 12, 2013

The most significant change for the company was the move from being a terminal market to an auction sale. A terminal market is one where the buyer and the seller meet and privately negotiate a sale treaty or agreement. Under the terminal market system two companies work in tandem. The stockyard company owns the facility while a commission company receives, sells,

company owned the facility, the commission company had the final say about the negotiated price of each sale. Allen said, “My dad owned the commission company and was a wonderful negotiator. His alley usually had 1,500 to 2,000 cattle in it.” Later Allen took

Photos by Terry Ropp

Allen Hales explained that the most significant change for Fort Smith Livestock Auction was the transition from a terminal market to an auction sale. collects money from the buyers that day and then pays the sellers. The commission company is supported by a yard company who supplies people to unload and Moffett, Okla. handle the animals during the sale process. Even though the stockyard Craig

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after his father and drove the countryside to drum up business. Allen said, “I met all kinds of people: bankers, lawyers, moonshiners and all were good.” He explained that he would drive by a place, stop and visit. He would ask them to sell and give them a writing book and a Newton

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pencil. The company also used to mail out 4” x 8” cards with the name of the market and the report of last week’s prices, a precursor of junk mail but one that was appreciated. The company used to send 2, 000 cards a week, but in time the postage alone was too expensive. However, during the 1950s, the cards worked well, so well that people who were dropped off the list for not selling would ask to be placed back on promising to sell soon. The business changed from a terminal market to an auction business in the 1970s. According to Allen, the auctions were good because they were fast and allowed everybody a chance to buy. The Fort Smith Livestock Auction makes every effort to accommodate their customers. Allen said, “We want to treat everybody the way we want to be treated.” Allen then explained that no customer is too large or too small, and larger consignments are sometimes brought in days before the once-a-week Monday sale. In order to accommodate larger customers whose cattle now arrive by truck rather than rail, the corporation raises and harvests hay for the longer-term cattle as well as providing grazing. The largest portion of cattle sold now is stocker/feeders followed by stock and butcher cattle. In terms of the future, Allen admitted that video sales are climbing but feels that there will always be a place for the auction house for smaller, commercial cattlemen. One thing that will not change is that the cattle will always bring what the buyer is willing to pay. Allen, who is now 76, believes he grew up in the best of times. He said, “No one locked their houses, there was an openness when meeting new people and visiting was a part of daily life.”

Pg. 19


YOUTH

Agriculture’s

Whether on the floor of the Missouri Senate, working for the USDA, or hosting the Farm & Ranch Report, Morris Westfall cares about the people of the Ozarks.

Tomorrow’s ag leaders

Ag Production and political news and views for the farm and ranch.

Name: Ryan Dean, 12 Parents: Ronnie Dean and Linda Hall Hometown: Roland, Okla.

Join Morris Westfall for the Farm & Ranch Report.

What is your favorite aspect of agriculture? “I really love both auctioneering and working with cattle.”

Most influential person: “My grandpa is the most influential person in my life. I remember when I was 2 years old and riding on his shoulders and looking at the pens to see which animals were good. Now I go to sales with him three times a week, and there’s a sale barn right near my school. When my homework is done, I sometimes get dropped off there to be with him.” Saturday 8:05am Weekdays 6:35am

Saturday 8:05am Weekdays 6:3Oam & 12:05pm

Agricultural involvement: “I help with pretty much everything. I feed

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and water the cattle, and when it’s time, I help drive them into the chutes for their shots and sometimes give them the shots myself. I also sit with my grandpa in the tractor when we fertilize and hay, but that’s really hot because we don’t have any air conditioning in the tractor and have to leave the door open.”

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favorite memory is when I was younger and we were driving into the pasture. The cattle started following the feed truck, and I would pretend I was an auctioneer. Now I sometimes auction the last two or three butcher cows when we go to the sale barn.”

