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PRODUCTIVE USE OF ENERGY (PUE) PILOT PROJECT IN SOUTH SULAWESI AND WEST SULAWESI

COMPLETION REPORT For

GIZ

Dr. Edi Purwanto January 2013


Table of Content Introduction …………………………………………………………………………….............. 1 1.1 Background .………………………………………………………………………............... 1 1.2 Objective of the Report …………………………………………………………….............. 2 II General Conditions of PUE Pilots Areas ………………………………………………............. 3 2.1 Mamasa District, West Sulawesi …………………………………………………................ 3 2.2 Luwu Utara District, South Sulawesi ………………………………………………............. 5 2.3 Suitability for PUE Development ………………………………………………….............. 6 III Project Implementation ………………………………………………………………................ 8 3.1 Project Socialization and Coordination …………………………………………….............. 8 3.2 Selection of community groups ……………………………………………………............. 8 3.3 PUE Pilot Preparation ……………………………………………………………................10 3.4 Procurement of Electrical Equipment ……………………………………………................11 3.5 Installation of Electrical Equipment ………………………………………………...............11 3.6 Monitoring …………………………………………………………………………..............14 3.7 Result of Performance Monitoring .………………………………………………................15 IV Problems and Proposed Actions ...................................................................................................18 4.1 Problems .................................................................................................................................18 4.2 Proposed PUE installation network ....................................................................................... 18 4.3 Conclusions and Recommendations ...................................................................................... 23 I

List of Table and Figures Table 2.1 Environmental, economic and social indicators of Luwu Utara and Mamasa District .….. 6 Table 3.1 The selected groups in Salumokanan Village …………………………………................. 9 Table 3.2 The selected groups in Tawalian Timur ………………………………….......................... 9 Table 3.3 The selected groups in Tandung Village ………………………........................................ 9 Table 3.4 MHP usage during the day before PUE Implementation ………………………................ 10 Table 3.5 MHP used during the day after PUE Implementation …………………………................ 11 Table 3.6 List of procured appliances and supplier ………………………………………................ 13 Table 3.7 PUE specification on each pilot village ………………………………………….............. 14 Table 3.8 Financial Performance of PUE Pilots, before and after PUE installation ………............... 15 Table 3.9 MHP monitoring in Salumokanan Village ……………………........................................ 16 Table 3.10 MHP monitoring in Tawalian Timur Village ………………………….......................... 16 Table 3.11 MHP monitoring in Tandung Village ……………………………….............................. 17 Table 4.1 Cost of network installation for Timer Control Arrangement ........................................... 19 Table 4.2 Cost of network using ATS at turbine house (in IDR) ....................................................... 20 Table 4.3 Cost of network installation for PUCA .............................................................................. 22 Table 4.4 Pros and cons of three installation alternatives ................................................................... 23 Figure 3.1 The increment of income generation after PUE implementation …………….................. 16 Figure 4.1 Network design of installing timer control in every house ............................................... 19 Figure 4.2 Network design of installing ATS at turbine house .......................................................... 20 i


Figure 4.3 PUCA supported by three MHP ........................................................................................ 21 Figure 4.4 PUCA network design which is supplied by three MHP .................................................. 21 Figure 4.5 PUCA network design using one MHP ............................................................................. 22

Acronyms BUMDES ENDev

GIZ PNPM-Green kWh MEMR MHP MHPP2 NGO OWT PLTMH PNPM PNPM-MP PUE KVC

Badan Usaha Milik Desa (Village-owned Entreprise) Energising Development; a Dutch-German Energy Partnership to promote sustainable access to modern energy services in developing countries Gesellschaft fßr Internationale Zusammenarbeit PNPM Lingkungan Kilo Watt hour Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources Mini/micro Hydro Power Mini Hydro Power Project for Capacity Development Non-Governmental Organisation Operation Wallacea Trust Pembangkit Listrik Tenaga Mikro Hidro Program Nasional Pemberdayaan Masyarakat (National Programme for Community Empowerment) Program Nasional Pemberdayaan Masyarakat – Mandiri Perdesaan (= PNPM Rural) Productive Use of Energy Key Village Champions

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Introduction 1.1. Background Small-scale renewable energy (RE) projects are good examples of environmentally protective activities which also present tangible benefits to participating communities. In Indonesia, there are more than 20 million un-electrified households - most of which are found in poor and remote rural areas. Current plans for expanding Indonesia’s national power grid do not include the connection of many rural communities within the next decade. Therefore, many communities are eager to explore alternative energy sources in order to meet their development goals. Micro-Hydro Power (MHP) technology is relatively well-established in Indonesia and holds significant potential for communities choosing to invest in RE schemes. Over the past 25 years, the MHP sector has developed significantly; local service providers have proven their capacity to develop successful ‘stand-alone’ rural electrification and ‘grid-connected’ MHP schemes within a specific size range (typically less than 100 kW). Unfortunately, many MHPs operate mainly after sunset and therefore the main benefit is in lighting and entertainment, such as TV & radio. However, MHP schemes should and need to be able as a minimum - in a long-run perspective - to generate sufficient income for upkeep in order to continue to deliver tangible benefits. So-called “productive use” of the electricity made available is often much slower to develop than recreational and convenience use. Productive use is taken to mean application of power from an MHP that adds value to an existing economic process or allows new processes to materialize such as micro and small-enterprises in agri-business, as well as to social service institutions such as schools and health clinics Since the 1990s, GIZ directed its attention towards systematic support of rural electrification through micro-hydro power (MHP) in Indonesia. Since 2006, the GIZ has been implementing the Energizing Development (EnDev) programme in Indonesia, following the previous MHP support interventions. During the first phase of the Energizing Development (EnDev I), from 2006 to 2009, the expertise and management competency of actors engaged in constructing and operating mini-hydropower schemes in rural areas was supported. EnDev facilitated contacts between service providers and users, transferring the necessary know-how to various actors, such as: operators, political authorities and user groups. Under EnDev II, starting in May 2009, the program split into two complementary components: (1) The Green PNPM Micro Hydro Power Technical Support Unit (MHP-TSU) to directly support the access to energy through MHP in rural areas, and (2) The Mini Hydro Power Project (MHPP2) as a capacity development component to institutionalize know-how and learning from experiences for a sustainable MHP sector development in Indonesia. While the MHP-TSU project partner is the Ministry of Home Affairs (MoHA), MHPP2 works closely with the Directorate General for New and Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation (NREEC) under the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (MEMR). One strategy towards achieving the sustainability of MHP sites is to encourage productive use of energy (PUE). Within MHPP2, PUE is defined as a small-scale activity, using a renewable energy-based electric energy source for providing a service or adding value to a product in order to sell the product and/or service to a willing market. MHPP2 has compiled a database of PUE options possible at rural MHP sites in Indonesia and seeks to test the appropriateness, acceptability and financial feasibility of some of these options. Operation Wallacea Trust (OWT) is a Civil Society Organization (CSO) working to empower community on natural resource conservation and management. In this project, 1


OWT is acting as GIZ contractor for the establishing and monitoring of a PUE pilot project in selected villages in Mamasa and Luwu Utara District. The contract run from 18 May to 31 November 2012. The total amount of contract is 202 million. 1.2. Objective of the Report The report discussed the approaches and strategies of PUE project implementation in Salomo Kanan and Tawalian Timur Villages, Mamasa District and Tandung Village, Luwu Utara District.

