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Oxford

ACCESS

SPRING / SUMMER 2018

STAND UP AND FIGHT

A YOUNG BOY AND FAMILY’S COURAGEOUS BATTLE WITH CANCER

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Message from the

Oxford Mayor Dear citizens, 2018 is off to an excellent start for Oxford. We’ve had so much going on in the first half of the year, and we have many more exciting events and updates over the course of the next few months. I hope you will join us as we continue to break records in Alabama. Downtown Oxford’s construction and renovation is coming along nicely. We are also beginning to plan for expansion at the Oxford Performing Arts Center by adding box seating, more restrooms, and the creation of a new venue on the lower level. As these projects are underway, please be mindful of construction and use all safety precautions in Historic Downtown Oxford. Choccolocco Park is blazing new trails in 2018. Attendance is higher than ever: on one Saturday in March, we had over 10,000 people at the complex. All 19 playing fields were in use, including a 24-team track and field meet. We have over 2,000 parking spots at the park, and every one of them was in use. We have more tournaments and sporting events coming up in the summer–including the Ohio Valley Conference softball and baseball championship tournaments in May–so we hope to see you at Choccolocco Park.

With the success we’ve had, people are noticing how hard our employees and those who partner with us are working. With that being said, I’d like to bid our Director of Turf Management at Choccolocco Park and Cider Ridge Golf Club, Chad Robinson, the fondest of farewells, as he moves to southern Florida to begin a new occupation. I am proud of the work he has accomplished, and I am confident in his ability to take on whatever he sets before him. May God continue to bless him and his family. In closing, I am filled with pride every time I see the citizens of Oxford at our complexes, shopping malls, restaurants, and other establishments in the city. I hear compliments every day about our police and fire departments, our building and street department, the friendly staff at the library, and how much they love to walk around Oxford Lake or Choccolocco Park. I am proud to be your mayor, and don’t forget to call 311 for any non-emergency issues you may have in the city. With your help, we are continuing to break records at our facilities, and I am confident that this summer will be another remarkable season for Oxford. Sincerely, Mayor Alton Craft

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OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2018

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CONTENTS 1

MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR

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CITY COUNCIL SPOTLIGHT: STEVEN WAITS

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LIBRARIES ROCK

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AUTISM AWARENESS TRAINING

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HISTORIC DOWNTOWN OXFORD

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PUBLIC WORKS UPDATE

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SPOTLIGHT: TAMMY WILKINS

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WHY I TEACH: LINDSEY WEBB

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PLAN AHEAD

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THE OVC AND OXFORD PARD: A GREAT MARRIAGE

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MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD FIRE CHIEF

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A TRUE HERO

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“HOME ALOFT” THE STORY BEHIND THE DRAWING

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MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD POLICE CHIEF

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CUTTING EDGE TRAINING

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MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY

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SPOTLIGHT: ZY’SHAVIA GARRETT

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MATTISON FAMILY CEMETERY

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT: ANISHA PATEL

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STAND UP AND FIGHT

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THE BIG QUESTIONS

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OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS

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KEEPING TECH FUN

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MESSAGE FROM CIDER RIDGE GOLF CLUB

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CHOCCOLOCCO PARK PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

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CALENDAR OF CITY EVENTS

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OPAC’S 2018 RENOVATION

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for highlights of community news, city events, and special moments as they happen in our beautiful city. 6

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Congratulations to the Oxford High School Wrestling Team for winning the 2018 AHSAA 6A State Wrestling Championship

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SOFTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP MAY 9-12 WHAT Ohio Valley Conference Softball Championship WHO Top eight regular season teams WHY To compete for the OVC championship title and trip to the NCAA tournament WHEN May 9-12, 2018 WHERE Choccolocco Park ADDRESS 954 Leon Smith Parkway, Oxford, AL 36203 TICKETS Purchase at the Oxford Civic Center or at Choccolocco Park during the event 8

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WHAT Ohio Valley Conference Baseball Championship WHO Top eight regular season teams WHY To compete for the OVC championship title and trip to the NCAA tournament WHEN May 22-27, 2018 WHERE Choccolocco Park

baseBALL CHAMPIONSHIP MAY 22-27

ADDRESS 954 Leon Smith Parkway, Oxford, AL 36203 TICKETS Purchase at the Oxford Civic Center or at Choccolocco Park during the event

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Seeking applicants for certified firefighter/medics Salary range: $39,135.20 — $61,037.56 negotiable depending on training and experience Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Alabama State Retirement Applications can be downloaded from the city website www.oxfordalabama.org City Departments > Civil Service > Current Openings Applications should be turned into the Civil Service Office at Oxford Police Department, 600 Stanley Merrill Dr, Oxford, AL 36203 12

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STEVEN WAITS City Council Spotlight By Joshua Craft

STEVEN WAITS IS CURRENTLY IN HIS FOURTH TERM AS AN OXFORD CITY COUNCIL MEMBER, AND HE HAS SERVED IN VARIOUS ROLES AS AN ELECTED OFFICIAL.

Born and raised in the area, Waits graduated from Oxford High School in 1986. After earning his Bachelor’s Degree from Jacksonville State, he began working in the healthcare industry, and he currently is the Chief Clinical Officer for Alacare Home Health and Hospice. Since his election in 2004, Steven has served as the council president (20122016) and is currently serving as council president pro tem. When asked about his reason for entering local politics, Waits stated that he had a passion for working with others and wanted to improve public safety and schools in Oxford. Mayor Alton Craft spoke highly of Councilman Waits, “I’ve known [Waits] since I coached him in 7th and 8th football at Oxford, and he’s grown up to be a fine man. I appreciate his hard work and dedication to the citizens of Oxford.” When asked about his future plans, Waits remarked that he would “like to continue to make Oxford the best it can be for our citizens–a place to live, work, and raise your family–while never forgetting or compromising our traditions, beliefs, and values that have made us ‘Oxford.’” Steven has been married to Kala (née Sizemore) for 25 years, and they have two children: Jared, who currently works in physical therapy, and Carlee, who is completing her nursing degree at Jacksonville State. On behalf of the City of Oxford, thank you, Councilman Waits, for serving our city. May you continue to be a leader in our area.

“I WANT TO CONTINUE TO MAKE OXFORD THE BEST IT CAN BE FOR OUR CITIZENS—A PLACE TO LIVE, WORK, AND RAISE YOUR FAMILY—WHILE NEVER FORGETTING OR COMPROMISING OUR TRADITIONS, BELIEFS, AND VALUES THAT HAVE MADE US ‘OXFORD.’”

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LIBRARIES ROCK MUSIC SURROUNDS US, AND IT HAS A DEFINITIVE CONNECTION WITH READING

Summer Reading Programs around the country promote reading throughout the summer, encouraging a positive lifelong relationship with learning and reading, as well as declining the speed and slope of the summer slide. Oxford’s Public Library has fun every summer as we play games, enjoy exciting performances, earn prizes, learn about our world, and, of course, read with our community. Each year features a theme, and this year’s is a fun one: Libraries Rock! Summer Slide is a documented trend that happens when children read less during the summer than they do during the school year due to summer vacation. This slide is more prevalent in children from lower socio-eco-

nomic backgrounds. In a single academic year, this decline resulted in an estimated three-month achievement gap between more advantaged and less advantaged students. Between grades 1 and 6, the potential cumulative impact of this achievement gap could compound to 1.5 years’ worth of reading development lost in the summer months alone (Cooper, Nye, Charlton, Lindsay, & Greathouse, 1996). When children spend time reading during the school year, along with instruction in other subjects, students can maintain or increase their reading proficiency level. When access to reading material is declined or ceased during the summer months because they are no longer in school, the differences become blatantly apparent. Of all the activities in which children

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C I T Y O F OX F O R D P U B L I C L I B R A R Y

engage outside of school, time spent actually reading is the best predictor of reading achievement – the more students read, the better readers they become (Allington, 2006; Anderson, Wilson, & Fielding, 1988). Summer Slide can affect any child; reading during the summer is imperative for maintaining or increasing reading skills during the summer. The Summer Reading Program at the Oxford Library is designed to keep kids reading. Kids don’t have to take tests or read specific books; they choose the books they want (with guidelines provided in the program), read them when they want, and log the books read in the library to get prizes. This keeps the kids interested in reading for personal pleasure, which has long-term benefits in addition to the short-term benefits of keeping the Summer Slide at bay. Programming is always a huge part of the SRP experience at the Oxford Public Library. This year is certainly no exception. We have more programs/events/ performances this year than any year before! Now that the library is open seven days a week, programs can be scheduled every day. Most days have multiple programs scheduled throughout the day. Look for musicals, performances, crafts, games, and other activities during the summer to keep yourself or your children actively reading. Programs are available for all ages.

MONDAYS Musical Mondays – We will show two musical films each week—Children at 10:00 a.m. and teens at 1:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAYS Craft Days at 3:00 p.m.

THURSDAYS Story Time in the morning at 10:00 a.m. Free play in the Courtyard at 2:00 p.m.

FRIDAYS Big event days — all at 1:00 p.m. June 1: Yarbrough’s Educational Reptile Show June 8: Tie Dye t-shirts Kids bring their own shirt to dye June 15: Millie Chastain Learn etiquette and manners

Summer Reading Program is now open to everyone! Reading doesn’t stop when you graduate high school; reading doesn’t start at a particular age. The age boundaries have been removed from Oxford’s Summer Reading Program so that every person can participate. The adult program encourages reading by playing a fun bingo game. The bingo squares each feature a suggestion for reading: read an author you haven’t tried before; read while watching the sunset; read a book that was made into a movie. When you complete the board, bring it in for a prize! Early exposure to reading plays dividends throughout life. Because of the importance of starting to read in early childhood, we encourage children to participate in the reading program from birth. Board books are available for infants and toddlers who may tear pages in paper books. Storytime will continue during the summer; most programs are adaptable to fit all ages. Join us while we read, play, sing, read, dance, laugh, and read! SUMMER READING PROGRAM MAY 29-JULY 27

June 22: Magician Skip Cain Each kid will take home a balloon animal June 29: OPL Talent Show Kids show OPL their talents July 13 – Dawn Mahealani Douglas Performs/teaches Hula dancing July 20 – Reverse Tie Dye (weather permitting) Kids bring their own colored t-shirts to reverse tie dye with bleach sprays (outside) July 27 – Atlanta Steel Pan & Island Music Prizes will be awarded after the show

SATURDAYS Karaoke at 11:00 a.m.

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CHIEF A.J. MARTIN AND LAUREN REAVES

Autism Awareness Training Autism Awareness for First Responders is a four-hour course which provides public safety workers with information and guidelines for communicating with individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in emergency situations. For individuals with autism, learning to interact with first responders is critical. On the other hand, it is just as essential for first responders to understand autism and be prepared to respond efficiently and safely to situations involving individuals on the spectrum. City of Oxford Fire Chief Gary Sparks said, “I have to thank Donnie Adams, one of my Battalion Chiefs, for getting this class together for us. It teaches us how to interact and recognize people with autism, along with how to effectively respond to whatever situation they have.�

The Oxford Fire Department would like to thank Miss Jacksonville State University 2018 Lauren Reaves for working in conjunction with Chief A.J. Martin of The Alabama Fire College to help educate our firemen and other city employees about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The Autism Awareness Curriculum was taught over a three-day period and offered to every employee of both the Oxford and Anniston Fire Departments. Other City of Oxford departments participating in the training course included the Oxford Public Library, Oxford Performing Arts Center, and the Finance Department. Thank you, Lauren Elizabeth Reaves, for choosing Autism Spectrum Disorder as your platform and helping spread awareness about it. Good luck in The Miss Alabama Pageant this summer.

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HISTORIC MAIN STREET OXFORD

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN OXFORD Historic Downtown, the heart and core of the City of Oxford, is currently undergoing a streetscape project, transforming the area into a more inviting, pedestrian-friendly destination. The project is an ongoing investment in the revitalization and preservation of our city’s oldest area, estimated at a cost over $3 million. The project entails new sidewalks lined with brick pavers, underground utilities, landscaping, and lighting that restores the historic aesthetic to the character and charm of Oxford’s quaint downtown.

In March 2018, Historic Downtown Oxford was nominated and recognized as an official historic district by the Alabama Historical Commission. The recognition is an honorary designation, celebrating the efforts and achievements of preservation and restoration.

above Southern Girl Coffee Company. Charlotte Hubbard is also creating a loft space, above Hubbard’s Off Main. With the addition of the two loft apartments, downtown will have a total of six living spaces.