Buying cattle:

“I’ve been buying cattle since I was 10 and I’ve bought over 100 cattle. I pay back the price of the animal but get to keep the profit. Sometimes grandpa will buy one that I don’t think is so good, and sometimes I buy some that he’s not so sure of. It’s really fun and it all works out.” Story and Photo by Terry Ropp

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August 12, 2013


16

Livestock Markets Northwest Arkansas & Eastern Oklahoma 1. 101 Livestock Auction, Morrilton, AR, Saturday at noon.....................................501-354-5900 2. Arrow P Equine Sales, Tulsa, OK, 1st Thursday of the month...............................918-343-2688 3. Ash Flat Livestock Auction, Ash Flat, AR, Friday at noon...................................870-994-7311 4. Benton County Sale Barn, Siloam Springs, AR, Thursday at noon........................479-524-2371 5. Cattlemen’s Livestock Auction, Harrison, AR, Wednesday at noon.....................870-741-6311 6. Centerton Livestock Auction, Centerton, AR, Saturday at 5 p.m.........................479-795-2397 7. Cleburne County Livestock Auction, Heber Springs, AR, Monday at 1:30 p.m.....501-362-8378 8. Clinton Livestock Auction, Clinton, AR, Monday at 1 p.m...................................501-745-2481 9. Collinsville Livestock Sales, Collinsville, OK, Saturday at 11 a.m........................918-371-1855 10. County Line Sale Barn, Ratcliff, AR, Wednesday at noon...................................479-635-4412 11. Decatur Livestock Auction, Decatur, AR, Tuesday at noon................................479-752-8499 12. Farmers & Ranchers Livestock Auction, Vinita, OK, Wednesday at noon.........918-256-6309 13. Farmers Livestock Auction, Springdale, AR, Friday at 9:30 a.m........................479-751-5727 14. Fort Smith Livestock Auction, Moffett, OK, Monday at 9 a.m...........................918-875-3131 15. I-40 Livestock Auction, Ozark, AR, Thursday at 11:30 a.m................................479-667-3737 16. Joplin Regional Stockyards, Carthage, MO, Feeders Monday at 8 a.m. & cow & bull Wednesday at 9 a.m..........................................................................................................417-548-2333 17. Le Flore County Livestock Auction, Wister, OK, Saturday at 10 a.m.................918-655-7462 18. MO-ARK Livestock Auction, Exeter, MO, Saturday at 11 a.m.............................417-835-3000 19. Morris Cattle Company, Inc., Harrison, AR, buy Wednesday & Saturday at 7:30 a.m................. .....................................................................................................................870-743-3707

August 12, 2013

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20. Mountain Home Horse Auction, Mountain Home, AR, 1st & 3rd Saturday at 5:30 p.m................ .....................................................................................................................870-425-3636 21. North Arkansas Livestock Auction, Green Forest, AR, Wednesday at 10:30 a.m.870-438-6915 22. OKC West Livestock Market, El Reno OK, Monday at 10 a.m. & Wednesday at 8 a.m................. .....................................................................................................................405-262-8800 23. Ouachita Livestock Market, Ola, AR, Friday at 1 p.m.......................................479-489-5415 24. Ozark Regional Stockyards, West Plains, MO, Feeders Tuesday at 8:00 a.m. & cow and bull sale Wednesday at 12:30 p.m..................................................................................417-256-0222 25. Poor Boy Livestock, Wister, OK, Saturday at 3:30 p.m.......................................918-655-3174 26. Salem Livestock Auction, Salem, AR, Thursday at 6:30 p.m.............................918-967-2561 27. Stigler Sale Barn, Stigler, OK, Wednesday at 11:30 a.m.....................................870-895-3231 28. Stilwell Livestock, Stilwell, OK, Wednesday at 11 a.m.......................................918-696-2605 29. Tahlequah Stockyards, Tahlequah, OK, Saturday at 11 a.m................................918-456-3153 30. T Bar P Horse Sale, Wagoner, OK, 2nd & 4th Fridays at 5 p.m............................417-214-0040 31. Tulsa Stockyards, Tulsa, OK, Monday at 9 a.m..................................................918-234-3138 32. Warren Livestock Auction, Kansas, OK, 2nd & 4th Fridays at 6 p.m...................918-868-2634 33. Welch Livestock Auction, Welch, OK, cattle Thursday at noon & horses 1st Friday at 5:30 p.m. . . . .....................................................................................................................918-788-3994