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II.

General Conditions of PUE Pilot Areas

2.1. Mamasa District, West Sulawesi Mamasa District was established in 2002. Previously, it was part of Polewali-Mamasa (Polmas) District. The district shares boundary with Mamuju District in the northern part, Polewali Mandar in the southern part, Tana Toraja District in the eastern part and Pinrang District in the western part. The area of the district is 3,006 km, total population, based on 2009 census is 178.025 persons. The population density is 59 persons per km. The establishment of a new district and the appointment of Mamasa ‘town’ (14.607 inhabitants) located at the uppermost of the West-Sulawesi upland as the capital of the newly established District have gradually opened up this isolated area, which only about two decades ago was only accessible on horseback. The distance to the province capital of West Sulawesi Province (Mamuju) is 286 km, while the distance with the capital of South Sulawesi Province is 340 km. Until 2005, Mamasa District is composed of 10 sub-districts, after partition, since 2006, consist of 15 sub-districts1. Environment and Livelihoods: Biophysically, the district is located at the upstream areas (mountains ecosystem), mostly having altitudes above 800 m with hilly and mountainous terrain. The soil is dominated by Inceptisol and Ultisol. Annual rainfall ranges from 2,500 – 3,000 mm. Temperature is cool (10 – 15 C), especially during the evening and early morning. Water resources are abundant but with brown colour, high suspended load, due to unstable substrate (bedrock). The natural vegetation is dominated by lower montane forest, Uru (Elmerrillia sp) is one of the indigenous species, but most of these have been logged and now the terrain is mostly covered with Sumatran native Pine trees. The major staple food of Mamasa community is rice. The main livelihoods of the local community are agriculture, irrigated rice, rainfed farming (coffee) and raise cattle (water buffalo). As a consequence of the high population pressure upon limited land resources, most farmers have occupational multiplicity or have several different occupations at the same time. They may also alter their main sources of income from season to season, as opportunities arise. During the last five years, Mamasa ‘town’ has rapidly developed into a real town. However, such development as has occurred has already been excessively paid for by its natural resources degradation. The natural resources in the area are very fragile. Apart from its hilly terrain, its substrate is dominated by unconsolidated sandy rocks which are easily eroded by landscape disturbance and torrential water flows. The rapid and un-environmentally friendly road and house construction has caused severe degradation. Landslides in the newly opened areas are widespread and indeed even impact the accessibility of Mamasa Town during the rainy season. Since the 1950s, the natural forest in the region has been degraded, especially when the local community started converting natural forest into grazing ground and shifting cultivation (coffee). Up till now, such practices are still widespread. During the 1970s, a government regreening program rehabilitated the degraded natural forest land with Sumatran native Pine trees (Pinus merkusii). The Pine trees thrive well in the area, but the wooded areas are now also in a degraded state, due to overexploitation. The blanket rehabilitation with Pines has led to dramatic ecosystem degradation. The Pine plantations offer poor ecological protection compared to the original indigenous trees or to broadleaved tree species 1

Name of sub-districts in Mamasa: (1). Mamasa, (2) Tabang, (3) Aralle, (4) Mambi, (5) Tabulahan, (6) Pana, (7) Nosu, (8) Sesena Padang, (9) Messawa, (10) Sumarorong, (11) Tanduk Kalua, (12) Tawalian, (13) Rantebulahan Timur, (14) Bambang, (15) Balla.

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in general. The Pine forests provide poor erosion control as the Pine tree roots are superficial, while the thick and slowly decomposing litter layer has reduced the soil pH leading to rapid nutrient leaching. The invasive nature of Pines has made the Mamasa landscape inhospitable for the growth of all other vegetation systems and species except Pine. Given that most of the gentler sloping areas have already been occupied with irrigated agriculture (rice field), as a consequence of the high population pressure and in search of additional income sources, many farmers have begun cultivating the steeper slopes, clearing the natural vegetation in the process. Steep slope agricultural practices require high investments, especially for terrace building and maintenance, while the soil productivity is quickly reduced, due to high erosion rates. The ecosystem degradation described above has created a vicious cycle of land degradation and the associated downstream impacts. The high sediment loads of the rivers resulting from land degradation in Mamasa is threatening the economic life of downstream investment such as the Bakaru Hydro-Power Reservoir in Pinrang, the biggest hydro-power scheme and the main source of electricity to West and South Sulawesi Provinces. Accessibility: The distance from Makassar to Mamasa Town is 340 km; this can be reached by public transportation (minibus, station wagon) about 10 hours. The road from Makassar to Polewali has been established since colonial time; the trace follows the flat terrain along the coast-line of South and West Sulawesi Provinces. Since 2007, the road from Makassar to Pare-Pare Town has been improved, concreted and widened, allowing separated two ways traffic. In fact, the construction takes long time. Terrestrial transportation from Makassar to Polewali is quite smooth and normally takes about five hours. The ‘adventure’ is started from Polewali to Mamasa. The narrow size road is continuously climbing upslope with many sharp curves along the mountainous terrain. The road condition is fragile and highly susceptible to landslide and rock-fall. The quality of the asphalt road is terrible from Sumarorong to Mamasa Town. The Mamasa District has still uncomfortable to reach from Makassar and even from the Mamuju (the capital city of West Sulawesi Province). The Airport is planned to build in Sumarorong2 and will serve Makassar-Mamasa and MamasaMamuju. Sumarorong is about 40 km from Mamasa Town. Now there has been Lion flight from Makassar to Mamuju, however, terrestrial transportation from Mamuju to Mamasa is harder than from Makassar. Flow of goods: Most of goods, from basic to secondary needs are served from surrounding towns such as Polewali, Enrekang, Pare-Pare and Makassar. During market days, two days a week, the road transportation are dominated by trucks which bring goods from outside to Mamasa. It is remarkable that flow of goods come from outside to Mamasa rather than viceversa. Economic empowerment development: The original district revenue (PAD) of Mamasa District is about 14 billion rupiah a year; this has been completely spent for local government wages (including district parliament), while development funding is originated from the centre government and heavily spend for infrastructure development (building roads and buildings). This left a little portion for economic empowerment of local community. So far, the only community development program at grass-root level is the Rural PNPM program. Social capital: The community is dominated by the Toraja ethnic group; it is mostly Christian and has strong social capital. This is reflected from the following phenomena: (a) High spirits on voluntary works: every village defines one day a week to conduct voluntary 2