Historic Main Street Oxford hosts monthly meetings with streetscape project progress and update reports. Please follow our social media accounts to stay informed. In September 2014, Adam Maniscalco and Alyssa Enzor Baxley purchased and renovated one of downtown’s oldest buildings. The building now houses a law office, a specialty shop, and two loft apartments. In addition to the ongoing progress in public investment from the City of Oxford, there is also a large sum of private investment. Brad and Leah Cleghorn are currently renovating their property on Choccolocco Street, creating a loft living space

“Old brick walls, broken windows, rusty staircases; those are the things some people may see when staring down the east side of Choccolocco Street in downtown Oxford. However, Brad and I see so much more. We see a coffee shop with people sitting, laughing, and enjoying life. We see charming specialty stores, bustling with energy. We see a restaurant, sending mouthwatering smells across downtown. We hope that the restoration of our properties will help strengthen the downtown’s position as a focal point in the community.” –Leah Sparks Cleghorn

Historic Main Street Oxford P.O. Box 3383, Oxford, AL 36203 256-241-6667 MainStreetOxford.org BY HUNTER GENTRY

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“I am presently renovating the apartment space above the original restaurant at 20 Choccolocco Street. Upon completion, there will be a living space, including a balcony overlooking Choccolocco Street. We uncovered three coal-burning fireplaces, which will be restored as gas fireplaces. There will also be a dining room, bathroom, and bedroom space. We are making every effort to keep the original floors and nine-foot ceilings. Hypodermic needles were discovered on the front wall of the apartment, where a doctor and his wife once lived. The project is projected to complete by June 1, 2018.” – Charlotte Young Hubbard OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2018

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C I T Y O F OX F O R D P U B L I C WO R K S D E PA R T M E N T

PUBLIC WORKS UPDATE It’s an honor to come to you again with a quarterly update on Public Works projects in our great city. First off, the solar-powered flashing school zone lights have been installed on Highway 78 and are functioning well. As mentioned in the last magazine issue, we have another lighting upgrade project in the works. The project will replace the existing streetlights with efficient LED lighting along Highway 78 from Leon Smith Parkway to Watson Drive. This project will provide much cleaner roadway lighting that will increase visibility and help make our roadways a little safer. The traffic signal on Leon Smith Parkway at the intersection of Crystal Waterway Drive was installed last fall and has helped ease traffic issues in the area. Another project you may or may not have heard about is the widening of Leon Smith Parkway from Crystal Waterway Drive southward to Choccolocco Park. This project will widen both bridges to allow for two full lanes in each direction to flow all the way to the entrance of the park and transition back to a standard two-lane roadway at that point. This will also add additional turning lanes on and off of Interstate 20 as well as other intersections along this corridor. Traffic congestion entering and exiting the shopping locations on either side of the Parkway will also be addressed. The scheduled work along Snow Street is progressing, and we anticipate utility relocation to be completed in the coming weeks. The storm drainage improvements will begin shortly after utility work is completed, followed finally by new asphalt pavement. Due to limited space to work and the installation of upgraded drainage, lane closures must be used from time to time. This is tedious and stressful work

due to congestion and high traffic flow. Please bear with us during this construction, and we apologize for any inconvenience that it may cause. These improvements are badly needed, and we feel that the result will be pleasing to all that are affected. We are also in the preliminary investigation and design phases of improvements to the intersection of Friendship Road and Cheaha Drive. We are looking at replacing the bridge near the intersection with a wider structure that will allow for a right turn lane for eastbound traffic and a left turn lane for westbound traffic. As previously mentioned, this project is in its infancy, and we do not have a current timeframe for this construction to begin. We will keep you all updated as we know more. Our curbside leaf vacuuming has concluded for the season. Leaves that are bagged will continue to be picked up yearround by our weekly curbside service. As a reminder, all grass clippings must be bagged in order to be picked up. As always, please continue to separate your curbside items into categorized piles. For example, one pile for rubbish, another pile for bagged lawn clippings, and a separate pile for limbs and brush. Help us spread the word and help yourself stay informed by liking and following us on Facebook. Search City of Oxford Department of Public works or @oxfordpublicworks. Thanks and I hope you have a great spring and summer. God Bless. Sincerely,

Rusty V. Gann, P.E. Public Works Director/City Engineer

RUSTY V. GANN, P.E., DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS, CITY ENGINEER (256) 835-6124 | 42 Public Works Drive, Oxford, Alabama OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2018

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SPOTLIGHT

TAMMY WILKINS BY OXFORD ACCESS STAFF

If you have ever been to the Oxford Civic Center or to any Oxford Parks and Recreation event, chances are you were welcomed with a big smile and lending hand from Tammy Wilkins. Tammy is the Administrative Assistant for the City of Oxford Parks and Recreation Department. She started as the Summer Day Camp Supervisor before becoming the Administrative Assistant. May 30th marks Tammy’s 15th year with parks and recreation. Tammy has several roles as the Administrative Assistant. When asked what her job entails, Tammy jokingly said, “You don’t have enough space on your recorder to hear everything.” Her role includes anything from mopping the floors, booking and setting up rooms for events, making deposits, administrative duties, or helping someone locate their vehicle in the parking lot. It varies every day. She strives to be a team player and does whatever she can to help the citizens of Oxford. Above everything her job requires, Tammy’s favorite part of the job is meeting different people. She loves people and getting to hear their stories. Her love for hearing people’s stories really developed from what she recalls as the “most memorable thing that has ever happened at work.” The Oxford Civic Center became a housing area for Hurricane Katrina refugees in 2005. Many people from Louisiana were displaced from their homes and Tammy was at the civic center trying to make them feel as comfortable as possible. Hearing their stories is something she will never forget. Tammy’s favorite event of the year is the Ohio Valley Conference Softball Tournament. She has

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always loved softball, but the reason it’s her favorite event goes beyond the game itself. With the help of sponsors, many elementary schools are given the opportunity to watch the games as a field trip. Tammy said, “Seeing the teams interact with the kids is so cool to watch. They make pictures, sign balls, and just hang out with them. The kids love it and see the players as their heroes!” Outside of her job, Tammy likes spending time with her dog, eight grandchildren (she especially likes watching them play softball), kayaking, and taking care of her mom. She looks to Romans 8:28 for encouragement and as something she lives by. It reads, “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” Loving people and loving God is something Tammy does very well, and it shows every day. Co-worker Greg Bagley said, “We all grow and learn from her. Everybody knows when they come in the civic center and they do not know where to go or what to do, they leave here taken care of, and they know the good Lord because of her. A lot of folks can’t say that, but it shows through Tammy.” Tammy says she loves her job and is very grateful to have it. In 2016 Tammy’s husband, Bobby, passed away and she said she could not have gone through it without her co-workers and the support of the entire city. Tammy said, “It wasn’t just the Parks and Recreation Department but the entire city that was there for me. I honestly feel like we are one, big, happy family. I am truly blessed by everyone in the City of Oxford.”


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WHY I TEACH Oxford City School System Teacher Spotlight — Lindsey Webb THE CITY OF OXFORD IS PROUD TO HAVE SOME OF THE BEST EDUCATORS AND HIGHEST RATED SCHOOL SYSTEMS IN THE STATE. RECENTLY, WE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO CHAT AND GET TO KNOW LINDSEY WEBB, WHO WAS AWARDED AND RECOGNIZED BY THE OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS EDUCATION FOUNDATION AS "EMPLOYEE OF THE MONTH" IN JANUARY 2018.

Webb was born and raised in Oxford and attended Oxford City Schools from kindergarten through twelfth grade. She has been married to her husband, Jason–who works as an accountant for the U.S. Department of Treasury–for 14 years. Together, they have three children: A son, Peyton (age 11), and two daughters, Reagan (age 10), and Chandler (age five). Webb graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham with a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing. She received her Master’s of Science in Nursing from the University of Alabama. Webb also attended Athens State University, where she obtained her Career Technical Education teaching certification, and currently works as a teacher in the Health Science Academy at Oxford High School. We invite you to join us in congratulating Mrs. Webb with the January Employee of the Month recognition and hope you enjoy getting to know her better in the Q&A that follows:

How long have you been part of the Oxford City School System? I started my teaching career in the fall of 2010. I am close to completing eight years in the Oxford City School System. What grades do you teach, and have you taught other grades? I teach 10th-12th grades in the Health Science Academy. I have never taught at any other grade level. What made you want to become a teacher? I have a passion for healthcare and enjoy sharing it with others who have similar interests. I hope to educate and encourage young minds to explore their options in the healthcare field and make a positive difference in the lives of others.

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W H Y I T E AC H

LINDSEY WEBB

What is the most satisfying thing about teaching? I get excited for students when they discover which career field they choose to enter and understand the steps to take to achieve their goal. I also enjoy keeping in touch with former students who have graduated and pursued a career in healthcare. It makes me proud to have former students return as guest speakers and give insight on their career choice. What do you look forward to most at the beginning of each year? I always look forward to meeting my new students and catching up with my returning students. It’s amazing how much they mature in such a short time. What’s the most challenging part of being a teacher? I find it challenging when a student lacks motivation. How do you want former students to remember you? I hope my former students remember me as being vested in their future. I also hope they felt encouraged and empowered by being in my classroom. What methods do you use in your classroom to bring out the best in students? I try to bring out the best in my students by helping them realize their unique talents. A student may not have the ACT score to attend a university, but the skills taught throughout the Health Science program will hopefully help them realize their talents and know they can be successful. What are your thoughts on receiving the teacher/employee of the month award? I am honored to have been chosen as the employee of the month. I work with very talented and experienced teachers, so this opportunity means a lot to me. What extracurricular activities/groups are you part of? I am the co-sponsor of the HOSA program (Health Occupations Students of America) and the FOCUS club at Oxford High School. When you see former students who are now older, what's one thing they typically say they remember about your classroom? When I see my former students, they typically mention how they had no idea about their future career when they entered high school, but throughout the Health Science program, they were able to explore the options available to them. Many of them were also able to complete an internship at area hospitals and clinics to gain hands-on experience. Do you have any hobbies? What do you like to do when not teaching? My hobbies all include my family…. whether it’s attending sports events, traveling, or working in my yard.

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PLAN AHEAD Having a plan means deciding on something in advance. It is especially important to have a plan in place when there’s a threat of severe weather. In Oxford, we want you and your family to have a plan. The Oxford Access team had a chance to talk with the Oxford Fire Chief, Gary Sparks, as well as Chief Partridge from the Oxford Police Department. We asked them to tell us what kind of steps and plan the residents of Oxford need to take when preparing for a severe weather threat. Chief Partridge gave us a four-step plan: 1. Make a family plan. Have a safe place to go. If severe weather hits your home and you get separated from other family members, know where to meet each other. 2. Get a weather radio. 3. Make sure your phones are charged. 4. Follow Chief Bill Partridge, the Oxford Fire Department, and the City of Oxford on all social media for real-time updates. Chief Sparks added, “The most important thing is for them to know where their safe place is. For those not aware, there are two storm shelters located in the City of Oxford.” One shelter is located in the Bynum area and the other in the DeArmanville area. The Oxford Civic Center also serves as a storm shelter. The storm shelters open when a tornado watch has been issued or the weather bureau or Calhoun County EMA think they should be opened. There is a red light on the side of both of the shelters to help indicate they are open. During the last severe weather threat on March 19th, thirty-three people used the Bynum shelter, twenty people used the DeArmanville shelter, and fifteen people used the Civic Center. The city is looking at other sites to place shelters. Chief Sparks said, “Mayor Craft has made a commitment to putting in more shelters for our residents to have more places to go if they don’t feel safe in their home.” Chief Sparks also wants to emphasize the importance of not relying on the tornado sirens. He stresses that they are not a reliable source during weather events. Instead, he encourages people to watch the weather on television and follow the same social media accounts Chief Partridge mentioned.

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THE OVC AND OXFORD PARD A GREATOVC MARRIAGE By Denny Bailey It was a marriage made in Athletic Heaven… the Ohio Valley Conference, which includes Oxford neighbor Jacksonville State University, and the City of Oxford’s Parks and Recreation Department, and its Choccolocco Park. The blind date… The relationship began over five years ago when Steve Ray, Jacksonville State University’s track & field and cross-country coach, had a decision to make. The host of the OVC Cross Country Championship had been rotated annually among conference member schools, and the school could host or pass. It was now JSU’s turn to chose whether to host the event or pass it along. Coach Ray opted to host the event, and chose to hold it in Oxford, near the old Par 3 Golf Course in front of the Oxford Civic Center. This marked the first time JSU hosted the conference cross country championship, and it was the first OVC Championship ever held in Oxford.

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The courtship begins… Two years later, Coach Ray received a call from the University of Tennessee at Martin coach when it was UTM’s turn to host the cross country championships. Coach Ray said, “The coach from UTM told me he liked the ‘track’ at Oxford and enjoyed the city’s facilities and hospitality.” Therefore, the OVC Cross Country Conference Championships were held, again, in Oxford in 2014, with UTM as the “host” school. Now we’re getting serious... From that beginning, Oxford’s relationship with the Ohio Valley Conference began to blossom. Softball was the next sport to bring the OVC championships to Oxford when the conference sought a neutral site to host the conference softball tournament. Choccolocco Park was, at the time, nearing completion and Oxford submitted a bid in 2015 to host the tournament for the following two years. Oxford won the bid. The City has also submitted and


secured the bid for the next two years’ championships as well, ensuring that the OVC Softball Tournament will be held in Oxford through 2019.

colocco” in the process. Oxford has submitted a bid to again host the baseball championships for 2019 and 2020 (that bid decision is still pending at the time of this writing).

Mutual appreciation… Both years that the OVC Softball Championships have been held at Choccolocco Park, Oxford’s Athletic Director Greg Bagley has promoted the idea of sponsorships and donations, providing area elementary school children the opportunity to see collegiate level softball that they might not otherwise get to see. Students were bussed in from across Calhoun County, with the students’ tickets paid for by area businesses and individuals. Often, the students would sit together behind an OVC team’s dugout and cheer for that team. After the game, it was not uncommon to see the college athletes joining the elementary students in the bleachers, leading cheers and signing autographs.

The relationship deepens… OVC Outdoor Track and Field also held their conference championship at Choccolocco Park in 2017. This was held at the same time as the softball tournament, thus showing that Choccolocco Park was large enough to accommodate multiple events at the same time. The host for the Track and Field championships, similar to the cross country guidelines, is rotated among the member schools of the OVC. It was no surprise then when JSU, at their turn in the rotation, and with Steve Ray still as their coach, chose Choccolocco Park as the host site for the 2017 Outdoor Track and Field Conference Championships.

Spending all our time together… Baseball became the next OVC sport to conduct a conference championship in Oxford and Choccolocco Park. The conference had been holding their conference championships at a neutral site (Jackson Tennessee) for some years when Oxford secured the bid to host the tournament in 2017 and 2018. The 2017 tournament set a record for tournament home runs at a neutral site, with 50 home runs at Choccolocco Park, eclipsing the previous record of 26, creating a new unofficial park nickname “Boom Choc-

People take notice… Jonathan Owens is the OVC Assistant Director of Championships and Administration. Speaking directly about the track championships held in Oxford, he said, “Choccolocco Park did a wonderful job hosting the 2017 Outdoor Track and Field Championships. Student-athletes and coaches had many positive things to say about the facility and park staff, and the Oxford community embraced the championship, which enhanced the student-athlete experience.”