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here is always something to do on the farm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; brush hogging this field, spraying thistle in that one, working the cattle, fixing the tractor or hauling the crop. Record keeping gets pushed to the back burner. It can be time consuming, using a precious commodity none of us desire to waste. However, it is becoming an ever more necessary part of our operations. Tedious as they can be, records can save and make a producer just as much, if not more, than any other job on the farm. Three of the more important reasons to keep good records are: expenses, production and your banker. Controlling and tracking oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expenses is usually the first place to begin increasing profit, especially in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environment of ever rising input costs. A good start would be to take an inventory of seemingly small inputs. How many of us go to the farm store for more fence clips rather than taking the time to find those leftover from last time we fixed the fence? Some times of the year require more cash than others. Tracking expenses from year to year can help identify patterns in cash needs. Now that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve identified when cash flow is tight, how can you find relief during those times? Some of us use a credit card to get through those periods until the next calf check comes in. Consider talking to your banker about a revolving operating loan; your savings

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in interest alone can be considerable. Does your real estate or machinery note payment come due during those tight periods? Ask your loan officer about refinancing or rescheduling your payment to come due when you sell calves. In marketing livestock today, keeping track of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production history is becoming almost mandatory. The cost of a good brood cow or heifer requires that she perform at optimum. The same applies to feeder calves, as many found during the drought last year. Keeping a record of which cows produce the best calves assists in culling, purchasing and retention decisions. Sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the worst looking cow that produces the heaviest calf, and the show heiferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calf cost rather than made you money. Which bull sired the most productive calves? Which producer sold you the best feeder calves? What pasture gave the most hay or produced the heavier calves? Having a production record can be an immense advantage not only when marketing your calves, but also when discussing expansion needs with your loan officer. It not only indicates your expertise and dedication to your operation, but, for the loan officer, it can be a great confidence booster in you as a successful and committed customer. Jessica Bailey is a Credit Analyst in the Agricultural Loan Division at Arvest Bank in Neosho, MO and was recently awarded the 2013 Crowder College Aggie Club Outstanding Agriculture Alumni Award.

August 12, 2013


What Do You Say? What criteria do you use to cull animals from your herd?

“When I cull my herd I use age, performance, disposition and if I need the money.” Warren Napier Washington Co., Ark.

FARM HELP Making farming a little bit easier

A Look Toward the Future Cattle numbers drop 11 months in a row, what does this mean for producers? By Amanda Erichsen

“In a good animal I look for well-boned, good body length and height, as well as how good a mother the animal had. I cull if the animal doesn’t meet up to the standards.” Cliff Cline Madison Co., Ark.

“Because my operation is a dairy reproduction rate and productivity are the critical factors. If a cow doesn’t reproduce in a year and a half, she needs to be gone.” Wendy Jackson Benton Co., Ark.

“Basically if a cow breeds well she is staying. That means we cull by age, childbearing effectiveness and soundness, though we will cull an extremely temperamental animal.” Bailey Yost Cherokee Co., Okla.

August 12, 2013

ccording to the June Cattle on Feed Report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture released July 19, cattle inventories in feedlots with 1,000 head or more total at 10.4 million head as of July 1. This number is down 3 percent from inventories on July 1, 2012. For the past 11 months this number has decreased. Declining feedlot inventories are a true reflection of the general decrease in cattle numbers in the U.S. “The beef cow herd at the beginning of 2013 was the lowest since 1962,” said Derrell Peel, professor, and Charles Breedlove Professorship in Agribusiness at the Oklahoma State University Department of Agricultural Economics. According to Scott Brown, research assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at the University of Missouri, stronger crop prices during the last few years have affected the cattle industry in a couple of ways. Firstly, increasing the cost of producing meat due to more expensive animal feed. Secondly, increasing the land devoted to crop production at the expense of pasture. “This smaller pasture base makes the droughts of the past three years even more difficult for the cow-calf industry to han-