The fund source is from Centre government (APBN), it is about 104 billion rupiah 4


work for their village (such as improving road, reinforce the fragile slope, develop tree nursery etc.); (b) Tallulalisan (three pillars): The strong cooperative works among the Priest, Village Head and Elders to build the village, solve social problems and safeguard environmental degradation (see Box 2.2.); (c) Strong social intact: high obedience to their culture and religion. 2.2. Luwu Utara District, South Sulawesi Luwu Utara District was established in 1999, as result of partition of the Luwu District. The District shares boundary with Centre Sulawesi Province on the north, Luwu Timur District on the east, Luwu District on the south and Mamuju District on the west. The area of the district is 7.502,58 km, total population, based on 2003 census is 250.111 persons (50,022 households). The population density is 42 persons per km. The district is located on the northern most of South Sulawesi Province. The capital of the district is Masamba (32,286 inhabitants), 136 km from Makassar. The district is composed of 11 sub-districts3. Luwu District is easily access from Makassar and other surrounding district, however, there are three sub-districts which are located far away from Masamba, i.e. Seiko, Rampi and Limbong. The most remote sub-districts areas are Seiko and Rampi (200 km) which are used to be reached by airplane from Masamba (20 minutes). Due to the road conditions (muddy and fragile), both sub-districts can only be accessed by Ojek (motor-bike taxi), which normally takes 2 days. Environment and Livelihoods: Biophysically, the district is located in the downstream areas, mostly having altitudes above 200 meter. The soil is dominated by Andosol. Annual rainfall ranges from 2,500 – 3,000 mm. Average temperature is 28 C. Although, the area is located in the downstream areas (with large river channel and the distance to the sea on average are about 20 km), the terrain surrounding river is not flat, but hilly to mountainous. Water resources are abundance; there are many spring waters and small streams (creek) originated from the areas and become a good source for micro-hydro power. It is different with Mamasa District; the substrate (bedrock) of the area is stable, the soil is compacted, landslide is minor, the stream water looks fresh and not in brown colour as in Mamasa. Natural vegetation is dominated by secondary forest. Massive deforestation has been occurred since 1970s, most of the natural forest has been logged by forest concession. It is different with Mamasa District, Pine species was not introduced in the areas which makes the natural environment is better. The fertile soil and the high rainfall are so favourable for natural regeneration of secondary forest. The major staple food of Luwu Utara community is Sago. Apart from Sago, they also eat rice. The main livelihoods are cocoa plantation, fruit trees (durian) and rice cultivation. In 1990s, community enjoyed the windfall profits from cocoa. The favourable environmental condition (fertile soil4) and good sanitation led the cocoa plantation develop very well. On average 200 of dry cocoa beans transported to Makassar, this raised until 600 tons during great harvesting season. Farmers were able to build good houses and had cars. The cocoa reach its maximum price during economic crisis of 1999 and 2000, which contributed to the district revenue until 4 billion rupiah a year. In 2002, the golden period of cocoa plantation had passed, after the outbreak of cocoa pod borer (Penggerek Buah Kakao/PBK). The capital of Luwu Utara District (Masamba) can be accessed through air and terrestrial modes. 3

Name of sub-districts in Luwu Utara District: (1) Masamba; (2) Baebunta, (3) Sabbang, (4) Bone-Bone, (5) Malangke, (6) Malangke Barat, (7) Suka Maju, (8) Mappedeceng, (9) Limbong, (10) Rampi, (11) Seko. 4

Most of the cocoa developed from the forest land which have high organic material content 5


Air transportation: Masamba has airport, names ‘Andi Jema’ which has been established since colonial time. The Airport has runway of 900 meters. Cassa 212 (PT. Sabang Merauke Air Carter/SMAC) was used to flight twice a week (Wednesday and Friday) to Masamba and then from Masamba to Seko and return to Masamba. The capacity is 20 seats and flight hour from Makassar to Masamba is 1.5 hours. Since early 2011, there has been no flight to Masamba, due to the airplane, which used to serve, had accident in Sumatra. Bus transportation: There are three luxury buses serving for Makassar-Masamba routes, Alam Indah, Bintang Prima and Gunung Rejeki. The bus has 35 seats, reclining seat, aircondition and toilet. All the luxury buses operate in the evening and takes 9 hours. Masamba is also possible to reach by boat from Kolaka (SE Sulawesi Province), it takes about 10 hours (Kolaka-Palopo). Palopo is the capital of Luwu District; it is about 30 km from Masamba. Flow of Goods: Inter-district goods transportation from and to Masamba is easily found. Local public transportation use Angkot and Ojek5. The district has various goods transportation (1-20 tons), such as: pick up, truck with four, six and 10 wheels which can support the fluent flow of goods from and into the district. Social capital: The community is dominated by Bugis Luwu ethnic group and is mostly Moslem. Luwu Utara District has a good social capital, although it is not as strong as Mamasa District. This is reflected from the following phenomena: (a) spirits on collaborative work still exist: Many activities at village level are conducted through voluntary work, such as: improving access road, improve mosque, school etc.); working together to erect the wooden house; (b) Strong social intact: high obedience to their culture and religion. 2.3. Suitability for PUE Development Luwu Utara District is ideal for productive use development. The district has good economic infrastructure, accessibility and great support of local government. The government has strong development policy to develop and maintain the areas as a leading cocoa production in South Sulawesi Province. See Table 2.1.While Mamasa, the economic infrastructure is still under development and rather poor accessibility, but the district has excellent social capital and well-known as the center of MHP development in Sulawesi. Mamasa is still ‘virgin’ from project (‘money’) intervention and Mamasa community is badly needed technical assistances. See Table 2.1. Profile of the village pilots is given in Appendix A. Table 2.1. Environmental, economic and social indicators of Luwu Utara and Mamasa District No Indicators Luwu Utara Mamasa

5

1. 2. 3.

Accessibility Natural Resources Natural hazard

1.

Economic infrastructure

Environmental +++ +++ + Economic ++

+ + +++ +

Motor-bike taxi 6


2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 2. 3.

Economic indicators Public service Government interest to community empowerment The variation of income generating activities Social Capital PNPM performance Numbers of MHP

++ +++ +++

+ + ++

++

+

Social ++ ++ +

+++ ++ ++

The existence of MHP in the survey area should be able to play roles as agent of changes for the rather gloomy picture of income generating activities in the survey areas. The generating power should be able to shed lights for the better livelihoods. It is true that the problem is not merely lack of energy and machine to support their work, but also local community attitude and business environment. The successful implementation of productive use will become a milestone of MHP’s best practice, it is expected to: (a) enhance strong ownership and awareness of local community on MHP sustainable management use, including catchment areas management; (b) enhance the establishment of sustainable livelihoods in the upstream areas; (c) As a driver of industrial revolution, accelerated and distributed income generation in the upstream/remote area. .

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III.