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Popping the question… What makes a city south of any OVC school a site attractive enough for the conference to hold four of their championships there? JSU is 20 miles north of Oxford and is the only OVC member school in Alabama, with the other eleven member schools located in Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Illinois. So why choose Oxford? Witnesses… Kyle Schwartz is the OVC’s Assistant Commissioner for Strategic Communications and has been with the OVC since 2006, working with media relations. He has been with the OVC during all of its Championships held in Oxford. He feels like the OVC returned to Oxford because of the way the conference was received when they first came in 2012. He said, “It was obvious that Oxford people wanted us there. The Oxford staff and community received us well, and we have developed a wonderful working relationship with the City of Oxford.” More witnesses… Emily Duncan, Tourism and Marketing Director for the Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce, thinks the beauty of the area, the excellent facilities, and the comparatively mild winters here were factors in the OVC’s regular return to Oxford and Calhoun County. But she also attributed the “mushroom effect,” where coaches and officials “become advocates” not only for Choccolocco Park, but for other amenities of the area as well, like hotels, restaurants, and retailers. Conversations are held with professional associates, and the news spreads. A partnership… Don Hudson, Director of Oxford’s Parks and Recreation Department, stated that “We have a wonderful working relationship with JSU and with the OVC and we are glad that we can partner with them.” Hudson’s philosophy of “partnership” with other organizations is a hallmark of his tenure as PARD Director and continues to be a compelling draw bringing others, such as the OVC, to this area. It’s a relationship—or marriage, so to speak—that both the City of Oxford and the Ohio Valley Conference hope lasts a lifetime.

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OXFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT

256-831-3208

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CITY OF OXFORD | FIRE DEPARTMENT

Message from the

Oxford Fire Chief Spring is in the air and summer will be upon us very quickly. As you do your spring cleaning and yard clean up, remember that you must obtain a burn permit from the Oxford Fire Department for any open burning. You can receive burn permits by calling Fire Station #1 at 256-831-3208. In this magazine, you will find a wonderful story about a young man who was very brave and did the right things when his home caught on fire this past Thanksgiving. I was proud to honor Jalen Roach with the “Earl P. Haynes Award of Excellence” for his actions that saved his and his mother’s life. The smoke detector that alerted Jalen to the fire was one that Oxford Fire Department had installed during our “Turn Your Attention to Fire Prevention Smoke Detector Blitz.” If you need a free smoke detector installed in your home, give us a call at Fire Station #1 at 256-831-3208. I would also like to commend the members of the Oxford Fire Department as well as members of the Oxford Police Department, Oxford Public Works Department, Oxford Building Inspector’s Department, Oxford Marketing Department, and Oxford City Garage for the response to the March 19, 2018 tornado that devastated our sister city of Jacksonville. I was very pleased and impressed by all of our City of Oxford workers and their dedication to not only protect our citizens but to also protect the lives of our neighbors. The March 19, 2018 storms also let us use our new storm shelters for the first time. While we were fortunate that the storms missed our city, I’m thankful to our mayor and council for providing the funding to install the shelters to help protect our citizens.

Chief Gary Sparks

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CITY OF OXFORD | FIRE DEPARTMENT

A TRUE HERO HAVE YOU EVER MET A HERO? IF NOT, I WOULD LIKE TO INTRODUCE YOU TO ONE. PLEASE MEET JAYLAN ROACH.

Jaylan is nine years old and in third grade at Coldwater Elementary School. His favorite class at school is physical education because he likes to be running around. When he is at home, he likes playing outside with friends (and his dog Charlie) and “popping wheelies” on his bicycle. He also loves to play with and collect Matchbox cars. Jaylan said he has a bunch, and when he was younger, he would fill up an entire rug and make a track to race them on. He would even watch videos on his iPad about kids opening Easter eggs with cars in them. One day in November 2017, Jaylan was at home with his mother. Jaylan shared that he was in a separate room from his mom when “God told me something bad was happening.” Shortly after, he heard their smoke detector go off. Jaylan walked into the living room and saw their Christmas tree on fire. He immediately started yelling that the house was on fire and woke his mother up. Jaylan shared that he started to put water on the tree, but knew he had to call 911 and get them out of the house. He said the scariest moment was when he was on the phone with 911 and the fire had spread to where the phone was plugged in, and the line went dead. When he tried to go out the front door, the fire was too close, so Jaylan and his mother had to exit their home through the back door. Jaylan said he was relieved when City of Oxford firefighters got to his house to put the fire out–it had scared him. When asked how he knew what to do during a fire, Jaylan said that over the years, Mrs. Knighton–the guidance counselor–had told him and his classmates what to do. The Oxford Fire

HE SAID THE SCARIEST MOMENT WAS WHEN HE WAS ON THE PHONE WITH 911 AND THE FIRE HAD SPREAD TO WHERE THE PHONE WAS PLUGGED IN, AND THE LINE WENT DEAD

Department had also visited the school, educating the students during Health class with Coach Cooper and Coach Payne. When speaking to Coach Payne, she said the students had completed a five-week Fire Safety Class and learned what to do if their home catches fire–or how to evacuate the building if there's a fire at the school. The students watched videos on fire safety, learned about fire extinguishers and smoke alarms, and discussed having the fire department come to the students' homes to install smoke detectors. On March 14th, Jaylan was called to the office by Ms. Shepard–Jaylan’s principal. Jaylan thought he was in trouble: he wasn’t! Jaylan was being surprised by the Chief of the Oxford Fire Department, Gary Sparks, and presented the Earl Haynes Award for Excellence for his outstanding lifesaving skills. The award was presented to Jaylan in front of City of Oxford Mayor, Alton Craft, OFD firefighters, his principal and teachers, Oxford City Schools Board of

BY BEN STEWART

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NEED A SMOKE DETECTOR? Go by Oxford Fire Station #1 located at 70 East 6th Street, and receive one for free. You can also call them at 256-831-3208 if you would like for a firefighter to come out and make sure your smoke detector is working properly and/or does not need new batteries. For emergencies, call the Fire Department at 831-3125 or 911

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DR. GOODWIN, MAYOR ALTON CRAFT, JAYLAN ROACH, GARY SPARKS, TY CORBAN, AND BEN STEWART

Education representatives, and many of his classmates. Jaylan shared that his family was very proud of him and the award he heroically earned. When several of Jaylan’s teachers were asked to describe him, they praised him and spoke of his great qualities. Jaylan is a leader, he always listens and works hard, he is sweet, polite, well-mannered and he always smiles. He is an outstanding young man, good-hearted, compassionate, willing to go the extra mile for others, he is responsible and never meets a stranger. Jaylan said he wanted to thank the Oxford Fire Department for coming to his house, and all the people being so helpful to him and his family, donating items that his family lost in the fire. If you get a chance to meet Jaylan, you will understand how he is such a tremendous young man and how he got the label of being a hero.

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W R E N ’ S N E S T G A L L E R Y AT T H E OX F O R D P E R F O R M I N G A R T S C E N T E R

ROBERT C. STROOP, UNSUNG AVIATION PIONEER WITH AN ALABAMA CONNECTION

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“HOME ALOFT” STORY BEHIND THE DRAWING BY DR. LARRY K. MARTIN

I should’ve stopped. Every time I passed the old man pushing his bicycle along Hwy 21, below Jacksonville, AL, I wanted to pull over and talk with him. But I always drove by and we nodded or waved to each other. (Back in the 1970’s everyone here still nodded or did the slow wave to each other). His bicycle was decorated with a long, whiplike antenna that sported a small flag. He always seemed to be pushing, rather than riding- even on a level or downhill grade. I suspected that the bike functioned primarily as a walking cane, preserving the dignity of an old gentleman who needed to lean on something now and then. My friend, Jerry Morrison, a local banker, told me about having been introduced to an elderly man- an old aviator, who showed Jerry his pilot’s license, (frayed and faded, #21, signed by Orville Wright). Bob Stroop returned the license to his wallet, walked out the bank’s back door, collapsed onto the sidewalk…and died upon arrival at the hospital. It was only after I heard of his death that I learned who he was—and about the unsung pilot who was Robert Catlow Stroop. Having missed my opportunity to meet the man, I tried the next-best thing; to talk with his family and friends, and weave enough anecdotal conversations to provide at least a reasonable account of his remarkable life.

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HOME ALOFT

I sought out members of the Greenleaf family. Stroop’s sister-in-law, Margaret, widow of Stephan Greenleaf, as I learned, lived only a few blocks from my little studio in Jacksonville. A few days after I’d introduced myself, she visited the studio, and offered valuable information about Bob Stroop. His widow, Frances Greenleaf Stroop, and their daughter, Victoria (Vikki), lived in a columned, antebellum home just south of Jacksonville. I made it clear to Margaret that if at all feasible, I’d like to meet Frances Stroop. “You can meet her’, Margaret nodded - ‘but I’ll need to go with you. That way, she won’t shoot you.” I took this as just a tongue-in-cheek warning to accent her description of her sister-in-law. “Frances is rather reclusive and quiet. She doesn’t put on airs. You’ve likely seen her around town, maybe around the bank, but You might’ve thought she was just a small man…She wears a hat and men’s pants and work shirt; but don’t let that fool you. She’s probably there to deposit money or to sit on the board, or something. One time, someone called the bank just before it opened, and said they saw a suspicious-looking character waiting outside. The bank manager laughed and said ‘Hope you didn’t scare her off… She might withdraw one of our best accounts.’” A few days later, I wandered among the tall privet hedges and other accoutrements that enveloped the old, rather dilapidated home. After I knocked a few times on the screen door, Frances did appear. She stood there, silent and apparently surprised but not amused at my unannounced appearance. As expected, she wore a man’s work clothes. The rifle in her hands was meant to be obvious, and we talked through the screen. I got right to the subject, and when she learned that someone was interested in her husband’s life story, she softened noticeably. She was well-spoken, and obviously very intelligent. Mrs. Stroop was pleased to know that someone wanted to listen to the Bob Stroop story, and attempt a pencil drawing and print edition of the subject. One of my proudest moments, a year later, was to see this lady, conventionally well dressed, silently easing her way through an exhibit at the Wren’s Nest Galley, during the opening that featured Barnstormer, the pencil drawing of her husband.

__________________________________

Robert C. Stroop was born 21 November 1896 in Cincinnati, Ohio (It seems that almost all great aviation stories begin in Ohio). Quoting from his short (unpublished) autobiography, and beginning with his childhood years in Tennessee until 1908 when he was “let go live with his uncle Norman Elberfeld and Aunt Grace who lived in Garrett Park, Maryland, close to Washington D.C., where ‘Uncle Norm’ (Kid Elberfeld) played professional baseball.”

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Also known as “Tabasco Kid” Elberfeld, Stroop’s uncle would have been happy to mentor Bob in the finer points of professional baseball. And “The Kid” was as strong a role model as any of the rowdy professionals who played for a living during the era of “The Babe” and Ty Cobb. It was the latter of these who won Elberfeld a new name, and a trip to the lockers, when he used his knee to grind the shoulder of a sliding Ty Cobb, into the dirt. The Kid added insult to injury by throwing a handful of dirt into the open mouth of an angry Cobb. The fans appreciated it. (Remember, in the movie “Field of Dreams,” when none of the ghost-players wanted to resurrect ‘that s.o.b., Ty Cobb’).

Young Bob made his decision. He “...tried to play baseball, but the hilly country around there attracted me and my desire to fly, so I built a contraption and covered it with bed sheets and had a hang glider with feet and legs for a landing gear, and would hop down the slopes of the hills…”

Photograph of Bob Stroop in his glider.

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HOME ALOFT

In 1910 a move to the D.C. area landed him jobs making relief maps and models for the Smithsonian Institution and geological survey maps. And even at that tender age, he built an airplane. “I took 2 years to build a Tractor Biplane. On weekends I would ride my bicycle to College Park to look and see Wright Model B and Curtis’ Pushers fly around the College Park Aviation Field.” He eventually gained the courage to fly his Biplane, made of parts from an early Ford, and Dodge experimental engines. He “flew or hopped” across the College Park air field. After leaving Maryland, he moved on to jobs to Tennessee, and to Georgia. In Rome, GA, in 1927, Dr. John L. Garrand hired Stroop to assemble a Waco 9-Curtiss to be used in his medical travel. It took a couple of years to put the plane together, and before it was completed, Bob was married to Garrand’s eldest daughter, Elizabeth, and they had eight children before her death in 1948. Another daughter, Bobbeth, was a valuable chronicler of Stroop’s personal life and career. And, what about the Alabama connection? It was almost like sitting there with Stroop, himself, in Jacksonville, when I talked with his brother-in-law, Gardner Greenleaf, in his old frame house that resembled the family home only in its interesting clutter. Unrestrained by any sense of modesty such as Stroop might’ve shown, Gardner was a repository of fascinating details of his years of learning “aviation and invention” under Robert Stroop. The factual accounts of the Stroop career were related with a serious tone, but when it came to his personal anecdotes, the talk became animated and personal. And, according to Gardner Greenleaf:

Yes, Stroop’s pilot’s license was #21, and signed by Orville Wright.

He did fly a route for the U.S. Mail in 1919-20.

Yes, Bob had been a fearless barnstormer or stunt pilot, performing at various air shows. In fact, his first wife, Millie, performed as a “wingwalker” in those days.

Stroop met the Greenleaf family when, during a cross-country flight, he was forced down with an engine problem, and landed in their pasture. Apparently he found something that he liked… because he stayed.

When Bob invented a modified hopper to hold powdered insecticide, he tested it, with a load of slaked lime. He took off, climbed to a few hundred feet, and suddenly went blind. A flaw in his design had allowed the wind to enter the hopper, and scatter the lime throughout the cockpit. With his eyes “on fire”, Bob made a dive to what he guessed would be a height just above the field. He then “pancaked” the plane into the ground, which was fortunately, right there. He jumped out of the

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HOME ALOFT

moving crop duster and yelled for Gardner to bring water- and a bucket happened to be handy. His eyes survived, and they both gained another colorful memory.