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dle, one of the major reasons that beef cow inventory has declined for the past seven years in a row.” The drought in 2011 and 2012 exhausted forage reserves in the country and that, combined with a delayed spring featuring colder and wetter than average conditions, are the principal cause of additional cow herd liquidation in 2013. “Economic incentives have been in place for a larger beef cowherd for the last few years, but there has not been enough grass in good condition in important beef cow producing areas to grow the U.S. herd in total,” Brown said. According to Peel, feedlots should see some relief from record feed prices with a larger 2013 corn crop. The national average corn price is expected to average $4.50-$5.00/bushel for the 2013-2014 corn marketing year, about $2.00/bushel lower than 2012-2013. “Some feedlot capacity is expected to exit the industry in the next couple of years,” Peel said. It has been a slow process but some feedlots have gone out of business in 2013 and more is expected.” As we look toward the future, Brown suggested that, “prices received are likely to stay elevated for all in the beef supply chain for the next few years, as the supply of cattle and beef declines, especially in per person terms,” Brown said. “Cow-calf producers are very much in the drivers’ seat for the foreseeable future, which will translate into strong prices for calves,” Peel said.

In This Section – 2013 Feed Outlook – what should producers know?............................................................................Above – Find out what traits will get you the highest selling price......................................................................p. 24 – New developments with the animal disease traceability program..........................................................p. 25 – How grain prices influence your paycheck at the livestock market........................................................p. 26

Ozarks Farm & Neighbor

Pg. 23


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FARM HELP

Ways to Select the Right Bull Frame, muscle score, color and EPDs all add up to a profitable bull By Gary Digiuseppe

W

hen selecting a bull for your cattle operation, keep the cows in mind. That means “looking at the positive traits of the cow herd, and also looking at the traits that need to be improved in the cow herd,” agreed Dr. Tom Troxel, associate head of animal science for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, told Ozarks Farm & Neighbor. “You should look at the types of calves you want to produce and the type of market you’re trying to reach with those calves.” Based on his own data collected over 10 years from Arkansas sale barns, Troxel said producers who plan to sell their calves at auction should seek out genetics that will result in medium-tolarge framed calves with number one muscle scores. “Those two traits are really the most important in terms of getting the highest selling price,” Troxel said. University of Missouri Extension southwest region livestock specialist Eldon Cole said the starting point is knowing the genetics in your herd. “Just because they’ve got a cow herd and they’ve been doing a certain practice or marketing in a certain way doesn’t mean that that’s what they want to stay with, or have to stay with,” Cole told OFN. More and more producers select Angus. “Angus feeder calves are pretty well sought after at the markets,” Cole noted. “If they are black, the order buyers seem to sit up and take a little bit

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more notice of them when they come into the ring. Angus have proven to be a good, productive female in the beef cow herd, and their offspring have certainly marketed well.” Another concern is the threat of trichomoniasis. The parasitic disease causes sterility and abortions, and Arkansas regulations require all non-virgin bulls sold in the state, unless they’re headed to slaughter or castration, to test negative within 30 days of the date of sale. Troxel cited Arkansas Livestock and Poultry Commission statistics showing 3.4 percent of the bulls tested this year were positive. “I think it’s very important to purchase a virgin bull,” he said, but recommended that whether or not the bull is virgin it be given at least 2-3 weeks of sexual rest upon arrival, and then tested for trich before coming into contact with the cows. The downside of buying a virgin bull is the reduced accuracy of the Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs). “If we do purchase a bull that’s three or four years old and has more offspring, their EPDs will have more accuracy, but usually you can get a better buy with a younger bull,” Troxel said. He said it’s too soon to say whether the new science of DNA testing will prove to be more accurate than EPDs in assessing the potential of virgin bulls. “Research time and time again has shown that EPDs work,” Troxel said. “If you select bulls with high weaning weight EPDs and compare them with bulls of low weaning weight EPDs and breed them to a group of cows, there’s no doubt about it – the bulls with high EPDs will produce calves with higher weaning weights.” But he also said EPDs should not be the only criteria, and urged producers to make sure the bull is structurally correct and has the muscle pattern and other phenotypic characteristics that they want.