Project Implementation

3.1. Project Socialization and Coordination In May 2012, one month before field implementation, we conducted village selection. The villages selection was conducted on the basis on the following criteria: (a) The existence of MHP in the village; (b) MHP management Team has been well established; (c) The availability of good running business and require electricity power; (d) The high social capital of the village and MHP beneficiaries; (e) The villages are easy to be accessed. This project was initiated during the first week of July 2012. The first activity was socialization of the Project to potential beneficiaries and relevant stakeholders i.e. Subdistrict Head, Village head and staff, Small and Business Enterprise (SME) Agencies at district level. Before having formal meetings at village level, we conducted socialization and coordination at district and sub-district level; in such a way that they are aware about the projects and will provide support to the implementation and sustainability of the project. After having coordination at district and sub-district level then we organized a meeting at village level, i.e. Salomokanan Village, Rantebulahan Timur Sub-district and Tawalian Timur Village, Tawalian Sub-district (Mamasa District) and Tandung Village, Sabang Sub-district, Luwu Utara District. Topic discussed during socialization and coordination were: (a) The village was selected as one of PUE pilot site; (b) The objective of the pilot was to enhance community income from electricity generated by MHP; (c) The project will provide electricity equipment, training, technical assistances and facilitation; (d) To run the pilot. MHP will be operated during the day. We had warm responses from local community and relevant stakeholders; they were enthusiastic to join the project. 3.2. Selection of community groups During the second week of July 2012, we worked together with village government, key village champions (KVC) and elders to select community groups which were suitable and had been ready to have our facilitation and technical assistances. They have been ready and should be able to deliver a quick win results or ‘first ready, first served’ approach, considering project technical assistance and facilitation were only a few months. The criteria of community group selection: (a) the community group has managed a running and good economic business prospect; (b) the community group is managed by champions who showed a great interest to the project; (c) the production sites of selected community group had a good access; (d) The selected community groups agreed by MHP Management Team and beneficiaries; (e) The selected community groups are willing to pay extra electricity fees; (f) The selected community groups are poor households. The selected group on each village is presented in Table 3.1, 3.2. & 3.3.

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Table 3.1. Salumokanan Village, Rante Bulahan Timur Sub-District, Mamasa PUE Type

Group Name

Chairman

No of Members

Tailor

Nani Tailor

Sara

5 Female

PUE Equipment Bordir Machine, Obras Machine

Carpentry

Salma Meubel

Fiksal

5 Male

Metal grinder, planer machine, drilling machine, trimmer machine, sander machine, circular saw, compressor

Workshop

Salumokanan Motor

Nanang

4 Male

Metal grinder, drilling machine, compressor

Bread Making

Gi-Di

Sari

5 Female

Mixer, Blender, Hand Sealer

Blacksmith

Kajumea

Martinus

3 Male

Metal grinder, Blower

Coffee Grinder

Sejahtera

Arwadi

5 Male

Coffee grinder

Table 3.2. Tawalian Timur Village, Tawalian Sub-District, Mamasa PUE Type

Group Name

Chairman

No of Members

Tailor

Usaha Bersama

Liyn Limbong Karaeng

5 Female

PUE Equipment Sewing Machine, Obras Machine

Carpentry

Mandiri

Amba Karaeng

5 Male

Metal grinder, planer machine, drilling machine, trimmer machine, sander machine, circular saw, compressor

Workshop

Sehati

Abner Patun

4 Male

Metal grinder, drilling machine, compressor

Bread Making

Usaha Bersama

Selfina

5 Female

Blacksmith

Salutallang

Sanda Ganggong

3 Male

Mixer, Hand Sealer Metal grinder, Blower

Table 3.3. Tandung Village, Sabang Sub-district, Luwu Utara PUE Type

Group Name

Chairman

No of Members

Tailor

Aqyfa Tailor

Seniwati

5 Female

PUE Equipment Sewing Machine, Obras Machine

Carpentry

Malelara

Iksan

5 Male

Metal grinder, planer machine, drilling machine, trimmer machine, sander machine, circular saw, compressor

Workshop

Tandung Jaya

Muh.

4 Male

Metal grinder, drilling 9


Alqodri Bread Making

Lestari

machine, compressor, Las Inverter

Rahmawati

5 Female

Mixer, Hand Sealer

3.3. PUE Pilot Preparation During the third week, we delivered on the job training to community groups selected as a PUE pilots. The training topics covered the following materials: (a) institutional management of the community group. This material discussed roles and responsibility of every member/person in the group, group regulation and benefit sharing mechanism; (b) financial administration and management. This material discussed about book-keeping; (c) standard operating procedure to deal with electricity power and equipment. This material discussed a safety procedure working with electricity, especially for grinder, cutters, weld inverter, blower. The topic include: (i) Making safety star-up (on/off) system; (ii) Install current protection; (iii) Install appropriate size and quality of cable network; (iv) Install cable grounding for efficient use of electricity;(v) Install step-up voltage regulator. During the fourth week of July, we facilitated several meetings with MHP beneficiary’s representatives. The objectives of the meeting were to: (a) define schedule of MHP operation during the day; (b) define new tariff or additional electricity fees for houses operating PUE. Change on MHP operation: Before PUE implementation all PUE pilot villages had run MHP during the day, especially for Friday Pray in the Mosque, Church (Saturday), week-end (Sunday) and public purposes (Monday), see Figure 2.4. The situation changed after PUE implementation: (a) MHP run during the day for the all days during the week; (b) PUE operated from Monday to Saturday, except Tawalian Timur Village where Saturday is used for Church; (c) On Sunday, MHP in all three pilot villages are used for weekend. Tariff Adjustment for PUE beneficiaries: It was committed for tailors, cake makers pay additional electricity monthly fee Rp. 5000 for each equipment, while for workshop, blacksmith and carpenter pay additional monthly fee Rp.30.000 – Rp. 50,000 per month for all equipments. MCB Installation on PUE pilot house: We also facilitated the installation of MCB (Miniature Circuit Breaker) on PUE pilots (houses). Table 3.4. MHP usage during the day before PUE Implementation Day Village S

M

T

W

T

F

S

Salumokanan Tawalian Timur Tandung Remarks:

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Table 3.5. MHP used during the day after PUE Implementation Day Village S

M

T

W

T

F

S

Salumokanan Tawalian Timur Tandung Remarks:

3.4. Procurement of Electrical Equipment Equipment procurement took considerable time and led the effective project implementation delayed for at least one month. The procurement procedure were as follow: (a) We conducted price survey in Jakarta; however, due to considerable delivery cost to project sites in Sulawesi, then we conducted the survey in Makassar; (b) we submitted the list of purchased electrical equipment to GIZ; (c) After the list has been approved, then we had to collect three quotations for an equipment package which cost more than 12 million (carpenter and workshops); the collection took time as not all the shops gave a quick responses to our request; (d) GIZ screened the quotation and defined the list equipments to be purchased. At the beginning, we should also arrange the procurement of kWh meter and hour meter, but it was finally handled by GIZ. Unfortunately, until the end of PUE facilitation (November 2012), both devices have not yet been available at project site. The absence of kWh meter has led the MHP weekly monitoring could not be done. List of procured appliances is presented on Table 3.6. 3.5. Installation of Electrical Equipment On the beginning of August 2012, we handed over the purchased equipment to community groups witnessed by Village Head and MHP beneficiaries. We facilitated 6 types of village business which were conducted by 15 community groups, the total installed appliances were 49 (see Table 3.7). We facilitated the trial of the equipment during the first week of August. The monitoring data collection started during the second week of August 2012. The types of community entrepreneur pilots are discussed below. 3.5.1. Coffee Grinder: Salumokanan Village, Mamasa Coffee is the traditional product of Mamasa, the plantation has been developed since colonial time and it is largely known as Toraja Coffee (mostly is Arabica). Peak harvesting season is between July and September. Coffee cherries produced are being grown in an ‘organic’ way 11


(i.e. without chemical pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers). Since many coffee plantations are located near the settlement areas, farmers only pick ripe, red cherries. After harvesting, coffee cherries are fermented overnight, in sacks, buckets or other storing apparatus. Cherries are then washed to remove the mucilage, before the drying process. Drying is done in an open, flat space such as a yard or by the roadside. Most of community sell dry coffee cherries without grinding. The local price was Rp.7000/kg. One kilogram coffee cherries can yield 0.7 kilogram coffee and the price per kilogram until Rp.25000. The incremental benefit by selling processed coffee is until Rp, 10000. One of the reasons why community do not process coffee was they do not have the grinding machine.

3.5.2. Black-smith: Salumokanan and Tawalian Timur Villages, Mamasa It is mostly produces agriculture utensil such as hoe, dibble, axe, scoop, machete, sickle, scythe, and cutter. The production process is manual; the work is normally conducted by two persons, one person strikes the iron while another generate wind blower to maintain the fire. They use charcoal to heat iron. In those pilots, we provided blower and grinder; so they do not need to generate blower manually and neither to go to down-town to sharpen the products. 3.5.3. Carpentry: Salumokanan, Tawalian Timur (Mamasa) and Tandung Village (Luwu Utara) Both rattan extractions and logging have destructive impacts to the ecosystem. To control natural resource extraction, efforts are required to change their current livelihoods from collectors to processors. Carpentry is a kind of livelihood, which can be developed as a way to reduce the speed of resource extraction, especially if this is compared by selling timbers. In those pilots, we provided seven appliances: (a) metal grinder; (b) planner machine; (c) drilling; (d) sander; (e) circular saw and (f) compressor. The uses of electrical appliances had been able to speed up the jobs; for instance to make one cupboard normally take six days, by using the appliances is only take three days. 3.5.4. Tailor: Salumokanan, Tawalian Timur (Mamasa) and Tandung Village (Luwu Utara) This job apart from requiring skill, also need appropriate equipment. Apart from sewing machine, tailors also need embroidery and ‘obras’ machine. The tailors selected for the pilots in Salumokanan and Tawalian Timur Villages only have one and old manual sewing machine; while Tailor in Tandung had three manual sewing machines. In those three pilots we provided three appliances: (a) electrical sewing machine; (b) border machine; (c) Obras machine. The uses of electrical appliances had been able to speed up the jobs; enhance products quality and they do not need to go down town for ‘obras’. 3.5.5. Workshop: (Luwu Utara)

Salumokanan, Tawalian Timur (Mamasa) and Tandung Village

Workshop in Salumokanan and Tawalian Timur Villages are used to repair motor-bike only, while in Tandung Village, apart from motor-bike is also used for metal welding. We provided: (a) metal grinder; (b) drilling; (c) compressor for three workshops, except for Tandung Village, we added with weld inverter. 12


3.5.6. Bread Making: Salumokanan, Tawalian Timur (Mamasa) and Tandung Village (Luwu Utara) It is a side-job and done by household wife. In three pilots, we provided: (a) Mixer; (b) Hand sealer and (c) blender. Table 3.6. List of procured appliances and supplier Appliances

Unit Price (IDR)

Total (IDR)

Supplier

Merk / Type

Wattage

Qty

Makita 9553B

600

8

475.000

3.800.000

Surya Utama

Blower

Makita UB1101

600

2

850.000

1.700.000

Surya Utama

Planer machine

Makita N1900B

580

3

1.500.000

4.500.000

Surya Utama

Hand drilling machine

Makita HP1630

710

6

560.000

3.360.000

Surya Utama

Trimmer machine (profil)

Makita 3709

530

3

750.000

2.250.000

Surya Utama

Sander machine (amplas)

Makita BO3700

180

3

625.000

1.875.000

Surya Utama

Circular saw

Makita 5800NB

900

3

2.000.000

6.000.000

Surya Utama

Compressor

Multipro 1HP

750

6

950.000

5.700.000

Surya Utama

Metal grinder

PPN 10%

2.918.500

Compressor (Inflator, Spoit Dico dan Selang) Inverter (mesin Las)

Set

2.025.000

Surya Kencana Surya Kencana

Lakoni

900

1

850.000

850.000

Singer

250

1

2.400.000

2.400.000

Toko Mewah

singer

100

2

920.000

1.840.000

Toko Mewah

Obras machine

Singer

100

2

725.000

1.450.000

Toko Mewah

Mesin Neci

Singer

100

1

1.000.000

1.000.000

Toko Mewah

Philips 1538

170

3

360.000

1.080.000

Alaska

Kirin

170

1

226.000

226.000

Alaska

Vacuum packing

300

3

220.000

660.000

Cahaya Indah

Coffee grinder

900

1

1.250.000

1.250.000

Cahaya Indah

Sewing machine (Bordir Yuki) Sewing Machine (standart)

Dough mixer Blender

MCB 4 Ampere (8 unit)

Broco

272.000

MCB 6 Ampere (7 unit)

Merlin

273.000

Grand Total

50

Veteran Electronic Surya Elektro

45.429.500

13


3.6. Monitoring The pilot is expected to answer three questions: (a) How the level of financial performance of community entrepreneur enhanced by using electrical appliances? (b) How the raising cost on operating MHP during the day is well compensated by PUE fee? (c) How efficient the use of MHP power? To answer those questions, GIZ has provided three questioners; (a) PUE Specification; (b) Entrepreneur daily monitoring form; (c) MHP operator weekly monitoring form. The summary of PUE specification in presented in Table 3.1 – 3.3 and Table 3.7.; the results of data monitoring based on the second and the third form is discussed on section 3.7. Table 3. 7. PUE specification on each pilot village Villages No