Stroop sometimes wore a copper ring which he’d made from the core of a broken electrical cable. His suggestion to Gardner was “If you see that you’re about to hit a power line, don’t slow down. Power up and hit it head-on with the propeller, and hope it cuts”.

Remember, in the movie Space Cowboys when the Tommy Lee Jones character, Hawk, gave a flying lesson to a young guy who wanted to impress his girl? The same kind of humor permeated Stroop’s “flying lessons” during his later years. He would have the victim (customer) advised to wait by the plane for the pilot to arrive. Wearing the antique aviator’s suit, Stroop would begin a slow, slumped walk to the plane… and he would be using a walking cane. Then came the loop-the-loops. Some accidents were nearly fatal. After a 4th of July crash in Connecticut in 1923 one of Bob’s legs was so damaged, that it was a candidate for amputation. However, a young doctor, testing a new wound-drainage technique, was able to save it. ** Robert C. Stroop was cognizant of a pending World War II as the war clouds began to appear. He said “Bomb attacks will be in the future the most disastrous of any and all past methods used in warfare. Therefore, nothing should stand in the way of building proper aircraft to adequately protect our country.” *** According to Roger Aycock, in his book All Roads Lead to Rome, “Stroop was an expert mechanic and plane builder whose experience and skill made him at once an institution and an oracle.” Stroop held several U.S. Patents, including one for a convertible-wing biplane, that never made it past the prototype stage, but demonstrated the principle of using an adjustable wing configuration to allow an aircraft to change drastically from high speed to a very slow landing speed without stalling. Its X-wing design never reached a production stage. However, this concept of “wing-adjustable drag” became pivotal in allowing fighter planes to land on carriers or small landing strips. His modification of the U.S. Army trainer BT13 was applauded for its vastly increased payload capability, and allowing much shorter takeoffs and landings. __________________________________ Sometimes, when I’m on an airliner, waiting for the landing gear to drop and the wing flaps to grind into the “Whoa” position, I think of Bob Stroop.

© 2018 All images and text copyright by Dr. Larry K. Martin. Other Sources: ** Bobbeth Stroop Hawkins, daughter of Bob Stroop. *** “Rome’s Aviation Pioneers”, published in the Rome News-Tribune (Rome, Georgia) on Sunday, September 30, 2012.

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200 Apple Blossom Way, Oxford, AL 36203 | 256-831-7222 | www.ciderridgegolf.com

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Oxford Police Department

As we all made it through several recent events with little difficulties, I’d like to first give admiration to the men and women of our agency. It’s hard to understand the tireless service they provide to our communities, but I assure you these individuals are truly dedicated to their profession. We should all be proud of our law enforcement personnel here at the Oxford Police Department. In the recent past, East-Central Alabama has experienced several cases of severe weather. As a multi-jurisdictional response agency, we assisted our neighbors as needed. Namely, Jacksonville, Alabama suffered a tornado which destroyed many homes and businesses. Jacksonville State University sustained substantial damage as well. Our agency was able to respond and provide needed assistance to the City of Jacksonville and their police department. The men and women of our agency spent more than two weeks on-site, supplying equipment and manpower. The outreach of support given by adjacent agencies as well proved to be much needed. Though the City of Jacksonville will remain on a long road to recovery, I was very proud that we could at least aid in the management of the tragic event. I was further pleased with the outpouring of support by other law enforcement agencies in our state. I feel a great deal of pride knowing that I work alongside some of the most dedicated individuals in law enforcement. Again, thank you to all who served our neighboring communities. As always, the Oxford Police Department is here to assist if ever needed. Never hesitate to call; and please, if you see one of our officers, try to express your thanks. I assure you, these men and women are dedicated to your well-being more than you can know.

Very Respectfully, Chief Bill Partridge

Message from the

Police Chief

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BY THE OXFORD ACCESS STAFF 56

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CUTTING EDGE TRAINING OXFORD POLICE DEPARTMENT RECOGNIZED AS SATELLITE TRAINING LOCATION

In the City of Oxford, nothing trumps keeping citizens, employees, and visitors safe. The brave men and women at the Oxford Police Department play a vital role in making Oxford the safest, most ideal community for those wanting to raise a family, work, retire, operate a business, play, or shop. To stay on the cutting edge of policing, and to remain a leader in the Alabama law enforcement community, OPD has worked tirelessly to bring continuing education and police training courses to the area. At the beginning of March, the Oxford Police Department hosted a Commercial Vehicle Interdiction export course from the Regional Counterdrug Training Academy (RCTA) at the Oxford Civic Center. During a press event tied to the course, the RCTA recognized OPD as a partner in training law enforcement, making the city and our police department the first ever RCTA Satellite Training Location in the United States. The designation enables the academy to provide much needed counterdrug training to the Alabama law enforcement community. During the Commercial Vehicle Interdiction training, the Oxford Access staff had the opportunity to get a glimpse of what the course’s participants learned. The course was specifically designed to teach the participants the skillset needed to recognize the criminal element within the Interior Transportation Industry and Transnational Organizations. It

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showed the students how to properly interview the commercial motor vehicle driver, understand and demonstrate proper CMV search techniques, locate hidden compartments in commercial motor vehicles, and recognize and identify improperly packaged or marked freight. The course attendees were introduced to the National Seizure System (NSS) and the El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC) and taught how to utilize them to gain intelligence as well as network with other counter-smuggling personnel. According to the RCTA, understanding the types of criminal enterprises that hide within the industry and how they operate is critical to illegal operations. While touring the outside, hands-on component of the RCTA training course, the Oxford Access staff witnessed law enforcement officers from the five-state region of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee work their way through training stations set up amongst trailers and eighteen-wheelers in the Civic Center parking lot. The vehicles had hidden parts and compartments used in transporting narcotics and money. The attendees studied different types of packaging, techniques used to hide illegal substances, learned about new smuggling trends, how to identify discrepancy and red flags in drivers’ paperwork and behavior, as well as how to search different types of vehicles and much more. The Oxford Police Department has hosted various RCTA classes over the years. T.J. Stoute of the RCTA said, “Oxford is the first ever transport location because of everyone’s hard work and support we get from them. Since 2016, we’ve had a working relationship with Oxford. When there is a training need here, Frank Mayo, OPD’s Training Coordinator, supplies us the venue, and we have the instructors and training material.” When speaking with Mayo, he shared that “Oxford has shown to have the appropriate and qualified

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equipment and classrooms, as well as positive turnouts for every class that has been hosted in the city thus far. 490 officers have been through training in Oxford through the RTCA partnership.” Further, Mayo explained that “Any of RCTA’s classes can come to Oxford. Some are only for law enforcement, but others go with all types of first responders and different agencies throughout the state.” In a prior interview, Mayo stated that “Bringing training courses to Oxford is beneficial in several ways; it provides another area in Alabama for officers to come and get additional training, while also supporting our neighboring local agencies who may not always get the training opportunities they want.” Officer Stoute told us, while RCTA is based out of Meridian, Mississippi, some departments can’t travel that far. Having the training in Oxford allows those who can’t make it to Mississippi to still receive the instruction. Oxford Police Department’s Chief Bill Partridge said, “It benefits not only us locally, but it benefits the smaller departments across the area and state that can’t afford to send officers out of state to train. We get to bring the training here in the region for officers to receive quality training without departments busting their budget.” The RCTA is a unique partnership between the Mississippi National Guard and law enforcement agencies. At the request of senior law enforcement officials, Congress established the RCTA in 1992 to leverage the training capabilities of the National Guard to meet the training challenges of local and state-level law enforcement. The RCTA began operations in 1992 at the Naval Air Station in Meridian, Mississippi. Since opening its doors, the RCTA has provided no-cost training to more than 137,000 officers from all 54 states and territories. There are currently 1,430 Law Enforcement Agencies registered with the RCTA.


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OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS EDUCATION FOUNDATION

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U P DAT E F RO M T H E OX F O R D P U B L I C L I B R A R Y

CHECK US OUT The Oxford Public Library is pleased to continue to serve our community, and we are continually striving to make sure our presence is a positive force for Oxford. To that end, I would like to update you on some current and future services available through the library. First off, let me take the opportunity to thank the trained volunteers who help people in our community prepare their taxes for free at the library. Through a partnership with United Way, the Oxford Library can provide these volunteers a place to help those who need tax assistance. This service has helped countless file their taxes with free professional help. The IRS trains the volunteers, and they are happy to use that knowledge to help our community. Tax time is sometimes dreaded, but with free help from some truly wonderful people, tax time is a lot more agreeable. Blind Date with a Book is one of our patrons’ favorite programs, and when the front desk staff started decorating in February, excited comments abounded. Many people say that they look forward to this all year. Books are wrapped like gifts in plain brown paper with a simple string and heart on the front. Patrons are invited to go on a “blind date” with that book by checking out a book that will be a surprise when they get home. The heart on the front of the book specifies the genre of the book, but that’s all the patron knows until they unwrap. What started out as a cute and fun program has introduced readers to books or authors they had never tried. Often, the patron has said that he wouldn’t have picked up the book from the shelf on his own, but that he now has a new favorite author! The program has also encouraged non-readers to pick up a book just for a

little fun. It doesn’t hurt that there are some pretty great prizes attached to the program. When a patron finishes a book, he returns the enclosed survey to be entered into a drawing. OPL would like to thank our sponsors for our program this year: Sister’s Treasures, Longhorn Steakhouse, Olive Garden, Smallcakes Cupcakery, and Sarah Cavender Metalworks. For those that have requested a program like this last year-round, please check out our book jar at the front desk. Sometimes the hardest part of reading a book is picking one out. The book jar is filled with staff and patron recommendations; patrons searching for good reads can reach into the jar and pull out a new favorite. This year’s Blind Date with a Book was fun; we can’t wait for next February to do it all again! The Summer Reading Program is always a fun time, and this year will be no exception. The theme is Libraries Rock, and it will feature programs/performances/events that will be inspired by music. It’s a great theme, and we are excited to dance and sing with our patrons! Don’t forget, age restrictions have been removed; everyone is invited to join the program, from birth through adulthood. Registration begins online in May, and the nine-week program runs from May 29 – July 27. See you here! Check out our seed library, to be available in May. You may “check out” a seed packet from the seed library at OPL to grow fruits and/or vegetables in your garden at home. These can be a valuable resource to help feed your family! Also, check out the educational resources that we plan to accompany the seed library. Keep a check on our calendar for these enjoyable events. Keep checking us out for programs, classes, events, and, of course, reading. We offer services to our community all year long. Libraries aren’t only books anymore! Books are indeed a big part of what we do, but our services have expanded to include many other types of resources,

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SEED LIBRARY too. Those that tell you that libraries and paper books are on the decline haven’t been in our library. Our friendly staff continually helps patrons in many facets of their lives. We love to see our patrons smile! OPL’s beautiful building turned ten years old this April. Those that remember the old library realize what an enhancement the new library is. I worked in the old library, and I still marvel at where we are now! The facility is remarkable, and it invites the community to take part in what services the library offers. Our city is very lucky to have a mayor and council who realize the importance the library serves to its community. Our beautiful building has lots of services to offer inside, but it does not stop there. Don’t forget to check out our website, www.oxfordpl.org, which includes our calendar of events as well as plenty of online resources. We hope to see you inside or online soon! Happy Reading! Amy E. Henderson, Library Director amy.henderson@oxfordal.gov

In order to provide Oxford families with a resource to feed their families and learn about plants, health, and nutrition, the Oxford Public Library will begin a seed library in May. Patrons can “check out” seed packets of fruits or vegetables that are planted at home. Learning experiences abound! Look for other resources or events to accompany the seed library, such as classes, vegetable/fruit shows (show what you grow), and recipe swaps. OPL plans to place a bulletin board near the seed library catalog that will feature pictures that patrons share of their successful growing. This is a way for the community to share experiences together in separate home spaces. Card catalogs aren’t used in libraries as they once were. Computer searching has revolutionized the library’s finding aids. Much more efficient and effective searching can be done today using the library’s OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog). An old-fashioned card catalog is a very good size, however, to house seed packets. For those that would like to feel the nostalgia brought about by using those card catalogs, come check out our seed library. Instead of index cards referencing where to find materials elsewhere, find the seed library itself housed inside a card catalog cabinet.

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OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY SPOTLIGHT ZY GARRETT Zy’shavia Garrett is an Oxford High School senior to graduate in 2018. She has volunteered at the library for several years, and when she became old enough, the library welcomed her to become one of the library’s paid summer workers. OPL loved Zy so much, she was invited to become one of the year-long weekend workers when the library opened on weekends in 2017. Her joyous laugh is infectious; she is respectful, vibrant, and dedicated. Artistic abilities abound in Zy’s touch. Many of the decorations seen in the library have been created by this resourceful young lady. Library Director Amy Henderson says, “Zy is a remarkable young woman. She will make something

magnificent of herself. Her journey is a great one; Zy’s creativeness will follow her wherever she chooses to go. I have no question that she will be successful in whatever path she chooses to follow, especially if it has to do with the world of art.” Her personal artwork is extraordinary; she will hone that craft when she goes to college to study art in the fall. Join her during Oxford Public Library’s Summer Reading Program to learn a fun technique. Zy loves to share her art, and she will be teaching how to create some beautiful artwork. Check out Zy’s art classes on June 14, June 28, and July 19. You will love to meet this energetic, fun-loving, and beautiful young woman.