August 12, 2013


FARM HELP

Developments In

Animal ID

How will animal disease traceability affect the producer on the state and national level? By Gary Digiuseppe t’s not entirely over yet, but on March 11, USDA at least partially resolved a decade-old debate over a national animal identification program. What was proposed in Dec. 2003, as NAIS – a USDA program that was launched in 2006 with the intention of making it universal and mandatory, became voluntary, and then was shelved for lack of participation – was resurrected in August 2011 by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack as “animal disease traceability.” Under the proposed rule, livestock producers would no longer have to register their premises; only animals that crossed state lines would need identification, and there would be additional exemptions. There were additional changes when the final rule was released in March 2013, according to Chelsea Good, vice president of government and industry affairs for the Kansas City, Mo., based Livestock Marketing Association. From LMA’s perspective, one of the most important changes was exemption of beef cattle under 18 months of age from the final rule. According to USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, “Additional traceability requirements for this group will be addressed in separate rulemaking in the future, allowing more time for APHIS to work closely with industry to ensure the requirements are effective and can be implemented.” Good noted younger dairy cattle still require ID to move interstate, as do all beef cattle that are being

I

August 12, 2013

used for rodeos, shows, exhibitions or recreational events. USDA also made the final rule flexible for the states and tribes that will be responsible for managing the program. For instance, said Good, the states decide how to keep and store data on livestock that move interstate. “Some states are utilizing it just by sending it to the federal government,” Good told Ozarks Farm & Neighbor. “Other states are utilizing a system keeping the data there on the state level, and some states have a system where some of the information is shared with the state, while the rest of the information is kept there at the tagging site or livestock market level.” She said there is an ongoing conversation on harmonizing the program between states, a particularly important step in addressing some of the exceptions to this rule. Among those, states can agree to exchange movement documents instead of a certificate of veterinary inspection or a health certificate; Good said there are some states working together on an owner-shipper state-

ment that could be used instead of health certificates. There is also variability in how much of the cost of compliance will accrue to the producer. Good said some states are covering the cost of compensating veterinarians who apply tags and other forms of official ID, but those states are in the minority. “Right now the federal government does have a limited number of identification tags available; we don’t know how long those will last,” she added. But that isn’t an issue for many producers in Arkansas, University of Arkansas animal scientist Dr. Tom Troxel told OFN. He explained, “We’re in better shape than a lot of states because we still have our brucellosis law in effect, where heifers that go back to the farm and are used for breeding stock are still required to be calfhood vaccinated for brucellosis.” Part of the program is use of the Bangs tag, also referred to as the bright tag, which serves as an official animal identification tag; this means all cows in

Animal ID at a Glance • Only animals that cross state lines. • Exemption of beef cattle under 18 months. • Younger dairy cattle require ID. • All beef cattle that are used for rodeos, show, exhibitions or recreational events require ID. • Cattle going directly to an approved livestock facility for slaughter are exempt. • Bangs tag serves as official ID. • Commuter herds can receive exemption.

Ozarks Farm & Neighbor

Arkansas are compliant with the animal disease traceability program. The final rule also exempts cattle that go directly to an approved livestock facility for slaughter; all they need is the back tag applied at the sale barn and, noted Troxel, “That’s where a lot of our commercial cows go.” USDA left the requirements for official ID flexible, and the tattoos typically used on purebred cattle will be sufficient provided they’re also carrying health papers. And, Troxel said, “If they have a commuter herd – for example, we have some herds along the Oklahoma-Arkansas line – they can get an exemption through an agreement to move their cattle from one farm to the next farm across the state line. So there are some ways that cattlemen can work within the system to make it as palatable as possible.” The original program a decade ago brought a lot of rancher resistance, but stakeholders agree on the importance of the goal of being able to rapidly detect the origin of an animal with a foreign disease. But Good said it’s also important that animal disease traceability doesn’t slow the speed of commerce and is designed to work the way the livestock industry is structured. She said, “Our member markets are working with those producers that come to their market to let them know what these new requirements are. It is the markets that are at a major point of cattle movement, so it’s the markets that are applying official identification and are in many cases keeping and submitting those records. So it is definitely something that we’re are already involved with on a day-to-day basis.”