1

2

3

PUE Type

Blacksmith

Bread making

Carpentry

appliances

Tawalian Timur

Grinder

1

1

2

Blower

1

1

2

Mixer

1

1

1

3

Hand Sealer

1

1

1

3

Blender

1

Metal Grinder

1

1

1

3

Planer machine

1

1

1

3

Drilling

1

1

1

3

Trimmer

1

1

1

3

Sander

1

1

1

3

Circular saw

1

1

1

3

Compressor

1

1

1

3

4

Coffee grinder

Coffee grinder machine

1

5

Tailor

Sewing machine

1

Workshop

1 1

2 1

1

Obras machine

1

1

1

3

Metal Grinder

1

1

1

3

Drilling

1

1

1

3

Compressor

1

1

1

3

1

1

15

49

Las Inverter Total

Tandung

1

Bordir machine

6

Total

Salomokanan

18

16

14


3.7. Results of Performance Monitoring We conducted monitoring in line with the GIZ entrepreneur daily monitoring form and MHP weekly monitoring from the results of data monitoring is presented on Table 3.8. and Table 3.9 – 3.11. 3.7.1. Financial Performance of Pilot Entrepreneur To understand the impacts of PUE to income generation, we collected base-line data prior PUE installation, the collected data is presented on column 2, while the average of income generation after PUE is presented in column 8. Inspecting column 9, the increment of income generation during the last five months (August – December) ranges between 20% - 40%, the remarkable increment were Tailor (Tandung Village); Carpentry (Salumokanan) and workshop (Tandung Village), see Figure 3.1. Table 3.8. Financial Performance of PUE Pilots, before and after PUE installation Village

Baseline

August

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Average

Increment %

Salumokanan Tawalian Timur

450,000

690,000

670,000

Blacksmith 555,000

660,000

690,000

653,000

30

600,000

470,000

995,000

905,000

905,000

945,000

844,000

30

Salumokanan Tawalian Timur Tandung

565,000

1,000,000

535,000

Tailor 643,000

806,000

1,060,000

808,800

30

635,000

525,000

825,000

920,000

1,117,000

1,148,000

907,000

30

1,065,000

2,030,000

1,041,000

2,690,000

1,435,000

1,780,400

40

Salumokanan Tawalian Timur Tandung

1,400,000

2,520,000

1,706,000 Carpentry 1,850,000 2,325,000

2,680,000

2,380,000

2,351,000

40

1,275,000

1,325,000

1,950,000

1,225,000

2,225,000

2,390,000

1,823,000

30

1,000,000

850,000

1,125,000

1,500,000

1,085,000

1,255,000

20

Salumokanan Tawalian Timur Tandung

400,000

390,000

1,715,000 Workshop 567,500 544,000

535,000

555,000

518,200

20

400,000

400,000

425,000

587,000

660,000

501,400

20

1,900,000

1,706,000

3,120,000

3,206,200

40

Salumokanan Tawalian Timur Tandung

400,000

203,000

660,000

506,400

20

370,000

405,000

528,000

461,000

535,000

465,500

20

480,000

358,000

695,500

605,000

607,500

20

Salumokanan

295,000

400,000

604,000 775,000 Coffe grinder 335,000 380,000 303,000

346,000

423,000

30

435,000

3,368,000 4,164,000 3,673,000 Bread making 312,500 787,500 569,000 398,500

The underlined reasons for the remarkable increment of those three entrepreneurs are discussed below. Tailor in Tandung Village: (a) The entrepreneur has been well-established prior to PUE implementation; (b) Tailor is not a side job and managed in a good manner. As such, the insertion of extra inputs has sharply promoted the entrepreneur performance. 15


Carpentry in Salumokanan Village: During project implementation, the community entrepreneur received government orders to develop furniture of the several elementary schools in Rante Bulahan Timur sub-district. Workshop in Tandung Village: The introduction of electricity welding in this workshop has attracted motor-bikes owners from surrounding sub-districts (especially from Seko, in which they were used to repair their motor-bike in Masamba) to repair their motor-bikes in the workshop. They do not necessary bring their motorbike to Masamba which is 20-30 km away from their villages.

Figure 3.1. The increment of income generation after PUE implementation

Table 3.9. MHP monitoring in Salumokanan Village August 1,500,000 250,000 Total income Salary (IDR) 1,000,000 Expenses for: Maintenance 100,000 Total expense Remarks: 90 consumers; tariff Rp. 15,000 – Rp 20,000 Income collected from households (IDR): Income collected from PUE (IDR):

Sept 1,500,000 250,000

Oct 1,500,000 250,000

Nov 1,500,000 250,000

1,000,000 100,000

1,000,000 100,000

1,000,000 100,000

Sept 600,000 175,000

Oct 600,000 175,000

Nov 600,000 175,000

260,000 50,000

260,000 50,000

260,000 50,000

Dec 1,500,000 250,000 1,750,00 1,000,000 100,000 1,100,000

Table 3.10. MHP monitoring in Tawalian Timur Village August Income collected from households (IDR): 600,000 Income collected from PUE (IDR): 175,000 Total income Salary (IDR) 260,000 Expenses for: Maintenance 50,000 Total expense Remarks: 50 consumers; tariff Rp. 15,000

Dec 600,000 175,000 775,000 260,000 50,000 310,000

16


Table 3.11. MHP monitoring in Tandung Village August Income collected from households (IDR): 650,000 Income collected from PUE (IDR): 175,000 Total income Salary (IDR) 400,000 Expenses for: Maintenance 50,000 Total expense Remarks: 70 consumers; tariff Rp. 15,000

Sept 650,000 175,000

Oct 650,000 175,000

Nov 650,000 175,000

400,000 50,000

400,000 50,000

400,000 50,000

Dec 650,000 175,000 825,000 400,000 50,000 450,000

Inspecting Table 3.9 – 3.11, the expense of MHP operations are not well compensated with income collected from households and PUE. As discussed on Section 3.3. it was committed for tailors, cake makers pay additional electricity monthly fee Rp. 5000 for each equipment, while for workshop, black-smith and carpenter pay additional package monthly fee of Rp.30.000 – Rp. 50,000 per month for all equipments. The ideal tariff to meet MHP economic return is about Rp. 30,000; One third is for operator salary, another one third is for maintenance and another one third for emergency, in case turbine and or generators are broken; need urgent repair or buy a new one. The power consumption ideally should not exceed 75% of MHP installed capacity to guarantee electrical power supply and future development. Except for Salumokanan Village, all the pilot villages have excess power capacity against designed productive use demand. This provides space for development and replication of the pioneer productive use model facilitated by the project. Unfortunately, the kWh meter and hour meter were not installed in the pilot.