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By Hunter Gentry

Mattison Family Cemetery The Mattison Family Cemetery lies just a few miles south of downtown Oxford. The cemetery, which is located on private property, contains three markers and is rumored to have more than a dozen grave sites. Benjamin Mattison was born August 1, 1786, in Virginia and died September 11, 1867, in Oxford. He was married to Jane Ghent. Jane, daughter of John Mitchell Gent and Elizabeth Wilhoit, was born January 4, 1786, in Abbeville County, South Carolina and died March 10, 1857, also in Oxford. Their children were Thomas Glover Mattison, George Franklin Mattison, and Lovenia Carolina “Lucy” Mattison. Benjamin Mattison and his family moved from South Carolina to Talladega County in the late 1820s. Mattison came from a religious background that was integral in his life, and he brought that influence to Alabama. The Mattison Family generously donated the land for the first Friendship Church. The church later became the First Baptist Church of Oxford and relocated in 1860 to the present location in Historic Downtown Oxford. Benjamin and Jane share the same headstone. The inscription reads: Benjamin Mattison Born Aug 1, 1785 Died Sept 11, 1867 Jane Wife of B. Mattison Born Jan 4, 1787 Died Mar 10, 1857 George Mattison, son of Benjamin Mattison and Jane Ghent, was born June 11, 1822, in Abbeville County, South Carolina and died March 16, 1890, in Oxford. George married Mildred Elizabeth “Millie” Mattison. Millie, daughter of William James Mattison and Eliza Frances Newton Wyatt, was born September 16, 1833, in Abbeville County, South Carolina and died October 6, 1890, in Oxford. They are also buried in the Benjamin Mattison Family Cemetery.

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Their children were:

Emma A. Mattison Craig, 29 April 1853 – 19 October 1940 Wiley O. Mattison, 8 August 1855 – 1 November 1862

Arra J. Mattison, 20 January 1861 – 9 September 1861 Otis A. Mattison, 1 December 1858 – 8 August 1881

Georgia F. Mattison, 12 September 1863 – 1 February 1864 James E. Mattison, 9 December 1864 – bef. 1870

William B. Mattison, 18 September 1867 – 19 December 1900 Olden Hames Mattison, 11 March 1869 – 28 December 1907 Bettie P. Mattison, 29 May 1870 – 20 September 1872

Mary Elizabeth Mattison Bagley, 25 April 1873 – 18 July 1933 Stella A. Mattison Bagley, 11 June 1877 – 29 January 1959

George and Millie share the same headstone. The inscription reads: G.E. Mattison Born Jun 11, 1882 Died Mar 10, 1890

Millie E. Mattison Born Sept 16, 1833 Died Oct 6, 1890

Gravestone text: “They steered their course to the same quiet shore not parted long and no to part no more.” Otis A. Mattison, the fourth child of George and Millie Mattison, was working in the sawmill with his father when lightning struck and killed him. An article in the Jacksonville Republican reads, “His neck was broken and skull was cracked.” He was buried in the Mattison Family Cemetery. The inscription reads: Otis A. Mattison Born December 1, 1858 Killed by Lightning August 8, 1881 “Thy God has claimed thee as his own” The present owner of the property first discovered the cemetery in about 1944. At that time, the property was overgrown with many stones toppled over and broken. When the owner returned in 1946, only the markers of Benjamin, Jane, George, Mille, and Otis were left. Over the past few decades, the cemetery has been cleaned and the markers have been restored.

SOURCES History of the First Baptist Church of Oxford, Alabama, 150 Years, 1836-1986 by Love & Bishop, The Jacksonville Republican, and other digital archives OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2018

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

ANISHA PATEL Big businesses may dominate the news, but it’s small businesses and startups that keep our economy growing. Their value and the role they play in our local economy is sometimes underestimated because they are, in fact, small. The truth is there’s nothing small about the impact they have in Oxford. While residents in the Friendship community may visit The Grub Mart for the wide selection of snacks and beverages, they often stay a bit longer for the friendly face behind the counter. Manager and owner, Anisha Patel, has been greeting customers for over ten years at the convenience store and gas station located on the corner of Friendship Road and Cheaha Drive.

Eventually, the customers did come back, and business improved. New relationships were formed, and now The Grub Mart is a thriving locally-owned business that serves the community. As our area continues to grow, Anisha looks forward to welcoming even more people to experience her store’s “neighborhood” feel.

Q & A with Anisha Patel, Business Owner Grub Mart Convenience Store & Gas Station on Friendship Road, Oxford Valero Convenience Store & Gas Station on Grace Street, Oxford How many employees do you have?

Five employees between both stores. “Oxford is a good community,” said Anisha. “I enjoy talking to people as they come in the store and I know my regular customers by name—they are like family to me.” Anisha moved to Oxford in 1997. She worked as a bank teller for BB&T, and her two sons attended Oxford schools. Wanting to provide more for her family and be a local business owner, she leased a convenience store in Weaver. In 2005, she had the opportunity to purchase The Grub Mart in Oxford from Young Oil Company. “They are a good company, good people,” she said. Change is hard, and the day she was introduced as the new owner, she faced many hurdles. She reflects back, “They did not tell the employees until the deal was done and one by one everybody left. Soon it was just my brother and me. We didn’t even know where the pump lights were.” Customers, too, were hesitant to return to shop. She said, “That first month the business was cut in half. I thought ‘what’s going to happen? How am I going to make the payment?’”

What is your biggest challenge?

Competition. We are competing with corporate stations on gas pricing. What do you enjoy about owning your own business?

No boss, no time clock. But I work a lot! Where were you born?

I grew up in Gujarat, India.

What brought you to America?

I got married. My husband was here before we were married. I was 21 years old when I moved. We lived in Atlanta, GA for 18 months, then moved to Birmingham, AL. Do you ever travel back to India?

Nowadays I go back every year. I try to stay two or three months. How many languages do you speak?

I speak English, Gujarati, and Hindi.

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STAND UP AND FIGHT A YOUNG BOY AND FAMILY’S COURAGEOUS BATTLE

Cancer. Some call it a disease, some call it an illness, and even some call it a cuss word. The one thing we can all agree on is that cancer can bring down the mightiest of men, but it can also strengthen those who have been diagnosed with it, and it can strengthen their families and friends. Here’s the truth: we have all lost a loved one– whether family or friend–to cancer, and we see the effect it has on the people who have been afflicted with the dreadful disease. We have also seen loved ones who have defeated this particular illness and have come out stronger and wiser after their battle. The amazing thing is that we see people who come out of the woodwork–whether they’re bringing food, money, prayers, or just dropping in to spend time with the person, they are always willing to help lend a hand and go the extra mile. Something like that happened in Oxford not long ago; our community united for a common cause, and it was a beautiful sight to see. Gerry Lyons (pronounced “Jerry”) has been with the Oxford Police Department for four years. If you’ve been to Choccolocco Park, I’m sure you’ve seen him on his bicycle patrolling the facility. He and his wife, JulieAnna, have been married for ten years and have two children–a girl, Lorelai, age 7, and a boy, Wesley, age 3. This seems to be the typical American family, but the events that have happened in the past few months not only made them atypical but one of the strongest and bravest families in the area.

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Wesley is a normal little boy. He likes to play outside and run around, eat ice cream, and get as dirty as possible before he’s called to come inside and eat dinner. He’s a normal kid, right? The answer to that is yes, but, recently, he would start getting tired easily and start running a fever. Gerry and JulieAnna gave their son Ibuprofen, but that didn’t ease the symptoms as much as it should have. Wesley’s doctor treated it as an ear infection, and

Joshua Craft is an employee of the City of Oxford Parks and Recreation Department and has been a cancer survivor since 2009.


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they returned home. Hopefully, some rest and relaxation would help as well. Back home, the Lyons family noticed that Wesley was limping. Gerry said, “He had grown three inches in a month, so JulieAnna and I assumed it to be growing pains, but he was complaining about how his leg hurt, so we went back to the doctor.” On top of that, his fever wasn’t breaking, so Wesley and his family were sent to Children’s Hospital to see a rheumatologist. After arriving at Children’s, Wesley was given a full exam, and the rheumatologist said that he didn’t know what was wrong. “He said the white blood cell count was high and the red blood cell count was low, so we started searching for answers,” Gerry said. After a quick Google search, Lyons said that the signs pointed to leukemia. “JulieAnna and I immediately came to grips with that,” he told me. After a bone marrow biopsy, their fears were confirmed: Wesley had Pre-B-ALL leukemia. The Lyons had to quickly process their son’s and brother’s diagnosis. December 17, 2017, is a day they’ll never forget. Families are preparing for Christmas, but this family was getting ready to fight with their son and brother. After the initial reaction, the doctors told them that Wesley would undergo three years of treatment with many different chemotherapy drugs. Dexamethasone, Vincristine, Doxorubicin, Pegaspargase, Cyclophosphamide, Thioguanine, Cytarabine, and Intrathecal Methotrexate were the drugs for his type of cancer, along with some lighter doses of other chemo drugs such as Mercaptopurine, and some steroids and antibiotics to help his weakened immune system. The

names of these medicines are complex, but I’m sure this family won’t forget them anytime soon. It’s been almost ten years since I had cancer, and I will always remember the names Bleomycin, Etoposide, Cisplatin (the chemo drugs that I took). Something that no one ever mentions or maybe even thinks about is the time that the persons with cancer and their families have to prepare for what’s about to come. Wesley started treatment a few days after his diagnosis. Even after my diagnosis, I had surgery two days after and started chemo a week after that. Thank God my mother is a nurse. She was at every appointment when the medical teams would talk about my cancer levels and knew exactly what they were talking about. I would look at her, and she would put it in layman’s terms for me. I was blessed beyond measure by that. Still, all of this is a lot to absorb for those affected, and it moves so quickly that it’s impossible to process. As with my mother and father, Gerry and JulieAnna, and many more families close to home (like Ted and Samantha Darby, whose daughter, Kayla, lost her battle with cancer in 2009,) I can say that the only thing worse than hearing, “you have cancer,” has to be “your child has cancer.” Whether you’re the one who just got diagnosed or a loved one within earshot, there are so many things running through your mind after hearing that. How is it possible to think after that? What do you do? The reality is that there is only one thing to do: get ready to fight. News travels through Oxford fast, and after hearing this news, Gerry’s coworkers at the Oxford Police Department and other departments wrapped their arms around him and

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his family with prayers, food, visits, and love. Firefighter Jason Bedford had the idea to do a fundraiser for the Lyons family by having a basketball game between the Oxford Fire Department and the Oxford Police Department. It was initially just going to be one game, but it grew, and other area agencies joined them. Upon getting the news, the Anniston Police and Fire Departments and the Calhoun County Sheriff’s Office joined together to create a tournament. On March 8th, the agencies held their basketball tournament at the Oxford Civic Center to raise money and awareness for Wesley and his family. Alexandria Elementary School brought baked goods to sell, officials manned coolers to sell drinks, and pizzas were donated by CiCi’s Pizza and Papa John’s. Hundreds of people from all over the area came to support a common cause. All in all, over $8,000 was raised for the Lyons family. Oxford Fire Chief Gary Sparks said, “To raise that kind of money is amazing. We appreciate everyone who came and supported them. My guys enjoyed playing in it, and it was a great time for an even greater cause.” Oxford Police Chief Bill Partridge echoed Sparks’ comments. “It was a good joint effort that shows good unity between the departments. [Officer Lyons] was teary-eyed when he talked to me, especially because of the turnout and the amount of support the community has given to his family.” Partridge summed up the emotions of many of his police officers and coworkers: “Not a day goes by that I don’t think about little Wesley. It’s just terrible to have a child and have to go through that, but the fundraiser made everybody involved feel good because of the way it turned out and how much money we were able to raise in such a short amount of time.”

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Wow, what a night! It’s amazing to see the way that our community bands together in times of need. We don’t even have to personally know the family to help them out. That is what makes Oxford home. I was talking with Gerry, and he cannot accurately describe the amount of love and support he has experienced over the past few months. “JulieAnna and I are very humbled and honored to have the support from the police department, the city, and the community. They have been such a great family during this difficult time. It is very awe-inspiring to see the number of people that have wept and prayed for my child, a child they have never met and may never meet. This just shows what a great community we are part of.” They are grateful for the support, but the fight is far from over. Wesley has a long and road ahead and will experience peaks and valleys along with his family. Even with the weekly trips to Children’s Hospital for treatment, Gerry and JulieAnna still have to take precautions with their son. Because of his weakened immune system, they have to keep him away from as many germs as possible. That means they have to stay at home a lot and take lots of showers when they do return from going out into public areas. I remember how weak my immune system was when I was undergoing chemotherapy. I went to work for one night and ended up spending a few days in the hospital because my white blood cell count was so low and I was unable to fight off many common illnesses we get over in a day or two. Even after my oncologist gave me Leukine shots to help my white blood cell count increase, he told me to stay at home so I wouldn’t be at a higher risk for infection.


JulieAnna and I are very humbled and honored to have the support from the police department, the city, and the community. They have been such a great family during this difficult time. It is very awe-inspiring to see the number of people that have wept and prayed for my child, a

child they have never met and may never meet. This just shows what a great community we are part of.

I was talking with Samantha Darby, whose daughter, Kayla, lost her battle with rhabdomyosarcoma in 2009, and she told me that her daughter, who would’ve been 24 on April 18th, was all about awareness and resources to help children fighting “the big C,” as she called it. John Childs and I, together and separately, went to see her so many times at her house and the hospital, to pray with her and her parents, Ted and Samantha, and her brother, Trent. When I was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, one of the first calls I made was to Ted, who happened to be with Kayla at that time. It was providence too because when Ted told her that I had just been diagnosed, I could hear her say, “Tell him he’ll be fine. If I can do it, he sure as heck can.” That helped me more than she ever knew. Here was this girl, much younger than me, with the courage and strength of a thousand men, who was looking “the big C” dead in the eye and daring it to try to outwork her. I never got a chance to thank her for what she did for me or for how much she meant to me, but I think she knew, and I think she knows right now how much she helped me “fight like Kayla.” She lost her battle, but cancer didn’t defeat her. Until the end, she was stronger than many of us will ever be.