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FARM HELP

Feed Influence on Feedlots As a result of lower cattle numbers feedlots in mid-July were only 65 percent full By Gary Digiuseppe

T

he price of feed influences what feedlots will pay for cattle. Except when it doesn’t. There’s normally a pretty direct relationship, according to University of Missouri Agricultural Economist Ron Plain. “Almost all steers and heifers go to feedlots and eat corn for 4-5 months, or maybe longer, before they go to slaughter,” Plain told Ozarks Farm & Neighbor. “The higher the price of grain, the more costly feedlot gain is, and the less cattle feeders can bid for feeder cattle.” Plain said a change in corn prices filters through the supply chain pretty quickly. “If corn futures go up, and suddenly it looks like I’m going to have to pay 25 cents a bushel more than I was planning on to feed cattle, then I will pretty quickly reduce my bid price for feeder cattle,” he said. But with that said, feedlots have bills to pay, and they need to keep some cattle on feed even if it’s not profitable. Plain said, “They’ve got a lot of fixed costs – there’s the facility itself, the pens, the feed mill and the employees. The overhead costs are lowest per animal when the feedlot’s full, and so one of the things that feedlots are very aware of is the need financially to keep the feedlots full. At times, that means they’re going to have to pay more than they’d like to when they’re buying feeder cattle. The alternative, to not get them bought and to try to get along at halfcapacity, is not very appealing, either.” As of mid-July U.S. feedlots were only 65 percent full, according to Dr. Tom Troxel, associate head of animal science

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for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture. That has a lot to do with a lot less cattle in the United States,” Troxel told OFN. “Average daily gain of feedlots is about 3.2 lb/day, and average cost of gain is about $1.31. With fat cattle in early July at $1.22, that pencils in a loss.” Particularly with higher feeder cattle costs; those prices rose throughout the early summer, after staying depressed in the spring. Troxel said, “Generally, every year we’ll see 500 pound calf prices seasonally peak in the spring. We didn’t see that this year; calf prices were $25/cwt less in the spring of 2013 than they were in 2012, and that really impacted our cow/calf producers in the state. I think that happened because the packers were losing money, feedyards were losing money and they just kept prices depressed throughout the spring to try to get the prices back in line.” But the price rally brought 700-750 pound calves to $139/cwt by July 8. The outlook for availability and the price of corn is also positive, if you’re a cattle producer. Troxel said, “The number of acres of corn that was planted this spring was more than anticipated, so if all that corn crop comes to fruition and we have an average yield, we’ll have more corn this fall than we’ll know what to do with, and a lot of people are predicting corn prices down around $4/bl. We haven’t seen corn prices like that for many years, so with the cattle numbers down as low as they are – you know, the cowherd is down to the size it was back in the ‘50s – we’ll just have plenty of corn this fall, if the corn crop is as successful as people are predicting. That’s got to be good for the cattle industry, so we’ll just have to wait and see.”