17


IV. Problems and Proposed Actions 4.1. Problems MHP operation during the day will reduce life time of turbine and generators. PUE operation has affected to the work load of MHP operators. The situation should be ideally well compensated by reasonable electricity tariff of PUE beneficiaries. For safety reasons, ideally, PUE is supported by two generators, one generator for night and another one for the day. Unfortunately, raising PUE electricity tariff was not so simple, due to the difficulty to isolate MHP use for only PUE during the day. The reasons, the site of PUE houses is not concentrated, but distributed over the village area, while PUE network installation has not been established. The implication, the beneficiaries of MHP during the day is not solely PUE but also non-PUE households as no electrical barrier for unintended beneficiaries. As results, MHP experience electricity leakages. The implications are: (a) the electricity power to PUE is not optimal; (b) the poor efficiency on electricity use, as most of them is used for consumptive. 4.2. Proposed PUE installation network There are at least three network designs to transfer energy from MHP to productive use houses: (a) installing timer control arrangement; (b) Installing Automatic Transfer Switch (ATS) at turbine house; (c) Establish Productive Use Center Area (PUCA). General assumptions for cost estimation: (a) 1 MHP is used by 60 houses; (b) 8 over 60 houses are productive use houses; (c) 5 over 8 productive houses have power input of more than 1,000 watt. 4.2.1. Installing Timer control in every house MHP is running for 24 hours, flow of electricity power to every house is arranged by timer control, see Figure 4.1. Standard Operating Procedure: -

Alternating operation either private use or productive use 16.00 – 07.00: MHP is used for private use (lighting and entertainment) 07.00 - 16.00: MHP is only used for productive used activities Flow of electricity to (non) productive-use houses is arranged by timer control Changed from productive-use to non-productive use activities or vice-versa in the productive use house is set by interlock.

18


Turbine Generator

Timer Control

Timer Control

Interlock

Interlock

Housing with productive

Housing without productive use

Housing without productive use

Housing with productive use

Figure 4.1. Network design of installing timer control in every house Table 4.1 Cost of network installation for Timer Control Arrangement No

Equipment

Price/Unit (IDR) 3,500,000

Number 5

Total Price (IDR) 17,500,000

750,000

60

45,000,000

Remark

1

Switch Over (Interlock)

2

Timer

3

Socket/Receptacle

90,000

8

720,000

4

Distribution Panel

5,000,000

8

40,000,000

To observe the voltage

5

Cable Power (Meter)

151,000

300

45,300,000

Size: NYY 4 x25 mm2 for in-house installation

6

Push Button Start/Stop

450,000

5

2,250,000

For machine with power input more than 1,000 watt

7

Installation Cost

5,000,000

1

5,000,000

House installation

Total

For machine with 1000 watt up See General assumption Installed on every productive use houses

155,770,000

19


Figure 4.2. Network design of installing ATS at turbine house

4.2.2. Installing Automatic Transfer Switch (ATS) at turbine house MHP is running for 24 hours, flow of electricity power to productive use and non-productive use houses are arranged by ATS installed at turbine house. See Figure 5.2. Standard Operating Procedure: From 16.00 – 07.00, MHP is for private use, while from 07.00 - 16.00, MHP is only used for productive used activities. Table 4.2 Cost of network installation using ATS at turbine house (in IDR) No Equipment Price/Unit Number Total Price 1

Panel Generator

2

Remarks

23,200,000

1

23,200,000

Socket/Receptacle

90,000

8

720,000

Generator capacity is 20 kWh See General assumption

3

Distribution Panel

5,000,000

8

40,000,000

See General assumption

4

Cable Power (Meter)

151,000

2000

302,000,000

5

Push Button Start/Stop

450,000

5

2,250,000

Assuming the most remote productive use house is 2 km from turbine house. NYY : 4x25 mm2; For machine with power input more than 1,000 watt

6

Installation Cost (Work)

50,000,000

1

50,000,000

Total

New installation

418,170,000.00

20


Figure 4.3 PUCA supported by three MHP

4.2.3. Establish Productive Use Centre Area (PUCA) Reasons to establish PUCA: (a) To ensure the use of electricity during the day for productive use; (b) To ensure the efficient use of power supply generated from MHP; (c) To ensure the safety use of electricity for local community. Additional assumptions: (a) 1 village has 3 MHP units which supply electrical power to 1 PUCA; (b) Distance of each MHP to PUCA is 1 km; (c) Village or villager provides land to establish PUCA. Turbine Generator 1

Turbine Generator 2

Turbine Generator 3

Figure 4.4. PUCA network design which is supplied by three MHP

21


The (dis)advantage of PUCA: Different entrepreneurs may help each other, share working equipment and tools and build a center for craft knowledge, so that a development of business activities can be expected. On the other hand, in many cases PUCA is impractical, especially for small scale home industry, as household members are distracted from their daily household work. Table 4.3 Cost of network installation for PUCA No

Equipment

Price/Unit (IDR) 23,200,000

Number

Price(IDR)

3

69,600,000.00

1

Panel Generator

2

Socket/Receptacle

90,000

8

720,000.00

3

Distribution Panel

5,000,000

1

5,000,000.00

4

Cable Power (Meter)

151,000

3,000

453,000,000.00

5

Push Button Start/Stop

450,000

5

2,250,000.00

6

Installation Cost

20,000,000

1

20,000,000.00

Total

Remarks For 3 MHP See general assumption Only for one PUCA Distance of each MHP to PUCA is 1 km, total 3 km For machine with power input more than 1,000 watt PUCA

550,570,000.00

ÂŤproductivity centreÂť carpentry

mill households

powerhouse

lines

switch

Figure 4.5 PUCA network design using one MHP (after Johannes, 2011)

22


4.3. Conclusions and Recommendations Pros and cons of electrical network installation: Installing ATS at turbine house and establishment of PUCA provide strong guarantee on the use of MHP for productive use only during the day, however, the cost for installation and maintenance is relatively expensive compare to installing timer control at every house, see Table 4.4.

Table 4.4. Pros and cons of three installation alternatives No

Issue

Timer on every house

ATS at Turbine house

PUCA

X

X

Pros 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Cheap installation Strong guarantee the use of MHP only for productive use during the day Land is not required Time for network installation is relative quick Cheap maintenance Easy to add productive use Cons Expensive installation cost Possibility to use MHP for non-productive use during the day Land is required Time for network installation is relative long Expensive maintenance

X

X X X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X X

X

The need to formulate Village Regulation: As MHP energy is used alternating either for private and productive use, to ensure the smooth implementation, apart from technical approach, regulation approach in the form of Village Regulation (Peraturan Desa/Perdes) is necessary, to establish new tariffs, limit the maximum currents, sanctions etc. The need to provide full facilitation on productive use development model: Realizing that productive use development is complex, involving many aspects, business development, improving capital and market access and MHP technical aspect, while there are no success story which can be used as learning sites, the establishment of productive use model requires full facilitation, i.e. training, awareness and intensive technical assistance.