To Gerry, JulieAnna, and Lorelai, we are here for you. We are Oxford, and we will do anything to make sure that you have what you need to help Wesley fight. This is not just his fight, this is our fight. We pray that God wraps His arms around you, and may He send his angels to comfort and protect you during this most trying time. To you, Wesley, we are here for you too. We are going to pray without ceasing for your health, and for you to win your battle with cancer. From one cancer survivor to another who is going through it now, I can tell you that you can win. You will win. God is so much greater than cancer, and we pray for the medical team to seek His guidance when treating you. In the words of Kayla Darby, “Cancer is a just a word–a mean, stupid word.” Isn’t that the truth? You are greater than a word. Here’s your new word: survivor. I’ll even use her quote, a quote that I’ve given to friends who are fighting cancer; terms of endearment that I’m now giving to you: “If I can do it, you sure as heck can.” We’re with you, little Mr. Lyons. God’s got this, and I can’t wait for the day when I get to say “fellow cancer survivor.” May God’s never-ending grace and peace be with you…always.

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the big questions WITH OHS CAREER TECH GRADUATING SENIORS

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ASHLEIGH REAVES

| Academy of Business Technologies

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Quick, challenging, and memorable. Q. What project or assignment challenged you the most as a student? A project or assignment that has challenged me the most as a student would have to be anything in my Calculus class with Mrs. Henderson due to her always challenging my classmates and myself to do better with more challenging real-life situations. Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? Stay focused in class, do what you have a passion for, and always do your homework; it will end up hurting you later in the year if you don’t. Q. What makes you happy? My family, friends, and teammates are what makes me happy. There is never a dull moment when I am around any of them; someone is always laughing.

CARSON FREEMAN

| Academy of Business Technologies

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Exciting, Challenging, and Fulfilling Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? The best advice I can give to underclassmen is to stay on top of college and scholarship applications, and don’t get stressed out–enjoy it. Q. What was the most memorable school event of the year? The most memorable event of the year was Junior-Senior War during Senior Week. Q. What makes you happy? Spending time with family and friends and being able to spend time outdoors.

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CALEB LAMBERT |

Academy of Digital Arts

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Amazing, memorable, and exciting. Q. What project or assignment challenged you the most as a student? I’ve been on the Yearbook Staff for four years, and it can be difficult meeting deadlines, interacting with students, and overall making sure we capture every moment of the year. Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? Don’t be afraid to be yourself. People don’t want to know a “fake” you, but rather a real, more personal you. Q. What was the most memorable school event of the year? I was elected to be a SkillsUSA State Officer for the 2016-2017 school year. I traveled to Washington, D.C. to talk about Perkins Funding with Congress, as well as travel to National Conference in Louisville, KY.

KAYLA HARRIS |

Academy of Digital Arts

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Stressful, Liberating, Fulfillment Q. Which school tradition are you the proudest of? Between Prom and the Senior Crown ceremony at the pep rally. Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? I would tell them to do their best in everything they try to do. We may not be able to do some things, but as long as we never give up and don’t quit, you’ll be able to have more of a chance of improving instead of giving up and having no opportunity to improve (or succeed) at all. Q. What was the most memorable school event of the year? I believe that the most memorable event this year would be prom. Prom helped me realize that I don’t have to worry about what people think of me. While I attended, I was able to be confident in myself, and not feel nervous about how I looked to others when I danced with my friends. 78

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IAN JOBST |

Academy of Engineering

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Veni Vidi Vici (I came, I saw, I conquered) Q. Which school tradition are you the proudest of? I am very proud of OHS’ dedication to excellence; more specifically, a devotion to our faithful CTSO’s, and extra-curricular education, especially as it relates to real world skills. Q. What project or assignment challenged you the most as a student? If you asked me my freshman year, I’d say without a doubt the cooperative aspects of the FIRST Robotics, and other similar competitions; now, I’d say AP Physics C: Mechanics Exam Prep. Q. What was the most memorable school event of the year? Most memorable school event? Probably winning ten medals at the ACTE Technology fair... My prior record had been six, and I was ecstatic to finally hit double digits in my final run.

DATREAUNA DYE |

Academy of Engineering

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: An Eye-Opening Journey Q. What project or assignment challenged you the most as a student? Both of my “ethics” projects in Therapeutics and DE Biology challenged me to not only present my side of a topic but also listen and understand the viewpoints of others without argument. Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? If you have the desire to do something, do it. It’s better to be bold and try something new than look back in four years and regret not doing it. Q. What makes you happy? The satisfaction of knowing that all of the hard work that I’ve completed is not going to waste makes me happy; these last four years, the teachers and this school have shaped me into the woman I am today.

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ALEXIS ORDENEAUX |

Academy of Education & Training

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Stressful, Astonishing, and Memorable. Q. Which school tradition are you the proudest of? I am most proud of Senior Crown Day during Senior Week because it brought us closer together. Q. What project or assignment challenged you the most as a student? Designing my own classroom. Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? You should always do your homework and make sure you choose your friends wisely because they will be the people you can turn to when you need them the most. Q. What was the most memorable school event of the year? Field trip to the Freedom Riders Museum in Anniston.

HEAVYN LEIGH WHITESIDE

|

Education & Training

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Stressful: I chose the word stressful because making sure that scholarships and schoolwork are done by the right due date and not getting them confused. Memorable: I made so many memories–not only with kids in my graduating class–but with some of the underclassmen. I regret not getting to know some of them until this year. Fast: I chose the word fast because I feel like just yesterday it was August, and now I have a little over a month until I walk across the field and get my diploma. Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? Do your very best at everything you do even if you don't feel as if it is important. Q. What was the most memorable school event of the year? Making it to state with the cross-country team. It was so great to see how all the summer workouts and practices had paid off. 80

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BARBARA COVARRUBIAS-LUGO | Academy of Health Science Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Challenging, Optimistic, Altering Q. Which school tradition are you the proudest of? Pep rallies because it’s an amazing sight to see the entire school, including faculty and teachers, gather to support the team and take pride in being an OHS student. Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? Be ready to learn how to manage your time, stay organized and motivated; know when to work hard and when to give yourself a break. Q. What was the most memorable school event of the year? HOSA competition because I enjoyed being surrounded and encouraged by like-minded students. Q. What makes you happy? Knowing I get to graduate high school at last after working so hard.

MARILOU JACKSON |

Academy of Health Science

Q. Describe your senior year in three words: Fleeting, adventurous, rewarding Q. What project or assignment challenged you the most as a student? Preparing for my event, Creative Problem Solving, at the State HOSA competition. I worked with my team in and out of school to prepare for the competition. It was challenging because I had to work with my teammates and study for the test and the problem-solving event. Q. What is the best advice you could give to underclassmen? Don’t stress yourself out and do all your assignments. Procrastination is not good. Q. What was the most memorable school event of the year? I’m sure that the most memorable event of the year will be graduation, but I will always remember Senior Skip Day. I had a really fun and eventful day, and it’s a memory that my friends and I will cherish for a long time. OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2018

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OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS

IT’S YOUR MOVE It is a medieval battle of wills, a strategic challenge of the mind, a one-on-one duel to the death. Checkmate the king and victory is yours. Chess—the game, or sport, depending on your point of view—has been played for nearly 1,500 years on every continent, in every country, and arguably in every city, town and hamlet on the planet. This includes Oxford, Alabama, as the Oxford High School Chess Club has been partaking in the game—or sport—for the past three years. However, now is the time for chess to become part of every school in the Oxford school system, according to Steve Morey, OHS Chess Club adviser. “The time to foster a desire and develop the skills for chess is at the elementary and middle school levels,” said Morey. “Those young minds are like sponges waiting to soak up chess skills and strategies.” According to chess.com, a website that provides beginner and experienced chess enthusiasts a variety of interactive chess activities, chess benefits schoolaged children in the following ways: Playing the game of chess on a regular basis right from childhood improves the learning, thinking, analytical power, and decision-making ability of the child. Chess makes the child learn how to strategize aspects of the game and life. In addition, a child can also learn the importance of foresight, and planning. Playing the game of chess on a regular basis in childhood teaches the importance of being disciplined in life. Practicing chess regularly also aids in improving the self-confidence of the child, which is extremely essential for the child’s growth. In the game of chess, a child learns to do a thorough analysis, research, and assessment of the situation before making any decision. Such an exercise provides mental clarity to the child. Mental clarity and mental dexterity is required for solving problems, analyze consequences,and formulate future tactics.

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Children playing chess from an early age exhibit extraordinary memory skills. Chess also helps in improving concentration and academic performance of the child.


ARCHERY In the 2017-18 school year, Oxford City Schools has introduced archery at both the middle and high school level. With support from our board office and Outdoor Alabama, we were able to purchase the first archery kit. Tryouts were held at the beginning of Christmas break at the Oxford Middle School gym. There were no previous skills required for tryouts, except for a desire to learn. Over the course of three days, the archers were taught the process, practiced, and finally shot for a spot on the team. In the end, there were 19 high school archers and 20 middle school archers.

Our archers have made significant progress this season with the startup of our program in Oxford. Students were able to find a place and starting point with archery and tremendous growth was noted in both their abilities and attitudes the more they excelled at the sport. Next season, we will be able to begin much earlier, which will allow us to compete in several more competitions in preparation for our regionals. Excitement has grown, so we anticipate even more students being interested in our archery program. We look forward to next year being a full year of excitement and success as our archery program continues to grow.

The next month was spent practicing and preparing for our regional competition at Pell City High School. We competed on February 15th and 16th and shot against many other middle and high school teams from around the area. Both teams shot very well for first-year archers. Our archers were able to take away the experience they needed to not only grow as a competitive archer but to learn what it takes to have a competitive team as well.

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OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS

OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS 2018 TECH FAIR PARTICIPATION WINNERS The 2018 JSU Regional Technology Fair was held at the Oxford Civic Center on April 4. Hundreds of students from school districts across Northeast Alabama came to showcase their skills and talents. Projects that finished first or second qualified to compete in the State Competition in Montgomery on April 28. Oxford was very well represented as each school had students who qualified and will have the opportunity to vie for a state championship. Our district is very thankful to the City of Oxford for hosting the tournament for Jacksonville State University due to the recent storm damage the University experienced. Winners from the district: OXFORD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 PROJECTS GO TO STATE Internet Applications – Group 2nd Place – Matthew Pointer and Canaan Whitman

Multi-Dimensional – Individual 3rd Place – Genesis Henderson

Hardware Modification – Individual 1st Place – Bryant McCarney

Multi-Media – Group Honorable Mention – Kathryn Barnhill and Gabriel Jackson

Multi-Dimensional Designs – Individual 2nd Place – Kinlea Barnhill

Video Production – Individual 2nd Place – Briah Dailey

DEARMANVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 PROJECTS GO TO STATE Information Technology Test 2nd Place – Chloey Middleton Animation – Individual 3rd Place – Zackary Austin Animation – Group 2nd Place – Natalie Mathews, Alaina Santiago, and Isabella Shull Internet Applications – Individual 1st Place – Matt Tippets Multi-Media – Group 1st Place – Payton Brooks, Annabelle Lamberth, Carly Shultz, and Zoey Wilson

Multi-Dimensional Designs – Individual 2nd Place – Kylee Beard Multi-Media – Individual 1st Place – Trevor Lentz Website Design – Individual 1st Place – Joshua Stack

COLDWATER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 PROJECTS GO TO STATE Animation - Individual 2nd Place – Avery Wright Audio Production – Group 1st Place – Evelyn Campos and Jessica Smith Digital Art – Group 1st Place – Presley League and Miley Wilkins

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C.E. HANNA 13 PROJECTS GO TO STATE Information Technology Test 2nd Place – Wyatt Boullemet 3rd Place – Conner Heaton Animation – Individual 2nd Place – Emily Byrne Animation – Group 3rd Place – Jackson Strayhorn and Desmond Whitson Audio Production – Group 3rd Place – Molly Barnett and Maylan Ussery Computer Programming - Group 1st Place – Wyatt Boullemet and Isaac Williams

Multi-Dimensional Designs – Group 1st Place – Roby Brooks and Kyron Brown 2nd Place – Tide Gann and Nic Thompson Multimedia – Individual 1st Place – Rory Parks Multimedia – Group 1st Place – Emmalyn Gibbs, Cason Hudgins, Annabelle Mertens, and Ana Romero Honorable Mention – Preston Conger and Lily Beth Snyder Robotics – Individual 1st Place – Mia Vivanco Video Production – Individual 1st Place – Lillian Kizziah 2nd Place – Sarah Ashley Edwards 3rd Place – Luke Gable Video Production – Group Honorable Mention – Parth Patel and Mike Tippets Website Design – Individual 1st Place – Kye McEwen Website Design – Group 3rd Place – Alana Smith and Victoria Ward

OXFORD MIDDLE SCHOOL 30 PROJECTS GO TO STATE Information Technology Test 1st Place – Michael Hanebuth Tied 2nd Place – Anna Abernathy, Josh Spears, and Ethan Wright 3D Modeling – Group 3rd Place – Kaitlyn Allen and Braxton Smith Animation – Individual 1st Place – Joshua Collins 2nd Place – Madisyn Burns


Animation – Group 1st Place – Aiden Howard and Braxton Snider 2nd Place – Jaquese Fegans, Peyton Harris, and China Page 3rd Place – Brendan Dutton, Tylan Scales, and Cameron Turner

Robotics – Group 1st Place – Isabella Heester and Victoria Robinson 2nd Place – Johnna Baker, Jaas Moore, and Ashanti Sterling 3rd Place – Jennifer Cruz-Pavon and Cesar Lopez

Audio – Individual 2nd Place – Diya Patel

Video Production – Individual 1st Place – Will Hamilton 2nd Place – Macie Williams

Audio – Group 1st Place – Miguel Mitchell, Luke Peoples, and Kyle Pilkington

Video Production – Group 2nd Place – Katie Keur and Mia Munoz 3rd Place – Josue Alvarez and Joshua Spears