August 12, 2013


FARM CALENDAR August 2013 12-17 Fulton Co. Fair – Fulton Co. Fairgrounds, Salem, Ark. – 870-895-3301 13-17 Logan Co. Fair – Fairgrounds, Paris, Ark. – 479-963-2360 14-18 Benton Co. Fair – Benton Co. Fairgrounds, Bentonville, Ark. – 479-271-1060 13 Nutrient Applicator Training – 2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. – Carroll Co. Extension Office, Berryville, Ark. – RSVP – 870-423-2958 15 Row Crop Tour – Morrilton, Ark. – 501-354-9618 15 Restricted Pesticide Applicator Training for Farmers – 6 p.m. – Powell Feed, Flippin, Ark. – 870-449-6349 17 Baxter Co. Cattlemen’s Field Day – 9 a.m. – Baxter Co. Fairgrounds, Mountain Home, Ark. – 870-425-2335 17-24 Ottawa Co. Fair – Miami Fairgrounds, Miami, Okla. – 918-542-1688 18-25 Newton Co. Fair – Newton Co. Fairgrounds, Jasper, Ark. – 870-446-2240 19 Rodeo – 8 p.m. – Fulton Co. Fairgrounds, Salem, Ark. – 870-371-0702 19-25 Madison Co. Fair – Madison Co. Fairgrounds, Huntsville, Ark. – 479-738-6826 20 Restricted Pesticide Applicator Class – 6 p.m. – Washington Co. Extension Office, Fayetteville, Ark. – $10 – 479-444-1755 20-24 Sebastian Co. Fair – Sebastian Co. Fairgrounds, Greenwood, Ark. – 479-484-7737 20-24 Johnson Co. Fair – Clarksville Fairgrounds, Clarksville, Ark. – 479-754-5050 21 Forage Brassica Field Day – 10 a.m.-3 p.m. – Salem, Ark. – Pre-register by Aug. 19 – $10 – 870-895-3301 23-25 55th Annual Arkansas Cattlemen’s Convention & Tradeshow – Ft. Smith, Ark. – 501-224-2114 24 Clinton Rotary Bull Riding Spectacular – 7:30 p.m. – Clinton High School, Clinton, Ark. – 817-626-2855 24-31 Carroll Co. Fair – Carroll Co. Fairgrounds, Berryville, Ark. – 870-423-2958 24-9/1 28th Annual National Championship Chuckwagon Races – Bar o f Ranch, Clinton, Ark. – 501-745-8407 26 Rodeo – 8 p.m. – Fulton Co. Fairgrounds, Salem, Ark. – 870-371-0702 27 Wildlife Food Plot Program – 6:30 p.m. – Charleston Community Center, Charleston, Ark. – 479-965-2272 27-31 Washington Co. Fair – Washington Co. Fairgrounds, Fayetteville, Ark. – 479-444-1755 28-31 Will Rogers Memorial Rodeo – 7 p.m. – American Legion Rodeo Grounds, Vinita, Okla. – 918-244-0552 29-9/5 Adair Co. Fair – Adair Co. Fairgrounds, Stilwell, Okla. – 918-696-2253 September 2013 2 Rodeo – 8 p.m. – Fulton Co. Fairgrounds, Salem, Ark. – 870-371-0702

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Montrose, Mo. - 660-492-2504 www.rotertharriman.com Lazy U Ranch - Haskell, Okla. 918-693-9420

Who Are Primarily Livestock Producers, By Placing Your Ad in Purebred Corral, Call Today!

532-1960

1-866-

Ozarks Farm & Neighbor

No Sunday Calls

Louis Hostetler 870-438-4209 Cell: 870-423-8083

Hostetler Litter Service

BARNS • SHOPS • STALLS • GARAGES • SHEDS • ETC.

FREE CONSULTATION • FREE QUOTES

866-211-8902

BARNS • SHOPS • STALLS • GARAGES

August 12, 2013

New Holland, All Pull-Type & Self-Propelled Models/Parts. Sell, Finance, Deliver & Buy! www.balewagon.com

or 870-365-8969

AUCTION BLOCK 24,000 Readers September 1013 2 20th Annual Autumn in the Ozarks Sale – Chappell’s Sale Arena, Strafford, Mo. – 870-897-5037 2 Eby Ranch Fall Production Sale – Emporia, Kan. – 620-343-6578 2 Snow Creek Angus Dispersal Sale – Springfield Livestock Marketing Center, Springfield, Mo. – 918-510-3464

BALE WAGONS

870-439-2285

Reach More Than

August 2013 23-24 Express Ranches Big Event Angus Production Sale – Yukon, Okla. – 800-664-3977 25 Pollard Farms Angus Female Sale – Waukomis, Okla. – 580-541-3361

MACHINERY

Kay Dee Feed Company, a manufacturer of quality, granulated mineral and protein products, is seeking candidates for distribution in your area. Please contact us at 800-831-4815 or customersupport@kay-flo.com for more information.

BARNS • SHOPS • STALLS • GARAGES

OZARKS

CONSTRUCTION, LLC www.stilwell-const.com BARNS • SHOPS • STALLS • GARAGES • SHEDS • ETC.

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