23


Appendix A : Profile Villages of The PUE Pilot Project 1. Salumokanan Village A. Village Area and Population Village : Salumokanan Sub-district : Rantebulahan Timur District : Mamasa Province : West Sulawesi Origin : Local settlement Area : 16 Km square Number of hamlets : 6 Main livelihoods : Irrigated rice, Coffee plantation, Cattle Population : 961 persons (Male : 475, Female : 486) Number of households : 220 Religion : Christian Dominant Etnic Group : Toraja Education : Passed secondary school : 89 University Graduate : 20 B. Accessibility Distance from District Capital (Mamasa) Distance from Sub-District Capital (Rantebulahan Timur) Accessibility from Mamasa to Rantebulahan Timur Accessibility from Rantebulahan Timur to Salumokanan Village

: 25 km : 2 km : Good during dry-season, poor during wet-season : Good during dry-season, poor during wet-season

C. MHP and Potential productive use Name of MHPs : Cahaya Galung Power Capacity : 8 kW Project initiator : PNPM-Green Debit design : 130 L/s Head : 10.5 m Year of operation : Desember 2010 Status : Active Customers : 90 kk Operation pattern : 24 Jam Potential PUE : Blacksmith, Bread making, Carpentry, Coffe grinder, Tailor and Workshop.

2. Tawalian Timur Village A. Village Area and Population Village : Tawalian Timur Sub-district : Tawalian District : Mamasa Province : West Sulawesi Origin : Local settlement 24


Area Number of hamlets Main livelihoods Population Number of households Religion Dominant Etnic Group Education

: : : : : : : :

14 Km square 7 Irrigated rice, Coffee plantation, Cattle, Collection of rattan and timbers 2468 persons (Male : 1108, Female : 1360) 638 Christian Toraja Passed secondary school : 162 Technical Diploma : 25 University Graduate : 20

B. Accessibility Distance from District Capital (Mamasa) Distance from Sub-District Capital (Tawalian) Accessibility from Mamasa to Tawalian Accessibility from Tawalian to Tawalian Timur Village

: : : :

4 km 2 km Good Good

C. MHP and Potential productive use Name of MHPs Power Capacity Project initiator Debit design Head Year of operation Status Customers Operation pattern Potential PUE

: : : : : : : : : :

Salulotong 15 kW PNPM-Rural 100 L/s 7m 2006 Active 50 kk 24 Hours Blacksmith, Bread making, Carpentry, Tailor and Workshop

3. Tandung Village a. Village Area and Population Village : Tandung Sub-district : Sabbang District : Luwu Utara Province : South Sulawesi Origin : Local settlement Area : 70 Km square Number of hamlets : 5 Main livelihoods : Irrigated rice, Making palm sugar, Cocoa plantation, Collection of rattan and timbers Population : 1432 persons (Male : 642, Female : 790) Number of households : 311 Religion : Moslem Dominant Etnic Group : Luwu, Bugis Bone, Bugis Sengkang Education : Passed secondary school : 137 University Graduate : 33 25


B. Accessibility Distance from District Capital (Masamba) Distance from Sub-District Capital (Sabbang) Accessibility from Mamasa to Sabbang Accessibility from Tawalian to Tandung Village

: : : :

30 km 17 km Good Good

C. MHP and Potential productive use Name of MHPs : Malerara Power Capacity : 15 kW Project initiator : PPK Fase II Debit design : 100 L/s Head : 17 m Year of operation : 2005 Status : Active Customers : 70 kk Operation pattern : 24 Hours Potential PUE : Bread making, Carpentry, Tailor, and Workshop

26


Appendix B : Monitoring Plan A. PUE Specification Name of Writer:

Ref. Number:

Monitoring of "productive use of energy" (PUE) implementation Name of the PUE option: Type of business (e.g. food processing): Challenges for the business: (tantangan) Competition for the business: (kompetisi)

Description Local Situation Name of village Name of kabupaten Name of province Number of households (jumlah rumah tangga) Other buisnesses in the village Number of workers in the village (jumlah pekerja) Access to village (akses kedesa) (tar or track) Name of the nearest large town (nama kota besar terdekat) Distance from the nearest large town (jarak dari kota besar terdekat)(km )

GSM coverage (yes or no) Electricity tariff (in IDR/kWh or fixed) Description of the entrepreneur Name of manager/group/individual/cooperative Age Sex Level of experience (professional, advanced, beginner ) School Level: e.g. college other activity: e.g. crop production Company Description (deskripsi perusahaan) No. employees Location (cottage industry, outdoors, shop, workshop) Existing Equipment: Investment cost of PUE appliance (biaya investasi alat PUE) e.g. electricity connection fee, electrical installation, energy metering

Cost [IDR]

Appliances (peralatan) 1 2 Total investment in IDR Technical Specifications PUE Appliances 1 2 Other electrical tools Installed lights (lampu yang terpasang)

-

Power [W]

TOTAL Financing Part of the investment grant [%] (dana bantuan) Investment by Entrepreneur [IDR] (investasi pengusaha)

-

-

27


B. Entrepreneur daily monitoring form Daily Report

Name of Writer:

Ref. Number:

Monitoring of "productive use of energy" (PUE) implementation Date Name of PUE option: Village: Implemented appliances:

Turn-over per week (in IDR)

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

TOTAL per week

Cost of materials Cost of services from others Cost of repairs Income from products Income from services TOTAL Technical Specifications Hours of Breakdowns Problem Solutions of Breakdowns

C. MHP operator weekly monitoring form MHP operator - Weekly Report

Name of Writer:

No. Referensi:

Date:

Name of MHP: Village: Installed MHP capacity (kW):

kW

Electronic load control (ELC) installed?

Yes

No

MHP kWh meter installed?

Yes

No

Week 1

Week 2

Week 4

Week 3

Week 5

Income collected from HH (IDR): Income collected from PUE (IDR): Expenses for:

Salary (IDR) Maintance (IDR)

Amount of energy: kWh generated

Week

kWh consumed

Operation hours

Flickering light: Occurance

Frequency

Blackout: Time (morning/ afternoon/ evening)

Occurance2

1

YES

YES

2

YES

YES

3

YES

YES

4

YES

YES

5

YES

YES

6

YES

YES

7

YES

YES

8

YES

YES

9

YES

YES

10

YES

YES

11

YES

YES

12

YES

YES

13

YES

YES

Frequency2

Time (morning/ afternoon/ evening)2

28


Appendix C : Photo Documentation

Salumokanan Village, Mamasa District

Socialization in Salumokanan Village

Distribution of Appliances in Tawalian Timur Village

Tawalian Timur Village, Mamasa District

Socialization in Tandung Village

Distribution Equipment in Tandung Village

29


Tailor (embroidery machine), Tandung Village

Workshop (las inverter), Tandung Village

Carpentry in Salumokanan Village

Workshop (motorbike modification), Tandung Village

Bread making, Tawalian Timur Village

Workshop, Tawalian Timur Village

Tailor, Salumokanan Village

Bread making, Salumokanan Village

30


Energising Development (EnDev) Indonesia Jl. Tebet Barat VIII No. 52 Jakarta 12950 – Indonesia T +62 21 830 9438 F +62 21 830 9032 I www.giz.de; www.mhpp2.or.id

Co-financed under the Global Dutch-German Partnership for Energising Development

31

Profile for Operasi Wallacea Terpadu

OWT_Completion Report_Productive Use Energy Project_2013  

OWT_Completion Report_Productive Use Energy Project_2013  

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