Digital Art – Individual 2nd Place – Michael Hanebuth

Website Design – Individual 2nd Place – Nico Gutierrez

Digital Art – Group 1st Place – Naydelin Gutierrez and Ashley Morales 2nd Place – Tatyana Conley, Logan Fox, and Jozlyn Hoard

Website Design – Group 1st Place – Kensley Hyatt and Anna Jones 2nd Place – Christian Brasher and Ethan Wright

Hardware Modification – Group 2nd Place – Aeja Heard, Serenity Houston, and Navia Martinez 3rd Place – Aaron McFarland and Kyler Wright Internet Applications – Individual 2nd Place – Cierra Calloway 3rd Place – Channing Gallahar Internet Applications – Group 1st Place – John Covington and Noah Mattox 2nd Place – Anna Abernathy and Ashley Paulson 3rd Place – Tyrone Cook and Joquez Shepard Multi-Media – Group 1st Place – McKinnlee Mata and Ally Munroe 3rd Place – Jayden Rawls and Charles Wright Productivity Design – Individual 1st Place – Matalyn Chappell 2nd Place – Kimara Parki 3rd Place – Kristyn Rowe Productivity Design – Group 1st Place – Sawyer Brooks and Hannah Grace Robbins 2nd Place – Jaiden Allen and Cynthia Monasterio 3rd Place – Nala Caldwell and Aniya Elston Robotics – Individual 1st Place – Rodrigo Vera Campos 2nd Place – Logan Ford 3rd Place – Armando Nunez

Team Programming - Group 1st Place – Brandy Jobst and Grant Reeder Video Production – Group 3rd Place – Jesse Beck and Brandy Jobst LEVEL 5 (11TH & 12TH GRADES) 3D Modeling – Group 2nd Place – Ian Jobst Computer Programming – Individual 1st Place – Wesley Wade Computer Programming – Group 1st Place – Ethan Baker, Ian Jobst, and Emmanuel Webb 2nd Place – Ian Jobst and Wesley Wade Digital Art – Individual 1st Place – Ian Jobst

OXFORD HIGH SCHOOL 23 PROJECTS GO TO STATE

Digital Art – Group 1st Place – Ian Jobst and Emmanuel Webb

LEVEL 4 (9TH & 10TH GRADES)

Internet Applications – Group 1st Place – Ian Jobst and Wesley Wade

Information Technology Test 1st Place – Emmanuel Webb 2nd Place – Datreauna Dye 3rd Place – Zy’shavia Garrett

Multi-Dimensional Design – Group 1st Place – Andrew Edwards 2nd Place – Ian Jobst

Animation - Individual 1st Place – Brandy Jobst

Team Programming – Group 1st Place – Ian Jobst, Wesley Wade, and Emmanuel Webb

Audio – Individual 1st Place – Cody Allen Computer Programming – Group 1st Place – Jesse Beck, Brandy Jobst, and Kaitlyn Shinn 2nd Place – Caitlyn Camp and Brandy Jobst

Video Production – Group 2nd Place – Datreauna Dye and Ian Jobst Website Design – Group 1st Place – Ethan Baker, Ian Jobst, and Emmanual Webb

Digital Art – Individual 1st Place – Josh Whaley Digital Art – Group 1st Place – Nathan Robbins and Josh Whaley

Multi-Media – Individual 1st Place – Camille Calhoun Robotics – Individual 2nd Place – Grant Reeder

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C E H A N N A RO B O T I C S T E A M

KEEPING TECH FUN

Robot Name: SULLY

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The Teachers: KELLY ROBERTS, STEM and Robotics Teacher ASHLEY LAYMON, 6th-grade Collaborative English Language Arts teacher and Robotics Coach Starting in September, we meet after school and continue meeting all year. There are six teams, and they work together in groups. We start with notes and sketches, and they progress to work on their robots and the engineering notebooks. Hard Work Pays Off: All six teams went to Auburn for the regional tournament. Five of the six teams qualified and went to the Alabama State VRC Championship Four teams were in the finals at state. They ranked: 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th One team qualified for the 2018 VEX Robotics World Championship. Ashley Laymon explained, “We are so lucky to have the support of the Oxford City School System. As soon as we told them we had the opportunity to compete at the next level, Dr. Goodwin said, ‘They’re going!’” ”It’s all about the experience for these children. The VEX Robotics World Championship will be a very big deal. There will be 400 teams there from about 20 different countries,” said Kelly Roberts.

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The Team: NEEL PATEL: Programmer DHARAV SHUKLA: Programmer ASHER OWENS: Builder and driver World Ranking: 594 / 3253 Competition: U.S. Open Robotics Championship, Council Bluffs, Iowa Unexpected Challenge: They shipped the robot, and when it arrived, it was in pieces. Fighting the urge to panic, the boys worked collaboratively together and in two hours were able to get it past inspection. They continued working on the robot for hours that evening in their hotel lobby and were able to compete the next day. Kelly Roberts shared, “They never gave up and we kept encouraging them. We had other teams come over and offer parts or suggestions. Teams from California were very helpful. I was so proud of these kids. They came together, they problem-solved, and they had fun.”

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I HAVE TONS OF LEGOS AT HOME AND I BUILD HOUSES. I’VE ALWAYS LIKED TO DESIGN STUFF. MY DREAM JOB IS TO BE AN ARCHITECT. I CAN’T WAIT TIL WE GET TO HIGH SCHOOL AND CAN WORK WITH THE METAL ROBOTS.

ASHER OWENS


The Team: ZACHERY FOLLETT: Programmer and driver ROXANNE FINDLAY: Builder and driver ANTHONY ROBERTS: Builder and driver ANNABELLE MERTENS: Team Leader World Ranking: 471 / 3253 Competition: 2018 VEX Robotics World Championship, Louisville, Kentucky Qualifying for VEX Robotic World Championship: The team won the “Design Award” for Exceptional Notebook at the state competition in Gadsden, AL.

WE’VE UPGRADED OUR 'BOT A LOT SINCE THE FIRST COMPETITION. NOW WE SCORE MORE POINTS. WE ALSO MADE THE CLAW PASSIVE, SO WE DON’T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT BUGS IN THE PROGRAM.

ROXANNE FINDLAY

“The success of the team’s notebook is because of details and organization. The judges want to see how you problem solve. The team documented the challenges they faced, the solutions tried, and the results. In other words, what worked and why it worked,” Ashley Laymon said. OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2018

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UPDATE CIDER RIDGE

Greetings from everyone at Cider Ridge! I hope everyone is enjoying the fact that the spring weather has finally arrived after such a cold winter for the area. I know everyone at Cider Ridge has been patiently waiting for the temps to rise, and now that they have, it’s time to tee it up! The course is coming along great and the conditions are fantastic right now. As we’ll soon be transitioning from our spring season into the summer months, be on the lookout for the start of our summer programming this year. Even if you haven’t played golf before, there’s no better time than a great summer day to come out with friends and family to learn the game or even just spend some time on the driving range. We’ve finally started to thaw from the winter and have hosted several golf outings here in the recent weeks. On behalf of the staff here at Cider Ridge, we want to thank all of the participating teams for the Calhoun County Boys High School Championship and also the participants for the Oxford High School Boys Invitational that were held April 13th-14th, and April 16th-17th, respectively. We hope all of the participants enjoyed their rounds, despite some less than ideal weather, and we also want to congratulate the Donoho Boys’ Golf Team that was able to take home the team wins for both events. Also, congratulations to Harrison Hughston (Donoho) and Tyler Lipscomb (Bremen, GA) for winning Low Medalist in the events as well. The summer looks to be a busy time at the golf course this year with several tournaments lined up, including the Sunny King Charity Classic July 13th-15th. With that in mind, we want to stress the importance to our guests to please call ahead or check our website for tee time availability. We know that driving to the golf course just to find out an event is going on is frustrating, and it doesn’t feel any better for the staff here to have to give the bad news to the customers. I’ll leave everyone with a quick piece of advice to help make sure you’re playing your best golf this season. Anyone will tell you that to improve your abilities in this game it helps tremendously to take proper instruction and dedicate some time on the practice greens and tee. One thing that often gets forgotten is the importance of being properly fit for your clubs. In this game, your clubs are your tools; and if the tools don’t fit you, then they aren’t right for the job. If anyone is seeking new clubs this year, I cannot stress the importance of visiting a club fitter or checking out a demo day strongly enough. Even if you’ve been fit before, it’s always a good idea just to take your clubs in each season to check them out. Thanks. Lee Shurden, PGA • Director of Golf/Club Manager • Cider Ridge Golf Club 256.831.7222 • lee.shurden@HonoursGolf.com

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CHOCCOLOCCO PARK SPORTS COMPLEX

Partnership Program

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CHOCCOLOCCO PARK SPORTS COMPLEX

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES DIGITAL ADVERTISING ON PARK MONITORS

BENCH SPONSORSHIP

$250 per month 10 digital still-ads per hour / 8 sec. per ad Advertisement displayed on 1x monitor at park trail head.

$500 per bench per year

SINGLE PLAY (Option 1)

DOUBLE PLAY (Option 2)

$400 per month 10 digital still-ads per hour / 8 sec. per ad Advertisement displayed on 2x monitors at park trail head.

GRAND SLAM (Option 3)

$500 per month 10 digital still-ads per hour / 8 sec. per ad Advertisement displayed on 2x monitors at park trail head and during all events at the signature baseball and softball fields (2x monitors), five-field complex (2x monitors), four-field complex (2x monitors), and track & field complex (1x monitor).

BANNER SPONSORSHIP

FAN (Option 1)

BOOSTER (Option 2)

5 benches for $2,000 per year

SPORTING EVENT MONITOR BLAST

$1,000 per event Advertise your business to all the teams, families, fans, and visitors inside the facility in which event is taking place. 8 second still-ad, shown multiple times per hour, industry exclusivity.

PAVILION SPONSORSHIP

$5,000 per pavilion per year Sponsorship includes name display by pavilion, sponsorship listing on park website, and four free rentals a year.

ROADWAY & PARKING BANNERS

PLAYGROUND SPONSORSHIP

$400 per month 4x 2.5’ x 6’ banners

4-and 5-pod Playground Sponsorship $7,500 per year

FAN (Option 1)

LEADER (Option 1)

BOOSTER (Option 2)

CHAMPION (Option 2)

WALKING TRAIL BANNERS

EVENT SPONSORSHIP

$700 per month 8x 2.5’ x 6’ banners

FAN (Option 1)

$300 per month 4x 18” x 36” banners

BOOSTER (Option 2)

$500 per month 8x 18” x 36” banners

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Boundless Playground Sponsorship $10,000 per year

$7,500 per event Sponsorship includes the following items: Digital monitor blast on event facility monitors, tent/ vending setup, audio announcements (when applicable), social media shout-outs, flyer distribution at gate, 20’ x 8’ event banner, and full-page ad in the Oxford Access magazine.


TREE SPONSORSHIP

$950 per tree Sponsorship includes name display by tree and sponsorship listing on park website and trail head monitors

FRIENDS OF THE PARK PARTNER (Option 1)

$99.00 annually • Name listing on website • Name listing on trail head digital monitors • Annual name listing in the Oxford Access magazine

PATRON (Option 2)

$299.00 annually • Name listing on website • Name listing on trail head digital monitors • Annual name listing in the Oxford Access magazine • Free admission to park events hosted by the City of Oxford

PREMIER (Option 3)

$599.00 annually • Name listing on website • Name listing on trail head digital monitors • Annual name listing in the Oxford Access magazine • Free admission to park events hosted by the City of Oxford • Access to the VIP lounge at the signature baseball/softball complex

FOR CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS, CONTACT: Joshua Craft 256-310-6054 jcraft@oxfordal.us

Lamar Carter 256-283-1057 lcarter@oxfordal.us

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THE OXFORD BUSINESS LEAGUE The City of Oxford is excited to announce the launch of the Oxford Business League. The League will host at least six workshops annually, act as the liaison between the businesses and City, recruit new businesses, promote available properties for expansion, and enhance partnerships for existing and new businesses. The Business League kicked off in March with a “Social Media & Marketing” workshop hosted by TV24 and the Southern Girl Coffee Company. In May, the Business League will be partnering with the Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce to host a “Business Basics” workshop. The event will be held at the Bynum Community Center on Friday, May 4 at 10 A.M. The workshop is open to all Oxford business owners. For further information regarding this and future events, please feel free to contact us. Hunter Gentry | hcgentry@mainstreetoxford.org | 256-241-6667

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STARTS: May 29 *no day camp on May 28, Memorial Day *no day camp on July 4, Holiday HOURS: 6:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. REGISTRATION FEE: $20 per child COST: $75 per child; $70 second and third child *$60 for the above listed holiday weeks, no additional discount Participants must be part of the Oxford School district

Swimming, skating, movie time, field trips, and lots of outdoor activities!

Call Pam Harris, Program Director 256-831-2660 for more information; oxfordpard@cableone.net

SENIOR TRIP TO CALLAWAY GARDENS

May 18 — Bus departs at 7:30 a.m. from the Civic Center

Price is $75 per person and includes motorcoach bus, admission to gardens, and lunch. We will see all of the gardens, butterfly house, and have time for shopping.

For more information, contact Pam Harris 256-831-2660.

Thank you to our Easter Egg Hunt Main Sponsor: CRICKET WIRELESS — and — Rosa Reed McDonald’s Lakeview Baptist Church Life Church

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C I T Y

OVC SOFTBALL Championship Tournament May 9-12 OVC BASEBALL Championship Tournament May 22-27

O F

O X F O R D

OXFORD CIVIC CENTER SENIOR DANCE SCHEDULE 2018 May 11 — Ryan Robertson June 8 — Duo Sonix July — no dance August 17 — Sundance September 21 — Ryan Robertson October 19 — Sundance November 16 — Duo Sonix December 14 — Ryan Robertson

OXFORD PARD YOUTH CHEERLEADING Registration Friday, June 8 3:00 to 6:00 p.m. at Oxford Civic Center Ages 4-12 $100 (includes uniform) Must bring child to registration to be sized for uniform YOUTH SOCCER Sign-up dates: July 5 - July 31 at Civic Center, Bynum or Friendship. Ages 4-12. $60

7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Admission is $5 per person For more information, call 256-831-2660

FLAG FOOTBALL Sign-up dates: July 5 - July 31 at Civic Center, Bynum or Friendship. 1st - 2nd Graders. $70

SENIOR AEROBICS Low impact aerobics with certified instructor Lyn Brown. Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00 a.m. Class is free. Everyone welcome!

EAST COAST PRO SELECTION DAYS Hosted by the Miami Marlins 2 scouts from every MLB team will be there to see future prospects June 19-20

TACKLE FOOTBALL Sign-up dates: July 5 - July 31 at Civic Center, Bynum or Friendship. 3rd - 6th Graders. $70

FRIENDSHIP COMMUNITY CENTER YOGA CLASS Mondays and Thursdays 6:00 p.m. Holly Box, instructor Cost: $10 per class

OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY Mondays: 4C’s Events: Coffee, Cake, Conversation, and Coloring Wednesdays: 12:00 Watch It Wednesday Bring your lunch and enjoy a movie

BYNUM COMMUNITY CENTER YOGA CLASS 1st Saturday of every 9:00 a.m. Holly Box, certified instructor Cost: $10 per class

DIXIE YOUTH ROOKIE BASEBALL TOURNAMENT July 5 -11 For more listings of events at the park, check out our web calendar www.choccoloccopark.com

Calendar

Thursdays: 10:00 Story time Sundays: 2:00 Sensory Friendly Fun Time

SENIOR AEROBICS Low impact aerobics with certified instructor Lyn Brown. Every Tuesday & Thursday 3:15 - 4:15 p.m. Class is free. Everyone welcome!

OPL Special Events June 14 • June 28 • July 19 Art Class with Zy

TECHNOLOGY CLASS Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Laptop, tablet, or phone Every Friday at 11:00 a.m. Amy Henderson, instructor Learn basic computer skills, how to check out E-books and E-magazines

June 5 and July 3 Bunco June 12 and July 10 Book Art June 19 Self Defense Class for Seniors

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Oxford Performing Arts Center It is our great pleasure to announce a transformative set of renovations and improvements to the Oxford Performing Arts Center, set to begin this summer. The Oxford City Council and Mayor Alton Craft have lent their full support on the $2 million project. I am certain that these improvements will dramatically enhance the patron experience as well as provide a safer environment for cast and crew members. We anticipate that construction will begin in early June and complete in time for our 20182019 season, which starts in mid to late September. This aggressive construction schedule will minimize any impacts to our series of performances. We invite you to learn more about this project at oxfordpac.org/renovations. At our Season Reveal Celebration, scheduled for May 5, 2018, we will announce dozens of incredible shows for our next season. Be on the lookout for our season guidebook which will be mailed to you in June. We cannot wait to share what artists and shows are coming to our stage! Thank you, John Longshore Executive Director Oxford Performing Arts Center

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PROJECT DETAILS BOX SEATING Built with a capacity of 1,133 guests, the Oxford Performing Arts Center has experienced an increasing number of sold-out performances with each successive season. The project will add approximately 100 premium quality box seats to the sides of the main theatre. The new seats will benefit from superb sightlines and acoustics. Naming rights and sponsorship options will be made available to both individual and corporate donors. Upon completion, OPAC will have the largest capacity of any performing arts venue within sixty miles.

NEW EVENTS SPACE - THE STUDIO A portion of the lower level of OPAC will be converted into a 3,000 sq. ft. flexible venue tentatively named The Studio. The new space will provide for greatly expanded pre- and post-function reception space as well as for stand-alone events such as jazz music, dinner theatre, and lectures in a more intimate environment. In addition to the event space, a new concessionaire will be added, allowing for improved food service options for guests. The Studio will have an arts and entertainment theme, featuring music and theatre memorabilia. The venue will accommodate 140 guests for banquets and dinners or up to 200 for theatre-style events.

NEW RESTROOMS With the addition of 100 new seats in the theatre as well as the new 3,000 sq. ft. event space, additional restrooms will be required. The project will convert existing lower level storage space into new, fully ADA accessible restrooms. Fourteen new women's stalls will be added, along with eight new men's stalls. The restroom additions are expected to shorten lines during intermission dramatically. Upon completion, the venue will have 34 women's toilets and 20 men's toilets, a total well above code requirements.

NEW FLY SYSTEM OPAC is one of only three venues in the state which presents a Broadway musical series. This component will replace the existing stage rigging with 30 new high-speed, high capacity hoists which will improve cast and crew safety tremendously while also increasing production flexibility for performances. The new digitally controlled hoists are capable of moving at 180 feet per minute during performances.

NEW CATWALK The current system of lighting hoists above the theatre floor will be replaced with a network of new catwalks, improving safety for production crews as they work to repair and focus stage lighting fixtures. There will be no impact to acoustics or sightlines.

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Spotlight Summer Theatre Camp Experience musical theatre in a fun, half-day camp for students entering grades 1-7 in the Fall of 2018. Your child will work alongside arts and theatre professionals and teaching artists during daily rehearsals, in dancing, singing, acting, and visual arts. With props and costumes, singing and scene-work, your child’s experience will culminate in a performance of an exciting, youth-appropriate main stage performances for friends and family. WEEK ONE: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs | June 11-16 WEEK TWO: King Arthur’s Quest | June 24-30 WEEK THREE: Blackbeard the Pirate | July 9-14

CAMP ACTIVITIES INCLUDE: Auditions Rehearsals Acting Workshops Dance Sessions Tech Theatre Demonstrations Theatre Crafts Interactive Theatre Games Snack and Story Time Main-Stage Performance Three Ways to Register:

Summer Theatre Camp Due to a recently announced $2 million renovation project at OPAC, our 2018 Spotlight Summer Theatre Camps will be held in an alternate location which will be announced soon.

ONLINE: oxfordpac.org/camps PHONE: 256-241-3322 IN PERSON: OPAC Box Office during regular business hours Monday-Friday 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.

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OX F O R D PE R F O R M I NG A RT S C E N T E R • F I V E Y E A R H I ST O RY O F I NC R E D I B L E S H OWS 2013 Grand Opening Celebration with the Alabama Symphony Orchestra - May 17, 2013 Ricky Nelson Remembered - August 24, 2013 Blood, Sweat and Tears with Bo Bice - September 19, 2013 The Duttons Family Christmas Show - December 9, 2013 2014 Travis Tritt - February 20, 2014 The Women of Ireland - March 17, 2014 Mark Trammell Quartet - April 26, 2014 Three on a String - June 6, 2014 Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder - June 21, 2014 BJ Thomas - July 19, 2014 Shadows of the Sixties - August 21, 2014 The Fab Four - September 4, 2014 Gordon Mote - September 14, 2014 Branford Marsalis and the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia - October 21, 2014 The Preservation Hall Jazz Band & Allen Toussaint - November 8, 2014 The Diamonds - November 21, 2014 The Nelons & LeFevre Quartet - December 12, 2014 Mark O’Connor - December 15, 2014 Voices of the South - December 20, 2014 2015 Shenandoah with Marty Raybon - January 31, 2015 The Glenn Miller Orchestra - February 6, 2015 A Rockin’ Valentine’s Tribute to The King starring Scot Bruce - February 13, 2015 Buddy, The Broadway Musical - February 28, 2015 The Vienna Boys Choir - March 12, 2015 James Gregory - March 14, 2015 Rhonda Vincent & The Rage - April 8, 2015 Menopause the Musical - May 2, 2015 The Barefoot Movement - July 3, 2015 Michael W. Smith - July 11, 2015 The Isaacs - July 25, 2015 The Heart Behind the Music - September 24, 2015 Flashdance The Musical - October 15, 2015 Henry Cho - October 22, 2015 The Oak Ridge Boys - October 29, 2015 Solid Soul Tour with Mavis Staples & Joan Osborne - November 19, 2015 The Barefoot Movement - November 22, 2015 The Jim Brady Trio and The Talley’s - November 29, 2015 Christmas with the Atlanta Pops Orchestra & John Driskell Hopkins - December 4, 2015 2016 The Producers, The Broadway Musical - January 3, 2016 Katie Deal in Today, Tomorrow & Forever, A Tribute to Patsy Cline - January 3, 2016 Dailey & Vincent - January 30, 2016 The Booth Brothers - February 5, 2016 A Rockin’ Valentine’s Tribute to The King starring Scot Bruce - February 12, 2016 Diamond Rio - February 13, 2016 The Masters of Soul - February 20, 2016 Kansas, 40th Anniversary Tour - March 5, 2016 Saturday Night Fever, The Musical - March 11, 2016 Street Corner Renaissance - March 17, 2016 Chanticleer - April 1, 2016 101 Years of Broadway - April 22, 2016 Jeanne Robertson - June 10, 2016 The Classic Nashville Roadshow with Katie Deal & Jason Petty - July 2, 2016 James Gregory - September 8, 2016 Scotty McCreery - September 29, 2016 Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - October 6, 2016

The Time Jumpers featuring Vince Gill, Kenny Sears, & Ranger Doug Green - October 13, 2016 Josh Turner - October 20, 2016 The Broadway Boys - November 17, 2016 The Marvin Gaye Experience with Brian Owens - December 2, 2016 Comfort & Joy with Jim Brickman - December 15, 2016 2017 Three Dog Night - January 20, 2017 The McCartney Years - January 26, 2017 42nd Street, The Broadway Musical - February 10, 2017 Alabama Ballet's Snow White and Giselle - March 4, 2017 The Fab Four - March 10, 2017 Once, The Broadway Musical - March 13, 2017 Sara Evans, An Acoustic Performance - March 18, 2017 An Irish Heart with the Atlanta Pops Orchestra and Chloë Agnew - March 24, 2017 Lonestar - April 1, 2017 Vanessa Williams - April 7, 2017 Mamma Mia, The Smash Hit Broadway Musical - April 29 & 30, 2017 The Phantom of the Opera presented by Jacksonville Opera Theatre - June 9 - 18, 2017 Ronnie Milsap - August 5, 2017 Taylor Hicks - August 26, 2017 Lee Greenwood & Crystal Gayle - August 31, 2017 The Little River Band - September 7, 2017 The Marshall Tucker Band - September 17, 2017 The Temptations - September 21, 2017 Aaron Neville - October 5, 2017 Clint Black - October 12, 2017 Styx - October 22, 2017 Hansel & Gretel - October 29, 2017 Rumours - November 2, 2017 The Charlie Daniels Band - November 9, 2017 ELF! The Broadway Musical - November 12, 2017 The Shadows of The Sixties - November 17, 2017 Dinosaur Zoo Live! - November 20, 2017 Dirty Dancing - The Broadway Musical - December 3, 2017 LeAnn Rimes - December 9, 2017 Mr. Popper's Penguins - December 11, 2017 2018 Travis Tritt - January 19, 2018 The Sound of Music - The Broadway Musical - January 23, 2018 Moon Mouse: A Space Odyssey - January 26, 2018 Brass Transit - January 27, 2018 America - January 28, 2018 The Illusionists present Adam Trent - February 1, 2018 Three Phantoms in Concert - February 2, 2018 The Heart Behind the Music with Teddy Gentry, Linda Davis, and John Berry - February 9, 2018 Bear Country - February 10-11, 2018 Seven Bridges - February 16, 2018 Swan Lake by the Alabama Ballet - February 23, 2018 Amazing Grace - The Broadway Musical - February 24-25, 2018 An Evening with Sandi Patty - March 2, 2018 An Irish Heart - March 10, 2018 The Hit Men - March 16, 2018 Jerrod Niemann - March 23, 2018 My Father's Dragon - April 10, 2018 Menopause the Musical - April 20, 2018 The Oak Ridge Boys - April 22, 2018 A Gentleman's Guide to Love & Murder - The Broadway Musical - April 27, 2018 OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2018

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The Oxford Performing Arts Center’s Martin-Lett Gallery of Art will host the Student Art Exhibition. May 4 — May 19

By hosting the Student Art Exhibition, the Oxford Performing Arts Center desires to emphasize the value of art and art education for all children and to encourage public support for quality school arts programs.

TEACHERS Anne Carr, Oxford High School Theresa Hatton Edwards, Elementary Anita Ambrister, C E Hanna

Martin-Lett Gallery of Art Oxford Performing Arts Center 100 Choccolocco Street, Oxford, AL Monday through Friday, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and during OPAC events

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100 Choccolocco Street Oxford, Alabama Buy online at OXFORDPAC.org with no convenience fees! Charge by phone by calling 256-241-3322 Purchase at the OPAC Box Office in advance: Monday – Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Purchase at the door beginning 90 minutes prior to most ticketed events.

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Quilts by the Lake Judged Show Quilt Appraisals Bed Turning Special Exhibits Vendors

Scissor Sharpening Door Prizes Opportunity Quilts Themed Baskets Hand Quilting Demos

SEPTEMBER 28-29

SHOW HOURS: Friday — 9am to 5pm Saturday — 9am to 4pm Oxford Civic Center 401 McCullars Lane Oxford, AL 36203 Admission: Adults $5 Children 10 and under FREE

P R E S E N T E D B Y L I C K S K I L L E T Q U I LT C L U B

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Profile for City of Oxford

Oxford Access Spring & Summer 2018  

There’s no place like Oxford, AL—and no one brings the city to life like Oxford ACCESS magazine. We showcase our city, the people, places, a...

Oxford Access Spring & Summer 2018  

There’s no place like Oxford, AL—and no one brings the city to life like Oxford ACCESS magazine. We showcase our city, the people, places, a...

Profile for oxfordpac

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